Neil Diamond – The Jazz Singer (OST) (1980)

FrontCover1Neil Leslie Diamond (born January 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. He has sold more than 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling musicians of all time. He has had ten No. 1 singles on the Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts: “Cracklin’ Rosie”, “Song Sung Blue”, “Longfellow Serenade”, “I’ve Been This Way Before”, “If You Know What I Mean”, “Desirée”, “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers”, “America”, “Yesterday’s Songs”, and “Heartlight”. 38 songs by Diamond have featured in the Top 10 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary charts.

Diamond was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1984 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011, and he received the Sammy Cahn Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000. In 2011, he was an honoree at the Kennedy Center Honors, and he received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018.

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The Jazz Singer is an album by Neil Diamond from 1980, which served as the soundtrack album to the 1980 remake of the film The Jazz Singer. The soundtrack was released in November 1980 originally on Capitol Records, instead of his then-usual Columbia Records, because the film was produced by EMI Films, owned by the parent company of the label for which the soundtrack was released. The soundtrack was re-released in February 1996 on Columbia Records in the United States and Sony elsewhere. After Diamond signed with Capitol Records, this album was reissued by Capitol globally in 2014.

The film’s reviews were negative, earning Diamond the first Razzie for Worst Actor at the 1st Golden Raspberry Awards, but made a modest profit at the box office, grossing almost double its budget. However, its soundtrack was a huge success and became Neil Diamond’s biggest selling album in the United States, selling over 5 million copies there and reaching #3 on the pop albums chart. This would mark the second time a Neil Diamond soundtrack outperformed the movie it came from (after Jonathan Livingston Seagull). Three songs from the album became top ten hits on the Billboard Hot 100, with “Love on the Rocks”, “Hello Again” and “America” reaching Nos. 2, 6, and 8, respectively. (wikipedia)

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Neil Diamond’s 1980 screen turn as a charismatic singer torn between Jewish tradition and pop music stardom spawned this phenomenally successful soundtrack album — six million copies and counting. Diamond’s 21st century resurgence as a walking item of kitsch has sparked renewed interest in the bombastic melting-pot jam “America,” as well as his signature late-career ballad “Hello Again.” In addition, the lite FM favorite “Love on the Rocks” is classic, raw-throated Neil. But beyond these notables, The Jazz Singer is an album of passable pop songs that stand on the edge of disco and in the grip of melodrama. The hyper “You Baby” is dressed up with an audio clip marking the film’s embarrassing black face sequence, while the album’s midsection sags with songs that shine like Sunset Strip billboards, yet lack any real substance.

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Swelling strings and lovely lyrics abound, but it all seems directionless, as if Diamond’s just going through the motions. Similarly, Jewish traditionals like “Kol Nidre/My Name is Yussel” are important as thematic elements. But removed from the film and in the context of open-collared, glitzy numbers like “Hey Louise,” their reverence is off-putting. As it’s aged, The Jazz Singer has come to mark the moment when Diamond fully embraced his soft rock audience and completely turned his back on the ambition and spine-tingling vocal presence of his early career. That decision certainly proved to be an economic winner, but it ignored the fact that his most resonant performances really tear into a song with true mirth. The Jazz Singer’s big hits have this quality — a fact not lost on a new generation of listeners who revel in Diamond’s powerful voice and showmanship. But the album’s bulk is as wooden as Neil’s acting. (by Johnny Loftus)

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Personnel:
Richard Bennett (guitar)
Vince Charles (percussion)
Neil Diamond (vocals, guitar)
King Errisson (percussion)
Tom Hensley (keyboards)
Dennis St. John (drums)
Alan Lindgren (synthesizers, piano)
Reinie Press (bass)
Doug Rhone (guitar, background vocals)
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background vocals:
Donny Gerard – Marilyn O’Brien – Linda Press – H.L. Voelker – Luther Waters – Oren Waters
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choir:
Timothy Allan Bullara – Jeremy C. Lipton – Dale D. Morich – Yoav Steven Paskowitz – Boyd H. Schlaefer – Mark H. Stevens – David Teisher – James Gregory Wilburn

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Tracklist:
01. America (Diamond) 4.17
02. Adon Olom (Traditional) 0.33
03. You Baby (Diamond) 2.59
04. Love On The Rocks (Diamond/Bécaud) 3.38
05. Amazed And Confused (Diamond/Bennett) 2.53
06. On The Robert E. Lee (Diamond/Bécaud) 2.03
07. Summerlove (Diamond/Bécaud) 3.17
08. Hello Again (Diamond/Lindgren) 4.03
09. Acapulco (Diamond/Rhone) 2.49
10. Hey Louise (Diamond/Bécaud) 2.59
11. Songs Of Life (Diamond/Bécaud) 3.33
12. Jerusalem (Diamond) 3.04
13. Kol Nidre/My Name Is Yussel (Traditional) 1.38
14. America (Reprise) (Diamond) 2.20

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Ennio Morricone – Once Upon A Time In The West (Extended Version) (OST) (1972)

FrontCover1Ennio Morricone (10 November 1928 – 6 July 2020) was an Italian composer, orchestrator, conductor, and trumpet player who wrote music in a wide range of styles. Morricone composed over 400 scores for cinema and television, as well as over 100 classical works. His score to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) is considered one of the most influential soundtracks in history[2] and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[3] His filmography includes over 70 award-winning films, all Sergio Leone’s films since A Fistful of Dollars, all Giuseppe Tornatore’s films since Cinema Paradiso, The Battle of Algiers, Dario Argento’s Animal Trilogy, 1900, Exorcist II, Days of Heaven, several major films in French cinema, in particular the comedy trilogy La Cage aux Folles I, II, III and Le Professionnel, as well as The Thing, Once Upon A Time In America, The Mission, The Untouchables, Mission to Mars, Bugsy, Disclosure, In the Line of Fire, Bulworth, Ripley’s Game and The Hateful Eight.

After playing the trumpet in jazz bands in the 1940s, he became a studio arranger for RCA Victor and in 1955 started ghost writing for film and theatre. Throughout his career, he composed music for artists such as Paul Anka, Mina, Milva, Zucchero and Andrea Bocelli. From 1960 to 1975, Morricone gained international fame for composing music for Westerns and—with an estimated 10 million copies sold—Once Upon a Time in the West is one of the best-selling scores worldwide. From 1966 to 1980, he was a main member of Il Gruppo, one of the first experimental composers collectives, and in 1969 he co-founded Forum Music Village, a prestigious recording studio.

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From the 1970s, Morricone excelled in Hollywood, composing for prolific American directors such as Don Siegel, Mike Nichols, Brian De Palma, Barry Levinson, Oliver Stone, Warren Beatty, John Carpenter and Quentin Tarantino. In 1977, he composed the official theme for the 1978 FIFA World Cup. He continued to compose music for European productions, such as Marco Polo, La piovra, Nostromo, Fateless, Karol and En mai, fais ce qu’il te plait. Morricone’s music has been reused in television series, including The Simpsons and The Sopranos, and in many films, including Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained. He also scored seven Westerns for Sergio Corbucci, Duccio Tessari’s Ringo duology and Sergio Sollima’s The Big Gundown and Face to Face. Morricone worked extensively for other film genres with directors such as Bernardo Bertolucci, Mauro Bolognini, Giuliano Montaldo, Roland Joffé, Roman Polanski and Henri Verneuil. His acclaimed soundtrack for The Mission (1986) was certified gold in the United States. The album Yo-Yo Ma Plays Ennio Morricone stayed 105 weeks on the Billboard Top Classical Albums.

