Various Artists – The Color Of Money (OST) (1986)

FrontCover1The Color of Money is a 1986 American drama film directed by Martin Scorsese from a screenplay by Richard Price, based on the 1984 novel of the same name by Walter Tevis. The film stars Paul Newman and Tom Cruise, with Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, Helen Shaver, and John Turturro in supporting roles. It features an original score by Robbie Robertson.

Newman won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance, his first Oscar win after eight nominations, seven of them for Best Actor.

The film continues the story of pool hustler and stakehorse Edward “Fast Eddie” Felson from Tevis’ first novel, The Hustler (1959), with Newman reprising his role from the 1961 film adaptation. It begins more than 25 years after the events of the previous film, with Eddie retired from the pool circuit. Although Tevis did author a screenplay, adapting the storyline from his novel, the filmmakers decided not to use it, instead crafting an entirely different story under Tevis’ title.

Eddie Felson is a former pool hustler turned successful liquor salesman. One night he meets Vincent Lauria, a young, charismatic pool player and video gamer who plays small-time nine-ball games while working as a sales clerk at a toy store. Eddie, who still stakes bets for players, persuades Vincent and girlfriend/manager Carmen to go on the road, where he can teach Vincent how to make much more money through hustling pool.

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With Eddie staking their bets, Vincent visits a series of billiard halls where Eddie tries to teach him that “pool excellence is not about excellent pool.” Although Carmen is a quick study, Vincent chafes at Eddie’s scams, which routinely require him to play well below his abilities. Eventually, Fast Eddie picks up a cue himself, and does well in several games, but is taken in by a pool shark named Amos. Humiliated, Eddie leaves Vincent and Carmen with enough money to make it to the championships in Atlantic City.

ColorOfMoney02Wearing new prescription eyeglasses, Eddie begins working out and practicing. He enters the 9-ball tournament in Atlantic City and, after several victories, finds himself facing off against a more world-wise Vincent. He beats Vincent, but later, when he is celebrating with girlfriend Janelle, Vincent arrives and informs Eddie that he intentionally lost in order to collect on a bet. He gives Eddie $8,000 as his “cut.” During his semi-final match against Kennedy, Eddie sees his reflection in the cue ball; disgruntled, he chooses to forfeit the game.

Out-hustled again, Eddie returns the money, saying that he wants to beat Vincent legitimately. The two set up a private match, where Eddie informs Vincent that if he doesn’t beat him now, he will in the future because “I’m back!” (by wikipedia)

Ex-Band songwriter/guitarist Robbie Robertson put together this soundtrack, which allowed him to collaborate with blues master Willie Dixon and jazz master Gil Evans, though it was his collaboration with Eric Clapton that produced the album’s hit song, “It’s in the Way That You Use It.” Also featured: Don Henley, Robert Palmer (three tracks), and B. B. King. (by William Ruhlmann)

Okay, here you´ll find a lot of rare tracks … and: this was the sound of the Eighties !

And “Werewolves Of London” was of course stealed/borrowed from Lynyrd Skynrd (“Sweet Home Alabama”).

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Tracklist:
01. Don Henley: Who Owns This Place? (Henley/Kortchmar/Souther) 4.48
02. Eric Clapton: It’s In The Way That You Use It (Clapton/Robertson) 3.56
03. Robert Palmer: Let Yourself In For It (Palmer) 5.18
04. Willie Dixon: Don’t Tell Me Nothin’ (Dixon) 4.43
05. Mark Knopfler: Two Brothers And A Stranger (Knopfler) 2.41
06. B.B. King: Standing On The Edge Of Love (Williams) 3.53
07. Robbie Robertson + Gil Evans: Modern Blues (Robertson) 2.55
08. Warren Zevon: Werewolves Of London (Marinell/Wachtel/Zevon) 3.21
09. Robert Palmer: My Baby’s In Love With Another Guy (Brightman/Lucie) 2.27
10. Robbie Robertson + Gil Evans: The Main Title (Robertson) 2.44

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Various Artists – FM (OST) (1978)

FrontCover1FM is the original AOR soundtrack to the 1978 film FM. In the United States, the album reached the Top Five of Billboard’s album chart and quickly earned a Platinum-certified disc. It reached 37 in the UK charts. The soundtrack also won the 1979 Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical.

QSKY radio station manager/program director Jeff Dugan (Michael Brandon) builds a large fan base by assembling a group of charismatic DJ personalities playing popular rock and roll. He soon finds that corporate management expects Jeff to use the station’s position atop the ratings to sell more advertising time. (Jeff Dugan is based loosely on Mike Herrington, the program director of Los Angeles radio station KMET while writer Sacks was working there.)

The conflict grows until sales manager Regis Lamar (Tom Tarpey) presents him with the chance to advertise for the U.S. Army using a series of cheesy radio ads. When Jeff refuses to endorse the contract, Regis takes the issue to upper management. Jeff is then ordered to run the ads as provided by the Army and on the schedule specified in the advertising contract. Rather than comply, Jeff quits his job.

