Simon & Garfunkel/Dave Grusin – The Graduate (OST) (1968)

FrontCover1The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.

Although the album features two versions of the acclaimed “Mrs. Robinson”, neither is the full version as featured on Bookends. The first is an instrumental, while the second is abbreviated, tapering off as it does in the film. However, the other major song of the album, “The Sound of Silence” is used three times in the film (by wikipedia)

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The soundtrack to Mike Nichols’ The Graduate remains a key musical document of the late ’60s, although truth be told, its impact was much less artistic than commercial (and, for that matter, more negative than positive). With the exception of its centerpiece track, the elegiac and oft-quoted “Mrs. Robinson” — which only appears here as a pair of fragments — the Simon & Garfunkel songs that comprise much of the record (a series of Dave Grusin instrumentals round it out) appeared on the duo’s two preceding LPs; Nichols’ masterstroke was to transplant those songs into his film, where they not only meshed perfectly with the story’s themes of youthful rebellion and alienation (and the inner life of the central character, Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock) but also heralded a new era in movie music centered around the appropriation of past pop hits, a marketing gimmick that grew exponentially in the years to follow.

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The Graduate soundtrack, then, merits the dubious honor of being the earliest and one of the most successful Hollywood repackagings of “found” pop songs, a formula essentially based around coercing fans to purchase soundtrack albums filled with material they already own in order to acquire the occasional new track or two.

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The album began its life because of Nichols’ enthusiasm for the duo’s music, and Columbia Records chief Clive Davis’ ability to persuade the pair of the importance of a soundtrack LP. Davis turned the actual making of the album over to producer Teo Macero, who approached it with skepticism — Paul Simon and Mike Nichols had discovered that they really weren’t on the same page, with Nichols rejecting “Overs” and “Punky’s Dilemma,” songs that ended up as highlights of the Bookends album, issued two months after The Graduate soundtrack.

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Thus, there wasn’t enough Simon & Garfunkel material to fill even one LP side, and only about eight minutes of that were “new” recordings, and barely a quarter of that (the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments) new song material. And there also wasn’t enough of David Grusin’s instrumental music (none of which meshed with the duo’s work) for an album. Macero combined this material into a musically awkward LP that somehow did its job — which, in Davis’ eyes, was to introduce Simon & Garfunkel’s music to the parents of their existing audience (topping the charts in the bargain, and turning Grusin’s “Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha” into a favorite of easy listening stations).

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Fans of Simon & Garfunkel likely felt cheated by the presence of the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments, as well as repeats of the 1966-vintage “The Sound of Silence” and “April Come She Will,” and an edited extension of “Scarborough Fair/Canticle.” But there were two curiosities for the completist — a high-wattage, edited rendition of “The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine” (in a style seemingly parodying the sound of Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited); and a gentle, subdued acoustic reprise of “The Sound of Silence,” which was possibly the best studio rendition the duo ever. (by Bruce Eder)

But we should not forget, that the soundtrack, written by Dave Grusin is a great one … Listen to “A Great Effect” ..  a wonderful jazz tune.

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Personnel:
Art Garfunkel (vocals)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
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Dave Grusin & orchestra (additional music)

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Tracklist:
01. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.07
02. The Singleman Party Foxtrot (Grusin) 2.53
03. Mrs. Robinson (Version 1) (Simon) 1.15
04. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha (Grusin) 2:53
05. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Interlude) (Traditional) 1.42
06. On The Strip (Grusin) 2.01
07. April Come She Will (Simon) 1.50
08. The Folks (Grusin) 2.28
09. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Traditional) 6.22
10. A Great Effect (Grusin) 4.07
11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (Simon) 1-46
12. Whew (Grusin) 2.12
13. Mrs. Robinson (Version 2) (Simon) 1.13
14. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.06

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Happy Birthday !

Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937)

Various Artists – The Twilight Saga – New Moon (OST) (2009)

FrontCover1The Twilight Saga: New Moon (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) is the official soundtrack for the 2009 film The Twilight Saga: New Moon. The score for New Moon was composed by Alexandre Desplat while the rest of the soundtrack was chosen by music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas, who also produced the Twilight soundtrack. The New Moon – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack album was released on October 16, 2009[3] by Patsavas’ Chop Shop label, in conjunction with Atlantic Records.