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Morricone’s best-known compositions include “The Ecstasy of Gold”, “Se Telefonando”, “Man with a Harmonica”, “Here’s to You”, the UK No. 2 single “Chi Mai”, “Gabriel’s Oboe” and “E Più Ti Penso”. In 1971, he received a “Targa d’Oro” for worldwide sales of 22 million,[8] and by 2016 Morricone had sold over 70 million records worldwide.[9] In 2007, he received the Academy Honorary Award “for his magnificent and multifaceted contributions to the art of film music.” He was nominated for a further six Oscars. In 2016, Morricone received his first competitive Academy Award for his score to Quentin Tarantino’s film The Hateful Eight, at the time becoming the oldest person ever to win a competitive Oscar. His other achievements include three Grammy Awards, three Golden Globes, six BAFTAs, ten David di Donatello, eleven Nastro d’Argento, two European Film Awards, the Golden Lion Honorary Award and the Polar Music Prize in 2010. Morricone has influenced many artists from film scoring to other styles and genres, including Hans Zimmer, Danger Mouse, Dire Straits, Muse, Metallica, and Radiohead.

Once Upon a Time in the West is a soundtrack composed by Ennio Morricone, from the 1968 western film of the same name directed by Sergio Leone, released in 1972. The film score sold about 10 million copies worldwide.

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The soundtrack features leitmotifs that relate to each of the main characters of the movie (each with their own theme music), as well as to the spirit of the American West.[6] The theme music for the Claudia Cardinale character has wordless vocals by Italian singer Edda Dell’Orso.

It was Leone’s desire to have the music available and played during filming. Leone had Morricone composed the score before shooting started and would play the music in the background for the actors on set.

In 2018, for the 50th anniversary of the film, the Italian records company “Beat Records” released a limited 500 copies edition. (wikipedia)

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And here´s one of his greatest sountracks:

Arguably a milestone for both director Sergio Leone and his musical cohort Ennio Morricone. After deconstructing the classic American western by way of The Good, the Bad & the Ugly and A Fistful of Dollars, Leone distilled his intentions with 1968’s Once Upon a Time in the West. For his part, Morricone framed Leone’s meditative camerawork and mythic narrative with a mix of hauntingly spacious pieces and reconfigured snatches of old-timey tunes. Just within the stretch of the first four pieces here, Morricone evokes the endless expanse of the West with a Copland-esque aria (the main title theme), weaves some twisted grit into the showdown theme with loads of guitar fuzz (“As a Judgment”), ingeniously combines whistling and a clippity-clop rhythm for a respite piece (“Farewell to Cheyenne”), and conjures the surreal end of the cowboy mythos via a wonderfully disjointed serial-style number (“The Transgression”). And whether sounding upbeat or stark, Morricone informs it all with the dry and windswept vacancy of the West. Beautiful and stunning. (by Stephen Cook)

Oh yes, he was a real master !

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Personnel:
Alessandro Alessandroni (whistle on 03.)
Edda (vocals on 01.
Franco de Gemini (harmonica)
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The Modern Singers Of Alessandroni (background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Once Upon A Time In The West 3.421
02. The Man 103
03. The Grand Massacre 2.41
04. Arrival At The Station 0.54
05. Bad Orchestra 2.21
06. Jill’s America 2.46
07. Harmonica 2.27
08. The First Tavern 1.41
09. A Bed Too Large 1.31
10. Jill 1.46
11. Frank 1.53
12. Cheyenne 1.16
13. The Second Tavern 1.34
14. The Third Tavern 1.18
15. Epilogue 1.14
16. On The Roof Of The Train 1.20
17. Man With A Harmonica 3.24
18. A Dimly Lit Room 5.09
19. The Transgression 4.40
20. Return To The Train 0.56
21. Morton 1.36
22. As A Judgment 3.08
23. Final Duel 3.33
24. Death Rattle 1.44
25. Birth Of A City 4.24
26. Farewell To Cheyenne 2.39
27. Finale 4.11

Music composed by Ennio Morricone

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Quincy Jones – In The Heat Of The Night (OST) (1967)

FrontCover1In the Heat of the Night is a 1967 American mystery drama film directed by Norman Jewison. It is based on John Ball’s 1965 novel of the same name and tells the story of Virgil Tibbs, a black police detective from Philadelphia, who becomes involved in a murder investigation in a small town in Mississippi. It stars Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger, and was produced by Walter Mirisch. The screenplay was by Stirling Silliphant.

The film won five Academy Awards, including the 1967 awards for Best Picture and Rod Steiger for Best Actor.

The quote “They call me Mister Tibbs!” was listed as number 16 on the American Film Institute’s 100 Years…100 Movie Quotes, a list of top film quotes. In 2002, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

In 1966, a wealthy industrialist named Phillip Colbert has moved from Chicago to Sparta, Mississippi, to build a factory there. Late one night, police officer Sam Wood discovers Colbert’s murdered body lying in the street.

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Chief Gillespie leads the investigation. A doctor estimates that Colbert had been dead for a few hours. At the train station, Wood finds a black man, Virgil Tibbs, and arrests him. Gillespie accuses Tibbs of the murder, and is embarrassed to learn Tibbs is a police officer from Philadelphia. Gillespie phones Tibbs’s chief, who informs Gillespie that Tibbs is a top homicide detective and recommends that he should assist the investigation. The idea does not appeal to either Gillespie or Tibbs, but for reasons of their own they reluctantly agree. Tibbs examines Colbert’s body and concludes the murder happened earlier than the doctor had estimated, that the killer was right-handed, and that the victim had been killed elsewhere and then moved to where the body was found.

Gillespie arrests another suspect, who protests his innocence. The police are planning to MoviePosterbeat him into confessing, but Tibbs reveals he is left-handed and has an alibi backed up by witnesses. Colbert’s widow is frustrated by the ineptitude of the police and impressed by Tibbs. She threatens to halt construction of the factory unless Tibbs leads the investigation, and the town’s leading citizens are forced to go along with her wish. The two policemen begin to respect each other as they are forced to work together.

Tibbs initially suspects plantation owner Endicott, a genteel racist and one of the most powerful individuals in town, who publicly opposed the new factory. When Tibbs interrogates Endicott, Endicott slaps him in the face and Tibbs slaps him back. Endicott sends a gang of thugs after Tibbs. Gillespie rescues Tibbs and tells him to leave town for his safety, but Tibbs is convinced he can solve the case.

