John Mayall´s Bluesbreakers – With Paul Butterfield (1967)

FrontCover1This 4 track EP is probably one of the rarest John Mayall records ever.

On November 26, 1966, Paul Butterfield, leader of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, was touring England. He met up with John Mayall, one of England’s pre-eminent blues bandleaders, his band the Bluesbreakers an incubator for talent ranging from Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor to Jack Bruce, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood. The Butterfield band, at that very moment, had two guitar greats in its ranks: Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop.
Butterfield, a powerful singer who learned his trade sitting in with black blues bands (including Muddy Waters) on Chicago’s South Side, was a virtuoso harmonica player whose lyrical style owed plenty to Little Walter. Mayall played keyboard, his own custom built guitars, piano and organ.
Butterfield and Mayall recorded four songs, but in deference to the Butterfield Blues Band’s Elektra recording contract, British Decca released the EP only in England. The Bluesbreakers lineup at this point was Peter Green, John McVie and drummer Aynsley Dunbar. (by Rich Kienzle)

A summit meeting of the leading U.S. and U.K. blues-rock bandleaders of their time resulted in this four-song, seven-inch EP, which, like most such projects, didn’t add up to the sum of its parts. By either man’s standards, it’s routine, if unobjectionable. Mayall takes a much stronger role than Butterfield; “Riding on the L&N” is about the best cut on a disc that also has a version of Junior Wells’ “Little By Little” and one Mayall original, “Eagle Eye.” Personnel is not listed on this rarity; one could reasonably assume from the date of release that it features the Peter Green version of the Bluesbreakers, but rock reference books are in conflict as to whether Mick Fleetwood and/or Peter Green appear on the disc or not. (by Richie Unterberger)

So … listen to two masters of what we call “white Boy blues”

 

MayallButterfield02

John McVie + Peter Green with Paul Butterfield, 1966

 

Personnel:
Aynsley Dunbar (drums)
Peter Green (guitar)
John Mayall (voclas, harmonica)
John McVie (bass)
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Paul Butterfield (vocals, harmonica)

 

BackCover1

Backcover, autographed by John Mayall himself

 

Tracklist:
01. All My Life (Robinson) 4.22
02. Riding On The L. And N. (Burley/Hampton) 2.26
01. Little By Little (Wells/London) 2.43
04. Eagle Eye (Mayall) 2.49

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John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers – Live in 1967 (2015)

FrontCover1The genesis of Live in 1967 came about because a staunch fan from Holland, Tom Huissen, was able to sneak a one channel reel to reel tape recorder into five London clubs (including the famed Marquee) in early 1967 and capture this exciting glimpse into music history.

For nearly 50 years these tapes remained unheard until John Mayall acquired them recently and began  restoring them with the technical assistance of Eric Corne of Forty Below Records. “While the source recording was very rough and the final result is certainly not hi-fidelity, it does succeed in allowing us to hear how spectacular these performances are,” says Corne.
“I’d known for a decade or two of the existence of these tapes and in fact Tom Huissen had sent me a CD with 50 second teasers for some of the tracks that he’d secretly recorded at our London shows,” recalls Mayall.“

Last year, Tom decided he wanted the world to hear these performances and work soon  began on restoring the already fine quality on the old reel-to-reel tapes.
”John Mayall has some fond memories about how this band came about. “ Through most Adof 1966, Peter and John were both regular members of the Bluesbreakers and Aynsley Dunbar was the drummer,” states Mayall. “
However, even though Aynsley was a great drummer, it was starting to become apparent that his jazz influenced style of playing was veering away from the blues. As I recall, Peter had been close friends with Mick Fleetwood for some time and he suggested I give
him a shot. And so for a short period of only about three months Mick became a  Bluesbreaker.”
The band’s repertoire on the tracks of Live in 1967 includes some songs that were originally recorded on The Bluesbreakers first two albums, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton and A Hard Road (which featuredPeter Green), plus the soon-to-be recorded Crusade album, which featured young guitarist Mick Taylor after Peter Green left the band. Other songs on the new CD make their live debuts afterhaving be en recorded originally as singles in the UK and would later appear on Mayall’s Looking Back album. In addition, several of the songs on Live in 1967 make their first appearance in any form on a Bluesbreakers album.

