Billboard (Magazine) – July, 10 (1965)

FrontCoverBillboard (stylized as billboard) is an American entertainment media brand owned by the Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Group, a division of Eldridge Industries. It publishes pieces involving news, video, opinion, reviews, events, and style. It is also known for its music charts, including the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard 200, tracking the most popular singles and albums in different genres. It also hosts events, owns a publishing firm, and operates several TV shows. Billboard was founded in 1894 by William Donaldson and James Hennegan as a trade publication for bill posters. Donaldson later acquired Hennegen’s interest in 1900 for $500.

In the early years of the 20th century, it covered the entertainment industry, such as circuses, fairs, and burlesque shows. It also created a mail service for travelling entertainers. Billboard began focusing more on the music industry as the jukebox, phonograph, and radio became commonplace. Many topics it covered were spun-off into different magazines, including Amusement Business in 1961 to cover outdoor entertainment, so that it could focus on music. After Donaldson died in 1925, Billboard was passed down to his children and Hennegan’s children, until it was sold to private investors in 1985, and has since been owned by various parties. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a nice example from 1965 …

And this is another sentimental journey in the Sixties … when we were young …

Enjoy it !

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Guitar World – Holiday 2015 Edition

FrontCoverGuitar World is a monthly music magazine devoted to guitarists, published since July 1980. It contains original interviews, album and gear reviews, and guitar and bass tablature of approximately five songs each month.

The magazine is published 13 times per year (12 monthly issues and a holiday issue).

Formerly owned by Harris Publications, Future US bought the magazine in 2003. In 2012, NewBay Media bought the Music division of Future US.

The latter company also published a spin-off title, Guitar Legends, each issue of which typically combined past articles from Guitar World under a specific theme.

And here´s the holiday editon from 2015 with articles about

  • Keith Richards
  • The Beatles (and their “love affair” with the Ephophone Casino guitar
  • Richie Kotzen
  • Deafheaven
  • Iron Maiden

plus many columns and tablatures “Here Comes The Sun” for example.

More Guitar World issues will come …

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Relix – Vol. 10, No. 1 (February 1983)

FrontCoverAnother item from my magazine archive:

Relix Magazine was launched in 1974 under the name Dead Relix. In its earliest incarnation, this hand-stapled, homegrown newsletter was an outlet for Grateful Dead tape traders ‹ avid concertgoers who taped and traded Grateful Dead concerts. The first issues were small (less than 20 pages), had hand-drawn black and white covers and focused on taping tips and Grateful Dead news. It also provided a forum for tape traders and music fanatics to communicate with each other.
Even as early as the second issue, non-Dead editorial found its way into Dead Relix’s pages and, with the addition of an editor, the young magazine expanded its scope to cover the music of the Bay Area psychedelic scene. By 1978, Dead Relix contained reviews, essays, short features and artwork, and had dropped the “Dead” from its title. In a world that was moving away from “hippy culture,” Relix managed to remain relevant, by expanding its scope of coverage beyond “Bay Area psychedelic rock” to cover genres as diverse as reggae and heavy metal, with varying degrees of success.

After some years of struggling with its direction, Relix regained its voice. It revived its FristIssue1974focus on the Grateful Dead, but also found room to cover genres as divergent as blues, reggae, bluegrass and jazz, and non-music issues such as mandatory minimum drug laws. It was during the late ’80s to mid-’90s that Relix established its reputation as a magazine that “broke” new acts. With the keen ear of British-born writer Mick Skidmore, many new and emerging bands made their debut in Relix columns such as Independents Daze and On The Edge.

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For a magazine with its roots in Grateful Dead coverage, the passing of Jerry Garcia on August 9, 1995, could have spelt its death knell. Instead, Relix served as a rallying point for the “community,” and, in the years since, has slowly moved its emphasis away from the Grateful Dead to coverage of “jambands” that have filled the void, as well as other, non-mainstream, types of music.

Today, Relix is the only music magazine of its kind. Having weathered 28 years of musical history, Relix has firmly established itself as a serious music magazine, “deadicated” to not only entertaining its readership, but providing a true community for lovers of “music for the mind.” (by relix.com)

And here´s another old Relix mag from 1983, and this issue included great articles about:

  • Gram Parsons
  • The Stray Cats
  • The Dinosaurs
  • Pigpen
  • Jorma Kaukonen
  • Mike Bloomfield
  • Josie Cotton
  • Jim Morrison

and much more … reviews and so on.