Tibbs asks Wood to re-trace his car patrol route on the night of the murder, and Gillespie joins them. Tibbs reveals that Wood has changed the route of his patrol. Gillespie discovers that Wood made a sizable deposit into his bank account the day after the murder. He starts to suspect Wood and arrests him, despite Tibbs’s protests. Purdy, a hostile local, brings his 16-year-old sister Delores to the police station and files charges against Wood for getting her pregnant. Tibbs insists on being present when Delores is questioned. Purdy is offended that a black man was present at his sister’s questioning, and gathers a mob to attack Tibbs. Meanwhile, Tibbs tells Gillespie that the murder was committed at the site of the planned factory, which clears Wood of the murder charge, because he couldn’t have driven both his and Colbert’s cars back into town. Tibbs adds that he knows why Wood changed his route: at night Delores likes to display her naked body to whoever is outside, and Wood, who watches her while on duty, did not want Tibbs to see a white woman in the nude.

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Tibbs visits a backstreet abortionist, who under pressure reveals that she is about to perform an abortion on Delores. Delores arrives, sees Tibbs, and runs away. Tibbs follows her and comes face to face with her armed boyfriend, Ralph, a cook from a local roadside diner. At that moment Purdy’s mob arrives on the scene and holds Tibbs at gunpoint. Tibbs shouts at Purdy to check Delores’ purse, that it contains money Ralph gave her for an abortion, which he got when he robbed and killed Colbert. Purdy grabs the purse and looks inside, and realizes Tibbs is right. Purdy confronts Ralph for getting his sister pregnant, and a startled Ralph shoots Purdy dead. Tibbs grabs Ralph’s gun, and just then Gillespie arrives on the scene. Ralph is arrested and confesses to Colbert’s murder: he had gone to ask Colbert for a job at the new factory, but ended up attacking him and taking his money. “That’s all. I didn’t mean to kill him,” are the final words of Ralph’s taped confession.

The final scene shows Tibbs boarding a train bound for Philadelphia, as Gillespie, having carried his suitcase, respectfully bids him farewell.

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The film score was composed, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones, and the soundtrack album was released on the United Artists label in 1967. The title song performed by Ray Charles, composed by Quincy Jones, with lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman was released as a single by ABC Records and reached #33 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and #21 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.

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AllMusic’s Steven McDonald said the soundtrack had “a tone of righteous fury woven throughout” and that “the intent behind In the Heat of the Night was to get a Southern, blues-inflected atmosphere to support the angry, anti-racist approach of the picture … although the cues from In the Heat of the Night show their age”. The Vinyl Factory said “this soundtrack to a film about racism in the South has a cool, decidedly Southern-fried sound with funk-bottomed bluesy touches, like on the strutting ‘Cotton Curtain’, the down ‘n’ dirty ‘Whipping Boy’ or the fat ‘n’ sassy ‘Chief’s Drive to Mayor'”.

What a great movie, what  great soundtrack !

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Personnel:
The Quincy Jones Orchestra
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Gil Bernal (vocals on 08.)
Clarke Boomer (vocals on 16.)
Ray Brown (bass)
Glen Campbell (vocals, banjo on 09.)
Ray Charles (vocals on 01., piano on 15.)
Don Elliott (human instrument)
Roland Kirk (flute)
Billy Preston (organ on 01.)
The Raelettes (background vocals on 01.)
Bobby Scott (tack piano)
Travis Lewis (vocals on 16.)

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Tracklist:
01.In The Heat Of The Night 2.32
02. Peep-Freak Patrol Car 1.35
03. Cotton Curtain 2.41
04. Where Whitey Ain’t Around 1.28
05. Whipping Boy 1.30
06. No You Won’t 1.35
07. Nitty Gritty Time 2.07
08. It Sure Is Groovy! 2.34
09. Bowlegged Polly 2.03
10. Shag Bag, Hounds & Harvey 3.47
11. Chief’s Drive To Mayor 1.07
12. Give Me Until Morning 1.12
13. On Your Feet, Boy! 2.03
14. Blood & Roots 1.11
15. Mama Caleba’s Blues 5.33
16. Foul Owl 2.32

Music: Quincy Jones
Lyrics: Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman

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Vangelis – 1492 (Conquest of Paradise) (OST) (1992)

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Evángelos Odysséas Papathanassíou[a] (born 29 March 1943), known professionally as Vangelis, is a Greek musician and composer of electronic, progressive, ambient, jazz, and orchestral music. He is best known for his Academy Award-winning score to Chariots of Fire (1981), as well as for composing scores to the films Blade Runner (1982), Missing (1982), Antarctica (1983), The Bounty (1984), 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), and Alexander (2004), and for the use of his music in the PBS documentary Cosmos: A Personal Voyage by Carl Sagan.

Vangelis began his career working with several popular bands of the 1960s such as The Forminx and Aphrodite’s Child, with the latter’s album 666 going on to be recognized as a progressive-psychedelic rock classic. Throughout the 1970s, Vangelis composed music scores for several animal documentaries, including L’Apocalypse des Animaux, La Fête sauvage and Opéra sauvage; the success of these scores brought him into the film scoring mainstream. In the early 1980s, Vangelis formed a musical partnership with Jon Anderson, the lead singer of progressive rock band Yes, and the duo went on to release several albums together as Jon & Vangelis.

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In 1981, he composed the score for the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Original Score. The soundtrack’s single, the film’s “Titles” theme, also reached the top of the American Billboard Hot 100 chart and was used as the background music at the London 2012 Olympics winners’ medal presentation ceremonies.

Having had a career in music spanning over 50 years and having composed and performed more than 50 albums, Vangelis is considered to be one of the most important figures in the history of electronic music

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1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 music score to the film of the same name by Greek electronic composer and artist Vangelis. The film, a recount of the voyage to America in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, was directed by Ridley Scott, for whom Vangelis had previously composed the music score for Blade Runner, in 1982. The album and the single “Conquest of Paradise” enjoyed a revival in 1995 for various reasons and broke many sales records.

Due to the soundtrack’s success, Vangelis won an Echo Award as “International Artist Of The Year”, and RTL Golden Lion Award for the “Best Title Theme for a TV Film or a Series” in 1996. The album was nominated for “Best Original Score – Motion Picture” at the 50th Golden Globe Awards in 1993.

On this soundtrack, Vangelis plays together with a number of performers, including two Flamenco guitarists and vocalists, violin, mandolin and flutes. As on a number of previous albums by Vangelis, the English Chamber Choir, directed by Guy Protheroe, performs the choral parts.

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The sound engineering was done by Philippe Colonna and coordination by French musician Frederick Rousseau (also known for his collaborations with Jean-Michel Jarre), who has been Vangelis’s studio partner since the 1980s till the recording of the Alexander soundtrack.

Vangelis plays all synthesizers, using mainly string patches but also several ethnic ones, to reflect the character of the film, and electric piano and harp patches. Some calmer, atmospheric pieces (tracks 3, 7, 11 and 12) are entirely performed by Vangelis, using pianos, strings and harp.

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For the ethnic music, Vangelis consulted with French specialist Xavier Belanger, who has advised other artists on similar issues, including Jean-Michel Jarre.

A video clip was shot in Paris with Vangelis in his Epsilon Studios (since dismantled), with the choir performing.

Three tracks of this album contain lyrics. In “Monastery of La Rabida” and “Deliverance”, the choir sings Latin hymns (“De Profundis” and “Dies Irae, respectively”). In “Conquest of Paradise” Vangelis used a pseudo-Latin invented language.

