Charlie Mariano – October (1976)

FrontCover1Carmine Ugo “Charlie” Mariano (November 12, 1923 – June 16, 2009) was an American jazz alto saxophonist and soprano saxophonist.

Mariano was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Italian immigrants, Giovanni Mariano and Maria Di Gironimo of Fallo, Italy. He grew up in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Boston, enlisting in the Army Air Corps after high school, during World War II. After his service in the Army, Mariano attended what was then known as Schillinger House of Music, now Berklee College of Music. He was among the faculty at Berklee from 1965–1971. Mariano moved to Europe in 1971, settling eventually in Köln (Cologne), Germany, with his third wife, Dorothee Zippel.

He played with one of the Stan Kenton big bands, Toshiko Akiyoshi (his then wife), Charles Mingus, Eberhard Weber, the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble, Embryo and numerous other notable bands and musicians.

He was known for his use of the nadaswaram, a classical wind instrument from Tamil Nadu.

Mariano had six daughters, including four with his first wife, and musician Monday Michiru with his second wife. He had six grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. He died of cancer on June 16, 2009. (by wikipedia)

A ’77 session with onetime Charlie Parker imitator Charlie Mariano now as immersed in Asian and Indian music as he ever was in bop. He’s working with a European rhythm section that includes keyboardist Rainer Bruninghaus and bassist Barre Phillips. There are some compositions that reflect Mariano’s jazz background, while others have everything from classical strains to Asian scales and instruments. (by Ron Wynn)

CharlieMariano

Personnel:
Rainer Brüninghaus (piano, synthesizer)
Udo Dahmen (drums, percussion)
Trilok Gurtu (tabla, percussion, drums)
Charlie Mariano (saxophone, flute, nagaswaram)
Hansgeorg Meuser (electric bass)
Barre Phillips (acoustic bass)

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Aszù (Brüninghaus) 8.10
02. Nagaswarup (Mariano) 7.47
03. Earth (Brüninghaus) 2.47
04. Out Of The Jungle (Dahmen) 4.18
05. To An Elfin Princess (Mariano) 7.26
07. 7 Up (Meuser) 5.26
08. Back Of J. (Phillips) 2.53
09. Down The Kaveri (Mariano) 4.41

LabelA1
*
**

 

Advertisements

Wolfgang Dauner, Charlie Mariano + Dino Saluzzi – Pas de trois (1992)

FrontCover1What a great trio !

Wolfgang Dauner (born 30 December 1935) is a German jazz fusion pianist, composer and keyboardist born in Stuttgart, Germany, probably best known for his work in the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble and with musicians such as Hans Koller, Albert Mangelsdorff, Volker Kriegel or Ack van Rooyen. Father of famous German drummer Florian Dauner, who is best known for his work with German hip-hop group Die Fantastischen Vier and electronic dance DJ Paul van Dyk, and is commonly referred to as Flo, the Flower, or the Fallopian.

Charlie Mariano (November 12, 1923 – June 16, 2009[1]) was an American jazz alto saxophonist and soprano saxophonist.

Mariano was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Italian immigrants, Giovanni Mariano and Maria Di Gironimo of Fallo, Italy. He grew up in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Boston, enlisting in the Army Air Corps after high school, during World War II. After his service in the Army, Mariano attended what was then known as Schillinger House of Music, now Berklee College of Music. He was among the faculty at CharlieMariano01Berklee from 1965–1971. Mariano moved to Europe in 1971, settling eventually in Köln (Cologne), Germany, with his third wife, Dorothee Zippel.

He played with one of the Stan Kenton big bands, Toshiko Akiyoshi (his then wife), Charles Mingus, Eberhard Weber, the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble, Embryo and numerous other notable bands and musicians.

He was known for his use of the nadaswaram, a classical wind instrument from Tamil Nadu.

Mariano had six daughters, including four with his first wife, and musician Monday Michiru with his second wife. He had six grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. He died of cancer on June 16, 2009.

Dino Saluzzi (born May 20, 1935 Campo Santo, Salta Province, Argentina) is a Argentinian bandoneon player. He is the son of Cayetano Saluzzi and the father of guitarist José Maria Saluzzi.