Two long -time mainstay influences on John Mayall’s storied career – Freddy King and Otis  Rush – are well represented here with live versions of songs long – associated with the two blues  giants. “All Your Love,” “Double Trouble,” “So Many Roads” and “I Can’t

Tom Huissen

The young Tom Huissen

Quit You Baby” come from the Otis Rush canon of blues classics; and Freddy King’s “The Stumble,” “San-Ho-Zay” and “Someday After Awhile,” are given resounding treatments here by the quartet playing with a sense of energyand urgency.

“Ever since Eric Clapton joined the band,we both had a great interest in the recorded work of Otis Rush and Freddy King and many of their classic songs became part of our live performing catalogue,” Mayall says about the two blues icons.“
Their guitar work was always an inspiration for Eric, Peter Green and Mick Taylor in those early years.” The music on John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers – Live in 1967 showcases a band that although only together for a short time, was incredibly tight and in- the -pocket while still allowing room for improvisation, none more so than Peter Green, whose guitar work on this CD will stand as some of his best-ever on record. All of Green’s guitar trademarks – the stop time signatures, his incredible sustain and a hair-raising powerful
tone – are presented here in all their glory, highlighting a musician who was more than able to assume the mantle as the guitar player following in Eric Clapton’s well-trod footsteps as a member of one of blues music’s all-time aggregations, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. (take from the press release)

Peter Green

Peter Green, 1967

Name the great guitarists of the British Invasion of the sixties, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor, Peter Green John McVie, Jimmy Page and so many more who went on to fame in such groups as Cream, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Canned Heat and Fleetwood Mac and they had their initial major exposure as members of or contributors to the famed John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Back when Reel to Reel was considered high end recording, a fan snuck in a one channel reel to reel tape recorder to tape John Mayall’s group over a period of five London club gigs. How John Mayall got his hands on this fan’s recording is a mystery to me, but I am grateful that he did. While in no way is this recording ‘high fidelity’ the audio puts you right in that smokey club atmosphere, the same atmosphere I spent my teen years every weekend at the Filmore East and other clubs in New York City. The recording was clearly cleaned up removing any white noise, hiss and other audio disparities, but retains the club ambience that makes this CD so invaluable to both music historians and those with an affinity for the blues. None of these recordings have been released anywhere else on either released CDs or bootlegs.
This specific recording features John Mayall, Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood before they moved on to other groups. Trust me when I say this, this was before the blues was pasteurized by the heavy influence of pure rock and yet you can still hear what these blues influences would lead to. John Mayall had yet to become a household name in the U.S. and he is in fine voice when he is not blowing that unique harp sound that would eventually would become so well recognized. On other numbers included on this CD, Mayall’s organ fills in and elevates songs such as ‘Double Trouble’ and ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’ with the organ playing call and response against Peter Green’s soulful but powerful as all get out lead guitar.

John Mayall
At almost every blues jam I have ever attended or when listening to most any blues based cover band, the performing of ‘Stormy Monday’ can always be expected. If you want to really feel the down-home blues of this song as it was intended, the Bluesbreakers give it what it should always be given, terrific and heartfelt guitar leads, strong but basic rhythm provided by Mick Fleetwood and John McVie and vocals that reach out and grab you by the lapels.
Crowd ambience sneaks into these recordings simply adding to that smokey club feel I referred to previously. It doesn’t distract or take away, but puts you front and center for what must have been an enviable front seat at these club dates. With ‘Live in 1967’ you are transported back in time and have your very own front and center seat. A darn fine album. (by Steve Douglas)

