Willie Nelson – It Always Will Be (2004)

WillieNelsonFrontCover1It Always Will Be is the fifty-second studio album by country singer Willie Nelson. It includes a cover of the Allman Brothers Band’s “Midnight Rider”, recorded here as a duet with Toby Keith. This cover was released, but did not chart. (by wikipedia)

On his millionth album (or does it just feel that way?), Willie Nelson teams with a new band — except for Family Band harmonicat Mickey Raphael — and duets with some major leaguers. Most of the time, It Always Will Be feels like a Willie album of old. Recorded for the Lost Highway label and produced by James Stroud in Nash Vegas, it’s an inspired collection of fine songs for the most part, and Nelson is in fine voice with the edges beginning to show just a tiny bit. He wrote the title cut, one of the strongest here. Lyrically, it’s tender without being overly sentimental, sweet without being saccharine, and delivered with his trademark elegance and grace. The cover of Tom Waits and Kathleen Brennan’s “Picture in a Frame,” though faithful, puts Nelson’s stamp firmly on it. With Raphael’s harmonica, Willie’s acoustic, and a skeletal band featuring an understated pedal steel, Nelson’s dignity in the delivery is deeply moving. When he’s this on fire, the only place he usually blows it is in duets — at least on his own records. There are duets here. “Be That As It May,” with daughter Paula and written by her, is just a gorgeous country song. The pair’s voices contrast beautifully and the tune itself is tight and hooky in a Texas country music way.

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“Dreams Come True,” with Norah Jones, is a pretty swing tune that is forgettable but far from offensive, and Lucinda Williams is the star on her own “Overtime.” Willie and Lucinda were made to sing together; the melancholy of the tune lends itself well to her whiskey contralto and his easy baritone. The tune sweetly drifts and lilts with swaying guitars, an accordion, and whispering brushwork. Toby Keith makes an appearance singing background vocals on his “Tired,” but Nelson makes the song his own. Nelson’s “Texas” is a wonderful mariachi blues song that gives way to bittersweet Southwestern honky tonk balladry and showcases his excellent guitar work. The set closes with the album’s only dog, a big-beat over-produced dancy punch-up of Gregg Allman’s classic “Midnight Rider.” It sucks bad. Why this song made the cut is a mystery, but it’s a typical thing for Nelson, to add something that just doesn’t fit. Thankfully, it’s the album’s final song and can be skipped. Be that as it may, It Always Will Be is the best outing for Nelson since Teatro. (by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Dan Dugmore (pedal steel-guitar)
Chris Dunn (horn)
Scotty Emerick (guitar)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel-guitar)
Kenny Greenberg (guitar)
Wes Hightower (vocals)
Jim Horn (horn)
Clayton Ivey (keyboards)
Amy James (vocals)
Sam Levine (horn)
Liana Manis (vocals)
Brent Mason (guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Willie Nelson (guitar, vocals)
Steve Patrick (horn)
Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
Michael Rhodes (bass)
Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Biff Watson (guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. It Always Will Be (Nelson) 4.12
02. Picture In A Frame (Waits/Brennan) 3.39
03. The Way You See Me (Adams/Day) 4.21
04. Be That As It May (Nelson) (Duet with Paula Nelson) 3.29
05. You Were It (Nelson) 4.28
06. Big Booty (Throckmorton) 3.03
07. I Didn’t Come Here (And I Ain’t Leavin’) (Emerick/Smotherman) 3.10
08. My Broken Heart Belongs To You (Anderson/Nelson) 2.26
09. Dreams Come True (Hopkins) (Duet with Norah Jones) 4.35
10. Over Time (Williams) (Duet with Lucinda Williams) 3.45
11. Tired (Cannon/Keith) 4.19
12. Love’s The One And Only Thing (Emerick/Loggins) 3.35
13. Texas (Nelson) 3.56
14. Midnight Rider (Allman/Payne) (Duet with Toby Keith) 3.00

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Willie Nelson – Here’s Willie Nelson (1963)

FrontCover1Here’s Willie Nelson is the second studio album by country singer Willie Nelson.