Enjoy this trup in the past !

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Kerrang – No. 99 (July 1985)

FrontCoverKerrang! is a UK-based magazine devoted to rock music, currently published by Hamburg based Bauer Media Group. It was first published on 6 June 1981 as a one-off supplement in the Sounds newspaper. Named after the onomatopoeic word that derives from the sound made when playing a power chord on a distorted electric guitar, Kerrang! was initially devoted to the new wave of British heavy metal and the rise of hard rock acts.[2] In the early 2000s it became the best-selling British music weekly.

Kerrang! was founded in 1981. The magazine commenced publication on 6 June 1981 and was edited by Geoff Barton, initially as a one-time supplement in the Sounds newspaper, which focused on the new wave of British heavy metal phenomenon and on the rise of other hard rock acts. Angus Young of AC/DC appeared on Kerrang!’s first cover. Launched as a monthly magazine, Kerrang! began to appear on a fortnightly basis later, and in 1987 it went weekly. The original owner was United Newspapers who then sold it to EMAP in 1991.

During the 1980s and early 1990s the magazine placed many thrash and glam metal acts on the cover (like Mötley Crüe, Slayer, Bon Jovi, Metallica, Poison, and Venom) but later discarded them when grunge acts such as Nirvana rose to fame. Readers often criticise the magazine for repeating this process every time a new musical trend becomes popular.

Kerrang!’s popularity rose again with the hiring of editor Paul Rees circa 2000 when the nu metal genre, featuring bands like Limp Bizkit and Slipknot were becoming more popular.[6] Rees went on to edit Q magazine and Ashley Bird took over as editor from 2003 to 2005. However the magazine’s sales went quickly into decline in 2003 and Paul Brannigan took over as editor in May 2005.

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The term “thrash metal” was first referred to in the music press by Kerrang journalist Malcolm Dome while making a reference to the Anthrax song “Metal Thrashing Mad” in issue number 62, page 8 published on 23 February 1984. Prior to this Metallica’s James Hetfield referred to their sound as power metal.

With the emergence of emo and metalcore, Kerrang! began to heavily feature this musical trend. However, the revamp was not welcomed by all readers and many complaints were received about Kerrang!’s sudden emphasis on emo and metalcore music. Brannigan took the magazine into its most commercially successful period with a record ever ABC for the title of 80,186 copies.

In 2008, EMAP sold its consumer magazine to current owner Bauer Media Group. Brannigan left Kerrang! in 2009 and Nichola Browne was appointed editor.[10] She later stepped down in April 2011. Former NME features editor and GamesMaster deputy editor James McMahon was appointed as editor on 6 June 2011.

In April 2017, Bauer sold Kerrang! magazine, its website, and the K! Awards to Mixmag Media, publisher of dance monthly Mixmag, along with assets related to defunct style magazine The Face, which Mixmag plans to relaunch as a digital-first title. It is suggested that the new owners will relaunch Kerrang! as a monthly title. Bauer will retain ownership of Kerrang! Radio and the Box Plus Network will continue to operate Kerrang! TV as before (by wikipedia)

Here´s a issue from July 1985:

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More Kerrang magazines will come ….

Punk – The Original – Nr. 14 (May June 1978)

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Punk Magazine was a fanzine started by cartoonist John Holmstrom (b. 1954) and Legs McNeil (b. 1956) in 1976 that showcased the New York punk rock scene. The term “punk” was previously used by Creem Magazine to describe the kind of music that was developing parallel to the excessive arena rock bands that developed following the late 1960’s. Punk Magazine came out just as The Velvet Underground, MC5, and Iggy & The Stooges had broken up but just in time for The Ramones, The Dictators, and Television.

Using photographs taken by staff photographers Roberta Bayley and Bob Gruen among others, the magazine’s layout was like a comic book, with panels overlaid with text bubbles. After fifteen issues, the publication came to an end in 1979. John Holmstrom would go on to publish several other underground comic magazines including Stop! and Comical Funnies and was a regular contributor to High Times.

