Scotty Moore – The Guitar That Changed The World (1964)

FrontCover1Winfield Scott “Scotty” Moore III (December 27, 1931 – June 28, 2016) was an American guitarist and recording engineer who formed The Blue Moon Boys in 1954, Elvis Presley’s backing band. He was studio and touring guitarist for Presley between 1954 and 1968.

Rock critic Dave Marsh credits Moore with the invention of power chording, on the 1957 Presley song “Jailhouse Rock”, the intro of which Moore and drummer D.J. Fontana, according to the latter, “copped from a ’40s swing version of ‘The Anvil Chorus’.” Moore was ranked 29th in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2011. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000, the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2007, and the Memphis Music Hall of Fame in 2015. The Rolling Stones’ lead guitarist Keith Richards has said of Moore:

When I heard “Heartbreak Hotel”, I knew what I wanted to do in life. It was as plain as day. All I wanted to do in the world was to be able to play and sound like that. Everyone else wanted to be Elvis, I wanted to be Scotty. (by wikipedia)

Scotty Moore01

Scotty Moore’s guitar, as represented on Elvis Presley’s Sun sides in 1954 and 1955, did help in a big way to change the world. But 1964 was definitely not the year in which for Moore or Epic Records to try and remind anyone that fact, even with Elvis alumni D.J. Fontana (drums), Bob Moore (bass), Boots Randolph (sax), Jerry Kennedy (guitar), Buddy Harman (drums), Bill Pursell (piano), and the Jordanaires aboard. The Guitar That Changed the World passed largely without notice that year, becoming a curiously mistimed attempt at a career move. Apart from its sense of timing, the album’s problems included having more of a Nashville than a Memphis sound, being a little too mid-tempo and relaxed, and having too much sax and country piano. Without Elvis’ presence, there wasn’t going to be an overabundance of sexuality, nothing like the excitement of the originals, in these re-recordings of “That’s All Right,” “Hound Dog,” “Money Honey,” “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Milk Cow Blues,” “Mystery Train,” and so on, but the country sound here is a little too pale, and a little too close in spirit to Chet Atkins.

Scotty Moore03

Rather than trying to pick up where he’d left off at Sun in 1955, or even recreating the pseudo-Sun sound of Elvis’ early RCA singles, Moore aimed for more of a mature, virtuoso performance — he plays beautifully and dexterously, but not with much excitement or any attempt to elicit excitement from the listener; he and the rest concentrate more on precision, and the resulting album is strong there and weak in most other departments. It’s beautifully, carefully played but nothing like spontaneous, cutting-edge rock & roll. Guitar buffs and Elvis completists will want this, but others should hear it also, if only to get a glimpse of what Elvis’ sidemen (and collaborators, in Moore’s case) could do on their own. (by Bruce Eder)

BackCover1

Personnel:
D.J. Fontana (drums)
Buddy Harman (drums)
Jerry Kennedy (guitar)
Bob Moore (bass)
Scotty Moore (guitar)
Bill Pursell (piano)
Boots Randolph (saxophone)
+
The Jordanaires (background vocals)

Scotty Moore04

Tracklist:
01. Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) 2.11
02. Loving You (Leiber/Stoller) 2.34
03. Money Honey (Stone) 2.12
04. My Baby Left Me (Crudup) 2.22
05. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden) 2.45
06. That’s All Right (Crudup) 2.23
07. Milkcow Blues Boogie (Arnold) 2.28
08. Don’t (Leiber/Stoller) 2.46
09. Mystery Train (Parker/Phillips) 2.02
10. Don’t Be Cruel (Blackwell) 2.02
11. Love Me Tender (Matson) 2.46
12. Mean Woman Blues (Demetruis) 2.12

LabelB1

*
**

Scotty Moore02Scotty Moore (December 27, 1931 – June 28, 2016)

Elvis Presley – Opening Night (1969)

FrontCover1Known for a powerful stage presence in total command of every room he has ever worked. But backstage at the International Hotel on July 31, 1969, Elvis Presley was packing back and forth like a panther. In a few minutes, he would march out into what was then the largest showroom in Las Vegas, holding 2.000 people.

Dressed in a chic black tunic and bell bottoms that matched his long but neatly combed black-tinted hair. Elvis Presley stepped onstage last week at the International Hotel in Las Vegas and launched into the driving beat of ‘Blue Suede Shoes’. The audience of 2,000, most of them over 30, roared and squealed in nostalgic appreciation. In spite of his updated look, Elvis hadn’t changed at all in the nearly nine years since his last personal appearance. Shaking, gyrating and quivering, he again proved himself worthy of his nickname, The Pelvis. Through nervousness caused him to sing ‘Love my, me tender’ for ‘Love Me Tender’, the pasty-faced enchanter quickly settled down to work his oleaginous charms, backed by a 30-piece orchestra, a five-man combo and a chorus of seven. Oozing the sullen sexuality that threw the America into a state of shock in the 50’s, he groaned and swiveled through a medley of ‘Jailhouse Rock’, ‘Don’t Be Cruel’, ‘Heartbreak Hotel’, ‘All Shook Up’ and ‘Hound Dog’. It was hard to believe he was 34 and no longer 19 years old.