After working as a disc jockey in Texas and Oregon, Nelson moved to Nashville in 1960 in hopes of making a living as a songwriter and recording artist. He found work writing compositions for Pamper Music and scored his first hit when Faron Young recorded “Hello Walls.” More hits followed, including Patsy Cline’s classic rendition of “Crazy,” but Nelson, who played bass on tour with Ray Price during this period, wanted to be a recording artist in his own right, and recorded his debut album, …And Then I Wrote for Liberty in 1962. He scored a Top 10 hit with “Touch Me,” but the LP was not a huge seller. Against his better judgement, Nelson would allow his songs to be heavily augmented when he returned to the studio, later admitting, “I didn’t argue. In those days, big productions like Johnny Cash’s ‘Ring of Fire’ were huge hits. So if it worked for Johnny, maybe it’d work for me. I went along with the program.”

After failing to deliver a hit for Liberty, Joe Allison, who produced Nelson’s debut, was replaced by Tommy Allsup, who would go on to produce twenty-six sides on the singer between December 1962 and November 1963. Some of those tracks found their way onto his second album, on which Nelson’s voice was complemented by a pronounced country and swing sound, although the tracks arranged by Ernie Freeman blatantly pushed him in a pop or jazz direction. Unlike his debut, Here’s Willie Nelson contains more cover songs, including two made famous by Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys, “Roly Poly” and “Right or Wrong.” Wills, one of Nelson’s idols, would also write the liner notes for the LP.

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Nelson worked out several songs on his second album while touring with his wife Shirley Collie and steel guitarist Jimmy Day while playing shows as the trio The Offenders.  Nelson later expressed dissatisfaction with the recorded version of “Home Motel,” a song he described as “another study in despair,” and it was typical of the frustration that he would feel regarding the tepid sound of his albums in the decade ahead:

It was a thrill to play the song live. Jimmy Day had his steel guitar weeping just enough, and Shirley added just a touch of harmony, and I got to sing my blues the way the blues should be sung: no frills. Yet when I brought the song into the Liberty studios, the producers felt compelled to put on the frills. “Aren’t you worried you’re burying the soul of the song?” I asked. “More worried about the song not selling,” was the usual answer.

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In his 2015 memoir, Willie admitted that “Half a Man” was “one of my stranger songs. It’s about a guy who considers what it would be like, in the name of lost love, to start losing body parts…This wasn’t exactly a song that made you want to dance.” The song was released as a single but only made it to number 25, with Allsup recalling, “Half the country stations wouldn’t play ‘Half a Man’ because they thought it was morbid.” Years later Nelson would record the song as two different duets with Merle Haggard and George Jones. (by  wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Willie Nelson (guitar, vocals)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians (arranged by Ernie Freeman &  Jimmy Day)

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Tracklist:
01. Roly Poly (Rose) 1.52
02. Half A Man (Nelson) 2.27
03. Lonely Little Mansion (Nelson) 2.26
04. The Last Letter (Griffin) 2.58
05. Second Fiddle (Miller) 2.24
06. Take My Word (Nelson) 1.50
07. Right Or Wrong (Gillespie/Sizemore/Biese) 2:10
08. Feed It A Memory (Cochran/Tubb) 2.35
09. Let Me Talk To You (Dill/Davis) 2.21
10. Way You See Me (Nelson) 2.58
11. Things I Might Have Been (Robert Sherman/Richard M. Sherman) 2.21
12. Home Motel (Nelson) 2.26

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Willie Nelson – … And Then I Wrote (1962)

WillieNelsonFrontCover1.jpg…And Then I Wrote is the debut studio album by country singer Willie Nelson, recorded during August and September 1962 and released through Liberty Records.

Despite Nelson’s fruitless efforts to succeed with his recording releases with D Records, and after trying with other labels as a singer, he sold several of his original written songs to other artists. After his composition “Family Bible” became a hit for Claude Gray in 1960, he moved to Nashville, where he was signed by Pamper Music as a songwriter. Several of his songs became hits for other artists, including Faron Young (“Hello Walls”); Ray Price (“Night Life”) and Patsy Cline (“Crazy”).

Fueled by the success of his songwriting, he was signed by Liberty Records. During August, Nelson started recording his first album, produced by Joe Allison. The single releases of the album “Touch Me” and “The Part Where I Cry” were recorded on that day in Nashville, Tennessee, while it was completed during September in the recording facilities of the label in Los Angeles, California. The single “Touch Me” became Nelson’s second top ten, reaching number 7 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles.