 
New Moon’s soundtrack comprises songs that are all original and exclusive to the soundtrack and are performed by various indie rock and alternative rock artists. New Moon director Chris Weitz stated that the soundtrack would feature songs from Radiohead, Muse, and Band of Skulls. Death Cab for Cutie contributed the soundtrack’s lead single, a song written specifically for the film called “Meet Me on the Equinox”, which debuted September 13 during the MTV Video Music Awards Bassist Nick Harmer says, “We wrote ‘Meet Me On the Equinox’ to reflect the celestial themes and motifs that run throughout the Twilight series and we wanted to capture that desperate feeling of endings and beginnings that so strongly affect the main characters.”[6] The music video for “Meet Me on the Equinox” premiered on October 7, 2009 and includes clips from the movie.[7] The English rock band Muse contributed a remix of their song “I Belong to You”, which appears in its original form on their 2009 album The Resistance. St. Vincent collaborated with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon to create a song called “Rosyln”. When describing the song, she said, “[Justin] sings in his beautiful falsetto and I’m actually singing very, very low… I think there’s something vampirey and creepy about the two of us singing together. It’s a simple, stripped-down kind of song.” The soundtrack originally had a release date of October 20, 2009, but the date was moved up four days to October 16 due to “overwhelming and unprecedented demand”. (by wikipedia)

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After Twilight became a world-wide hit, the film series based on Stephenie Meyer’s series of vampire romance books got a major upgrade. More time, effort, and money were poured into the second film, New Moon, and nowhere is this clearer than the film’s soundtrack. New Moon’s music is darker, more sophisticated, and much more indie-friendly than its predecessor’s soundtrack, and features more of the artists Meyer credits for inspiring her writing. One is Muse, whose “I Belong to You (New Moon Remix)” is so dramatic that it’s easy to hear how the band inspired Meyer’s angst-filled love triangle between the clumsy yet somehow irresistible Bella Swan, her vampire boyfriend Edward Cullen and her best friend (and werewolf) Jacob Black. Meyer also cites Radiohead as a big influence, and Thom Yorke’s previously unreleased “Hearing Damage” is New Moon’s main attraction.

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Drifting in on buzzing synth bass, the song builds to luminous, ghostly heights that make it one of the album’s highlights. However, it’s not the only one: Death Cab for Cutie’s “Meet Me on the Equinox” is more brooding and rock-tinged than the band’s usual approach, but it fits in beautifully with New Moon’s sullen mood, while the close harmonies and piano on the Killers’ “White Demon Love Song” inject some much-needed drama. Indeed, despite the fact that this soundtrack is more musically satisfying, and certainly more star-studded than the first film’s, Twilight felt more like the world Meyer created in her books — melodramatic, earnest, definitely not reeking of indie rock cool. Even if nothing here nails that vibe the way that Paramore’s “Decode” did, Lykke Li’s “Possibility” and Anya Marina’s “Satellite Heart” still offer winsome indie folk backgrounds for Bella’s moping. Despite a few upbeat moments that stick out like a thumb that isn’t sore, songs like Grizzly Bear and Victoria Legrand’s “Slow Life,” Editors’ “No Sound But the Wind,” and Bon Iver and St. Vincent’s lovely, truly odd “Roslyn” are morose enough for die-hard Twilight fans and stylish enough to please the most discerning music snobs. (by Heather Phares)

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Tracklist:
01. Death Cab for Cutie: Meet Me on the Equinox  3.41
02. Band of Skulls: Friends 3.03
03. Thom Yorke: Hearing Damage  5.04
04. Lykke Li: Possibility 5:06
05. The Killers: A White Demon Love Song 3:34
06. Anya Marina: Satellite Heart 3:33
07. Muse: I Belong to You [New Moon Remix] 3:12
08. Bon Iver and St. Vincent Bella: Roslyn 4:49
09. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: Done All Wrong 2:49
10. Hurricane Bells: Monsters 3:16
11. Sea Wolf: The Violet Hour 3:32
12. OK Go: Shooting the Moon 3:18
13. Grizzly Bear featuring Victoria Legrand: Slow Life 4:21
14. Editors: No Sound But the Wind 3:48
15. Alexandre Desplat: New Moon (The Meadow) 4:09

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Various Artists – Boys On The Side (OST) (1995)

FrontCover1Boys on the Side is a 1995 American comedy-drama film directed by Herbert Ross (in his final film as a director). It stars Whoopi Goldberg, Drew Barrymore and Mary-Louise Parker as three friends on a cross-country road trip. The screenplay was written by Don Roos.