BackCover

Personnel:
Mick Fleetwood (drums)
Peter Green (guitar)
Jihn Mayall (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica)
John McVie (bass)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. All Your Love (Rush) 3.56
02. Brand New Start (Mayall) 4.51
03. Double Trouble (Rush) 6.33
04. Streamline (Mayall) 4.02
05. Have You Ever Loved a Woman (Myles) 8.16
06. Looking Back (Watson) 2.35
07. So Many Roads (Marshall) 5.53
08. Hi Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham) 6.49
09. I Can’t Quit You Baby (Dixon) 4.28
10. The Stumble (King/Thompson) 6.48
11. Someday After Awhile (King/Thompson) 5.13
12. San-Ho-Zay (King/Thompson) 8.11
13. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.54

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Tom Huissen + John Mayall

Tom Huissen + John Mayall

Various Artists – Raw Blues (1967)

FrontCover1From this modest beginning Mike Vernon was eventually able to lure several ‘name’ Stateside blues men to ‘The Supreme Record Company’s’ then head offices on London’s Albert Embankment, for the purpose of inking a recording contract, and thereafter driving them to West Hampstead — Decca’s studio complex. Simultaneously, his was the influence which convinced some of Britain’s finest home-grown exponents of the genre to follow a similar course.

This package, aptly titled Raw Blues, was assembled by Mike and issued on Decca’s subsidiary ‘Ace Of Clubs’ label in January 1967 (ACL (Mono)/SCL (Stereo) 1220). An intriguing collection of artifacts, its wetter of big name participants may now be appreciated through the sophisticated medium of sound which is a compact disc. The technology may be smoother these days, but the blues remain as raw as ever…

A few details about the contents and its protagonists wouldn’t go amiss: Bom Jackson, Mississippi, on 21 st March 1930, Otis Spann shared his parents affections with two brothers and two sisters. Product of a musically inclined family, his father Frank Euston Spann played piano and mother Josephine was formerly a guitarist with Memphis Minnie, a top vocalist who knew a good picker when she heard one, having married another Jackson six-string resident, Joe McCoy (Kansas Joe). Mot surprisingly, Otis took to music like a duck to water, adopting piano as his chosen Instrument Largely self-taught, in later life he always acknowledged the influence Big Maceo Merriweather had upon his style. Gaining confidence as a result of forming a small band with some other local juveniles, when he heard about a neighbourhood talent competition happening at the Alamo Theatre he entered and won — as a singer — performing Coot Davis’ Four O’clock Blues.

CurtisJonesCurtis Jones

With the passing years he pursued medical studies at Jackson’s Campbell College in the hope of becoming a doctor. When not buried in textbooks, he displayed a sporting prowess at boxing and football, briefly even turning professional at the latter. Between 1946 and ’51 the U.S. Army called upon his time, but after discharge he relinquished all thoughts of any other occupation than music and moved to Chicago. The rest of the family had domiciled themselves there two years earlier, when mother died. Swiftly contacted by Muddy Waters, Otis joined the great guitarist/vocalist and stayed with his outfit for many years thereafter, although between 1952 and the time of this recording he’d also supplied studio accompaniment for such legends as Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf, Bo Diddley and Lowell Fulson.

Visiting Britain in May 1964 for a tour, our subject recorded an acclaimed Decca LP: The Blues Of Otis Spann (LK 4615). Included here are the four additional cuts from that London session of May 4th: Pretty Girls Everywhere (a), My Home In The Desert and the McKinley Morganfield (alias Muddy Waters) duo Country Boy and You’re Gonna Need My Help. Personnel: Otis Spann (Vocal, Piano); ‘Brother’ (Guitar); Ransom K nowli ng (Bass); Little Willie Smith (Drums); add Eric Clapton (Gtr.) on (a) only. Further south in New Orleans, seaport metropolis of Louisiana, on Independence Day 1910, was bom William Thomas ‘Champion Jack’ Dupree. His father was French, while mother was a descendant of the Cherokee Indian tribe.