In 1958, Nelson released under a contract with Pappy Daily of D Records two records, “Man With the Blues”/”The Storm Has Just Begun” and “What a Way to Live”/”Misery Mansion”. While working for D Records and singing in nightclubs, Nelson was hired by guitar instructor Paul Buskirk to teach in his school. He sold to Buskirk his original songs “Family Bible” for US$50, and “Night Life” for US$150. “Family Bible” turned into a hit for Claude Gray in 1960.

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Nelson moved to Nashville in 1960, but no label signed him. Most of his demos were rejected. Nelson was later signed as a songwriter to Pamper Music with the help of Hank Cochran, who worked for the publishing company owned by Ray Price and Hal Smith. Faron Young recorded Nelson’s “Hello Walls”, and after Ray Price recorded Nelson’s “Night Life”, and his previous bassist Johnny Paycheck quit, Nelson joined Price’s touring band as a bass player. While playing with Price and the Cherokee Cowboys, other of his original songs became hits for other artists, including “Funny How Time Slips Away” (Billy Walker), “Pretty Paper” (Roy Orbison), and, most famously, “Crazy” by Patsy Cline. Nelson signed with Liberty Records and was recording by August 1961 at Quonset Hut Studio. As Nelson later recalled, Cochran was instrumental in getting him signed: “Hank had convinced Liberty’s A&R man for country music, Joe Allison, that I was the next big thing…Allison knew that there wasn’t any way I was gonna change my singing style – and that was fine by him. He understood me. He just wanted me to sing my own songs in my own way.”

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In his 2015 autobiography, Nelson insists that he composed “Crazy”, “Night Life”, “Funny How Time Slips Away”, “Mr. Record Man”, “I Gotta Get Drunk” and “The Party’s Over” in one songwriting jag while living in Houston before finally moving to Nashville: “Within an astounding short period of time – a week or two – I’d written a suite of songs that reflected my real-life situation. I knew these songs were damn good, but at the same time, I didn’t know what to do with them.” Nelson unconsciously borrowed the first few notes of “Crazy” from the Floyd Tillman song “I Gotta Have My Baby Back.”[10] “Hello Walls” was written after Nelson had been hired by Pamper Music. Initially collaborating with Hank Cochran, he was nervous at first, realising “this was creativity on demand,” and later recalling:

First few days found me a little uneasy. I had my guitar, a pencil, and a blank notebook. Hank might throw out an idea, hoping it might spark something in me. When that didn’t work, he might tell me a joke, or I might tell him one, hoping that joking would lead to some kind of song. It didn’t…And one afternoon, after we had just sat around throwing the bull, he said, “I’m going to the office to make a few calls. You work on something by yourself.

WillieNelson01By the time Cochran had returned from his phone call Nelson had written “Hello Walls” and sang it for him. “It’s worth a fuckin’ fortune,” Cochran responded, adding, “Willie, my friend, you just wrote a hit.”

The recording sessions for his first album release, …And Then I Wrote, began in the Nashville studios of Liberty Records. Nelson recorded on August 22–23, starting during the night and lasting until the morning of the following day. Dissatisfied with the results, Allison moved the sessions to the studios of the label in Los Angeles, California, where Nelson was joined by three other stellar guitarists – session leader Billy Strange, Roy Nichols from the Maddox Brothers, and Johnny Western, who had worked with Johnny Cash. During two sessions in September 11–12, Nelson recorded “Crazy”, “Darkness on the Face of the Earth”, “Three Days”, “Funny How Times Slips Away”, “Mr. Record Man” and “Hello Walls”. B.J. Baker led the vocal chorus that attempted to back Nelson, but the singer’s idiosyncratic style gave them problems, as recounted by Nelson biographer Joe Nick Patoski: “The singers got lost trying to follow Willie’s lead vocals until Joe Allsion put up some baffles between Willie and the singers so they couldn’t hear one another. To stay on the beat, the singers followed Johnny Western’s direction.” The liner notes of the album were written by local DJ Charlie Williams, by request of Allison. The albums biggest hit was “Touch Me,” a sad blues done in a slow drag with the rough edges smoothed out by harmony singers and a cool instrumental arrangement that reached the Top 10 and earned Nelson a place on jukeboxes throughput the United States.