 

Three unique women embark on a cross-country road trip: Jane (Whoopi Goldberg), a lesbian lounge singer in search of a new life after breaking up with her girlfriend and getting fired; Holly (Drew Barrymore), a pregnant girl who just wants to escape her brutal boyfriend; and Robin (Mary-Louise Parker), an uptight real estate agent who has her own secrets (namely being infected with HIV).

Robin puts an ad in the newspaper that she is looking for a traveling companion to accompany her on a cross country trip to California. Jane answers the ad and agrees to join Robin after her car gets towed during their meeting. Jane and Robin leave New York City and travel through Pittsburgh to take Jane’s friend Holly to lunch. They stumble across a knock out-fight between Holly and her abusive boyfriend, Nick, over some missing drugs.

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They leave him there bound to a chair with tape after Holly hits him in the head with a bat to stop him from attacking Jane. Later, he frees himself from the chair, stumbles across the floor, falls and hits his head on the bat and dies. The three unlikely travelers then form a special friendship on their journey which sees them through ultimately tragic times.

After discovering that Nick is dead and that Holly is pregnant, the three women decide to continue across country and end up in Tucson, Arizona when Robin has to be hospitalized. They decide to stay in Tucson, hoping to start a new life. However, Jane has a secret crush on Robin, Holly falls in love with and eventually confesses to a local police officer named Abe Lincoln (Matthew McConaughey), and Robin finds the courage to face her impending death.

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Shortly after Jane and Robin have a falling out over Jane telling a friendly bartender (James Remar) who was interested in Robin that she has HIV, Holly is arrested by Abe. She is taken back to Pittsburgh to face the consequences of her actions. The return to Pittsburgh involves Robin and Jane making peace with each other on the courthouse’s “Bridge of Sighs” while the Pittsburgh Police process Holly.

A few months pass, in Tucson, Holly is free and with Abe and her daughter, which is celebration to all family and friends. Robin is now farther along with AIDS and is not expected to live much longer. The party asks Robin to sing the Roy Orbison song “You Got It” as she performed that song in a Star Search contest; though weak, she manages to sing with Jane backing her singing. In the final scene, Robin has died from AIDS as her wheelchair is now empty, Holly and Abe plan to stay in Arizona and become a family, while Jane hits the road to finally seek a life of her own.

The film’s soundtrack album is made up entirely of contributions from female pop/rock artists, including lesbian icons Melissa Etheridge (“I Take You With Me”), Joan Armatrading (“Willow”) and the Indigo Girls (“Power of Two”). Previous hit singles by Annie Lennox (“Why”) and The Cranberries (“Dreams”) are also included, as are new recordings by Sheryl Crow, Sarah McLachlan, Stevie Nicks and The Pretenders among others. The hit single from the movie soundtrack was Bonnie Raitt’s cover of the Roy Orbison hit “You Got It”, which peaked at #34 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. (by wikipedia)

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Boys on the Side is a collection of mainstream ’90s rock dominated by female artists, which is appropriate for the feminist nature of the film. Not all of the music is first-rate, but much of it is, particularly Bonnie Raitt’s cover of Roy Orbison’s “You Got It.” Fans of the film will find much to enjoy here, but the record doesn’t quite hold together as an individual entity. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

This is just such an amazingly wonderful collection of beautiful songs, from the movie of the same title. This CD is like a warm, happy, occasionally sad, emotional journey through the eyes & hearts of some really talented women! I’m going to stockpile some more copies of this CD, as I never want to be without it! (by Mary Jo Ashleyon)

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This has always been one of my favorite CDs, given the assortment of some of the best tracks of a series of female artists. Recently on a trip out west I inadvertently left the CD playing when my daughter (4th grade) got in the car–it is now her favorite album as well, and I don’t have to listen to the teeny bop music she usually pleads for–what a relief!!
I had never heard many of these artists before, given that I stopped hearing new artists about when my daughter was born and Raffi took over our lives, and it was such a delight to discover so much talent–it really sent me out to get acquainted with more of their music on their own individual albums. (by an Amazon customer)