ElivsPresly1969_01

In fact, there are several unbelievable things about Elvis, but the most incredible is his staying power in a world where meteoric careers fade like shooting stars, Presley shot to the top in 1956 with ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ and has stayed in the uppermost tax bracket ever since.

Forty-seven of his singles have sold more than a million copies. He has made 32 movies, currently turning them out at a rate of four year and raking in a cool million plus half the profits for each. Presley’s income is estimated at $5 million a year and he spends it freely. Among his purchases are an antebellum mansion called Graceland near Memphis (the house is painted luminous blue and gold and glows in the dark), and a succession of cars including a gold Cadillac. No ones knows how much the boy from Memphis is being paid for his four week Las Vegas stand but, according to Presley associate, ‘Coming in on ElivsPresly1969_03the heels of Barbra Streisand, you know that it’s over a million’.

Credit for the successful maintenance of the Presley image goes largely to his canny manager, ‘Colonel’ Thomas Andrew Parker, who for almost fifteen years has kept the price up and the live exposure down.

When, during a news conference after the opening, a British entrepreneur offered Elvis a million pounds sterling for one appearance in London, it was Parker who answered: ‘Bring me a deposit tomorrow’. Presley doesn’t seem to mind letting Parker run interference, for he likes privacy and spends his free time holed up at one of his houses with his wife, his infant daughter and a group of buddy-bodyguards sometimes called the ‘Memphis Mafia’. Elvis arrived in Las Vegas a week before the show and immediately began rehearsing five hours a day-losing 10 pounds in the process. ‘He’s really working on this one’, said a stagehand. ‘He doesn’t know if he can still cut it.’ Presley magic were his loyal fans, women and teen-age girls, who lined the corridor outside his suite. ‘He’s better than ever’, claimed one girl. ‘His latest songs have been groovy’.

Only celebrities and big spenders were there opening night to hear Presley sing a lot of oldies and one new song, with a new message aimed at the black rock market. ‘In The ElivsPresly1969_05Ghetto’ chronicles the evils of poverty in a Chicago slum and could signal the birth of a social conscience for Presley. Another recent record release, ‘If I Can Dream’, proclaims brotherhood according to the gospel of Martin Luther King, but did not appear on the Vegas program. When asked if these songs marked a new direction he might take, Elvis answered, ‘I go by the material. When I got ‘In The Ghetto’, I couldn’t turn it down. It was too big’. It’s selling big, too-more than a million to date. Presley’s plans include other personal appearances, through no dates have been specified, and more movie roles. ‘I’m going after more serious material’, he said. ‘I’m tired of playing a guy who gets into a fight, then starts singing to the guy he’s just beat up’. And of course, the granddaddy of rock will continue trying to catch up with the times, sensing that he can’t trade on the power of nostalgia forever. ‘There are a lot of new records out now that have the same sound I started. But they’re better’, he admitted, ‘I mean, you can’t compare a song like ‘Yesterday’ with ‘Hound Dog’, can you?’ As Elvis came off the stage, he had tears in his eyes and was soaked in sweat, but this was the sweat of a job well done. (by Joe Esposito)

And even I´m much more in Chuck Berry, this is a surpringly good performance of this legend of Rock N Roll !

Recorded live at Las Vegas , Nevada (dinner show), August 03, 1969

BackCover1

Personnel:
James Burton (leadguitar)
Larry Muhoberac (piano)
Elvis Presley (vocals, guitar)
Jerry Scheff (bass)
Ron Tutt (drums)
John Wilkinson (guitar)
+
The Bobby Morris Orchestra
+
background vocals:
The Imperials Quartet – Millie Kirkham – The Sweet Inspirations – Charlie Hodge

ElivsPresly1969_04
Tracklist:
01. Blue Suede Shoes (Perkins) 2.47
02. I Got A Woman (Charles/Richard) 3.18
03. All Shook Up (Blackwell) 3.05
04. Love Me Tender (PoultonDarby) 3.05
05. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) / Don’t Be Cruel (Blackwell) 2.14
06. Heartbreak Hotel (Presley/Axton/Durden) 4.03
07. Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) 2.11
08. Memories (Strange/Davis) 3.58
09. Mystery Train (Parker) / Tiger Man (Burns/Lewis/Louis) 4.16
10. Life Story (Dialogue) (Presley) 4.40
11. Baby, What’d You Want Me To Do (Reed) 2.26
12 Are You Lonesome Tonight? (Turk/Handman) 3.14
13. Yesterday (Lennon/McCartney) 2.28
14.  Hey Jude (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
15. Band introductions 4.20
16. In The Ghetto (Davis) 3.09
17. Suspicious Minds (James) 8.02
18. What’d I Say (Charles) 4.28
19. Can’t Help Falling In Love (Weiss/Creatore/Peretti) 2,53

CD1

*
**

ElivsPresly1969_02
Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977)

Gene Vincent – The Crazy Beat Of Gene Vincent (1963)

FrontCover1Vincent Eugene Craddock (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971), known as Gene Vincent, was an American musician who pioneered the styles of rock and roll and rockabilly. His 1956 top ten hit with his Blue Caps, “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, is considered a significant early example of rockabilly. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

Craddock was born February 11, 1935, in Norfolk, Virginia, United States,[1] to Mary Louise and Ezekiah Jackson Craddock. His musical influences included country, rhythm and blues and gospel music. His favourite composition was Beethoven’s Egmont overture. He showed his first real interest in music while his family lived in Munden Point (now Virginia Beach), in Princess Anne County, Virginia, near the North Carolina line, where they ran a country store. He received his first guitar at the age of twelve as a gift from a friend.

