Raymond Lefevre – Can-Can (1966 – 1976)

FrontCover1The instrumental smash “Ame Câline” vaulted conductor and arranger Raymond LeFevre to the front ranks of the easy listening renaissance that followed the commercial vogue for stereophonic sound. Born in Calais, France on November 20, 1929, LeFevre studied flute as a child and at 16 entered Paris’ Conservatoire National de Musique, moonlighting as a jazz pianist in local clubs and cabarets. After a stint behind jazz bandleader Hubert Rostaing, LeFevre joined conductor Bernard Hilda’s Club des Champs-Elysées orchestra. He established himself as a composer and arranger during a lengthy tenure as a Barclay Records staffer, concurrently serving six years behind Egyptian born singer Dalida and in 1957 scoring the first of more than a dozen films with director Guillaume Radot, Fric-Frac en Dentelles. A year later, LeFevre notched a minor U.S. hit with his interpretation of Gilbert Bécaud’s “Le Jour Ou La Pluie Viendra,” retitled “The Day the Rains Came” for American consumption. By this time, he was also established as the musical director for the French television variety series Musicorama, leading his orchestra in accompaniment of countless singers. While scoring the 1964 feature Faites Sauter La Banque!, LeFevre first collaborated with fellow easy listening maestro Paul Mauriat, his greatest commercial rival in the years to follow. While Mauriat scored the biggest instrumental hit of the period with the chart-topping “Love Is Blue,” LeFevre’s lush symphonic approach was a fixture on the European pop charts throughout the ’60s as consumer demand for stereo recordings guaranteed impressive sales for singles including “La La La (He Gives Me Love),” “Puppet on a String,” and “A Whiter Shade of Pale.”

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Raymond Lefevre in the year 1966

He scored his biggest hit in 1968 when composer Michel Polnareff’s haunting “Ame Câline” (aka “Soul Coaxing”) emerged as a staple on pirate station Radio Caroline, and while his commercial fortunes dwindled in the decade to follow, LeFevre remained a ubiquitous presence in French cinema, winning widespread acclaim for the 1971 thriller score Jo. He also continued recording until 2001, enjoying his greatest commercial renown in Japan. LeFevre died in Seine-Port, France on June 27, 2008. (by Jason Ankeny)

And this is a very good example of his timeless music. Most of the tunes are written by french composer Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880)

This is a vinyl-rip from German re-release in 1976.

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Alternate frontcovers from the Sixties

Personnel:
Raymond Lefevre et son grand orchestre

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Tracklist:
01. La vie Parisienne (Offenbach) 3.02
02. La gaîté Parisienne (Can-Can) (Offenbach) 4.15
03. La chaloupée (Apache danse) (Offenbach) 2.15
04. La belle Helène (Offenbach) 2.39
05. Moulin Rouge (Auric) 2.57
06. Quadrille des Lanciers (Lust) 11.18
06.1. Introductions 0.15
06.2. Les tiroirs 1.46
06.3. Les lignes 2.01
06.4. Les Moulinets 1.42
06.5. Les visites 1.42
06.6. La chaîne 4.08
07. La donde de l’amour (Tiré du film “La Ronde”) (Ducreux) 2.34
08. Valentine (Christiné) 2.11

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Raymond Lefevre – Mammy Blue (1971)

FrontCover1Raymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008) was a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer.

Born on November 20, 1929 in Calais, France, Raymond Lefèvre is best known for his 1968 theme “Soul Coaxing (Ame Caline)”, which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès like La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the series of legendary Le Gendarme de Saint Tropez. During the late 1950s and early 1960s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu peux tout faire de moi, Quand on n’a que l’amour), amongst many others. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay Records label. (read more)

This is another beautiful by the french maestro of Easy Listening, especially produced fir the US market … very nice !

RaymondLeFevreAPersonnel:
Raymond LeFevre Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. What Have They Done To My Song Ma (Safka) 2.33
02. Here’s To You (Baez) 2.32
03. How I Always Want To Love (Hamilton) 2.20
04. Wig Wam (Dylan) 2.34
05. Gloria (Delanoe/de Senneville) 3.41
06. Largo Of Haendel (Händel) 2.27
07. Mammy Blue (Giraud/Trim) 2.56
08. Two Friends From One Love (Debout/Dumas) 2.35
09. El Condor Pasa (Tradtional) 3.06
10. Adagio Of The Pethetic Sonate Of Beethoven (Beethoven) 3.00
11. The Black Eagle Dedicated To Laurence (Barbara) 2.40
12. Modinha (Villa/Lobos) 3.33

SingleASingle of “Mammy Blue”

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Raymond Lefevre – Merry Christmas (1968)

FrontCover1Raymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008) was a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer.

Born on November 20, 1929 in Calais, France, Raymond Lefèvre is best known for his 1968 theme “Soul Coaxing (Ame Caline)”, which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès like La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the series of legendary Le Gendarme de Saint Tropez. During the late 1950s and early 1960s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu peux tout faire de moi, Quand on n’a que l’amour), amongst many others. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay Records label.

He was accepted at the Paris Conservatory at 17 years old. During the early 1950s he played the piano for the Franck Pourcel orchestra. In 1953 he played the piano at the Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay label and recorded his debut album in the same year.

He worked in the French television programs Musicorama (1950s) and Palmarés des Chansons (1965, 1966, 1967) accompanying famous artists as Dalida, Claude Francois, Richard Anthony, with his own orchestra.

His recording of “The Day the Rains Came” was a best seller in the United States in 1958. The song “Ame Caline” (Soul Coaxin’) became an international hit in 1968 and “La La La (He Gives Me Love)” was a minor hit in 1968 in Canada and the United States. In 1969 his recording of “La Reine de Saba” (Queen of Sheba) became a big hit in Japan. Between 1972 and the early 2000s (decade), he made successful tours in Japan.