This is a strong album for strong women … And I love strong women …

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Tracklist:
01. Bonnie Raitt: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.25
02. Melissa Etheridge: I Take You With Me (Etheridge) 4.48
03. Sheryl Crow: Keep On Growing (Clapton/Whitlock) 5.24
04. Indigo Girls: Power Of Two (Saliers) 5.22
05. Stevie Nicks:  Somebody Stand By Me (Crow/Wolfe) 5.05
06. The Pretenders: Everyday Is Like Sunday (Morrissey/Street) 3.41
07. The Cranberries; Dreams (Hogan/O’Riordan) 4.30
08. Annie Lennox: Why (Lennox) 4.53
09. Sarah McLachlan: Ol’ 55 (Waits) 4.11
10. Joan Armatrading: Willow (Armatrading) 4.01
11. Jonell Mosser: Crossroads (Johnson) 2.49
12. Whoopi Goldberg: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.08
13. Bonnie Raitt: You Got It (Lynne/Orbison/Petty) 3.25

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Angelo Badalamenti – Music From Twin Peaks (OST) (1990)

FrontCover1The music of the American television series Twin Peaks, and its 1992 sequel film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, was composed by Angelo Badalamenti. Twin Peaks’ co-creator David Lynch wrote lyrics for five songs used throughout the series—including “Falling”, “The Nightingale”, “Into the Night”, “Just You” and “Sycamore Trees”—and three songs featured in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, including “A Real Indication”, “Questions in a World of Blue” and “The Black Dog Runs at Night.” Julee Cruise, who made cameo appearances in both the series and film, provided vocals for four of Lynch’s and Badalamenti’s collaborations, and jazz vocalist Jimmy Scott performed on “Sycamore Trees.” Three of the series actors, James Marshall, Lara Flynn Boyle and Sheryl Lee, provided vocals for “Just You.”

Badalamenti’s compositions have been released on three soundtrack albums: Soundtrack from Twin Peaks (1990), Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) and Twin Peaks Music: Season Two Music and More (2007). Starting in March 2011, David Lynch began distributing The Twin Peaks Archive, a collection of previously unreleased and unused songs on his official web site for digital download. In total, 215 songs were made available for download.

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Twin Peaks’ music has received widespread critical acclaim. The Guardian has said that the original soundtrack “still marks the summit of TV Soundtracks” and Allmusic reviewer Stephen Eddins has referred to it as “a model of film music ideally matched to the images and actions it underscores.” The main theme song to Twin Peaks, composed by Badalamenti, also received a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance at the 1991 Grammy Awards.

All the songs from the album were written by Angelo Badalamenti, who received the 1991 Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “Twin Peaks Theme”. Most of the songs are instrumental pieces, but three songs that contain lyrics were written by David Lynch. These three songs are available on the singer Julee Cruise’s album Floating into the Night. Cruise’s album also contains songs that were used in the series, but are not included in any soundtrack release. (by wikipedia)

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Composer Angelo Badalamenti (Cousins) set the tone for David Lynch’s bizarre television soap with a haunting theme created from electric piano, synthetic strings, and the twangiest guitar this side of Duane Eddy. The love theme, appropriately enough, sounds like a funeral march. (The series’ central character was found dead at the beginning of the first episode.) The rest of the music, instantly recognizable to anyone who saw even one episode of the series, borders on fever-dream jazz. Lynch favorite Julee Cruise sings the only three vocal songs. The music from Twin Peaks is dark, cloying, and obsessive — and one of the best scores ever written for television. (by Brian Mansfield)

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And yes … I´m a real fan of “Twin Peaks” … till today and this soundtrack is one of the finest soundtracks ever !

Listen to the Magic “Twin Peaks Theme 2 or to “Dance Of The Dream Man” and you´ll know, what I mean !

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Personnel:
Angelo Badalamenti (piano, synthesizer)
Vinnie Bell (guitar)
Julee Cruise (vocals on 04, 07. + 11.)
Eddie Daniels (flute, clarinet)
Eddie Dixon (guitar)
Kinny Landrum (Synthesizer)
Al Regni (saxophone, clarinet, flute)
Grady Tate (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Twin Peaks Theme (Instrumental) 5.10
02. Laura Palmer’s Theme (Instrumental) 4.52
03. Audrey’s Dance (Instrumental) 5.17
04. The Nightingale (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.56
05. Freshly Squeezed (Instrumental) 3.48
06. The Bookhouse Boys (Instrumental) 3.29
07. Into The Night (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.44
08. Night Life In Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 3.27
09. Dance Of The Dream Man (Instrumental) 3.41
10. Love Theme From Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 5.04
11. Falling (vocal by Julee Cruise) 5.21

All music composed by Angelo Badalamenti
All lyrics by David Lynch

 

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Various Artists – Moulin Rouge (OST (2002)

FrontCover1Moulin Rouge!  is a 2001 Australian–American jukebox musical romantic comedy film directed, produced, and co-written by Baz Luhrmann. It tells the story of a young English poet/writer, Christian (Ewan McGregor), who falls in love with the star of the Moulin Rouge, cabaret actress and courtesan Satine (Nicole Kidman). It uses the musical setting of the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France.