Dino played the bandoneón since his childhood. Other than his father, he was influenced by Salta musicians such as Cuchi Leguizamón, and by the lyrical strain of the tango of Francisco de Caro and Agustin Bardi. Dino described the vividness of his musical sketches as “an imaginary return” to the little towns and villages of his childhood.

For much of his youth, Saluzzi lived in Buenos Aires, playing with the Radio El Mundo orchestra. He would play in orchestras for a living, while touring with smaller, sometimes jazz-oriented ensembles, developing a personal style that made him a leading bandoneonist in Argentine folklore and avant-garde music (especially since Ástor Piazzolla did not participate in projects other than his own). His record career doesn’t start until the 70s, along with Gato Barbieri, when he signed a couple of crazy lyricism albums under the name of Gaucho. Over this decade, he worked on many tours in South America and specially in Japan, but always associated to other names, as Mariano Mores or Enrique Mario Franchini.

Dino

Through word-of mouth publicity (mostly from expatriate musicians) he was invited to several European music festivals, and landed a contract with the ECM label. Several records have resulted, including Kultrum, 1982. From the beginning of the 1980s onwards, there were collaborations with European and American jazz musicians including Charlie Haden, Tomasz Stanko, Charlie Mariano, Palle Danielsson, and Al Di Meola.

ECM brought Saluzzi together with Charlie Haden, Palle Mikkelborg and Pierre Favre for Once Upon A Time … Far Away In The South, and subsequently with Enrico Rava for Volver. Rava had worked extensively in Argentina, and Haden’s sympathy for Latin American music was well-known; furthermore Palle Mikkelborg and Dino Saluzzi had worked together productively in George Gruntz’s band: there was a common ground on which an artistic exchange of ideas could take place. Saluzzi later played with ‘Haden’s Liberation Music Orchestra’, and the ‘Rava Saluzzi Quintet’ also toured.

In 1991, Saluzzi recorded an album with his brothers Felix and Celso and his son José María on guitar, kicking off his “family project”, which has since toured many countries. Mojotoro drew upon the full range of South American musics: tango, folk, candina music, candombe, the milonga music of the la Pampa province…

Anja Lechner and Dino have toured widely as a duo, too and US jazz magazine “Down Beat” declares the album that recorded together, Ojos Negros album of the year (best of 2007 list). (by wikipedia)

This is the second album of this trio (the first one is called “One Night in `88).

Dino Saluzzi whose musical antennae mtch the sensivities of Dauner and Mariano. The interplaya and sonorities sing out with brilliant consonance. Both albums are excellent with Pas De Trois having just the edge of focus and pith. (taken from “A Rough Guide To Jazz”)

BackCover1

uncaPersonnel:
Wolfgang Dauner (piano)
Charlie Mariano (saxophone)
Dino Saluzzi (bandoneón)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01.Randy (Mariano) 8.10
02. Plum Island (Mariano) 6.04
03. Lucas (Salizzi) 5.33
04. Se Va La Murga (Ross) 2.25
05. Trans Tanz (Dauner) 6.29
06. Y Amo A Su Hermano Hasta El Final (Saluzzi) 9.10

CD1
*
**

Embryo with Charlie Mariano and the Karnataka College of Percussion – Life (1980)

lpfrontcover1Embryo is a musical collective from Munich which has been active since 1969, although its story started in the mid-1950s in Hof where Christian Burchard and Dieter Serfas met for the first time at the age of 10. It was one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s and has also been described as “the most eclectic of the Krautrock bands.

As far as EMBRYO live albums go, each one that I’ve heard so far, seems to have their own individual direction and sound. The “BREMEN 1971” radio broadcast is typical Krautrock from their early period, then INVISIBLE DOCUMENTS seems to start the crossover from Krautrock, into freejazz, and worldmusic. With “LIFE” I think that Embryo really took their adventurous nature with world music to the extreme, for maybe the first time. Much of this CD sounds like it was recorded by Indian musicians, rather than some jazzfusion Germans. Although the famous Jazz sax player Charlie Mariano is sitting in on this set, you also have the “Karnataka College of Percussion” providing a thick bed of Indian percussion. Since EMBRYO, like MAGMA, is a band lead by a jazz drummer that went rock in the 1970s, this thick percussion sound works with the EMBRYO band concept. I would not buy this, expecting anything like the EMBRYO you might know from OPAL, or FATHER SON AND HOLY GHOST, or even APO-CALYPSO. Instead, this is the band, as explorers of world music, with Jazz icing on the cake. As far as the sound goes, it’s fantastic. The recording is clean and sharp, and the orchestrated plethoria of drums represents itself well. My only criticism of the CD, is that EMBRYO seems dominated and overwhelmed by the Karnataka College of Music’s percussion. Still, it’s enjoyable listen that sets the stage for their double live CD, LA BLAMA SPAROZZI, which documents their Indian-Middle Eastern touring from the end of the 70s and into the early 80s. I personally love Indian music, and enjoy the jazz sax solos, and vibraphone playing, mingled into it. I believe that Embryo’s more extreme, purist world musical experiments ended up influencing a lot more followers of this genre than they are given credit for. (by W.T.Hoffman)