Vincent’s father volunteered to serve in the U.S. Coast Guard and patrolled American coastal waters to protect Allied shipping against German U-boats during World War II. Vincent’s mother maintained the general store in Munden Point. His parents moved the family to Norfolk, the home of a large naval base, and opened a general store and sailors’ tailoring shop.

GeneVincent01Vincent dropped out of school in 1952, at the age of seventeen, and enlisted in the United States Navy. As he was under the age of enlistment, his parents signed the forms allowing him to enter. He completed boot camp and joined the fleet as a crewman aboard the fleet oiler USS Chukawan, with a two-week training period in the repair ship USS Amphion, before returning to the Chukawan. He never saw combat but completed a Korean War deployment. He sailed home from Korean waters aboard the battleship USS Wisconsin but was not part of the ship’s company.

Craddock planned a career in the Navy and, in 1955, used his $612 re-enlistment bonus to buy a new Triumph motorcycle. In July 1955, while he was in Norfolk, his left leg was shattered in a motorcycle crash. He refused to allow the leg to be amputated, and the leg was saved, but the injury left him with a limp and pain. He wore a steel sheath around the leg[3] for the rest of his life. Most accounts relate the accident as the fault of a drunk driver who struck him, but some claim Craddock had been riding drunk. Years later in some of his music biographies, there is no mention of an accident, but it was claimed that his injury was due to a wound incurred in combat in Korea. He spent time in the Portsmouth Naval Hospital and was medically discharged from the Navy shortly thereafter.

Craddock became involved in the local music scene in Norfolk. He changed his name to Gene Vincent and formed a rockabilly band, Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps (a term used in reference to enlisted sailors in the U.S. Navy). The band included Willie Williams on rhythm guitar (replaced in late 1956 by Paul Peek), Jack Neal on upright bass, Dickie Harrell on drums, and Cliff Gallup on lead guitar. He also collaborated with another rising musician, Jay Chevalier of Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Vincent and His Blue Caps soon gained a reputation playing in various country bars in Norfolk. There they won a talent contest organized by a local radio DJ, “Sheriff Tex” Davis, who became Vincent’s manager.

GeneVincent03

In 1956 he wrote “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, which drew comparisons to Elvis Presley[2] and which Rolling Stone magazine later listed as number 103 on its “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. Local radio DJ “Sheriff Tex” Davis arranged for a demo of the song to be made, and this secured Vincent a contract with Capitol Records. He signed a publishing contract with Bill Lowery of the Lowery Group of music publishers in Atlanta, Georgia. “Be-Bop-A-Lula” was not on Vincent’s first album and was picked by Capitol producer Ken Nelson as the B-side of his first single, “Woman Love”. Prior to the release of the single, Lowery pressed promotional copies of “Be-Bop-A-Lula” and sent them to radio stations throughout the country. By the time Capitol released the single, “Be-Bop-A-Lula” had already gained attention from the public and radio DJs. The song was picked up and played by other U.S. radio stations (obscuring the original A-side song) and became a hit, peaking at number 5 and spending 20 weeks on the Billboard pop chart and reaching number 5 and spending 17 weeks on the Cashbox chart, and launching Vincent’s career as a rock-and-roll star.

GeneVincent02After “Be-Bop-A-Lula” became a hit, Vincent and His Blue Caps were unable to follow it up with the same level of commercial success, although they released critically acclaimed songs like “Race with the Devil” (number 96 on the Billboard chart and number 50 on the Cashbox chart) and “Bluejean Bop” (number 49 on the Billboard chart and another million-selling disc).

Cliff Gallup left the band in 1956, and Russell Williford joined as the new guitarist for the Blue Caps. Williford played and toured Canada with Vincent in late 1956 but left the group in early 1957. Gallup came back to do the next album and then left again. Williford came back and exited again before Johnny Meeks joined the band. The group had another hit in 1957 with “Lotta Lovin'” (highest position number 13 and spending 19 weeks on the Billboard chart and number 17 and 17 weeks on the Cashbox chart). Vincent was awarded gold records for two million sales of “Be-Bop-A-Lula”,[8] and 1.5 million sales of “Lotta Lovin'”.[citation needed] The same year he toured the east coast of Australia with Little Richard and Eddie Cochran, drawing audiences totaling 72,000 to their Sydney Stadium concerts. Vincent also made an appearance in the film The Girl Can’t Help It, with Jayne Mansfield, performing “Be-Bop-A-Lula” with the Blue Caps in a rehearsal room. “Dance to the Bop” was released by Capitol Records on October 28, 1957. On November 17, 1957, Vincent and His Blue Caps performed the song on the nationally broadcast television program The Ed Sullivan Show.[10] The song spent nine weeks on the Billboard chart and peaked at number 23 on January 23, 1958 and reached number 36 and spent eight weeks on the Cashbox chart. It was Vincent’s last American hit single. The song was used in the movie Hot Rod Gang for a dance rehearsal scene featuring dancers doing the West Coast Swing.