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Both the album and the EP had poor sales upon their release in 1992, but success came three years later, in 1995, for disparate reasons: In Germany, local boxer Henry Maske used the album-track “Conquest of Paradise” as his introduction theme during boxing bouts. When he became the IBF world title holder in the light heavyweight category, the piece received wide coverage and a single was hastily released.

In Portugal, the local Socialist Party also used “Conquest of Paradise” as its theme for the general election campaign (it won). The song has also been used as a theme for the Crusaders, a Super Rugby team based in Christchurch, New Zealand, for English rugby league team the Wigan Warriors, for the 2011 Cricket World Cup, and for the 2010 and 2014 cricket World Twenty20 championships.

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The soundtrack album charted very well, and went on to be certified gold and platinum in over 17 countries, including Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the U.K., culminating with over million copies in Germany.

The single “Conquest of Paradise” also topped the charts in a number of countries, including 10 weeks at No. 1 in the Netherlands and Germany, where it sold 1.5 million copies, 8 weeks at No. 1 in Belgium and Switzerland. (by wikipedia)

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Suitably grand in scale and far-reaching in its scope, this soundtrack is the first new music from Vangelis since 1990’s The City. 1492 stands up well next to Vangelis’s classic Chariots of Fire, due to his innate ability to get right inside the material and provide an integral part of the film itself. Vangelis succeeds in capturing the 15th-century mood, mixing rich choral portions with modern elements, and portraying the larger than life character of Columbus, complete with full-range, dynamic sound. (by All Music)

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Personnel;
Francis Darizcuren (mandolin, violin)
Didier Malherbe (flute)
Pepe Martinez (guitar, vocals)
Guy Protheroe (vocals)
Vangelis (keyboards, synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. Opening 1.22
02. Conquest Of Paradise 4.48
03. Monastery Of La Rábida 3.39
04. City Of Isabel 2.16
05. Light And Shadow 3.47
06. Deliverance 3.29
07. West Across The Ocean Sea 2.53
08. Eternity 2.00
09. Hispañola 4.56
10. Moxica And The Horse 7.06
11. Twenty Eighth Parallel 5.14
12. Pinta, Niña, Santa María (Into Eternity) 13.20

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Cliff Richard with The Shadows – Wonderful Live (OST) (1964)

OriginalFrontCover1Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is a British singer, musician, performer, actor and philanthropist. Richard has sold more than 250 million records worldwide. He has total sales of over 21 million singles in the United Kingdom and is the third-top-selling artist in UK Singles Chart history, behind the Beatles and Elvis Presley.

Richard was originally marketed as a rebellious rock and roll singer in the style of Elvis Presley and Little Richard.[3] With his backing group, the Shadows, Richard dominated the British popular music scene in the pre-Beatles period of the late 1950s to early 1960s.[4] His 1958 hit single “Move It” is often described as Britain’s first authentic rock and roll song; in the opinion of John Lennon of the Beatles, “before Cliff and the Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in British music”. Increased focus on his Christianity and subsequent softening of his music led to a more middle-of-the-road image and he sometimes ventured into contemporary Christian music.

Over a career spanning 60 years, Richard has amassed many gold and platinum discs and awards, including two Ivor Novello Awards and three Brit Awards. More than 130 of his singles, albums and EPs have reached the UK Top 20, more than any other artist. Richard has had 67 UK top ten singles, the second highest total for an artist behind Elvis.

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Richard holds the record (with Elvis) as the only act to make the UK singles charts in all of its first six decades (1950s–2000s). He has achieved 14 UK number-one singles, and is the only singer to have had a number-one single in the UK in five consecutive decades.

Richard has never achieved the same popularity in the United States despite eight US Top 40 singles, including the million-selling “Devil Woman” and “We Don’t Talk Anymore”. In Canada, he had a successful period in the early 1960s, and again in the late 1970s and early 1980s with some releases certified gold and platinum. He has remained a popular music, film, and television personality in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Northern Europe and Asia, and retains a following in other countries. Richard has been a resident in the United Kingdom for most of his life, though in 2010, he confirmed that he had become a citizen of Barbados. When not touring, he divides his time between Barbados and Portugal. In 2019, he relocated to the United States.

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Wonderful Life is a soundtrack album by Cliff Richard with The Shadows to the 1964 film Wonderful Life. It is their third film soundtrack album and Richard’s eleventh album overall. The album reached number 2 in the UK Albums Chart, spending 8 weeks in the top 3 and 23 weeks on in the top 20, but was a marked decline from their previous soundtrack album Summer Holiday that had spent 14 weeks at number 1.

The album had two lead singles, the first being the instrumental “Theme for Young Lovers” from the Shadows, followed by “On the Beach” with Richard being backed by the Shadows.

Curiously, some of the recordings on the album are not those used on the actual film soundtrack, including the title song. The vocal takes are different and in some cases the orchestrations are also altered slightly. The recordings on the album are generally more polished than the soundtrack ones. The Shadows recording line-up included Brian Locking on bass guitar although by the time filming commenced John Rostill had replaced him.

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The vinyl LP released on the Columbia label in the UK featured an inner sleeve with a storyline outlining the plot and the position of each of the musical numbers, illustrated with stills from the film.

Released in the US with the title Swingers Paradise the album did not chart. (by wikipedia)

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Cliff Richard’s first post-Beatles movie, Swingers Paradise (Wonderful Life in the U.K.) maintained business as usual for the team — another fun-packed romp in foreign climes, it was again peppered with naggingly familiar songs, absurd and adorable in more or less equal doses, and accompanied, of course, by a soundtrack which squeezed every last ounce of effervescence from the plot. The formula was, by then, firmly entrenched. The Michael Sammes Singers twitter, Norrie Paramor produces, and the Associated British Studio Orchestra lavish everything beneath monstrous slabs of sweet strings and winds. Meanwhile, the Shadows rattle along as both an understated backing band and, when the mood hits, frontmen in their own right, throwing two characteristic guitar-led instrumentals into the brew — “Walkin'” and “Theme for Young Lovers.” Equally predictably, the hits flew from the album — “Theme for Young Lovers” reached number 12 in the U.K., Richard’s understatedly grand “On the Beach” made number seven, and both the title track and “Do You Remember” remained favorites long after the movie slipped off the screens. But that, unfortunately, is where comparisons with past soundtracks end. The others were fun because they were so ridiculously enjoyable. This one’s no fun at all. It is, however, contrived, condescending, and, for the most part, utterly overblown. It does have a few great moments — “Wonderful Life” comes over like something from a Broadway spectacular, all racing orchestration, broad backing vocals, and imbibed with the same timeless bravado which one normally associates with the classics of the ’40s and ’50s.