All of the remaining DJs decide to take control of the station in a sort of lock-in/sit-in/protest. They get listeners to gather in the street outside the station as a sort of protest while the DJs play music without any commercials.

MoviePosterJeff Dugan wakes up to hear the DJs take control of the station. The crowd is already present when he arrives at the station. The DJs lift him up to the second story with a fire hose as they have already barricaded the front doors.

The lock-in lasts only until the police get an injunction to remove the staff. A tow truck rips off the front doors and the police enter the building. The DJs battle back using a fire hose and throwing tapes and other office objects at the police.

The battle is resolved when Jeff Dugan finds himself fighting a policeman outside on an overhang. Jeff saves the policeman from falling off and decides that fighting is the wrong thing to do. He calms the crowd and announces that the DJs are coming out.

Unknown to him, the company owner, Carl Billings (Norman Lloyd), has watched from the crowd as the events unfolded. He insists that the DJs stay in the station, fires his management staff responsible for the advertising conflict, and then joins the DJs inside the station.

The story unfolds across a background of concerts, broadcast music, appearances by various rock stars, and public appearances by the station DJs. A minor subtheme to the film is the competition between QSKY and another area radio station. The major event of that subtheme occurs when Jeff arranges to broadcast a live concert by Linda Ronstadt that is being sponsored by the competitor’s radio station.

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Another minor subtheme is the ongoing task of massaging egos of the various DJs to keep them happy and on the air.

Martin Mull appears in his feature film debut as a zoned-out record spinner. He plays Eric Swan, a libidinous disc jockey with eyes for everyone female. The character is self-centered, smarmy, quick tempered, and overbearingly insincere. During the course of the film, Swan beds a supposed girlfriend, encounters a female fan with a peculiar physical “gift”, and barricades himself in owing to a severe emotional breakdown due to his agent’s dropping him and his girlfriend’s leaving him, all within the confines of QSKY’s studio.

Also rounding out the cast are Cleavon Little, who plays the Prince of Darkness, QSKY’s overnight host (Little had previously played a disc jockey in the 1971 film, Vanishing Point); Eileen Brennan as ” Mother”, the 40-something nighttime DJ; Alex Karras as “Doc Holiday”, the midday DJ with the lowest ratings on the station who is eventually let go from the station; and Tom Tarpey as new sales manager Regis Lamar, the bane of the disk jockeys’ existence.

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In addition, the film includes live appearances by Tom Petty & REO Speedwagon and live performances by Linda Ronstadt & Jimmy Buffett. Steely Dan performed the title theme, which became a sizable hit. The Eagles, James Taylor, Bob Seger, Dan Fogelberg, Billy Joel, and Queen were featured on the Platinum-plus soundtrack album.

Rolling Stone magazine considered the music heavily biased towards musicians who had been managed by Irving Azoff, who was head of MCA Records at the time. Some reference books claim that the TV sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati was based on FM. The physical resemblance between Michael Brandon and WKRP lead actor Gary Sandy and the fact that their respective characters were both based upon KMET programming director Mikel Hunter may have contributed to this speculation. However, WKRP series creator Hugh Wilson asserts that the sitcom was already in development when the film came out. He also states that he was “scared to death” when the film came out, afraid that it would eclipse the CBS show, which made its debut in September 1978. Wilson was relieved when FM came and went from theaters quickly. (by wikipedia)

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Appropriately, the soundtrack for the 1978 movie FM feels like a radio play list of the era, collecting songs from Joe Walsh, Randy Meisner, Boz Scaggs, and other ’70s radio staples. Steely Dan’s title track, Queen’s “We Will Rock You,” Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band’s “Night Moves,” Billy Joel’s “Just The Way You Are,” and Boston’s “More Than a Feeling” are some of the highlights from this double-disc set, which also includes tracks from Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, Foreigner, and Linda Ronstadt, all of whom also appeared in the film. Though FM itself wasn’t exactly a box-office smash, its soundtrack is a surprisingly durable and entertaining collection of classic rock that is arguably better than many of the ’70s rock compilations available today. (by Heather Phares)

In other words: If you like to celebrate a Seventies party … use this soundtrack and you can´t do wrong !