Tragically, both were killed when the family home burnt down during his seventh year. After spending the next seven cooped up in an institution he ran away, but not before he’d mastered the basics of singing and playing piano. Thereafter he maintained his existence by thumping the untuned pianos of seedy dubs and houses of ill-repute, acquiring the technique known as’ Barrelhouse’ playing thanks to prominent exponent of the art Willie Hall, otherwise billed as Drive ’em Down.

ChampionJackDupreeChampion Jack Dupree

The Depression found our subject attempting to make ends meet by taking up boxing—whence ‘Champion Jack’ — but by the mid-Thirties he’d joined forces with Cotton Club keyboarder Leroy Carr. Upon the tatter’s early death Jack was offered the unfortunate vacancy, which he accepted. In 1940 the Okeh label added him to their roster; it was the first of a multitude of labels great and small to do so over the next thirty years, including King — where he notched a big hit on the R ‘ n’ B charts, Walkingthe Blues, in 1955-and Atlantic.

As blues music gained European popularity through the Fifties, many big names were lured from America to tour and occasionally record as a bonus. Big Bill Broonzy was instrumental in persuading Dupree to take the plunge, and he liked it so much that by 1960 he’d married an English giri half his age and settled in Zurich, Switzerland.  From here he was able to commute around Europe, finding appreciative audiences for his set which at that time still included some dance routines — early in his career he’d worked in vaudeville performing the tap variety.

By 1965 he was living in and working out of Denmark’s capital, and the following February Mike Vernon signed him to a three album deal for Decca. The first of these, From New Orleans To Chicago (LK 4747), hit the shops in April, and included here are the two tracks from those sessions which were omitted through lack of space: Calcutta Blues (a) and the Eddie Boyd penned 24 Hours. Backed by an all-star British group, Now deservedly billed as ‘The Father Of British Blues’, John Mayall is rightly predominant on this collection. As one of the handful of pioneers responsible for popularizing the style in the U.K., his contribution cannot be overstated.

The Bluesbreakers became a veritable ‘nursery’ for so many future stars in their formative years, and amongst the home grown contingent on display here are some of the finest. Of his two solo billings, the impassioned Burn Out Your Blind Eyes and Milkman Strut, this second title prevailed, according to Vernon’s original album sleeve note, when the daily delivery to the studios saw the dairy employee wander in midway through a ‘take’, deposit his crate, and nonchalantly walk out slamming the door behind him…

OtisSpannOtis Spann

Of John’s pairing with organist Steve Anglo, it may now be revealed that for Anglo read Winwood. Owing to contractual obligations elsewhere he could not appear under his true identity when the album was published. Rhythm section duties on Long Night belonged to then Bluesbreakers’ members John McVie (Bass) and drummer Aynsley Dunbar.

The Mayall and Clapton liaisons here, John’s Lonely Years and Eric’s instrumental Bernard Jenkins, were cut at Mike’s instigation and originally issued as a back-to-back limited edition 45 on his own Purdah label. Dating from the period between the players’ joint collaborations under contract to firstly Andrew Oldhams Immediate company and then Decca, (Bluesbreakers era), both were committed through a single microphone in the middle of the capital’s Wessex Studios in Soho, hence the unusual sound.

At the time of its taping, Peter Green had recently been recruited to the Mayall ranks as Eric’s axe wielding replacement. On his own composition, Evil Woman Blues, he displayed a mature prowess at both playing and singing despite his relative lack of experience. In time, of course, he formed Fleetwood Mac, but that’s another story… Legendary purveyors of the blues from both sides of the Atlantic are gathered together in this one historical little collocation. We all owe grateful thanks to Mike Vernon for making it possible. Why wait? Just play on… (by John Tracy)

What a line-up !!!