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It was during the recording of “Mr. Record Man” that Nelson met his second wife Shirley Collie, with whom he would soon record the duet “Willingly,” a Cochran composition.

The record was released on September 1962. “Touch Me” was released as a single, becoming Nelson’s second top ten single, reaching No. 7 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart. Billboard wrote a review about the single, describing it as an “interesting country-styled tune” with “good” lyrics.  (by wikipedia)

Willie Nelson, with an innocent earnestness & remarkable sincerity unbecoming of Nashville’s production line business model is more in line with the work of Roy Orbison in Nashville (minus the Spector influences) at the same time this was recorded and should be approached as a singer-songwriter record written for the classic late 1950’s Nashville sound (Several of these songs were written in a two week window in Houston, just before he moved to Tennessee). Before Nelson was a singer, he was a remarkable songwriter pitching his songs to Patsy Cline and the likes. His humility and genuine WillieNelson03earnestness made him a popular man among musically inclined talents and producers like Joe Allison, and this August/September 1962 recording of his classic songs penned for others over the previous handful of years along with a couple new songs like Touch Me, intended to find a mass audience (It shot up the country charts to #7).

Allison saw Nelson’s talent outweighed his limitations as a vocalist, especially after having observed the folk movement going on in New York’s Greenwich Village and thought Nelson’s genuine ability to come off earnest, sincere and straight-forward with no nonsense would appeal to a new country audience seeking something closer to the lyrical inventiveness of Hank Williams. This is a wonderful listen, a truly remarkable cache of songs that while formulaic in their instrumentation and chord structure, are brilliant pieces of the human spirit and capture the range of emotions with a new sincerity Nashville wasn’t used to since the late 1950’s. All killer, no filler, a wonderful excursion into the pre-fame, salad and bread days when Willie was trying to make a name for himself behind the scenes. (Johnny Nebraska)

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Personnel:
Willie Nelson – guitar, vocals
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians (including Billy Strange, Roy Nichols and Johnny Western)

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Tracklist:
01. Touch Me (Nelson) 2.13
02. Wake Me When It’s Over (Nelson) 2.50
03. Hello Walls (Nelson) 2,25
04. Funny How Time Slips Away (Nelson) 3.04
05. Crazy (Nelson) 2.52
06. The Part Where I Cry (Nelson) 2.20
07. Mr. Record Man (Nelson) 2.47
08. Three Days (Nelson) 3.00
09. One Step Beyond (Nelson) 2.27
10. Undo The Right (Cochran/Nelson) 2.34
11. Darkness On The Face Of The Earth (Nelson) 2.33
12. Where My House Lives (Nelson) 2.21

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What a long career … 

Willie Nelson – Stardust (1978)

FrontCover1Stardust is the 23rd studio album by Willie Nelson that spans the genres of pop, jazz, and country music. Its ten songs consist entirely of pop standards that Nelson picked from among his favorites. Nelson asked Booker T. Jones, who was his neighbor in Malibu at the time, to arrange a version of “Moonlight in Vermont”. Impressed with Jones’s work, Nelson asked him to produce the entire album. Nelson’s decision to record such well-known tracks was controversial among Columbia executives because he had distinguished himself in the outlaw country genre. Recording of the album took only ten days.

Released in April, Stardust was met with high sales and near-universal positive reviews. It peaked at number one in Billboard’s Top Country Albums and number thirty in the Billboard 200. Meanwhile, it charted at number one in Canadian RPM’s Country Albums and number twenty-eight in RPM’s Top Albums. The singles “Blue Skies” and “All of Me” peaked respectively at numbers one and three in Billboard’s Hot Country Singles.