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Tracklist:
01. Steely Dan: FM (Becker/Fagen)  4:52
02.  Bob Seger: Night Moves (Seger) 3:27
03. Steve Miller Band: Fly Like an Eagle (Miller) 3:04
04. Foreigner:  Cold As Ice (Gramm/Jones) 3:20
05. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers: Breakdown (Petty)  2:44
06. Randy Meisner: Bad Man (Frey /Souther)  2:38
07. Eagles: Life in the Fast Lane (Frey/Henley/Walsh) 4:46
08. Steely Dan: Do It Again (Becker/Fagen) 5:54
09. Boz Scaggs: Lido Shuffle (Paich/Scaggs) 3:42
10. Boston: More Than a Feeling (Scholz) 4:45
11. Linda Ronstadt: Tumbling Dice (Jagger/Richards  4:51
12. Linda Ronstadt: Poor, Poor Pitiful Me (Zevon/Ronstadt) 4:15
13. Jimmy Buffett: Livingston Saturday Night (Buffett)  3:10
14. Dan Fogelberg: There’s A Place In The World For A Gambler (Fogelberg) 5:41
15. Billy Joel: Just the Way You Are (Joel) 4:49
16. The Doobie Brothers: It Keeps You Runnin’ (McDonald)  4:13
17- James Taylor:  Your Smiling Face (Taylor) 2:43
18. Joe Walsh: Life’s Been Good (Walsh) 8:05
19. Queen: We Will Rock You (May) 2:04
20. Steely Dan: FM (Reprise) (Becker/Fagen) 2:54

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This is another item from the great greygoose collection !
Thanks a lot !

Strange Fruit – Still Crazy (OST) (1998)

FrontCover1Still Crazy is a 1998 British comedy film about a fictional 1970s rock band named “Strange Fruit”, who, after being split up for two decades, are persuaded to get back together to perform at a reunion of the same concert venue where they played their last gig. The film focuses on the personal lives of the band members and those closest to them, and their individual experiences with approaching middle-age and the success that eluded them.

It was nominated for two Golden Globes in 1999.

 

The band Strange Fruit performs at the 1977 Wisbech Rock Festival. Hughie Case tells how, due to the pursuit of “fame, fortune and fornication” – and the drug overdose of their original singer, Keith Lovell – this is their last performance. After various issues, the band prematurely ends their performance, frustrated over competing egos and various members’ lack of self-control.

Twenty years later, a stranger who turns out to be the son of the founder of The Wisbech Rock Festival recognises keyboardist Tony Costello and convinces him to reunite the band for a special anniversary of the event. Tony quickly tracks down Karen Knowles, the band’s original runaround-girl. Initially reluctant, she is inspired to return to the band after finding memorabilia. She insists on being the band’s manager, and Tony Roadieagrees. Gradually, Karen and Tony track down the original members: bassist Les Wickes, who has a family and works as a roofer; drummer David “Beano” Baggot, who is working at a nursery and is on the run from the Inland Revenue; and lead singer Ray Simms, who, after years of drug and alcohol abuse, is now completely sober. Though he claims to be working on a solo album, Simms has not released anything in almost ten years.

The band meets up at the Red Lion pub to discuss the reunion. Everyone expects Brian Lovell, the band’s lead guitarist, to be there. Karen says she was unable to find him but learned he donated away all his royalties to charity; everyone assumes he is dead. Their roadie, Hughie, turns up during their first rehearsal to resume his original role. Ray insists on playing guitar but is convinced to concentrate on singing. They find a replacement for Brian in young Luke Shand, a talented guitarist who remains blissfully unaware of the band’s internal tensions.

Following a warm up tour of Europe, Karen negotiates for the rights to their back catalogue. Their initial performances are poorly received. Les, Beano, and Hughie hold little hope for the band, believing Keith and Brian the main talent. Tony makes advances on Karen, but she resists due to her attachment to Brian. At one of their gigs, Ray’s over-the-top ideas backfire, and Les and Ray walk off the stage. Following a confrontation with Les, Ray has a nervous breakdown, exacerbated by turning 50. Ray leaves the gig, buys drugs, and falls into a canal. Karen’s daughter rescues him, and Ray’s wife blames Karen for his troubles. Following an angry reaction from the townspeople over the volume levels, the band escape to their bus and flee the town.

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Les and Ray make up, and Ray says he “received a positive message” from Brian’s ghost. The bus breaks down, and Karen confronts the band about their lack of confidence. When the band meet a girl wearing a Strange Fruit tour T-shirt that belonged to her father, they take it as another positive omen. The next few shows go without incident and are well-received; the band becomes slightly more optimistic. Following a record deal, the band records a new song written and sung by Les, which Ray had never previously allowed. However, after watching a previously-taped drunken TV interview in which Les and Beano imply that the band was much better with Keith and Brian, Ray breaks down again and quits.

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As the band members return to their former lives, Karen and Claire visit Keith’s grave to pay their respects. They find a note that quotes “The Flame Still Burns”, a tribute to Keith written by Brian. Hughie is then confronted by Karen, and reluctantly admits he knows Brian is alive. Karen and Tony find Brian in a psychiatric hospital. He explains he gave up his material possessions to sever himself from his previous life. When he agrees to rejoin the band, the others follow. However, at a pre-show press conference, hostile questions cause Brian to walk out. Everyone but Luke follows, and Luke chastises the journalists. Visibly shaken, Brian decides to back out of the show but gives his blessing.