GeneVincent05

Vincent and His Blue Caps also appeared several times on Town Hall Party, California’s largest country music barn dance, held at the Town Hall in Compton, California. Town Hall Party drew in excess of 2,800 paid admissions each Friday and Saturday, with room for 1,200 dancers. The show was also broadcast from 8:30 to 9:30 pm on the NBC Radio network. It was also shown on KTTV, channel 11, from 10 pm to 1 am on Saturday nights.[14] Vincent and His Blue Caps appeared on October 25, 1958, and July 25 and November 7, 1959. They performed “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, “High Blood Pressure”, “Rip It Up”, “Dance to the Bop”, “You Win Again”, “For Your Precious Love”, “Rocky Road Blues”, “Pretty Pearly”, “High School Confidential”, “Over the Rainbow”, “Roll Over Beethoven” and “She She Little Sheila”.

A dispute with the US tax authorities and the American Musicians’ Union over payments to his band and his having sold the band’s equipment to pay a tax bill led Vincent to leave the United States for Europe.

On December 15, 1959, Vincent appeared on Jack Good’s TV show, Boy Meets Girl, his first appearance in England. He wore black leather, gloves, and a medallion, and stood in a hunched posture. Good is credited with the transformation of Vincent’s image.[1] After the TV appearance he toured France, the Netherlands, Germany and the UK performing in his US stage clothes.

GeneVincent06

On April 16, 1960, while on tour in the UK, Vincent, Eddie Cochran and the songwriter Sharon Sheeley were involved in a high-speed traffic accident in a private-hire taxi in Chippenham, Wiltshire. Vincent broke his ribs and collarbone and further damaged his weakened leg. Sheeley suffered a broken pelvis. Cochran, who had been thrown from the vehicle, suffered serious brain injuries and died the next day. Vincent returned to the United States after the accident.

Promoter Don Arden had Vincent return to the UK in 1961 to do an extensive tour in theatres and ballrooms, with Chris Wayne and the Echoes. After the overwhelming success of the tour, Vincent moved to Britain in 1963. His accompanying band, Sounds Incorporated, a six-piece outfit with three saxophones, guitar, bass and drums, went on to play with the Beatles at their Shea Stadium concert. Vincent toured the UK again in 1963 with the Outlaws, featuring future Deep Purple guitar player Ritchie Blackmore, as a backing band. Vincent’s alcohol problems marred the tour, resulting in problems both on stage and with the band and management.

GeneVincent07

Vincent’s attempts to re-establish his American career in folk rock and country rock proved unsuccessful; he is remembered today for recordings of the 1950s and early 1960s released by Capitol Records. In the early 1960s, he also put out tracks on EMI’s Columbia label, including a cover of Arthur Alexander’s “Where Have You Been All My Life?” A backing band called the Shouts joined him.

In 1966 and 1967, in the United States, he recorded for Challenge Records, backed by ex-members of the Champs and Glen Campbell. Challenge released three singles in the US, and the UK London label released two singles and collected recordings on to an LP, Gene Vincent, on the UK London label in 1967. Although well received, none sold well. In 1968 in a hotel in Germany, Vincent tried to shoot Gary Glitter. He fired several shots but missed and a frightened Glitter left the country the next day.

In 1969, he recorded the album I’m Back and I’m Proud for long-time fan John Peel’s Dandelion Records, produced by Kim Fowley with arrangements by Skip Battin (of the Byrds), and backing vocals by Linda Ronstadt. He recorded two other albums for Kama Sutra Records, reissued on one CD by Rev-Ola in March 2008. On his 1969 tour of the UK he was backed by the Wild Angels, a British band that had performed at the Royal Albert Hall with Bill Haley & His Comets and Duane Eddy. Because of pressure from his ex-wife, the Inland Revenue and promoter Don Arden, Vincent returned to the US.

GeneVincent09

His final US recordings were four tracks for Rockin’ Ronny Weiser’s Rolling Rock label, a few weeks before his death. These were released on a compilation album of tribute songs, including “Say Mama”, by his daughter, Melody Jean Vincent, accompanied by Johnny Meeks (of Blue Caps and Merle Haggard’s The Strangers) on guitar. He later recorded four tracks (released years later as The Last Session) in Britain in October 1971 as part of his last tour. He was backed by Richard Cole and Kansas Hook (Dave Bailey, Bob Moore, Richard Cole and bass player Charlie Harrison from Poco and Roger McGuinn’s Thunderbyrd). They recorded five tracks at the BBC studios in Maida Vale, London, for Johnnie Walker’s radio show. He managed one show at the Garrick Night Club in Leigh, Lancashire, and two shows at the Wookey Hollow Club in Liverpool on October 3 and 4. Vincent then returned to the US and died a few days later. Four of these tracks were later released on the BBC’s own label prefix BEEB001 called The Last Session; this includes a version of “Say Mama”. The four tracks are now on Vincent’s album White Lightning.