In 1979, Nelson won a Grammy Award for Best Male Country Vocal Performance for the song “Georgia on My Mind”. Stardust was on the Billboard’s Country Album charts for ten years—from its release until 1988. The album also reached number one in New WillieNelsonZealand and number five in Australia in 1980. In 2003, the album was ranked number 257 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It was originally certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in December 1978. In 1984, when it was certified triple platinum, Nelson was the highest-grossing concert act in the United States. In 2002, the album was certified quintuple platinum, and it was later inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame class of 2015. (by wikipedia)

At the height of outlaw country, Willie Nelson pulled off perhaps the riskiest move of the entire bunch. He set aside originals, country, and folk and recorded Stardust, a collection of pop standards produced by Booker T. Jones. Well, it’s not entirely accurate to say that he put away country and folk, since these are highly idiosyncratic interpretations of “Georgia on My Mind,” “All of Me,” “Moonlight in Vermont,” and “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” blending pop, country, jazz, and folk in equal measures. It’s not that Willie makes these songs his own, it’s that he reimagines these songs in a way that nobody else could, and with his trusty touring band, he makes these versions indelible.

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It may be strange to think that this album, containing no originals from one of America’s greatest songwriters, is what made him a star, and it continues to be one of his most beloved records, but it’s appropriate, actually. Stardust showcases Nelson’s skills as a musician and his entire aesthetic — where there is nothing separating classic American musical forms, it can all be played together — perhaps better than any other album, which is why it was a sensation upon its release and grows stronger with each passing year. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Paul English (drums)
Chris Ethridge (bass)
Booker T. Jones (keyboards)
Rex Ludwick (drums)
Bobbie Nelson (piano)
Willie Nelson (vocals, guitar)
Jody Payne (guitar)
Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
Bee Spears (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. “Stardust (Carmichael/Parish) 3.53
02. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 4.20
03. Blue Skies (Berlin) 3.34
04. All Of Me (Simons/Marks) 3.54
05. Unchained Melody (North/Zaret) 3.50
06. September Song (Weill/Anderson) 4-35
07. On The Sunny Side Of The Street (McHugh/Fields) 2.36
08. Moonlight In Vermont (Suessdorf/Blackburn) 3.25
09. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore (Ellington/Russell) 2.33
10. Someone To Watch Over Me (G.Gershwin/I.Gershwin) 4.03
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11. Scarlet Ribbons (Danzig/Segal) 4.30
12. I Can See Clearly Now (Nash)  4.18

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Gustavo Santaolalla & Various Artists – Brokeback Mountain (OST) (2005)

FrontCover1What is most notable about the soundtrack to Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain is the original score by Argentinian music wizard Gustavo Santaolalla (producer of the grand Café Tacuba recordings and a songwriter in his own right, as evidenced by his two albums, Gas and Ronroco). His interludes and cues evoke the very landscape that Lee portrays in his film, but there are also some fine vocal performances by a star-studded cast of singers. Willie Nelson’s read of “He Was a Friend of Mine,” complete with squeezebox and layered acoustic guitars, is gorgeous. Emmylou Harris’ performance of Santaolalla and Bernie Taupin’s “A Love That Will Never Grow Old” is simple, spare, and poignant. The shuffling honky tonk ballad that Santaolalla wrote for Mary McBride, with its crying pedal steel, hits close to the bone and evokes Patsy Cline. Likewise, the hard-driving country of “I Will Never Let You Go,” written for Jackie Greene, Still01is tough and tender. Santaolalla’s cues, like the best of Ry Cooder’s film scores, touch the film’s scenery, move its narrative, and pricelessly frame it in time. Teddy Thompson and Rufus Wainwright team for a throwaway country-swing version of Roger Miller’s “King of the Road,” but Thompson does a fine job on the Santaolalla and Taupin tune “I Don’t Want to Say Goodbye,” which is as heartbroken a ballad as one is likely to hear. This is an utterly wonderful soundtrack that could have done without Linda Ronstadt’s version of Buddy Holly’s “It’s So Easy,” Steve Earle’s “The Devil’s Right Hand,” or even Wainwright’s “The Maker Makes,” but this is a small complaint. (by Thom Jurek)