Beano nearly misses the set when a stalker-groupie demands sex. The band starts their set with the same song with which they opened up the last Wisbech Festival. Though Ray’s confidence is shaken, Tony saves him by playing “The Flame Still Burns”. Brian is pleased to hear the band playing the song, which helps him finally overcome his demons and joins the band onstage to play an inspiring guitar solo, much to the surprise and delight of everyone. (by wikipedia)

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Twenty years after Strange Fruit’s highly publicized breakup in 1978 at the Wisbech open-air festival, the band-keyboardist Tony, who was working as a condom salesman in Ibiza; bassist Les, now a roofer in the frozen North of England; drummer Beano, leading a reclusive existence in his mother’s garden; ultra-vain lead singer Ray, living beyond his means with his second Swedish wife; and Brian, the fragile lead guitarist who is currently MIA-is persuaded to get back together for a reunion concert, Wisbech 1998. STILL CRAZY charts their increasingly desperate efforts to recapture the magic, the music, the lost opportunities and the missed performances of their prime. (by rottentomatoes.com)

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And here´s the sound of this great movie … :

The film Still Crazy is the story of the fictional ’70s British rock band Strange Fruit. After showing their breakup in the late ’70s, the movie follows the groups attempt to reunite in the late ’90s. An obvious spoof of many bands from that era currently on the oldies circuit, it gave some good insight into how difficult it is for these bands to recapture their former glory. While the film was only a modest success, this 14-track album manages to recreate the style and at the same time pay tribute to stadium rock bands like Styx, Blue Oyster Cult, Grand Funk Railroad, and even Lynyrd Skynyrd.

The opening song “Flame Still Burns” was delivered at a pivotal moment in the film when the group stood stone faced in front of a festival crowd of 50 thousand. It is a sprawling eight-minute “Free Bird”-esque rock anthem with a dazzling final guitar solo. The track, which is the films strongest, captures the essence of this genre and the rest of the album struggles to keep up. There are a few decent tracks including the gritty “Dirty Town” and the operatic “Scream Freedom,” both of which hold up rather well when disassociated from the film. Even with a few weak songs this album serves as a decent tribute to the misunderstood beauty of ’70s stadium rock. (by Curtis Zimmermann)

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Great soundtrack, brilliant movie. Bill Nighy was superb in his role as the ageing vocalist and carries off the Strange Fruit material with surprising ease, especially on the excellent ‘All Over The World’ & ‘Scream Freedom’. I would definately check out the movie first – you will enjoy this excellent soundtrack all the more. (by jez)

Chris Difford of Squeeze fame won an Ivor Novello award for his lyrics. Here´s one of the finest songs from this album:

I had friends against the war
By things they did so well yesterday
They lived their lives without fortune or thrill
With nothing very much to say
Always standing in the same old lines
Moving sideways to the march of time

What might have been
What might have been
A portrait of my life
No fool would say
You live today
Without a will to survive

Cornered now, what can I do
I’m trapped by what might have been
The great big ‘if’ that hangs around my neck
Has played its part in all my dreams
Always making the bad seem worse
Living my life reversed

Another great song is “All Over The World”:

“All over the world tonight
Feet are hittin’ the ground
The day is following night
The strong are leadin’

All over the world tonight
Clocks are spinning around
We’re putting teh world to right
The weak are dreamin’

Crossing borders of innocence
Breaking down the walls of time
All over the world
It’s a happening
It’s happening tonight

All over the world
All over the world

We’ll slay the dragon
It has to happen
Love is makin’
The future’s breakin’

All over the world
Tonight

All over the world tonight
Love is always the verb
When the moments have gone
From our creation

All over the world tonight
The young fires have burnt
And now the heat is on
With this frustration

All over the world
All over the world

We’ll slay the dragon
It has to happen
Love is makin’
The future’s breakin’

All over the world
Tonight

All over the world tonight
You’re gonna lose control
You leave by satellite
For deep devotion

Crossing borders of innocence
We’re breaking down the walls of time
All over the world
It’s happening
Tonight

 