He often worked on the soundtracks of Louis de Funès movies.

Lefèvre conducted entries four times at the Eurovision Song Contest, three times for Monaco (in 1961, 1962, and 1963 ) and once for Luxembourg (in 1970) (by wikipedia)

And this is his one and only Christmas album from 1968 … and this is a very beautiful one .. listen and enjoy the magic of Raymond LeFevre´s sound … very unique !

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Personnel:
Raymond LeFevre and his Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Silver Bells (Livingston/Evans) 2.13
02. White Christmas (Berlin) 3.10
03. Jingle Bells (Traditional) 2.21
04. Little Father Christmas (Vincy/Martinet) 2.42
05. O Tannenbaum (Traditional) 1.55
06. Angels We Have Heard On High (Glria in excelsis deo) (Traditional) 2.13
07. Silent Night /Gruber) 2.56
08. O Holy Night (Traditional) 4.10
09. He Is Born The Child Of God (Traditional) 2.38
10. Three Angels Came That Night (Holmes) 2.49
11. O Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles) 2.44LabelB1*
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Raymond Lefevre Grand Orchestra – Live in Japan (1984)

FrontCover1Raymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008) was a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer.

Born on November 20, 1929 in Calais, France, Raymond Lefèvre is best known for his 1968 theme “Soul Coaxing (Ame Caline)”, which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès like La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the series of legendary Le Gendarme de Saint Tropez. During the late 1950s and early 1960s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu peux tout faire de moi, Quand on n’a que l’amour), amongst many others. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay Records label.
Early career

He was accepted at the Paris Conservatory at 17 years old. During the early 1950s he played the piano for the Franck Pourcel orchestra. In 1953 he played the piano at the Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay label and recorded his debut album in the same year.

Raymond01He worked in the French television programs Musicorama (1950s) and Palmarés des Chansons (1965, 1966, 1967) accompanying famous artists as Dalida, Claude Francois, Richard Anthony, with his own orchestra.

His recording of “The Day the Rains Came” was a best seller in the United States in 1958. The song “Ame Caline” (Soul Coaxin’) became an international hit in 1968 and “La La La (He Gives Me Love)” was a minor hit in 1968 in Canada and the United States. In 1969 his recording of “La Reine de Saba” (Queen of Sheba) became a big hit in Japan. Between 1972 and the early 2000s (decade), he made successful tours in Japan.

He often worked on the soundtracks of Louis de Funès movies.

Raymond02Lefèvre conducted entries four times at the Eurovision Song Contest, three times for Monaco (in 1961, 1962 , and 1963) and once for Luxembourg (in 1970).
Death

Lefèvre died on June 27, 2008 at the age of 78. (by wikipedia)

And this is a brilliant concert in Japan of Raymond Lefevre and his Grand Orchestra in Japan, a very rare item.

Enjoy this powerful sound by the one and only Raymonde Lefevre !

Thanks to the help of Hsieh Chih-Chien.

Recorded live at Shinjuku Kousei Nenkin Kaikan, Japan, on April 10, 1984

Personnel:
Raymond Lefevre Grand Orchestra

Raymond03Tracklist:
01. Cadette rouselle (Lefevre) 1.42
02. Ai no corrida (Lefevre) 3.48
03. Allegro digital (Lefevre) 3.14
04. Medley: 7.24
a). Love story (Lai)
b). Ne me quitte pas (Brel)
c). Les parapluies de Cherbourg (Legrand)
05. Let’s Dance (Bowie) 3.54
06. La reine de Saba (Laurent) 3.11
07. Les montagnes (Hokkaido Symphonie, part 1) (Lefevre) 3.38
08. La foret (Hokkaido Symphonie, part 2) (Lefevre) 3.52
09. Carnaval des neiges (Hokkaido Symphonie, part 3) (Lefevre) 3.46
10. Kisetsu no nakade (Chiharu) 3.41
11. Automne en Irlande (Lefevre) 3.34
12. Allegro de la 40eme symphonie (Mozart) 2.54
13. Night Flight “L’ile Bleu” (Lefevre) 2.55
14. Les 4 seasons (Vivaldi) 10.55

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Raymond Lefevre – Merry Christmas (1968)

LefevreChristmasFCOkay, christmas is coming soon … And so I´ll continue with my Christmas special series .
This time I will offer sentimental versions of Christmas classics by the french mastermind of easy listening music, Raymond LeFevre.Raymond Lefèvre (born November 20, 1929 in Calais, France), true name Raymond Lefèbvre is a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer. He is best known for his 1968 theme Soul Coaxin’ (Ame Caline), which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès like La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the series of legendary Le Gendarme De Saint Tropez. During late 1950s and early ’60s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu Peux Tout Faire de Moi, Quand on N’A Que l’Amour).

Merry Christmas is a beautiful selection of festive standards, arranged in the typical style of Raymond Lefevre and played with skill by the orchestra.

LefevreChristmasBackCoverPersonnel:

Raymond LeFevre Orchestra

Tracklist:
01. Silver Bells (Livingston/Evans) 2.16
02. White Christmas (Berlin) 3.14
03. Jingle Bells (Pierpont) 2.25
04. Litte Father Christmas (Martinet/Ovanessian) 2.45
05. Oh Tannenbaum (Traditional) 1.57
06. Angels We Have Heard On High (Traditional) 2.21
07. Silent Night (Gruber) 3.03
08. O Holy Night (Adam) 4.15
09. He Is Born The Child Of God (Traditional) 2.40
10. Three Angles Came That Night (Traditional) 2.52
11. O Come All Ye Faithful (Reading) 2.46

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