At the 74th Academy Awards, the film was nominated for eight Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Actress for Nicole Kidman, winning two: for Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design. It was the first musical nominated for Best Picture in 10 years, following Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (1991). (by wikipedia)

 

The story:

MoviePosterThe year is 1899, and Christian, a young English writer, has come to Paris to follow the Bohemian revolution taking hold of the city’s drug and prostitute infested underworld. And nowhere is the thrill of the underworld more alive than at the Moulin Rouge, a night club where the rich and poor men alike come to be entertained by the dancers, but things take a wicked turn for Christian as he starts a deadly love affair with the star courtesan of the club, Satine. But her affections are also coveted by the club’s patron: the Duke. A dangerous love triangle ensues as Satine and Christian attempt to fight all odds to stay together but a force that not even love can conquer is taking its toll on Satine… (by imdb.com)

Moulin Rouge! Music from Baz Luhrmann’s Film is a soundtrack album to Baz Luhrmann’s 2001 film Moulin Rouge!. It was released on May 8, 2001. The album features most of the songs featured in the film. However, some of the songs are alternate versions and there are two or three major songs that are left off. The original film versions and extra songs were featured on the second soundtrack.

The soundtrack consists almost entirely of cover versions—”Come What May”, composed by David Baerwald and Kevin Gilbert, is the only original song on the album. The opening track, “Nature Boy”, is performed by David Bowie, though in the film the song is performed by actor John Leguizamo as the character Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Originally by American singer-songwriter Eden Ahbez, the song is reprised as the last song on the soundtrack with performances by Bowie and Massive Attack, along with a dialogue by Nicole Kidman.

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“Lady Marmalade”, written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan, was made famous in the 1970s by the girl group Labelle. The song contains the sexually-suggestive lyric “Voulez-vous coucher avec moi, ce soir?”, which translates to “Do you want to sleep with me tonight?” Labelle’s version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2003. The version for the soundtrack is performed by Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Mýa, and Pink, with production and additional vocal credits by Missy Elliott. The song was well-received, topping the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States and earning a Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals[9][10] (see here for additional information about the Moulin Rouge! version, including additional chart positions and awards).

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“Because We Can” is credited to Norman Cook, with performance and production credits given to his stage name Fatboy Slim. The song contains portions of “Zidler’s Rap”, performed in the film by Jim Broadbent as the character Harold Zidler, and has been called the “‘Can Can’ for the next generation”. “Sparkling Diamonds” is performed by Kidman, Broadbent, Caroline O’Connor, Natalie Mendoza and Lara Mulcahy. The song is a medley featuring “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend”, written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin and introduced by Carol Channing in the Broadway production of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), and “Material Girl” by Madonna. “Rhythm of the Night” was a hit single made famous in 1985 by the American R&B group DeBarge. The track reached number one on the Billboard Hot R&B chart and number three on the Billboard Hot 100, and is said to have “jumpstarted” the career of songwriter Diane Warren. The soundtrack version is performed by Valeria, and includes a dialogue by Kidman. (by wikipedia)