And then the acoustic version of “Brian’s Theme” and of course “The Flame Still Burns” (written my Mick Jones from Spooky Tooth” and “Foreigner”), a monster of song ! And I guess, this is the theme of my life !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Steve Donnelly (guitar)
Michael Lee (drums, percussion)
Jimmy Nail (vocals)
Morgan Nichols (organ)
Bill Nighy (vocals)
Guy Pratt (bass)
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Paul Carrack (organ on 05.)
Alan Dunn (accordion on 11.)
Brian Gulland (tuba on 06.)
Simon Hale (piano on 13.)
Charlie Jones (bass on 01.)
Clive Langer (guitar on 02.)
Bob Loveday (mandolin, violin on 11.)
Bernie Marsden (guitar on 11.)
Hans Matheson (guitar, vocals on 08.)
Ralph McTell (guitar on 06.)
Steve Nieve (keyboards on 01., 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. The Flame Still Burns (Jones/Frederiksen/Difford) 7.57
02. All Over The World (Jones/Frederiksen/Difford) 3.40
03. What Might Have Been (Ballard/Difford) 4.19
04. Brian’s Theme (Acoustic) (Langer) 1.32
05. Dirty Town (Lynne/La Frenais) 4.30
06. Stealin’ (Traditional) 2.25
07. Black Moon (Pratt/Vyse/Difford) 2.31
08. Live For Today (C. Langer)
09. Bird On A Wire (Jones/Frederiksen/Difford) 3.48
10. Ibiza Theme (C. Langer)2.03
11. Scream Freedom (Jones/Frederiksen/Difford) 4.17
12. A Woman Like That (Lynne/Vela/La Frenais) 3.16
13. Dangerous Things (Langer/Difford) 4.07
14. Brian’s Theme (Reprise) – Steve Donnelly – (C. Langer)

 

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I live a life that’s surreal
Where all that I feel I am learning
Oh life, has been turned on the lathe
Reshaped with a flame that’s still burning
And in time, it’s all a sweet mystery
When you shake the trees of temptation
Yeah and I, I know the fear and the cost
Of a paradise lost in frustration
And the flame still burns
It’s there in my soul for that unfinished goal
And the flame still burns
From a glimmer back then
It lights up again in my life
In my life, yeah
I, I want my thoughts to be heard
The unspoken words of my wisdom
Today, as the light starts to flow
Tomorrow who knows who will listen
But my life has no language in love
No word from above is appearing
Oh the time, in time there’s a fire that’s stoked
With a reason of hope and believing

 

And here´s a great  version of “The Flame Still Burns” by Mick Jones & Foreigner

Simon & Garfunkel/Dave Grusin – The Graduate (OST) (1968)

FrontCover1The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.

Although the album features two versions of the acclaimed “Mrs. Robinson”, neither is the full version as featured on Bookends. The first is an instrumental, while the second is abbreviated, tapering off as it does in the film. However, the other major song of the album, “The Sound of Silence” is used three times in the film (by wikipedia)

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The soundtrack to Mike Nichols’ The Graduate remains a key musical document of the late ’60s, although truth be told, its impact was much less artistic than commercial (and, for that matter, more negative than positive). With the exception of its centerpiece track, the elegiac and oft-quoted “Mrs. Robinson” — which only appears here as a pair of fragments — the Simon & Garfunkel songs that comprise much of the record (a series of Dave Grusin instrumentals round it out) appeared on the duo’s two preceding LPs; Nichols’ masterstroke was to transplant those songs into his film, where they not only meshed perfectly with the story’s themes of youthful rebellion and alienation (and the inner life of the central character, Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock) but also heralded a new era in movie music centered around the appropriation of past pop hits, a marketing gimmick that grew exponentially in the years to follow.

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The Graduate soundtrack, then, merits the dubious honor of being the earliest and one of the most successful Hollywood repackagings of “found” pop songs, a formula essentially based around coercing fans to purchase soundtrack albums filled with material they already own in order to acquire the occasional new track or two.

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The album began its life because of Nichols’ enthusiasm for the duo’s music, and Columbia Records chief Clive Davis’ ability to persuade the pair of the importance of a soundtrack LP. Davis turned the actual making of the album over to producer Teo Macero, who approached it with skepticism — Paul Simon and Mike Nichols had discovered that they really weren’t on the same page, with Nichols rejecting “Overs” and “Punky’s Dilemma,” songs that ended up as highlights of the Bookends album, issued two months after The Graduate soundtrack.

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Thus, there wasn’t enough Simon & Garfunkel material to fill even one LP side, and only about eight minutes of that were “new” recordings, and barely a quarter of that (the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments) new song material. And there also wasn’t enough of David Grusin’s instrumental music (none of which meshed with the duo’s work) for an album. Macero combined this material into a musically awkward LP that somehow did its job — which, in Davis’ eyes, was to introduce Simon & Garfunkel’s music to the parents of their existing audience (topping the charts in the bargain, and turning Grusin’s “Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha” into a favorite of easy listening stations).

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Fans of Simon & Garfunkel likely felt cheated by the presence of the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments, as well as repeats of the 1966-vintage “The Sound of Silence” and “April Come She Will,” and an edited extension of “Scarborough Fair/Canticle.” But there were two curiosities for the completist — a high-wattage, edited rendition of “The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine” (in a style seemingly parodying the sound of Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited); and a gentle, subdued acoustic reprise of “The Sound of Silence,” which was possibly the best studio rendition the duo ever. (by Bruce Eder)

But we should not forget, that the soundtrack, written by Dave Grusin is a great one … Listen to “A Great Effect” ..  a wonderful jazz tune.