The John Holmstrom & Punk Magazine Lot contains an entire run of the original Punk Magazine as well as the D.O.A. Film Book and the revived Punk issues of the 2000s. Also included is a complete run of Stop! and Comical Funnies, Holmstrom’s comic-focused publications and S.V.A. publications that he contributed too. This lot also contains an original ticket and poster to the Punk Magazine Awards in 1978 that were overshadowed by the death of Nancy Spungen, allegedly, at the hands of Sid Vicious just a few nights prior.

And here´s one of the last issues of this short-lived Punk magazine.

Punk was never a favorite sound for me … but Punk is without any doubts an important part of the history of music. So, this magazine can or must be a part of this crazy little blog …

Enjoy the very special design of this era …

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Believe it … or not: in this issue you´ll find an articale about The Bay City Rollers !

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The backcover of this issue

Relix – Vol. 6, No. 3 (June 1979)

FrontCoverAnother item from my magazine archive:

Relix Magazine was launched in 1974 under the name Dead Relix. In its earliest incarnation, this hand-stapled, homegrown newsletter was an outlet for Grateful Dead tape traders ‹ avid concertgoers who taped and traded Grateful Dead concerts. The first issues were small (less than 20 pages), had hand-drawn black and white covers and focused on taping tips and Grateful Dead news. It also provided a forum for tape traders and music fanatics to communicate with each other.
Even as early as the second issue, non-Dead editorial found its way into Dead Relix’s pages and, with the addition of an editor, the young magazine expanded its scope to cover the music of the Bay Area psychedelic scene. By 1978, Dead Relix contained reviews, essays, short features and artwork, and had dropped the “Dead” from its title. In a world that was moving away from “hippy culture,” Relix managed to remain relevant, by expanding its scope of coverage beyond “Bay Area psychedelic rock” to cover genres as diverse as reggae and heavy metal, with varying degrees of success.
After some years of struggling with its direction, Relix regained its voice. It revived its FristIssue1974focus on the Grateful Dead, but also found room to cover genres as divergent as blues, reggae, bluegrass and jazz, and non-music issues such as mandatory minimum drug laws. It was during the late ’80s to mid-’90s that Relix established its reputation as a magazine that “broke” new acts. With the keen ear of British-born writer Mick Skidmore, many new and emerging bands made their debut in Relix columns such as Independents Daze and On The Edge.
For a magazine with its roots in Grateful Dead coverage, the passing of Jerry Garcia on August 9, 1995, could have spelt its death knell. Instead, Relix served as a rallying point for the “community,” and, in the years since, has slowly moved its emphasis away from the Grateful Dead to coverage of “jambands” that have filled the void, as well as other, non-mainstream, types of music.
Today, Relix is the only music magazine of its kind. Having weathered 28 years of musical history, Relix has firmly established itself as a serious music magazine, “deadicated” to not only entertaining its readership, but providing a true community for lovers of “music for the mind.” (by relix.com)
Here´s an old Relix mag from 1979, and this issue included great articles about:

  • The Byrds
  • Chet Helms
  • Dire Straits
  • California´s Rock N Roll Women
  • Peter Tosh
  • Blondie
  • Norton Buffalo (a real great harmonica payer)
  • David LaFlamme (from “t´s A Beautiful Day” youknow !)
+ lots of reviews …

Enjoy this trip in the past !
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Those were the days, my friends …

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Steve Harnell (Editor) – Vintage Rock The Beatles – The Early Years

FrontCoverHere´s an illustrated 132-page bookazine pays tribute to the early years of The Beatles.

Liverpool’s finest were quite simply the most important pop-cultural phenomenon that the 20th century and beyond has ever seen – wildly ambitious, successful, influential and groundbreaking. And all this sprang from that most British of institutions – a parish church fête, where John Lennon met Paul McCartney, 60 years ago on 6 July 1957.

In this latest Collectors Edition of Vintage Rock, we trace the band’s roots as fledgling skifflers The Quarrymen playing local gigs in Liverpool through to their hothouse development as they became The Beatles at the Cavern and in Hamburg, before moving on to inventing the mega-gig at Shea Stadium.

Inbetween, we serve up some fascinating insights into the life of their manager Brian Epstein, the astonishing rise of Beatlemania in the UK, Europe and the United States, put the band’s first five studio albums under the microscope and also go behind the scenes on their two big-screen outings, A Hard Day’s Night and Help!

It all adds up to a must-read magazine for fans of the Fab Four. The greatest that ever was and the greatest that ever will be…
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