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At the very least, director Baz Luhrmann has created something different here. His modern-day musical weaves new cover versions of songs from the past three decades into one story about a brothel in turn of the century Paris. Its an odd combination to begin with, and the soundtrack itself bounces back and forth between very hip, modern tracks from artists at the top of their game and big Broadway-style ballads from the cast of the film. Some of the most well-respected names in music signed on for the project, including Beck, Bono, Timbaland, and David Bowie. Fatboy Slim created a “Can Can” for the next generation with “Because We Can,” and Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Pink, and Mya teamed up for a surefire hit with their naughtier version of Patti Labelle’s “Lady Marmalade.” In stark contrast to these edgy tracks, the album spends the rest of its time on love songs from Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman. They perform big-voiced, orchestra-backed versions of sentimental favorites like Elton John’s “Your Song.” The “Elephant Love Medley” strings together some of pop’s sappiest hits, including “Up Where We Belong,” “One More Night,” and “I Will Always Love You.” Perhaps to many people’s surprise, Kidman and McGregor can really sing, and maybe in a different environment it would be easier to take these songs seriously, but standing here outside the context of the film and next to Beck covering David Bowie, they seem more comic than creative. (by Brad Kohlenstein)
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Tracklist:
01. David Bowie: Nature Boy (Ahbez) 3.25
02. Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Mýa and P!nk: Lady Marmalade (Crewe/Nolan) 4.25
03. Fatboy Slim: Because We Can (Cook) 3.27
04. Nicole Kidman, Jim Broadbent, Lara Mulcahy, Caroline O’Connor and Natalie Mendoza: Sparkling Diamonds (Brown/Rans) 2.52
05. Valeria: Rhythm Of The Night (Warren) 3.49
06. Ewan McGregor and Alessandro Safina:  Your Song (John/Taupin)  3:40
07. Bono, Gavin Friday and Maurice Seezer:  Children of the Revolution (Bolan) 2.59
08. Nicole Kidman: One Day I’ll Fly Away (Sample/Jennings) 3.18
09. Beck: Diamond Dogs (Bowie) 4.34
10. Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor and Jamie Allen: Elephant Love Medley (  4:13
11. Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor: Come What May (Baerwald) 4.48
12. José Feliciano, Ewan McGregor and Jacek Koman: El Tango de Roxanne (Sting) 4.42
13. Rufus Wainwright: Complainte de la Butte (Pepin/Wainwright) 3.07
14. John Leguizamo, Nicole Kidman, Joe Leguabe and Alka Yagnik: Hindi Sad Diamonds (  3:28
15. David Bowie and Massive Attack: Nature Boy (Ahbez) 4.23
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Various Artists – The Rocky Horror Picture Show (OST) (1975)

FrrontCover1The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the original soundtrack album to the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show, an adaptation of the musical The Rocky Horror Show that had opened in 1973. The soundtrack was released as an album in 1975 by Ode Records, produced by Richard Hartley.
This low-budget freak show/cult classic/cultural institution concerns the misadventures of Brad Majors (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss (Susan Sarandon) inside a strange mansion that they come across on a rainy night. After the wholesome pair profess their love through an opening song, their car breaks down in the woods, and they seek refuge in a towering castle nearby. Greeting them at the door is a ghoulish butler named Riff Raff (Richard O’Brien), who introduces them to a bacchanalian collection of partygoers dressed in outfits from some sort of interplanetary thrift shop. The host of this gathering is a transvestite clad in lingerie, Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry), a mad scientist who claims to be from another planet. With assistants Columbia (Nell Campbell) and Magenta (Patricia Quinn) looking on, Frank unveils his latest creation — a figure wrapped in gauze and submerged in a tank full of liquid.

With the addition of colored dyes and some assistance from the weather, Frank brings to life a blonde young beefcake wearing nothing but skimpy shorts, who launches into song in his first minute of life. Just when Brad and Janet think things couldn’t get any stranger, a biker (Meat Loaf) bursts onto the scene to reclaim Columbia, his ex-girlfriend. When Frank kills the biker, it’s clear that Brad and Janet will be guests for the night, and that they may be next on Frank’s list — whether for murder or carnal delights is uncertain. And just what is that mystery meat they’re eating for dinner, anyway? In addition to playing Riff Raff, O’Brien wrote the catchy songs, with John Barry and Richard Hartley composing the score. (vy Derek Armstrong)

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The album peaked at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 in 1978. It reached No. 12 on the Australian albums chart and No. 11 on the New Zealand albums chart. William Ruhlmann of Allmusic gave the album a star rating of five stars out of five and described it as the “definitive version of the [Rocky Horror] score”.

Following its initial release, the album was not successful, and was deleted everywhere but in Canada. Marty Scott, co-founder of Jem Records, obtained a licensing agreement from Ode Records owner Lou Adler, which enabled the album to be imported to the United States. Scott also obtained a production and distribution license from Adler, which resulted in renewed interest in the album.