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But that, too, is a damning confession. The hit singles aside, there is no denying the audience which Swingers Paradise was gunning for — the mums and dads (and beyond) who still had time for pop, but maybe found the latest crop of superstars a little too outlandish for their tastes. All that long hair, all those suggestive lyrics, all that hand-holding and yeah, yeah, yeah-ing. No such dangers here. The frothy over-excitement of “Home,” the stirring big-band buoyancy of “A Little Imagination,” the string-driven simplicity of “In the Stars,” everything harks back to an earlier age, a more innocent time. In fact, in the brutally blunt parlance of the time, Cliff Richard was by then so well-rounded an entertainer that he was turning positively square. And Swingers Paradise doesn’t swing quite so impressively after all. (by Dave Thompson)

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Personnel:
Brian Bennett (drums)
Brian Locking (bass)
Hank Marvin (lead guitar)
Cliff Richard (vocals)
Bruce Welch (guitar)
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The Associated British Studio Orchestra conducted by Stanley Black
The Norrie Paramor Strings
The Mike Sammes Singers

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Tracklist:
01. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: Wonderful Life (Bennett/Welch) 2.28
02. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: A Girl In Every Port (Myers/Cass) 2.49
03. The Shadows: Walkin’ (Marvin/Welch) 2.46
04. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: A Little Imagination (Myers/Cass) 3.54
05. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: Home (Myers/Cass) 3.31
06. Cliff Richard & The Shadows: On The Beach (Marvin/Richard/Welch) 2.29
07. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: In The Stars (Myers/Cass) 4.00
08. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: We Love A Movie (Myers/Cass) 3.22
09. Cliff Richard, The Shadows & The Norrie Paramor Strings: Do You Remember (Marvin/Welch) 2.50
10. Cliff Richard & The Shadows: What’ve I Gotta Do (Marvin/Welch) 2.33
11. The Shadows: Theme For Young Lovers (Welch) 2.40
12. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: All Kinds Of People (Myers/Cass) 3.15
13. Cliff Richard, The Shadows & The Norrie Paramor Strings: A Matter Of Moments  (Welch) 2.58
14. Cliff Richard & The A.B.S. Orchestra: Youth And Experience (Myers/Cass) 3.36
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15. Cliff Richard & The Shadows: Look Don’t Touch (Ifield) 1.44
16. Cliff Richard, The Shadows & The Norrie Paramor Strings: Do You Remember (alternate take) (Marvin/Welch) 2.57
17. Cliff Richard, The Shadows & The Norrie Paramor Strings: Wonderful Life (Bennett/Welch) 2.22
18. Cliff Richard: Angel (Non-Album Import A-Side) (Tepper/Bennett) 2.19

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Jean Yatove – The Girl In The Bikini (OST) (1952)

LPFrontCover1.jpgManina, la fille sans voiles, released in the US as Manina, the Girl in the Bikini, and in the UK as Manina, the Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter, is a 1952 French film directed by Willy Rozier and starring Brigitte Bardot, Jean-François Calvé and Howard Vernon. The film is one of Bardot’s first film roles, at the age of 17, and was controversial for the scanty bikinis worn by the young Bardot in the film, one of the first occasions when a bikini had appeared in film and when the bikini was still widely considered immodest.

Though released in France in 1953 as Manina, la fille sans voiles, the film was not released in the United States until 1958 as Manina, the Girl in the Bikini and in the United Kingdom until 1959 as The Lighthouse-Keeper’s Daughter. In other countries it was released under other names. The film was able to be screened in the United States notwithstanding the Hays Code prohibition of exposure of the midriff as a foreign film.

The film was shot in Cannes, Nice and Paris in the summer of 1952. Brigitte Bardot’s father had signed a contract, on behalf of his minor daughter, specifying that the film was not to show indecent images. When in the course of filming, a series of “highly suggestive” photographs of his daughter was released, he accused the producing company of not respecting the contract and demanded that the film not be projected without the permission of a court. He lost the suit.

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A 25-year-old Parisian student, Gérard Morere (Calvé), hears a lecture about a treasure Troilus lost at sea after the Peloponnesian War, and thinks he knows where it is, thanks to a discovery he made five years earlier when diving near the island of Levezzi, in Corsica. He gets friends and an innkeeper to invest in his dream, enough to get him to Tangiers where he convinces a cigarette smuggler, Eric (Vernon), to take him to the island.

There they find 18-year-old Manina (Bardot), the light-keeper’s daughter, who is beautiful and pure. Eric thinks Gérard may have conned him, but Gérard’s belief in the treasure compels patience. Gérard dives by day and romances Manina at night. Gérard finds the treasure, though Eric runs away with it and is wrecked in a storm. (by wikipdia)

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And here´s the nice soundtrack, written by Jean Yatove, including some exotic sounds.

Jean Yatove was a french composer and orchestra leader, born 7 May 1903 in Fondettes, France, died 28 June 1978 in Boulogne-Billancourt, France.

Enjoy this sentimental trip in the past !

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Personnel:
Unknown Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Overture 3.04
01.1.Manina Theme
01.2.Parisian Interlude
01.3.Tangier Oriental
02. Swimmers Ballet 3.09
03. Corsican Guitar Motif 1.18
04. Music Hall Can Can 2.44
05. Undersea Moods (Ending With Manina Theme) 4.05
06. Moorish Oriental 1.32
07. Guitar Serenade 3.22
08. The Escape 5.01
08.1. The Chase
08.2. Manina’s Love Song
09. Drowning Scene Music (Ending With Manina Theme) 5.32

Music composed by Jean Yatove

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John Paul Jones – Scream For Help (OST) (1985)

FrontCover1Scream for Help is a soundtrack album by John Paul Jones, released by Atlantic Records on 22 March 1985 to accompany the film Scream for Help (a horror movie). Following the Death Wish II album project, guitarist Jimmy Page was asked by his Berkshire neighbour, movie director Michael Winner, to record a soundtrack for the film Scream for Help in August 1984. Due to other commitments by Page, he instead suggested to Winner that Jones, who had just completed upgrading his 24-track digital recording studio at Devon, was best placed to write and record the soundtrack. In return, Jones asked Page to help record two tracks “Crackback” and “Spaghetti Junction”.

The musical score differs in style from the Death Wish pentalogy of films, with Winner requesting that a minimum 70 piece orchestra backing be used for the soundtrack in addition to Jones’ rock arrangements. Besides Page, folk guitarist John Renbourn assists on guitar, and Yes singer Jon Anderson sessioned on vocals as well as Madeline Bell, for whom Jones had previous produced, composed, recorded, and played all the instruments for her solo album Comin’ Atcha in December 1973. Jones sings lead vocals on “When You Fall in Love”. Jacinda Baldwin (aka Jacinda Jones), Jones’ daughter is co-writer on two tracks. It was his first full-length album release since the break-up of Led Zeppelin. (by wikipedia)

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The score for this otherwise forgotten Michael Winner film was written by former Led Zeppelin member John Paul Jones and performed by Jones with Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, Madeline Bell, and Yes singer Jon Anderson. It is unremarkable, but since it represents Jones’s only recorded work since Led Zeppelin’s demise in 1980, completists may wish to seek it out. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Colin Green (background vocals)
John Paul Jones (keyboards, synthesizer, bass, guitar, vocals on 02. + 08. background vocals)
John Renbourn (guitar)
Graham Ward (drums, percussion)
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Jon Anderson (vocals on 03. + 07.)
Madeline Bell (vocals  on 06. + 09.)
Jimmy Page (guitar on 01. + 04.)
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Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The Johnny Pearson Studio Orchestra – Orchestra

Booklet1.jpgTracklist:
01. Spaghetti Junction (Jones) 5.00
02. Bad Child (Jones/Baldwin) 5.45
03. Silver Train (Jones/Anderson) 3.49
04. Crackback (Jones/Page) 4.15
05. Chilli Sauce (Jones) 4.59
06. Take It Or Leave It (Jones/M.Bell) 4.28
07. Christie (Jones) 3.06
08. When You Fall In Love (Jones/Baldwin) 3.35
09. Here I Am (Jones/S.Bell) 4.33

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Goblin – Their Hits, Rare Tracks & Outtakes Collection 1975-1989 (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgGoblin (also Back to the Goblin, New Goblin, Goblin Rebirth, the Goblin Keys, The Goblins and Claudio Simonetti’s Goblin) is an Italian progressive rock band known for their soundtrack work. They frequently collaborate with Dario Argento, most notably creating soundtracks for Profondo Rosso in 1975 and Suspiria in 1977. CD re-releases of their soundtracks have performed well, especially in Germany and Japan. Goblin returned with a series of live concerts in Europe in 2009 and in North America in 2013.