Vincent died at the age of 36 on October 12, 1971, from a ruptured stomach ulcer, while visiting his father in Saugus, California. He is interred at Eternal Valley Memorial Park, in Newhall, California.

Ian Dury paid tribute to him in the 1976 song “Sweet Gene Vincent”.

GeneVincent08Vincent was the first inductee into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame upon its formation in 1997. The following year he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Vincent has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1749 North Vine Street. In 2012, his band, the Blue Caps, were retroactively inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by a special committee, alongside Vincent. On Tuesday, September 23, 2003, Vincent was honored with a Norfolk’s Legends of Music Walk of Fame bronze star embedded in the Granby Street sidewalk.

Writing for AllMusic, Ritchie Unterberger called Vincent an “American rockabilly legend who defined the greasy-haired, leather-jacketed, hot rods ‘n’ babes spark of rock & roll”. Village Voice critic Robert Christgau was less impressed by the musician’s career, saying “Vincent was never a titan—his few moments of rockabilly greatness were hyped-up distillations of slavering lust from a sensitive little guy who was just as comfortable with ‘Over the Rainbow’ in his normal frame of mind.” However, the critic included the 1974 Vincent compilation album, The Bop That Just Won’t Stop (1956), in his “basic record library” published in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981). (by wikipedia)

And here´s a pretty good sampler witha lot of his hits and some rarities … Oh yes .. Genen Vincent was true Rock N Roller … Listen and enjoy  !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Gene Vincent & The Blue Caps

Ths great French backcover:
FrenchBackCover

Tracklist:
01. Crazy Beat (Fallin/Rhodes) 2.17
02. Important Words (Vincent/Davis) 2.53
03. It´s Been Nice (Pomus/Shuman) 2.03
04. Lonesome Boy (Bedwell) 3.01
05. Good Lovin’ (Calaban/Rorie) 2.04
06. I’m Gonna Catch Me A Rat (Robinson) 2.14
07. Rip It Up (Blackwell/Marascalco) 2.23
08. High Blood Pressure (Smith) 2.50
09. That’s The Trouble With Love (Huling/Shilton) 2.23
10. Weeping Willow (Lynn) 2.40
11. Tear Drops (Glasser) 2.36
12. Gone, Gone, Gone (South) 2.09
+
13. Wild Cat (Schroeder/Gold) 2.24
14, Spaceship To Mars (Subotsky/Paramor) 2.06
15. Crazy Beat (alternate version) (Fallin/Rhodes) 2.12
16. Lonesome Boy (alternate version) (Bedwell) 3.12
17. Spaceship To Mars (alternate version) (Subotsky/Paramor) 2.57

LabelB1

*
**

GeneVincent04
Gene Vincent (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971)

John Lennon – Rock N Roll (1975)

FrontCover1Rock ‘n’ Roll is the sixth studio album by John Lennon. Released in 1975, it is an album of late 1950s and early 1960s songs as covered by Lennon. Recording the album was problematic and spanned an entire year: Phil Spector produced sessions in October 1973 at A&M Studios, and Lennon produced sessions in October 1974 at Record Plant Studios (East). Lennon was being sued by Morris Levy over copyright infringement of one line in his song “Come Together”. As part of an agreement, Lennon had to include three Levy-owned songs on Rock ‘n’ Roll. Spector disappeared with the session recordings and was subsequently involved in a motor accident, leaving the album’s tracks unrecoverable until the beginning of the Walls and Bridges sessions. With Walls and Bridges coming out first, featuring one Levy-owned song, Levy sued Lennon expecting to see Lennon’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album.

The album was released in February 1975, reaching number 6 in both the United Kingdom and the United States, later being certified gold in both countries. It was supported by the single “Stand by Me”, which peaked at number 20 in the US, and 30 in the UK. The cover was taken by Jürgen Vollmer during the Beatles’ stay in Hamburg. It was Lennon’s last album until 1980; with no recording contract obligation, he took a hiatus from the music business to raise his son Sean.

JohnLennon1975

In 1969, Lennon composed the song “Come Together” for the Beatles’ album Abbey Road. Inspired by the Chuck Berry tune “You Can’t Catch Me”, it bore too much of a melodic resemblance to the original—and Lennon took the third line of the second verse (“Here come [old] flat-top”) for the new lyric. Publisher Morris Levy brought a lawsuit for infringement, and the case was due to be heard in a New York court in December 1973. It was later settled out of court, with the agreement that, according to an announcement by Levy, Lennon had to “record three songs by Big Seven publishers on his next album”. The songs [he] intends to record at this time are “You Can’t Catch Me”, “Angel Baby” and “Ya Ya”.” Lennon had the right to change the last two songs to any other songs that were published by Big Seven. In the meanwhile, Lennon had split with Yoko Ono and was living in Los Angeles with his personal assistant, May Pang. Nostalgia was a popular trend on film with American Graffiti, and television was readying the series Happy Days (Lennon and Pang had even visited the set). Lennon, rather than writing his own songs, and partly inspired by his arrangement to include at least three songs from Levy’s publishing company catalogue, Big Seven Music, decided to record an album of oldies as his next release, following on from Mind Games.