The soundtrack omits two of the songs sung in the film: Rocky’s “The Sword of Damocles”, and the Frank-N-Furter-led “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” (often erroneously referred to as “Wise Up, Janet Weiss”). Also omitted is “Once in a While,” which was shot for the film but later unincluded.
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“The Sword of Damocles” and “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” are included on the album “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” however “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” is missing the last verse (don’t get hot and flustered) and they are in mono and ported directly from the film itself and so include all the sound effects and dialogue that would normally be omitted from a soundtrack album.
In 2011 these three songs were released, as MP3 format only, in their stereo, studio mixes on the download only release “The Rocky Horror Picture Show Complete Soundtrack: Absolute Treasures 2011 Special Edition”. The album was later issued on double red vinyl for the film’s 40th anniversary. However, incidental music and cues are not included and “The Sword of Damocles” features an unknown lead vocalist in place of Trevor White. The latter is included with Trevor White’s vocals as a bonus track for the iTunes edition; this is the same version found on the “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” release, albeit in stereo and contains the dialogue and sound effects from the film. (by wikipedia)
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For the 1975 film version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, American producer Lou Adler wisely mixed the best of the London and Los Angeles stage versions, shooting the movie in England with Tim Curry and several of the other original cast members, plus Meatloaf (years before Bat Out of Hell), and Americans Barry Bostwick and Susan Sarandon as the innocent couple Brad and Janet. Adler also brought back original London stage musicians in place of the slick studio musicians who had marred the L.A. cast album. The film version resequenced the songs and reassigned some of the vocals, with Brad’s song “Once in a While” dropped. But it all worked out fine. The strings that were added to ballads like “Science Fiction/Double Feature” only improved them; the rockers rocked out; Bostwick and Sarandon proved to be the best Brad and Janet ever; the original cast members, especially Curry, reveled in the opportunity to immortalize their portrayals; and Rocky Horror’s potential as a witty parody of cheap movies, rock & roll, and sexual mores was fully realized.

The film soundtrack album became the definitive version of the score, despite lacking the songs “Planet Shmanet Janet” and “The Sword of Damocles.” The Rocky Horror Picture Show was not successful in its initial theatrical run, but then a strange thing happened. In 1976, the Waverly Theater in New York’s Greenwich Village began showing the film at midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Soon, a cult of repeat viewers began turning up every week; they began to dress like the characters, call out their own comments at strategic moments, sing along, and add their own theatrical effects. The phenomenon spread across the U.S., with fans rivaling Trekkies and Deadheads for loyalty and eccentricity, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show took on a life Richard O’Brien never could have anticipated. (William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Count Ian Blair (guitar)
John Bundrick (keyboards)
Mick Grabham (guitar)
Phil Kenzie (saxophone)
B.J. Wilson (drums)
Dave Wintour (bass)
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background vocals:
Abigale Haness – Susan Morse – Bruce Scott
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Trackist:

Richard O’Brien:
01. Science Fiction/Double Feature 4.30

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon:
02. Dammit Janet 2.51

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Richard O’Brien:
03. Over At The Frankenstein Place 2.37

Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Little Nell:
04. Time Warp 3.15

Tim Curry:
05. Sweet Transvestite 3.21
06. I Can Make You A Man 2.07

Meat Loaf:
07. Hot Patootie – Bless My Soul  3.00

Tim Curry:
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8. I Can Make You A Man (Reprise) 1.44

Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Patricia Quinn:
09. Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch Me 2.27

Jonathan Adams, Little Nell, Susan Sarandon, Tim Curry:
10. Eddie 2.44

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Peter Hinwood, Tim Curry, Trevor White, Jonathan Adams   :
11.1. Rose Tint My World :
11.2. Floor Show
11.3. Fanfare/Don’t Dream It
11.4. Wild and Untamed Thing 8.13

Tim Curry:
12. I’m Going Home 2.48

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Jonathan Adams:
13. Super Heroes 2.45

Richard O’Brien:
14. Science Fiction/Double Feature (Reprise) 1.26
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15. Time Warp (1989 remix – extended version) 5.36
16. Time Warp (music – 1 = background track = U mix) 4.09

All Songs written by Richard O’Brien.
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Various Artists – A Love Song For Bobby Long (OST) (2005)