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Personnel:
Art Garfunkel (vocals)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
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Dave Grusin & orchestra (additional music)

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Tracklist:
01. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.07
02. The Singleman Party Foxtrot (Grusin) 2.53
03. Mrs. Robinson (Version 1) (Simon) 1.15
04. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha (Grusin) 2:53
05. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Interlude) (Traditional) 1.42
06. On The Strip (Grusin) 2.01
07. April Come She Will (Simon) 1.50
08. The Folks (Grusin) 2.28
09. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Traditional) 6.22
10. A Great Effect (Grusin) 4.07
11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (Simon) 1-46
12. Whew (Grusin) 2.12
13. Mrs. Robinson (Version 2) (Simon) 1.13
14. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.06

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Happy Birthday !

Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937)

Various Artists – The Twilight Saga – New Moon (OST) (2009)

FrontCover1The Twilight Saga: New Moon (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) is the official soundtrack for the 2009 film The Twilight Saga: New Moon. The score for New Moon was composed by Alexandre Desplat while the rest of the soundtrack was chosen by music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas, who also produced the Twilight soundtrack. The New Moon – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack album was released on October 16, 2009[3] by Patsavas’ Chop Shop label, in conjunction with Atlantic Records.

 
New Moon’s soundtrack comprises songs that are all original and exclusive to the soundtrack and are performed by various indie rock and alternative rock artists. New Moon director Chris Weitz stated that the soundtrack would feature songs from Radiohead, Muse, and Band of Skulls. Death Cab for Cutie contributed the soundtrack’s lead single, a song written specifically for the film called “Meet Me on the Equinox”, which debuted September 13 during the MTV Video Music Awards Bassist Nick Harmer says, “We wrote ‘Meet Me On the Equinox’ to reflect the celestial themes and motifs that run throughout the Twilight series and we wanted to capture that desperate feeling of endings and beginnings that so strongly affect the main characters.”[6] The music video for “Meet Me on the Equinox” premiered on October 7, 2009 and includes clips from the movie.[7] The English rock band Muse contributed a remix of their song “I Belong to You”, which appears in its original form on their 2009 album The Resistance. St. Vincent collaborated with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon to create a song called “Rosyln”. When describing the song, she said, “[Justin] sings in his beautiful falsetto and I’m actually singing very, very low… I think there’s something vampirey and creepy about the two of us singing together. It’s a simple, stripped-down kind of song.” The soundtrack originally had a release date of October 20, 2009, but the date was moved up four days to October 16 due to “overwhelming and unprecedented demand”. (by wikipedia)

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After Twilight became a world-wide hit, the film series based on Stephenie Meyer’s series of vampire romance books got a major upgrade. More time, effort, and money were poured into the second film, New Moon, and nowhere is this clearer than the film’s soundtrack. New Moon’s music is darker, more sophisticated, and much more indie-friendly than its predecessor’s soundtrack, and features more of the artists Meyer credits for inspiring her writing. One is Muse, whose “I Belong to You (New Moon Remix)” is so dramatic that it’s easy to hear how the band inspired Meyer’s angst-filled love triangle between the clumsy yet somehow irresistible Bella Swan, her vampire boyfriend Edward Cullen and her best friend (and werewolf) Jacob Black. Meyer also cites Radiohead as a big influence, and Thom Yorke’s previously unreleased “Hearing Damage” is New Moon’s main attraction.

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Drifting in on buzzing synth bass, the song builds to luminous, ghostly heights that make it one of the album’s highlights. However, it’s not the only one: Death Cab for Cutie’s “Meet Me on the Equinox” is more brooding and rock-tinged than the band’s usual approach, but it fits in beautifully with New Moon’s sullen mood, while the close harmonies and piano on the Killers’ “White Demon Love Song” inject some much-needed drama. Indeed, despite the fact that this soundtrack is more musically satisfying, and certainly more star-studded than the first film’s, Twilight felt more like the world Meyer created in her books — melodramatic, earnest, definitely not reeking of indie rock cool. Even if nothing here nails that vibe the way that Paramore’s “Decode” did, Lykke Li’s “Possibility” and Anya Marina’s “Satellite Heart” still offer winsome indie folk backgrounds for Bella’s moping. Despite a few upbeat moments that stick out like a thumb that isn’t sore, songs like Grizzly Bear and Victoria Legrand’s “Slow Life,” Editors’ “No Sound But the Wind,” and Bon Iver and St. Vincent’s lovely, truly odd “Roslyn” are morose enough for die-hard Twilight fans and stylish enough to please the most discerning music snobs. (by Heather Phares)