JohnLennon1962_01

Lennon initially teamed up with producer Phil Spector to record the album, letting Spector have full control. Spector chose some of the songs, booked the studio, and the musicians.[8] When news got around that Lennon was in Hollywood making a record, every musician there wanted to be part of the sessions. In mid-October 1973, sessions were booked at A&M Studios, with many of them having over 30 musicians, but the sessions quickly fell into disarray—fueled by alcohol. Spector once showed up dressed in a surgeon’s outfit and shot a gun in the ceiling of the studio, hurting Lennon’s ears. On another occasion, a bottle of whiskey had spilled on the A&M Studio’s mixing console causing future sessions to be banned from the facility. Unknown to Lennon, each night Spector would remove the master tapes from the studio, and move them to his house.

Spector then disappeared with the session tapes and would not be heard from for several months. Spector made one cryptic call to Lennon, claiming to have the “John Dean tapes” from the recent Watergate scandal; Lennon deduced that Spector meant he had the album’s master tapes. When a car accident on 31 March 1974 left Spector in a coma, the project was put on indefinite hold. In mid-1974, Lennon returned to New York with Pang and began writing and recording a new album of original material, Walls and Bridges.

JohnLennon1962_02Shortly before these sessions began, Al Coury, then-head of A&R/promotion for Capitol Records retrieved the Spector tapes. Not wanting to break stride, Lennon shelved the tapes and completed work on Walls and Bridges.

With Walls and Bridges coming out first, Lennon had reneged on his deal with Levy, and Levy threatened to refile his lawsuit, but Lennon explained to Levy what had happened, and assured him that the covers album was indeed in the works. Levy gave Lennon use of his farm in upstate New York to rehearse material. Lennon then recalled the session musicians from Walls and Bridges to complete the oldies tracks. Several tracks never made it past the rehearsal stage: “C’mon Everybody”, “Thirty Days”, “That’ll Be the Day” – the band also played a few impromptu jams. On 21 October, Lennon went into Record Plant East, completing the oldies tracks in a few days. Lennon wanted the musicians to stay close to the original arrangements of the songs, apart from “Do You Wanna Dance?”. Mixing and editing lasted until mid-November. To assure him progress was being made, Lennon gave Levy a rough tape of the sessions to review. Levy took the tapes and pressed his own version of the album called Roots: John Lennon Sings the Great Rock & Roll Hits on his record label, Adam VIII, then proceeded to sue Lennon, EMI and Capitol for $42 million for breach of contract. Capitol/EMI quickly sought an injunction. After two trials, in which Lennon had to convince the court of the difference between a rough version and a final take, Levy won $6,795 in damages, and Lennon won $144,700, in February 1976. The album was originally scheduled for release in April 1975; however, in February 1975, Capitol Records rush-released the official Rock ‘n’ Roll as a Capitol “budget” album (prefix code SK—one dollar cheaper than the usual releases) to counteract sales of the Levy album.

Starclub

Lennon said the following about Rock ‘n’ Roll: “It started in ’73 with Phil and fell apart. I ended up as part of mad, drunk scenes in Los Angeles and I finally finished it off on me own. And there was still problems with it up to the minute it came out. I can’t begin to say, it’s just barmy, there’s a jinx on that album.”

Lennon planned to use some of his childhood drawings for the cover of his oldies album, and production had already begun when Lennon switched gears, so the artwork was used instead for Walls and Bridges. In September 1974, May Pang attended the first Beatlefest convention at Lennon’s behest, and met Jürgen Vollmer, an old friend of the Beatles from Hamburg, Germany, who had photographed the band from their Hamburg days. He was selling some striking portraits, and Pang immediately phoned Lennon to tell him of her find. Reuniting with Vollmer in New York, Lennon chose one of his photos for the album’s cover.

OriginalPic

The photo depicts Lennon in a doorway with three blurry figures walking past him in the foreground. Those figures are George Harrison, Stu Sutcliffe and Paul McCartney.[40] It was taken on 22 Wohlwill Street in Hamburg. The album’s working title had been Oldies But Mouldies; no official title had been chosen until Lennon saw the neon sign prepared as cover art by John Uomoto, with Lennon’s name and the words “ROCK ‘N’ ROLL” beneath. This struck Lennon in a positive way, and it became the album title. (by wikipedia)

JohnLennon1962_03

Although the chaotic sessions that spawned this album have passed into rock & roll legend and the recording’s very genesis (as an out-of-court settlement between John Lennon and an aggrieved publisher) has often caused it to be slighted by many of the singer’s biographers, Rock ‘n’ Roll, in fact, stands as a peak in his post-Imagine catalog: an album that catches him with nothing to prove and no need to try. Lennon could, after all, sing old rock & roll numbers with his mouth closed; he spent his entire career relaxing with off-the-cuff blasts through the music with which he grew up, and Rock ‘n’ Roll emerges the sound of him doing precisely that. Four songs survive from the fractious sessions with producer Phil Spector in late 1973 that ignited the album, and listeners to any of the posthumous compilations that also draw from those archives will know that the best tracks were left on the shelf — “Be My Baby” and “Angel Baby” among them. But a gorgeous run through Lloyd Price’s “Just Because” wraps up the album in fine style, while a trip through “You Can’t Catch Me” contrarily captures a playful side that Lennon rarely revealed on vinyl.