frontcover1A Love Song for Bobby Long is a 2004 American drama film written and directed by Shainee Gabel. The screenplay is based on the novel Off Magazine Street by Ronald Everett Capps.
Eighteen-year-old Purslane (Pursy) Hominy Will leaves a Florida trailer park where she lives with her abusive boyfriend to return to her hometown of New Orleans following the drug overdose death of her jazz singer mother Lorraine, a free spirit whom Pursy had not seen for several years. The girl is startled to discover one-time Auburn University professor of literature Bobby Long and his protégé and former teaching assistant, struggling writer Lawson Pines, living in her mother’s dilapidated fixer-upper home. Both men are heavy drinkers who spend their days smoking numerous cigarettes, quoting Dylan Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, and T.S. Eliot, playing chess, and spending time with the neighbors while Bobby strums a guitar and sings melancholy country-folk songs. The two convince Pursy her mother left the house to all three of them, although in reality she is the sole heir and the time they legally are allowed to remain in it is limited by the terms of the will.
Pursy moves in and proves to be the most responsible and sensible member of the dysfunctional family the three create. The men’s efforts to drive her away gradually abate as they grow fond of her with the passing of time. Bobby – unshaven, slovenly, and suffering from ailments he prefers to ignore – attempts to improve the lot of the young girl by introducing her to The Heart is a Lonely Hunter and encouraging her to return to high school and get her diploma. Lawson, suffering from writer’s block, finds himself attracted to Pursy but hesitant to complicate his life further by becoming involved with her. Memories of Lorraine linger for all of them, especially Pursy, who vividly recalls her mother ignoring her in favor of pursuing a career. Her sense of who her mother was is altered somewhat when she finds a cache of letters Lorraine wrote her but never mailed, letters that lead her to discover not only how her mother really felt about her, but the true identity of her father as well. (by wikipedia)
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And here´s the Soundtrack of this movie:
The soundtrack to Shainee Gabel’s directorial debut, A Love Song for Bobby Long, is steeped in the regional sounds of New Orleans. Based on the novel Off Magazine Street by Everett Capps, the film, starring Scarlett Johansson, Gabriel Macht, and John Travolta — the latter performs two cuts (“Barbara Allen” and the Howard Barnes/Don Robertson hit “I Really Don’t Want to Know”) — focuses on the grittier, blue-collar side of the Big Easy. Capps’ son, singer/songwriter Grayson Capps, provides three of the compilation’s most affective tracks, “Washboard Lisa,” “Love Song for Bobby Long,” and a gorgeous duet with Theresa Andersson called “Lorraine’s Song (My Heart Was a Lonely Hunter) — both have cameos in the film. Nathan Larson’s brief but powerfully atmospheric score appears twice, casting a long shadow of melancholy that permeates classic cuts from celebrated bluesman Lonnie Pitchford, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Magic Slim, and Big Bill Morganfield. Other highlights include Los Lobos’ previously unreleased “Someday,” an outtake from 1990’s Neighborhood, and Nada Surf’s achingly nostalgic “Blonde on Blonde,” rounding out a collection that effortlessly and continuously provides the listener with dusk-tipped emotionality and a succinct sense of place. (by James Christopher Monger)
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Not only the perfect background music, but the backbone of a little and precious independent movie that blends together love, life, death, literature, music, loneliness, friendship, failures, heavy hungovers, redemption…
Young and talented songwriters (Grayson Capps, Nathan Larson), indie acts (Nada Surf, Trespassers William), blues legends (Lightnin’ Hopkins, Magic Slim & the Teardrops) and John Travolta himself (singin’ a couple of numbers including the traditional Barbara Allen) all cooperate to give birth to a collection of trembling and at the same time intimate songs that accompanies the story of the tortured existence of Mr Bobby Long & his Friends in a New Orleans never as charming and mysterious as here.
An hidden gem not to be missed. (by tenentedrogo)
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Tracklist:
01. Los Lobos: Someday (Hidalgo/Perez) 3.44
02. Grayson Capps & Theresa Andersson:  Lorraine’s Song (My Heart Was A Lonely Hunter) (Capps) 4.50
03. Thalia Zedek: Bone (Zedek) 4.35
04. Nathan Larson, Joan Wasser & Lyle Molzan:  Bobby (Original Score) (Larson) 1.48
05. Trespassers William: Different Stars (Williams) 4.45
06. Lonnie Pitchford: Lonesome Blues (Pitchford) 5.34
07. Magic Slim & The Teardrops:  Early Every Morning (Holt) 5.08
08. John Travolta: I Really Don’t Want To Know (Barnes/Robertson) 0.54
09. John Travolta: Barbara Allen (Traditional) 1.02
10. Giant Drag: This Isn’t It (Hardy) 3.00
11. Nathan Larson, Joan Wasser & Lyle Molzan:  Daughter Like Mother (Larson) 1.59
12. Big Bill Morganfield: Rising Son (Morganfield) 4.18
13. Grayson Capps: Washboard Lisa (Capps) 3.24
14. Nada Surf: Blonde On Blonde (Caws) 4.30
15. Lightnin’ Hopkins: Praying Ground Blues (Ellen) 2.59
16. Grayson Capps: Love Song For Bobby Long (Capps) 4.52
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Thanks to greygoose for the tip !