Initially recording as Cherry Five (they had done some live gigs as Oliver), their early work spawned one eponymous progressive rock record, and they were then called in to compose the soundtrack for Profondo Rosso. The band changed their name to Goblin, rewriting most of the score, originally written by Giorgio Gaslini including the famous main theme. The 1975 soundtrack album was a huge hit. After a reshuffle in their line-up, they put out an instrumental progressive rock album Roller, before working with Argento again for 1977’s Suspiria.

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Other film soundtracks and a concept album (Il Fantastico Viaggio Del Bagarozzo Mark) followed, then the score for the European version of George A. Romero’s 1978 Dawn of the Dead. In both this and Suspiria’s opening title sequences, they are credited as “The Goblins with Dario Argento”. Tracks 1, 2 and 7 from the European version are also in the American version of the film.

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Despite their success, membership continued to be a revolving door, and the band also struggled to maintain their credibility. The remaining members continued to work on further soundtracks, and there was a partial reunification of three of the four band-members for Argento’s Tenebrae (1982) (the album was credited to the three band-members separately, not as Goblin). The last collaboration with the director took place in 2000, with the film Non ho sonno (Sleepless).

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Halloween is upon us, and it’s time to fire up the VCR for some primo fright-fests. True lovers of the blood & gore genre know that Italian filmmaker Dario Argento and Pittsburgh’s one and only George Romero are two of the best in the biz, and both turned to the Italian art-rock group Goblin when they needed otherworldly sounds to match their nightmarish visions. Goblin is one of the only rock bands that exclusively recorded soundtracks, and this collection includes some of its most inventive and creepy work. The jazzy, percussive, synth-driven tunes will be instantly familiar to anyone who’s seen Argento’s Profondo Rosso (1975) or Suspiria (1977) or Romero’s classic Dawn of the Dead (1978). That’s a fine triple bill if you have an adventurous video store in the neighborhood, but the music works just as well on its own, especially as background music for your Halloween party, or for a little vampiric necking. (by Jim Derogatis)

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Personnel:
Various line ups … look here

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Tracklist:

Profondo Rosso 1975:
01. Profondo Rosso (Main Title) (Simonetti/Pignatelli/Martino) 3.43
2 Death Dies – M32 (Original Film Version) (Simonetti/Pignatelli/Martino) 2.44
3 Profondo Rosso – M15 (Simonetti/Pignatelli/Martino) 0.40
4 Profondo Rosso – M31 (Simonetti/Pignatelli/Martino) 1.02

Wampyr (a/k/a Martin) 1976:
05 Wampyr (Finale) (Morante/Simonetti) 1.42

Chi? (Theme From The Original TV Show) 1976:
06. Chi? – Part 1 (Caruso/Baudo) 3.20
07. Chi? – Part 2 (Caruso/Baudo) 3.27

Patrick 1977:
08. Patrick – M32 Bis (Marangolo/Pignatelli/Pennisi) 3.01
09 Patrick – M1 (Marangolo/Pignatelli/Pennisi) 0.56
10 Patrick – M34/34 Bis/35 (Marangolo/Pignatelli/Pennisi) 0.47

Suspiria 1977;
11. Suspiria (Main Title) (Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 5.55

La Via Della Droga 1977:
12. La Via Della Droga – M11V  ((Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 2.08
13. La Via Della Droga – M2 (Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 2.00
14 La Via Della Droga – M6 (Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 2.05
15 La Via Della Droga – 31 (Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 4.29

Zombi 1978:
16. L’Alba Dei Morti Viventi (Marangolo/Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 6.04

Buio Omega 1979:
17. Buio Omega – M6 (Marangolo/Pennisi/Pignatelli) 2.33
18 Buio Omega – M25 (Marangolo/Pennisi/Pignatelli) 4.02
19 Buio Omega (Main Title) (Marangolo/Pennisi/Pignatelli) 2.56

St. Helen 1979:
20. St. Helen (Love Theme) (Marangolo/Guarini/Pignatelli) 2.08

Contamination 1980:
21. Contamination – M3 (Marangolo/Pignatelli) 1.40
22. Contamination – M8 (Marangolo/Pignatelli) 1.02

Tenebre 1982:
23. Tenebre (Main Title) (Morante/Simonetti/Pignatelli) 4.35

Notturno 1983:
24. Bass Theme (Pignatelli/Guarini/Marangolo) 3.22

Phenomena 1984:
25. Phenomena – M12 (Pignatelli) 1.01
26. Phenomena – M15 (Alternate Version) (Simonetti) 3.10

La Chiesa 1989:
27. La Chiesa (Pignatelli) 5.25

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Doris Day – On Moonlight Bay (1951)

FrontCover1.jpgDoris Day (born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff; April 3, 1922 – May 13, 2019) was an American actress, singer, and animal welfare activist. After she began her career as a big band singer in 1939, her popularity increased with her first hit recording “Sentimental Journey” (1945). After leaving Les Brown & His Band of Renown to embark on a solo career, she recorded more than 650 songs from 1947 to 1967, which made her one of the most popular and acclaimed singers of the 20th century.

Day’s film career began during the latter part of the Classical Hollywood Film era with the 1948 film Romance on the High Seas, and its success sparked her twenty-year career as a motion picture actress. She starred in a series of successful films, including musicals, comedies, and dramas. She played the title role in Calamity Jane (1953), and starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) with James Stewart. Her most successful films were the ones she made co-starring Rock Hudson and James Garner, such as Pillow Talk (1959) and Move Over, Darling (1963), respectively. She also co-starred in films with such leading men as Clark Gable, Cary Grant, James Stewart, David Niven, and Rod Taylor. After her final film in 1968, she went on to star in the CBS sitcom The Doris Day Show (1968–1973).

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Day was usually one of the top ten singers between 1951 and 1966. As an actress, she became the biggest female film star in the early 1960s, and ranked sixth among the box office performers by 2012. In 2011, she released her 29th studio album, My Heart, which became a UK Top 10 album featuring new material. Among her awards, Day has received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and a Legend Award from the Society of Singers. In 1960, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress, and in 1989 was given the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures. In 2004, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush followed in 2011 by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association’s Career Achievement Award. She was one of the last surviving stars of the Golden Age of Hollywood. (by wikipedia)

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And here are some songs from the Warner Bros. movie “On Moonlight Bay”

On Moonlight Bay is a 1951 musical film directed by Roy Del Ruth which tells the story of the Winfield family at the turn of the 20th century. The movie is based loosely on the Penrod stories by Booth Tarkington. There was a 1953 sequel, By the Light of the Silvery Moon.