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Tracklist:
01. Death Cab for Cutie: Meet Me on the Equinox  3.41
02. Band of Skulls: Friends 3.03
03. Thom Yorke: Hearing Damage  5.04
04. Lykke Li: Possibility 5:06
05. The Killers: A White Demon Love Song 3:34
06. Anya Marina: Satellite Heart 3:33
07. Muse: I Belong to You [New Moon Remix] 3:12
08. Bon Iver and St. Vincent Bella: Roslyn 4:49
09. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: Done All Wrong 2:49
10. Hurricane Bells: Monsters 3:16
11. Sea Wolf: The Violet Hour 3:32
12. OK Go: Shooting the Moon 3:18
13. Grizzly Bear featuring Victoria Legrand: Slow Life 4:21
14. Editors: No Sound But the Wind 3:48
15. Alexandre Desplat: New Moon (The Meadow) 4:09

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Various Artists – Boys On The Side (OST) (1995)

FrontCover1Boys on the Side is a 1995 American comedy-drama film directed by Herbert Ross (in his final film as a director). It stars Whoopi Goldberg, Drew Barrymore and Mary-Louise Parker as three friends on a cross-country road trip. The screenplay was written by Don Roos.

 

Three unique women embark on a cross-country road trip: Jane (Whoopi Goldberg), a lesbian lounge singer in search of a new life after breaking up with her girlfriend and getting fired; Holly (Drew Barrymore), a pregnant girl who just wants to escape her brutal boyfriend; and Robin (Mary-Louise Parker), an uptight real estate agent who has her own secrets (namely being infected with HIV).

Robin puts an ad in the newspaper that she is looking for a traveling companion to accompany her on a cross country trip to California. Jane answers the ad and agrees to join Robin after her car gets towed during their meeting. Jane and Robin leave New York City and travel through Pittsburgh to take Jane’s friend Holly to lunch. They stumble across a knock out-fight between Holly and her abusive boyfriend, Nick, over some missing drugs.

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They leave him there bound to a chair with tape after Holly hits him in the head with a bat to stop him from attacking Jane. Later, he frees himself from the chair, stumbles across the floor, falls and hits his head on the bat and dies. The three unlikely travelers then form a special friendship on their journey which sees them through ultimately tragic times.

After discovering that Nick is dead and that Holly is pregnant, the three women decide to continue across country and end up in Tucson, Arizona when Robin has to be hospitalized. They decide to stay in Tucson, hoping to start a new life. However, Jane has a secret crush on Robin, Holly falls in love with and eventually confesses to a local police officer named Abe Lincoln (Matthew McConaughey), and Robin finds the courage to face her impending death.

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Shortly after Jane and Robin have a falling out over Jane telling a friendly bartender (James Remar) who was interested in Robin that she has HIV, Holly is arrested by Abe. She is taken back to Pittsburgh to face the consequences of her actions. The return to Pittsburgh involves Robin and Jane making peace with each other on the courthouse’s “Bridge of Sighs” while the Pittsburgh Police process Holly.

A few months pass, in Tucson, Holly is free and with Abe and her daughter, which is celebration to all family and friends. Robin is now farther along with AIDS and is not expected to live much longer. The party asks Robin to sing the Roy Orbison song “You Got It” as she performed that song in a Star Search contest; though weak, she manages to sing with Jane backing her singing. In the final scene, Robin has died from AIDS as her wheelchair is now empty, Holly and Abe plan to stay in Arizona and become a family, while Jane hits the road to finally seek a life of her own.

The film’s soundtrack album is made up entirely of contributions from female pop/rock artists, including lesbian icons Melissa Etheridge (“I Take You With Me”), Joan Armatrading (“Willow”) and the Indigo Girls (“Power of Two”). Previous hit singles by Annie Lennox (“Why”) and The Cranberries (“Dreams”) are also included, as are new recordings by Sheryl Crow, Sarah McLachlan, Stevie Nicks and The Pretenders among others. The hit single from the movie soundtrack was Bonnie Raitt’s cover of the Roy Orbison hit “You Got It”, which peaked at #34 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. (by wikipedia)

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Boys on the Side is a collection of mainstream ’90s rock dominated by female artists, which is appropriate for the feminist nature of the film. Not all of the music is first-rate, but much of it is, particularly Bonnie Raitt’s cover of Roy Orbison’s “You Got It.” Fans of the film will find much to enjoy here, but the record doesn’t quite hold together as an individual entity. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

This is just such an amazingly wonderful collection of beautiful songs, from the movie of the same title. This CD is like a warm, happy, occasionally sad, emotional journey through the eyes & hearts of some really talented women! I’m going to stockpile some more copies of this CD, as I never want to be without it! (by Mary Jo Ashleyon)

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This has always been one of my favorite CDs, given the assortment of some of the best tracks of a series of female artists. Recently on a trip out west I inadvertently left the CD playing when my daughter (4th grade) got in the car–it is now her favorite album as well, and I don’t have to listen to the teeny bop music she usually pleads for–what a relief!!
I had never heard many of these artists before, given that I stopped hearing new artists about when my daughter was born and Raffi took over our lives, and it was such a delight to discover so much talent–it really sent me out to get acquainted with more of their music on their own individual albums. (by an Amazon customer)