Eric ClaptonEric Clapton, 1966

Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar, vocals)
Jack Fallon (bass)
Aynsley Dunbar (drums)
Champion Jack Dupree (piano, vocals)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals)
Keef Hartley (drums)
Curtis Jones (piano, vocals)
Ransom Knowling -(bass)
Alexis Korner (guitar)
John Mayall (guitar, harmonica, piano, vocals)
John Mcvie (bass)
Malcolm Pool (bass)
Little Willie Smith (drums)
Otis Spann (piano, vocals)
Eddie Taylor (drums)
Steve “Anglo” Winwood (organ)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Otis Spann: Pretty Girls Everywhere (Church/Williams) 2.57
02. John Mayall: Burn Out Your Blind Eyes (Mayall) 3.00
03. Champion Jack Dupree: Calcutta Blues (Unknown) 4.00
04. John Mayall & Steve Anglo: Long Night (Mayall,/Anglo) 2.04
05. Otis Spann: Country Boy (Morganfiled) 3.34
06. Curtis Jones: You Got Good Business (Jones) 3.23
07. John Mayall & Eric Clapton: Lonely Years (Mayall) 3.21
08. Peter Green & John Mayall: Evil Woman Blues (Green) 4.04
09. Otis Spann: My Home In The Desert (Unknown) 4.20
10. John Mayall: Milkman Strut (Mayall) 2.26
11. Champion Jack Dupree: 24 Hours (Boyd) 4.07
12. Curtis Jones: Roll Me Over (Jones) 2.38
13. John Mayall & Eric Clapton: Bernard Jenkins (Clapton) 3.50
14. Otis Spann: You Gonna Need My Help (Morganfield) 3.25

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John Mayall – A Special Life (2014)

FrontCover1John Mayall has been doing this blues thing now for over five decades (he released his first single in 1964), exploring the form in all of its incarnations, from gutbucket country blues to the more urbane jazz side of things, and amazingly, he’s always sounded pretty much like John Mayall, a blues everyman who has always surrounded himself with the best bands and players, a big part of the reason he is still a successful touring act in his eighties. Mayall’s put out 60 some albums since 1964, and while he’s slowed down a bit in recent years, he’s still good for a new album or live set every couple of years or so. A Special Life, recorded in November 2013 at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood, features Mayall’s current band — guitarist Rocky Athas, bassist Greg Rzab and drummer Jay Davenport — with singer and accordion player C.J. Chenier sitting in on a couple of tracks. It’s a typical Mayall album, featuring a couple of classic blues covers (including Albert King’s “Floodin’ in California” here) and several Mayall originals (most of which unfortunately fall lyrically into the generic), all punctuated by piercing harmonica runs and solid ensemble playing.

JohnMayallLive2014The opener, a cover of Clifton Chenier’s “Why Did You Go Last Night,” is one of the highlights, a Jimmy Reed-like shuffle given warmth, poignancy, and depth by Clifton’s son C.J.’s accordion swells. Although it is built on a fairly generic blues progression in D, Mayall’s own “World Gone Crazy” stands out because of its subject matter, which pretty much puts the responsibility for war at the feet of religions, most of which are rigidly intolerant of other religions. It’s certainly not one’s run of the mill blues theme. This is what Mayall does. He plays blues right down the middle of the road, never straying too far from the classic Chicago blues model, but he adds embellishments now and then, and when they work, he gently bumps the blues into an interesting side alley. (by Steve Leggett)

Booklet1

Personnel:
Rocky Athas (guitar)
Jay Davenport (drums)
John Mayall (vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards, clavinet)
Greg Rzab (bass, percussion)
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C.J. Chenier (accordion on 01., vocals on 01. + 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Why Did You Go Last Night (Chenier) 4.54
02. Speak Of The Devil (Landreth) 3.26
03. That’s All Right (Lane) 3.19
04. World Gone Crazy (Mayall) 4.15
05. Floodin’ In California (King) 4.37
06. Big Town Playboy (Taylor) 4.19
07. A Special Life (Mayall) 4.10
08. I Just Got to Know (McCracklin) 4.08
09. Heartache (Mayall) 4.48
10. Like a Fool (Rzab) 4.03
11. Just A Memory (Mayall) 6.39

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John Mayall – The Turning Point (1969)

FrontCover1The Turning Point is a live album by John Mayall, featuring British blues music recorded at a concert at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East on July 12, 1969.