Beatles PromoCard1962

The remainder of the album was cut a year later with Lennon alone at the helm, and the mood remains buoyant. It might not, on first glance, seem essential to hear him running through nuggets like “Be Bop A Lula,” “Peggy Sue,” and “Bring It on Home to Me,” but, again, Lennon has seldom sounded so gleeful as he does on these numbers, while the absence of the Spector trademark Wall-of-Sound production is scarcely noticeable — as the object of one of Lennon’s own productions, David Peel once pointed out, “John had the Wall of Sound down perfectly himself.” Released in an age when both David Bowie and Bryan Ferry had already tracked back to musical times-gone-by (Pin-Ups and These Foolish Things, respectively), Rock ‘n’ Roll received short shrift from contemporary critics. As time passed, however, it has grown in stature, whereas those other albums have merely held their own. Today, Rock ‘n’ Roll sounds fresher than the rock & roll that inspired it in the first place. Imagine that. (by Dave Thompson)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Ken Ascher (keyboards)
Hal Blaine (drums)
Jim Calvert (guitar)
Steve Cropper (guitar)
Jesse Ed Davis (guitar)
José Feliciano (guitar)
Michael Hazelwood (guitar)
Arthur Jenkins (percussion)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Michael Lang (keyboards)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals)
Gary Mallaber (drums)
Eddie Mottau (guitar)
Leon Russell (keyboards)
Klaus Voormann (bass guitar, answer vocals on 10.)
+
brass section:
Nino Tempo – Jeff Barry –Barry Mann –Bobby Keys – Peter Jameson – Joseph Temperley Dennis Morouse –Frank Vicari

JohnLennon1974

Tracklist:
01. Be-Bop-A-Lula (Davis/Vincent) 2.40
02. Stand By Me (Leiber/Stoller/King) 3.26
03. Medley: Rip It Up/Ready Teddy (Blackwell/Marascalco) 1.35
04. You Can’t Catch Me (Berry) 4.51
05. Ain’t That A Shame (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.38
06. Do You Wanna Dance? (Freeman) 3.16
07. Sweet Little Sixteen (Berry) 3.01
08. Slippin’ And Slidin’ (Bocage/Collins/Penniman/Smith) 2.17
09. Peggy Sue (Allison/Petty/Holly) 2.05
10. Medley: Bring It On Home To Me/Send Me Some Lovin’ (Cooke/Marascalco)Price) 3.42
11. Bony Moronie (Williams) 3.47
12. Ya Ya (Dorsey/Lewis/Robinson/Levy) 2.17
13. Just Because (Price) 4.26

Labels

*
**

Coming soon:
John Lennon Sings the Great Rock & Roll Hits 

Rock&RollHits

Link Wray – Jack The Ripper (1963)

FrontCover1Fred Lincoln “Link” Wray, Jr. (May 2, 1929 – November 5, 2005) was a Shawnee rock and roll guitarist, songwriter, and vocalist who became popular in the late 1950s.

Building on the distorted electric guitar sound of early records, his 1958 instrumental hit “Rumble” by Link Wray & His Ray Men popularized “the power chord, the major modus operandi of modern rock guitarists,” facilitating the emergence of “punk and heavy rock”. Rolling Stone placed Wray at No. 45 of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time. In 2013 and 2017 he was a nominee for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though he began in country music, his musical style went on to consist primarily of rock and roll, rockabilly, and instrumental rock.

Wray was born on May 2, 1929 in Dunn, North Carolina, to Fred Lincoln Wray, Sr., and his wife, Lillian M. Wray (née Coats), who were both Native Americans of Shawnee descent,. although the 1930 and 1940 censuses refer to them as White as many Native Americans either registered themselves as White or Black to avoid discrimination.

His two brothers, Vernon (born January 7, 1924) and Doug (born July 4, 1933), were his earliest bandmates.

Link Wray01Three songs he performed were named for indigenous peoples: “Shawnee,” “Apache,” and “Comanche.” “Apache” was an instrumental composed by Jerry Lordan; it was originally a hit in the United Kingdom for The Shadows in 1960 and reached #2 on the Billboard charts in the U.S. on April 3, 1961 by Danish guitarist Jørgen Ingmann. Wray recorded a cover version 30 years later, when it was also associated with The Ventures and the Incredible Bongo Band.

Wray served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War (1950–53), and contracted tuberculosis, which hospitalized him for a year. His stay concluded with the removal of a lung, which doctors predicted would mean he would never be able to sing again.

In 1958, Wray’s first hit, “Rumble,” was banned in New York and Boston for fear it would incite teenage gang violence. The record was first released on Cadence Records (catalog number 1347) as by “Link Wray & His Ray Men.” Building on the distorted electric guitar sound of early records, his 1958 instrumental hit “Rumble” by Wray and his band popularized “the power chord, the major modus operandi of modern rock guitarists,”  facilitating the emergence of “punk and heavy rock”. Before, during, and after his stints with major labels Epic and Swan, Wray released 45s under many names. Tiring of the corporate music machine, he began recording albums using a three-track studio he converted from an outbuilding on his brother’s property that his father used to raise chickens.