In a small Indiana town in the mid-1910s, the Winfield household – banker father George, his wife Alice, their grown tomboyish daughter Marjorie, their precocious trouble-making son Wesley, and their exasperated housekeeper Stella – have just moved into a larger house in a nicer neighborhood.

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No one but George is happy about the move, until Marjorie meets their new neighbor, William Sherman, home on a break from his studies at Indiana University. The two are immediately attracted to each other, which makes Margie change her focus from baseball to trying to become a proper young woman. Their resulting relationship is despite, or perhaps because of Bill’s unconventional thoughts on life, including not believing in the institution of marriage, or believing in the role money plays in society.

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The road to a happy life between Margie and Bill is not only hindered by distance as Bill returns to school and Margie’s attempts to learn feminine things, but also George’s dislike of Bill because of their differing beliefs, the stuffy Hubert Wakely also trying to court Margie (he who is George’s choice as an appropriate suitor for her), Wesley’s continual meddling in his sister’s life, and World War I. One of those issues may be overcome when Wesley receives a gift from Aunt Martha that used to be his father old slingshot that he used to kill Aunt Martha’s’ best hen. His father discovers the old slingshot after Wesley cracks a window with it, his father gets emotional after he sees it and everything is resolved in time for a happy ending. (by wikipedia)

And this is of course the perfect story for all these romantic, sentiental and old fashioned songs ….

RIP … Doris Day

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Personnel:
Doris Day (vocals)
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Jack Smith (vocals)
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Paul Weston & His Orchestra
The Norman Luboff Choir

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Tracklist:
01. Moonlight Bay (Madden/Wenrich) 2.32
02. Till We Meet Again (Egan/Whiting) 2.42
03. Love Ya Tobias (De Rose) 2.19
04. Christmas Story (Walsh) 3.12
05. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles (Kenbrovin/Kellette) 2.19
06. Cuddle Up A Little Closer (Harbach/Hoschma) 2.55
07. Every Little Movement (Harbach/Hoschma) 2.45
08. Tell Me (Tell Me Why) (Callahan/Kortlander) 3.20
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09. Closing Remarks (acoustic record ad) 0.26

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Day was married four times. She was married to Al Jorden, a trombonist whom she first met in Barney Rapp’s Band, from March 1941 to February 1943. Her only child, son Terrence Paul Jorden (later known as Terry Melcher), resulted from this marriage; he died in 2004. Her second marriage was to George William Weidler, a saxophonist and the brother of actress Virginia Weidler, from March 30, 1946, to May 31, 1949. Weidler and Day met again several years later; during a brief reconciliation, he introduced her to Christian Science.

On April 3, 1951, her 29th birthday, she married Martin Melcher. This marriage lasted until Melcher’s death in April 1968. Melcher adopted Day’s son Terry, who, with the name Terry Melcher, became a successful musician and record producer (The Byrds, Paul Revere & the Raiders and many more)

John Barry – From Russia With Love (OST)(1963)

LPFrontCover1From Russia with Love is a 1963 British spy film and the second in the James Bond film series produced by Eon Productions, as well as Sean Connery’s second role as MI6 agent James Bond. It was directed by Terence Young, produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, and written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood, based on Ian Fleming’s similarly named 1957 novel. In the film, Bond is sent to assist in the defection of Soviet consulate clerk Tatiana Romanova in Turkey, where SPECTRE plans to avenge Bond’s killing of Dr. No.

Following the success of Dr. No, United Artists greenlit a sequel and doubled the budget available for the producers. In addition to filming on location in Turkey, the action scenes were shot at Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire, and in Scotland. Production ran over budget and schedule, and was rushed to finish by its scheduled October 1963 release date.

From Russia with Love was a critical and commercial success. It took in more than $78 million in worldwide box-office receipts, far more than its $2 million budget and more than its predecessor Dr. No, thereby becoming a blockbuster in 1960s cinema.

This film also marked the debut of Desmond Llewelyn as Q, a role he would play for 36 years until The World Is Not Enough in 1999.

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Seeking to exact revenge on James Bond (007) for killing its agent Dr. No and destroying the organisation’s assets in the Caribbean, the international criminal organisation SPECTRE begins training agents to kill Bond. Their star pupil is Donald “Red” Grant, an Irish assassin who proves his mettle by killing a Bond impostor in 1 minute and 52 seconds on a training course with a garrote wire concealed in his wristwatch.

Meanwhile, the organisation’s chief planner, a Czech chess grandmaster named Kronsteen (Number 5), devises a plan to play British and Soviet intelligence against each other to procure a Lektor cryptographic device from the Soviets. SPECTRE’s chief executive, Number 1, puts Rosa Klebb (Number 3), a former colonel of SMERSH (the counter-intelligence branch of Soviet Intelligence) who has defected to SPECTRE in the West, in charge of the mission as chief of operations. Klebb chooses Grant to protect Bond until he acquires the Lektor and then to eliminate 007 and steal the cipher machine for SPECTRE. As part of the scheme, Klebb recruits the beautiful Tatiana Romanova, a cipher clerk at the Soviet consulate in Istanbul, who believes the ex-colonel is still working for SMERSH.

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In London, M informs Bond that Romanova has contacted their “Station ‘T'” in Turkey, claiming to have fallen in love with Bond from his file photo. She offers to defect to the West, and will bring a top-secret Lektor with her to sweeten the deal, but only on the condition that Bond handle her case, personally. Prior to his departure, Bond is supplied by Q with an attaché case containing a concealed throwing knife, gold sovereigns, a special tear gas booby trap connected to the lock mechanism, and ammunition for an included ArmaLite AR-7 folding sniper rifle with an infrared night scope.

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After travelling to Istanbul, Bond heads into the city to meet with station head Ali Kerim Bey, tailed by Bulgarian secret agents working for the Russians. They are in turn tailed by Grant, who kills one of them after Bond is taken back to his hotel, stealing their car and dumping it outside the Soviet Consulate to provoke hostilities between British and Soviet Intelligence. In response, the Soviets bomb Kerim’s office with a limpet mine; Kerim, however, is away from his desk for a tryst with his mistress. Bond and he then investigate the attack by spying on a Soviet consulate meeting through a periscope installed in the underground aqueducts beneath Istanbul. Thus, they learn that the Soviet agent Krilencu is responsible for the bombing. Kerim Bey declares it unwise to stay in the city under such circumstances and takes Bond to a rural gypsy settlement. However, Krilencu learns of this and promptly attacks a gypsy feast, where Bond and Kerim are honoured guests, with a band of hired Bulgarian fighters. Much to Bond’s confusion, he is saved from an enemy fighter during the attack by a distant sniper shot from Grant. The following night, Bond and Kerim Bey track Krilencu to his hideout, where Kerim Bey kills him with Bond’s rifle.