Still02Tracklist:
01. Gustavo Santaolalla: Opening (Santaolalla) 1.31
02. Willie Nelson: He Was A Friend Of Mine (Dylan) 4.39
03. Gustavo Santaolalla: Brokeback Mountain 1 (Santaolalla) 2.32
04. Emmylou Harris: A Love That Will Never Grow Old (Santaolalla/Taupin) 3.20
05. Teddy Thompson & Rufus Wainwright: King Of The Road (Miller) 2.52
06. Gustavo Santaolalla: Snow (Santaolalla) 1.18
07. Steve Earle: The Devil’s Right Hand (Santaolalla(Earle) 2.34
08. Mary McBride: No One’s Gonna Love You Like Me (Santaolalla) 3.06
09. Gustavo Santaolalla: Brokeback Mountain 2 (Santaolalla) 1.59
10. Teddy Thompson: I Don’t Want To Say Goodbye (Santaolalla/Taupin) 3.12
11. Jackie Greene: I Will Never Let You Go (Santaolalla/Spillman) 1.55
12. Gustavo Santaolalla: Riding Horses (Santaolalla) 1.24
13. Gas Band: An Angel Went Up in Flames (Santaolalla) 2.36
14. Linda Ronstadt: It’s So Easy (Holly/Petty) 2.27
15. Gustavo Santaolalla: Brokeback Mountain 3 (Santaolalla) 2.14
16. Rufus Wainwright: The Maker Makes (Santaolalla/Wainwright) 3.50
17. Gustavo Santaolalla: The Wings (Santaolalla) 1.52

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Ray Charles – Genius & Friends (2005)

FrontCover1Atlantic/Rhino’s 2005 Genius & Friends is the end result of a project Ray Charles initiated a few months before his death in June 2004. According to James Austin’s liner notes, Charles called Austin in December of 2003, asking if he could find the masters to an unreleased duets record Ray recorded in 1997 and 1998. Austin found the tapes, but Charles was too sick to work on them, so after his passing — and after his final studio album, the duets record Genius Loves Company, became a number one hit in August of 2004 — Atlantic/Rhino decided to finish off the project, bringing in producer Phil Ramone to oversee the completion of the album. This included bringing in singers to record their parts, since apart from two tracks — a 1994 duet with Diana Ross on “Big Bad Love” and a live 1991 version of “Busted” with Willie Nelson (taken from the television special Ray Charles: 50 Years in Music) — these are all studio constructions, with vocalists duetting with a previously recorded Ray. While not quite the monstrosity it could have been — posthumous duets albums like this always bear an unsettling ghoulish undertow — Genius & Friends is also not a particularly good album either. This isn’t because the pairings are ill conceived — apart from the woefully outmatched American Idol winner Ruben Studdard on “Imagine” (which boasts perhaps Ray’s best vocal performance on this record), there’s nobody here who doesn’t hold his or her own, and Ramone has skillfully edited the new recordings with the existing tapes so it sounds like they were recorded at the same time, even if it rarely sounds as if the vocalists were in the same room together. Rather, the problem is that the productions are caught halfway between ’90s adult contemporary and modern neo-soul, sounding too slick and polished to really be memorable. It’s pleasant enough — and it’s top-loaded, too, with the duets with Angie Stone, Chris Isaak, and Mary J. Blige being among the best cuts — but it’s not as relaxed or appealing as Genius Loves Company, which had the feeling of being a real duets album. This feels like what it is — a professional studio creation. Not a terrible thing per se, but not something that makes for a good album, either.( by Stepen Thomas Erlewine)

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Tracklist:
01. Angie Stone:  All I Want to Do (McKinney/Walden) 4.00
02. Chris Isaak: You Are My Sunshine (Davis/Mitchell) 3.48
03. Mary J. Blige: It All Goes by So Fast (Hirsch/Levy) 5.07
04. Gladys Knight: You Were There (unknown) 3.41
05. The Harlem Gospel Singers / Ruben Studdard: Imagine (Lennon) 3.41
06. Leela James: Compared to What (McDaniels) 3.42
07. Diana Ross: Big Bad Love (Sample/Stephanie Tyrell/Steve Tyrell) 3.42
08. Idina Menzel: I Will Be There (Dakota/Walden) 4.43
09. George Michael: Blame It On The Sun (Wonder/Wright) 4.46
10. John Legend: Touch (McKinney/Walden) 4.40
11. Patti LaBelle / The Andraé Crouch Singers: Shout (Hilden/Walden) 5.10
12. Laura Pausini: Surrender To Love (unknown) 4.13
13. Willie Nelson: Busted (Howard) 2.32
14. Alicia Keys: America the Beautiful (Bates/Ward) 2.58

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