letters

This record has a surprisingly low average rating, most probably because hardly anyone understands it. The Karnataka College of Percussion is an Indian school where you can be taught the Indian art of drumming. It is a highly sophisticated art, and it is all the more difficult to play live. Embryo prove that they have learned their lessons well, and Charlie Mariano was trained in Indian music too, so he definitely is an asset. It is, however, NOT an album of traditional Indian music, played by a jazz rock band plus extension, it is a collaboration and definitely a fusion of Western and Indian music. One of the tracks on the album even is in 6/8, a meter Indian musicians don’t play in at all. Since I am a drummer and can appreciate the complicated patterns played here I will give the album five stars.
(by baldfriede)

theband

Personnel:
Christian Burchard (vibraphone, marimba on 01., 02. + 04.)
Edgar Hofmann (saxophone on 01., 02. + 04.)
Friedo Josch (flute on 01., 02. + 04.)
Uwe Müllrich (bass on 01., 02. + 04.)
Michi Wehmeyer (harmonium on 01., 02. + 04.)
Jay Zier (guitar on 01., 02. + 04.)
+
T.N. Ashok (vocals)
B.N. Chandramouli (kanjira)
V.R. Chandrasekhar (mridangam)
N.N. Dinesh (dholak)
M. Gururaja (jew´s harp)
Principle T.A.S. Mani (mridangam)
M.R. Mohankumar (drums)
M. Raghavendra (vocals)
R.A. Rajagopal (dholak)
T.N. Ramesh (ghatam)
T.N. Shashikumar (dholak)
S. Srishyla (mridangam)
+
Charlie Mariano (saxophone on 01. + 04.)

lpbooklet45

Tracklist:
01. Cello Cello (Burchard/Mariano/Hofmann/Josch/Wehmeyer/Müllrich) 15.27
02. Telisirama (Burchard/Mariano/Hofmann/Josch/Wehmeyer/Müllrich) 7.16
03. Talatarangini (Traditional) 14.44
04. Marokkanische Seerauber (Moroccan Pirates) (Burchard/Mariano/Hofmann/Josch/Wehmeyer/Müllrich) 11.35

labels

*
**

dholak

Dholak

Charlie Mariano + Chris Hinze – Blue Stone (1971)

CDFrontCover1Charlie Mariano, who gained his initial fame for playing bop and cool jazz in the 1950s, by the early ’70s was exploring a mixture of world music and funk/R&B. This interesting but now somewhat dated CD reissue finds Mariano switching between alto, soprano, flute and the nagasuram in a quintet with flutist Chris Hinze and a European rhythm section that explores three Mariano originals (including the previously unreleased 18½-minute “Blue Stone”), a piece by Hinze and a traditional South Indian folk song. The moody music contains plenty of intriguing colors and some surprising moments. (by Scott Yanow)

FrontCoverReleased on LP 1973 by Freedom/Intercord 28 460 4 U

Personnel:
Jimm Chaaperoe (drums)
Roger Cooke (bass)
Chris Hinze (flute, piano)
Charlie Mariano (saxophones, flute)

BackCover1ATracklist:
01. Lullaby For Dewi (Hinze) 9.42
02. Mirror Of Your Mind (Mariano) 7.37
03. Blue Stone (bonus track)  (Mariano) 18.27
04. Traditional South Indian Kirtanam (Traditional) 6.32
05. Lassana Lamaya (Beautiful Child) (Mariano) 11.31

CD1*
**