When John Mayall was starting another band after the break-up of the Bluesbreakers in May 1969,he decided to have a band that would play “low volume music” – or music without “heavy lead guitar and drums”.

The performers on the album were Mayall on vocals, harmonica, a slide and a Fender Telecaster guitar, a tambourine, and mouth Booklet03Apercussion, Jon Mark on acoustic guitar, Steve Thompson on bass, and Johnny Almond on tenor and alto saxophones, flutes, and mouth percussion. All the songs on the album were written or co-written by John Mayall. Thompson co-wrote California, Thoughts About Roxanne and Don’t Waste My Time. Another track, “I’m Gonna Fight For You, J.B.,” is a tribute to the American blues guitarist J. B. Lenoir who died in 1967 and who had a deep influence on Mayall (this was Mayall’s second such tribute to the musician; “The Death of J.B. Lenoir” appeared on his earlier Crusade album). Two concerts took place, one on July 11 and one on 12. All tracks are from the second gig.

The album was produced by John Mayall, who also designed the packaging and was the album’s art director. The recording engineer was Eddie Kramer, who had engineered Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, among others. (by wikipedia)

Booklet05AThis prophetically titled project represents yet another crossroad in John Mayall’s ever evolving cast of prime British bluesmen. This album also signifies a distinct departure from the decibel drowning electrified offerings of his previous efforts, providing instead an exceedingly more folk and roots based confab. The 2001 “remastered & revisited” edition of The Turning Point boasts vastly improved audio — when compared to its previous CD counterparts — and a trio of three “bonus tracks” from the same July 12, 1969 performance at Bill Graham’s fabulous Fillmore East in New York City. The specific lineup featured here is conspicuous in its absence of a lead guitarist, primarily due to Mayall recommending himself out of his most recent string man. After the passing of Brian Jones, the Rolling Stones decided to tour and at the behest of Mick Jagger, Mayall suggested Mick Taylor — who had been with him since Crusade (1967). Mayall gave this potentially negative situation a positive outcome by retooling the combo into an acoustic quartet featuring old friends as well as some vital new sonic Booklet01Atextures. Mayall (vocals/harmonica/slide guitar/telecaster six-string/hand & mouth percussion) joined forces with former associates Steve Thompson (bass) and Johnny Almond (tenor & alto sax/flute/mouth percussion), then added the talents of Jon Mark (acoustic finger-style guitar). It becomes readily apparent that Mark’s precision and tasteful improvisational skills place this incarnation into heady spaces. The taut interaction and wafting solos punctuating “So Hard to Share” exemplify the controlled intensity of Mayall’s prior electrified outings. Likewise, Mark’s intricate acoustics pierce through the growl of Mayall’s haunting slide guitar solos on “Saw Mill Gulch Road.” The Turning Point also examines a shift in Mayall’s writing. The politically charged “Laws Must Change,” the personal “I’m Gonna Fight for You J.B.” and the incomparable “Room to Move” are tinged with Mayall’s trademark sense of irony and aural imagery. As mentioned above, the supplementary sides “Sleeping by Her Side,” “Don’t Waste My Time,” and “Can’t Sleep This Night” — which were left off of the original disc owing to the restrictions imposed upon the vinyl medium — are sourced from the same mid-July 1969 Fillmore East set as the main program. (by Lindsay Planer)