This is a strong album for strong women … And I love strong women …

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Tracklist:
01. Bonnie Raitt: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.25
02. Melissa Etheridge: I Take You With Me (Etheridge) 4.48
03. Sheryl Crow: Keep On Growing (Clapton/Whitlock) 5.24
04. Indigo Girls: Power Of Two (Saliers) 5.22
05. Stevie Nicks:  Somebody Stand By Me (Crow/Wolfe) 5.05
06. The Pretenders: Everyday Is Like Sunday (Morrissey/Street) 3.41
07. The Cranberries; Dreams (Hogan/O’Riordan) 4.30
08. Annie Lennox: Why (Lennox) 4.53
09. Sarah McLachlan: Ol’ 55 (Waits) 4.11
10. Joan Armatrading: Willow (Armatrading) 4.01
11. Jonell Mosser: Crossroads (Johnson) 2.49
12. Whoopi Goldberg: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.08
13. Bonnie Raitt: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.25

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Angelo Badalamenti – Music From Twin Peaks (OST) (1990)

FrontCover1The music of the American television series Twin Peaks, and its 1992 sequel film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, was composed by Angelo Badalamenti. Twin Peaks’ co-creator David Lynch wrote lyrics for five songs used throughout the series—including “Falling”, “The Nightingale”, “Into the Night”, “Just You” and “Sycamore Trees”—and three songs featured in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, including “A Real Indication”, “Questions in a World of Blue” and “The Black Dog Runs at Night.” Julee Cruise, who made cameo appearances in both the series and film, provided vocals for four of Lynch’s and Badalamenti’s collaborations, and jazz vocalist Jimmy Scott performed on “Sycamore Trees.” Three of the series actors, James Marshall, Lara Flynn Boyle and Sheryl Lee, provided vocals for “Just You.”

Badalamenti’s compositions have been released on three soundtrack albums: Soundtrack from Twin Peaks (1990), Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) and Twin Peaks Music: Season Two Music and More (2007). Starting in March 2011, David Lynch began distributing The Twin Peaks Archive, a collection of previously unreleased and unused songs on his official web site for digital download. In total, 215 songs were made available for download.

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Twin Peaks’ music has received widespread critical acclaim. The Guardian has said that the original soundtrack “still marks the summit of TV Soundtracks” and Allmusic reviewer Stephen Eddins has referred to it as “a model of film music ideally matched to the images and actions it underscores.” The main theme song to Twin Peaks, composed by Badalamenti, also received a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance at the 1991 Grammy Awards.

All the songs from the album were written by Angelo Badalamenti, who received the 1991 Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “Twin Peaks Theme”. Most of the songs are instrumental pieces, but three songs that contain lyrics were written by David Lynch. These three songs are available on the singer Julee Cruise’s album Floating into the Night. Cruise’s album also contains songs that were used in the series, but are not included in any soundtrack release. (by wikipedia)

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Composer Angelo Badalamenti (Cousins) set the tone for David Lynch’s bizarre television soap with a haunting theme created from electric piano, synthetic strings, and the twangiest guitar this side of Duane Eddy. The love theme, appropriately enough, sounds like a funeral march. (The series’ central character was found dead at the beginning of the first episode.) The rest of the music, instantly recognizable to anyone who saw even one episode of the series, borders on fever-dream jazz. Lynch favorite Julee Cruise sings the only three vocal songs. The music from Twin Peaks is dark, cloying, and obsessive — and one of the best scores ever written for television. (by Brian Mansfield)

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And yes … I´m a real fan of “Twin Peaks” … till today and this soundtrack is one of the finest soundtracks ever !

Listen to the Magic “Twin Peaks Theme 2 or to “Dance Of The Dream Man” and you´ll know, what I mean !

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Personnel:
Angelo Badalamenti (piano, synthesizer)
Vinnie Bell (guitar)
Julee Cruise (vocals on 04, 07. + 11.)
Eddie Daniels (flute, clarinet)
Eddie Dixon (guitar)
Kinny Landrum (Synthesizer)
Al Regni (saxophone, clarinet, flute)
Grady Tate (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Twin Peaks Theme (Instrumental) 5.10
02. Laura Palmer’s Theme (Instrumental) 4.52
03. Audrey’s Dance (Instrumental) 5.17
04. The Nightingale (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.56
05. Freshly Squeezed (Instrumental) 3.48
06. The Bookhouse Boys (Instrumental) 3.29
07. Into The Night (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.44
08. Night Life In Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 3.27
09. Dance Of The Dream Man (Instrumental) 3.41
10. Love Theme From Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 5.04
11. Falling (vocal by Julee Cruise) 5.21

All music composed by Angelo Badalamenti
All lyrics by David Lynch

 

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