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Upon returning to his hotel suite that night, Bond finds Romanova waiting for him in his bed and has sex with her; neither is aware that SPECTRE is filming them. The next day, Romanova heads off for a prearranged rendezvous at Hagia Sophia to drop off the floor plans for the consulate, with Grant ensuring Bond receives the plans by killing the other Bulgarian tail who attempts to intercept the drop. Using the plans, Bond and Kerim Bey successfully steal the Lektor, and together with Romanova, escape with the device onto the Orient Express. On the train, Kerim Bey quickly notices a Soviet security officer named Benz tailing them, prompting him and Bond to subdue him. When Bond leaves Benz and Kerim Bey alone together, Grant kills them and makes it appear as though they killed each other, preventing Bond from leaving the train with Romanova to rendezvous with one of Kerim’s men.

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At the railway station in Belgrade, Bond passes on word of Kerim Bey’s death to one of his sons, and asks for an agent from Station Y to meet him at Zagreb. However, when the train arrives at the station, Grant intercepts Nash, sent from Station Y, killing the agent before posing as him. After drugging Romanova at dinner, Grant overpowers Bond before taunting him about SPECTRE’s involvement in the theft. After disclosing that Romanova was unaware of what was truly going on, believing she was working for Russia, Grant reveals to Bond his plans to leave behind the film SPECTRE took of him and Romanova at the hotel, along with a forged blackmail letter, to make it appear that their deaths were the result of a murder-suicide, to scandalise the British intelligence community. Bond quickly convinces him to accept a bribe of gold sovereigns in exchange for a final cigarette, tricking Grant into setting off the booby trap in his attaché case. This distracts Grant enough for Bond to attack him in a brutal brawl. In the ensuing fight, Bond narrowly gains the upper hand, stabbing Grant with the case’s concealed knife before strangling him with his own garrotte. Bond then drags the barely conscious Romanova from the train, which has been stopped by a SPECTRE accomplice, where he hijacks Grant’s getaway truck and flees the scene with Romanova.

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Upon hearing the news of Grant’s death, Number 1 calls Klebb and Kronsteen onto the carpet to explain what went wrong and remind them that SPECTRE does not tolerate failure. Kronsteen is executed by the henchman Morzeny with a kick from the poison-tipped switchblade in his shoe. Klebb, however, is given one last chance to make good on the mission and acquire the Lektor (which has already been promised to the Russians in a sell-back scheme).

The next morning, Bond’s stolen truck is intercepted along its escape route by a SPECTRE helicopter, but 007 destroys the attacking aircraft by shooting its co-pilot with his sniper rifle, causing the man to drop a live hand grenade in the cockpit. Thus, Bond and Romanova make it to Grant’s escape boat on the Dalmatian coast and steal that, too, only to be pursued by Morzeny, who leads a squadron of SPECTRE powerboats. Bond, however, escapes by dumping his own powerboat’s fuel drums overboard and detonating them with a Very flare to engulf all the chase boats in a sea of flames.

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Eventually, Romanova and he reach a hotel in Venice, where they believe themselves to be safe. Klebb, however, disguised as a maid, makes one final attempt on Bond and the Lektor. Klebb tries to kick him with a poisoned switchblade shoe, but Romanova shoots her with her own dropped gun. With the mission accomplished, Bond and Romanova leave Venice on a romantic boat ride, in which course Bond throws Grant’s blackmail film into the canal.

From Russia with Love is the soundtrack for the second James Bond film of the same name. This is the first series film with John Barry as the primary soundtrack composer.

John Barry, arranger of Monty Norman’s “James Bond Theme” for Dr. No, would be the dominant Bond series composer for most of its history and the inspiration for fellow series composer, David Arnold (who uses cues from this soundtrack in his own for Tomorrow Never Dies). The theme song was composed by Lionel Bart of Oliver! fame and sung by Matt Monro.

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Following the decision of the producers not to use Monty Norman, though keeping his “James Bond Theme”, Harry Saltzman decided on using the then popular Lionel Bart of Oliver! fame. Bart was unable to read or write music, but he offered to compose the music and lyrics for a title song to the film.

The producers chose John Barry to score the film. Barry had not only arranged and conducted the “James Bond Theme” from the previous film, but had already scored some films such as Beat Girl and Never Let Go. Barry’s group also charted at No. 13 in the November 1962 UK charts with a different arrangement of the Bond theme from that heard in the film.

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The title song was sung by Matt Monro. Monro’s vocal version is played during the film (as source music on a radio) and properly over the film’s end titles. The title credit music is a lively instrumental version of the tune preceded by a brief Barry-composed “James Bond is Back” then segueing into the “James Bond Theme”. On the original film soundtrack, Alan Haven played a jazzy organ over the theme but this version was not released on the soundtrack album. The tune also appears in a soft string arrangement as a theme for Tania. In Germany, the original release featured an end title track cover version called Die Wolga ist Weit sung by Ruthe Berlé.

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Originally planning to use local Turkish music as Norman had used Jamaican music on Dr No, Barry accompanied the film crew to Istanbul, however he found nothing suitable for the film.

Recalling his visit to Istanbul, John Barry said, “It was like no place I’d ever been in my life. [The Trip] was supposedly to seep up the music, so Noel Rogers and I used to go ’round to these nightclubs and listen to all this stuff. We had the strangest week, and really came away with nothing, except a lot of ridiculous stories. We went back, talked to Lionel, and then he wrote ‘From Russia with Love.”

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The soundtrack’s original recordings are thought to be lost and did not appear when the Bond soundtrack albums were issued in remastered form on CD. The album is different from the film with the album’s recording of the main titles sounding slower and not featuring the organ played by Alan Haven. Several tracks on the album do not appear in the completed film. The album was the last of the Bond soundtrack albums to feature more than the usual six tracks per record side.

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The soundtrack album reached No. 28 on the Variety charts in March 1964 with the title song becoming Unart Music’s most recorded song. Other cover versions of the “James Bond Theme” were also released to coincide with the film. Barry also released different cover versions of the title song and “007” on his Ember records for the pop charts. The Roland Shaw Orchestra performed cover versions of most of the music of Barry’s soundtrack on several albums. (by wikipedia)

The cover images include Sean Connery as James Bond, and Daniela Bianchi.

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Personnel:
Unknown orchestra conducted by John Barry
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Matt Monro (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. James Bond Is Back – From Russia With Love – James Bond Theme (Bart/Norman) 2.26
02. Tania Meets Klebb (Barry) 1.31
03. Meeting In St. Sophia (Barry) 1.09
04. The Golden Horn (Barry) 2.25
05. Girl Trouble (Barry) 2.27
06. Bond Meets Tania (Bart) 1.20
07. 007 (Barry) 2.47
08. Gypsy Camp (Barry) 1.17
09. Death Of Grant (Barry)
10. From Russia With Love (Bart) 2.35
11. Spectre Island (Barry) 1.19
12. Guitar Lament (Barry) 1.12
13. Man Overboard – Smersh In Action (Barry) 2.19
14. James Bond With Bongos (Norman) 2.33
15. Stalking (Barry) 2.05
16. Leila Dances (Barry) 1.57
17. Death Of Kerim (Bart/Barry) 2.31
18. 007 Takes The Lektor (Barry) 3.03
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19. Die Wolga ist weit (German version of “From Russia With Love” (Bart/Hertha) 2.27

 

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