Live1969Personnel:
John Almond (flute, saxophone, mouth percussion)
Jon Mark (guitar)
John Mayall guitar, slied-guitar, harmonica, keyboards, tambourine, vocals, mouth percussion)
Steve Thompson (bass)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. The Laws Must Change (Mayall) 7.21
02. Saw Mill Gulch Road (Mayall) 4.39
03. I’m Gonna Fight For You J.B. (Mayall) 5.27
04. So Hard To Share (Mayall) 7.05
05. California (Mayall/Thompson) 9.30
06. Thoughts About Roxanne (Mayall/Thompson) 8.20
07. Room To Move (Mayall) 5.03

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John Mayall – The Last Of The British Blues (1978)

FrontCover1This was the last of the six albums John Mayall originally made for Blue Thumb/ABC Records between 1975 and 1978, about which he has said, “ABC released six of my albums as a tax write-off. A week after they were released you couldn’t find them in any store.” It’s a live album on which Mayall fronts a quartet consisting of guitarist James Quill Smith (who sings lead on several songs), bassist Steve Thompson, and drummer Soko Richardson. The approach is rock-oriented, and the set list includes such Bluesbreakers favorites as Mose Allison’s “Parchman Farm,” and Freddie King’s “Hideaway” (taken at a frantic tempo), along with the usual complement of generic Mayall originals, among them, a remake of “The Bear,” from Blues From Laurel Canyon. (by William Ruhlmann)

And … it´s an very extiting  live album … listen to live version of “Parchman Farm” and you know what I mean !

JohnMayallPersonnel:
John Mayall (vocals, guitar, harmonica clavinet)
Soko Richardson (drums)
James Quill Smith (guitar, vocals)
Steve Thompson (bass)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Tucson Lady (Mayall) 4.02
02. Parchman Farm (Allison) 3.57
03. There’s Only Now (Smith) 4.00
04. The Teaser (Mayall) 4.09
05. Hideaway (King) 2.57
06. The Bear (Mayall) 4.13
07. Lonely Birthday (Mayall) 3-50
08. Lowdown Blues (Mayall) 4.26
09. Another Man (Mayall) 2.15
10. It Must Be Three (Mayall) 4.16

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John Mayall – Road Show Blues (1981)

FrontCover1Road Show Blues was John Mayall’s third album for the U.K.’s DJM Records, following Bottom Line and No More Interviews. At this time, his backup band included guitarist/singer James Quill Smith, bassist Kevin McCormick, drummer Soko Richardson, and singer Maggie Parker. Two cuts, Jimmy Reed’s “Baby, What You Want Me to Do” and Mayall’s “Mexico City,” were recorded live. The band is a tight unit in support of the leader, who sings and plays fiercely. By the time that this album, the last in Mayall’s DJM contract, was recorded, his career was in decline, and the disc was not released in the U.S. at the time. It would be another five years before he made another. Through some corporate legerdemain, the record has bounced around from one company to another and been reissued several times under different titles. These reissues include The Adventures of John Mayall, Road Show, and Lost and Gone. Of course, the Mayall fan needs only one, but it does make a worthy addition to the catalog. (by William Ruhlmann)

AlternateFRontCover
Alternate frontcover

Personnel:
John Mayall (vocals, harmonica, keyboards, guitar)
Kevin McCormick (guitar, background vocals)
Maggie Parker (vocals, percussion)
Soko Richardson (drums)
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Christiaan Mostert (flute on 02, saxophone on 09.)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Why Worry (Mayall) 3.15
02. Road Show (Parker) 4.21
03. Mama Talk To Your Daughter (Lenoir) 3.52
04. Big Man (Mayall) 4.51
05. Lost And Gone (Mayall) 2.40
06. Mexico City (Mayall) 5.00
07. John Lee Boogie (Mayall) 4.10
08. Reaching For A Mountain (Mayall) 4.20
09. Baby What You Want Me To Do (Reed) 5.08

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