Link Wray02

While living in the San Francisco Bay Area in the early 1970s, Wray was introduced to Quicksilver Messenger Service guitarist John Cipollina by bassist James “Hutch” Hutchinson. He subsequently formed a band initially featuring special guest Cipollina along with the rhythm section from Cipollina’s band Copperhead, bassist Hutch Hutchinson, and drummer David Weber. They opened for the band Lighthouse at the Whisky a Go Go in Los Angeles from May 15–19, 1974. He later did numerous concerts and radio broadcasts in the Bay Area including KSAN and the Bill Graham venue Winterland Ballroom, with Les Lizama later replacing Hutchinson on bass. He toured and recorded two albums with retro-rockabilly artist Robert Gordon in the late 1970s. The 1980s to the present day saw a large number of reissues as well as new material. One member of his band in the 1980s, drummer Anton Fig, later became drummer in the CBS Orchestra on the Late Show with David Letterman. In 1994, he played on four songs of the album Chatterton by French rocker Alain Bashung. He went on to release two albums of new music: Shadowman (1997) and Barbed Wire (2005). Recently discovered recordings were slated to be released in 2018.

Link Wray03

Wray’s first three marriages, to Elizabeth Canady Wray, Katherine Tidwell Wray, and Sharon Cole Wray, produced eight children. Wray relocated to Denmark in the early 1980s.

Wray died of heart failure at his home in Copenhagen, on 5 November 2005, at the age of 76. Survivors included his eight children and 23 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren from the United States, daughter Beth Wray Webb, son Link Wray III, son Link Elvis Wray, daughter Belinda Wray Muth, daughter Mona Wray Tidwell, daughter Rhonda Wray Sayen, son Shayne Wray, daughter Charlotte Wray, and his fourth wife, Olive Julie Povlsen Wray, and their son. He was buried in the crypt of the Christian’s Church, Copenhagen.

Link Wray04

Jack Rose cited Wray as an influence, as did Iggy Pop and Neil Young. Jimmy Page says that Link Wray had a “real rebel attitude” and credits him in It Might Get Loud as a major influence in his early career. According to Rolling Stone, Pete Townshend of The Who once said, “If it hadn’t been for Link Wray and ‘Rumble,’ I never would have picked up a guitar.” “The only people I ever really looked up to were Link Wray and Iggy Pop,” said Mark E. Smith of The Fall. “Guys like…Link Wray…are very special to me.”

Bob Dylan references Wray in his song, “Sign Language”, which he recorded as a duo with Eric Clapton in 1975: “Link Wray was playin’ on a juke box I was payin’/ for the words I was saying, so misunderstood/he didn’t do me no good”  Both Dylan and Bruce Springsteen performed Wray’s tune “Rumble” in concert as a tribute to the influential musician upon his 2005 death.(by wikipedia)

Link Wray06
As bad-ass as Elvis and Gene Vincent were, Link Wray was the first real punk rocker. Not only did his guitar work suggest a man whose talent came from a deal with Satan, one look at the man’s face told you this was no one to fuck with. That’s why his fellow guitarist Duane Eddy, with the pretty-boy looks, got into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame while Link was relegated to cult-rocker status.

Wray is most famous, and justifiably so, as the originator of 1958’s “Rumble,” the first power-chord-based guitar number. “Jack the Ripper” sports a re-recording, which is nowhere near as good as its predecessor. Another track I could have done without is “My Beth,” a cloying surf number that sounds like the Ventures on Quaaludes.

Singles

As for the other ten tracks, they’re all first-rate instrumental rockers! The cowboy-flavored “Mr. Guitar” begins Side A and leaves the listener thirsting for more. The organ-driven “Deacon Jones,” with Wray’s demented yowls, might just be the first garage-rock tune. (It predated the Kingsmen’s “Louie, Louie.”) “Steel Trap,” with its jabbing brass riffs, could have been a lo-fi soul record if a singer had replaced the lead guitar. “Cross Ties” evokes images of a steam-powered train chugging through the Old West. Closing out Side A is “Jack the Ripper,” which more than lives up to its title.

The numbers on Side B are just as hot, especially “Run Chicken Run” and “Big Ben.” And “Mash Potato Party” is even grittier than what Nat Kendrick & The Swans (A/K/A James Brown & The Famous Flames) came up with! (by goldwax)

BackCover

Personnel:
Link Wray (guitar, vocals)
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians

Link Wray07

Tracklist:
01. Mr. Guitar (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2.36
02. My Beth (B.Wray) 2.17
03. Deacon Jones (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2.08
04. Steel Trap (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2.08
05. Cross Ties (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 1.37
06. Jack The Ripper (F.L. Wray, Sr./Cooper) 2.22
07. Fat Back (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2,43
08. Run Chicken Run (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 1.48
09. Dinosaur (V.Wray) 2.12
10. Big Ben (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2.18
11. Mash Potato Party (F.L. Wray, Sr.) 2.12
12. Rumble (F.L. Wray, Sr./Cooper) 2.27LabelA1

*
**

Link Wray05Link Wray, Jr. (May 2, 1929 – November 5, 2005)

Wanda Jackson – Right Or Wrrong (1961)

FrontCover1Wanda Lavonne Jackson (born October 20, 1937) is a retired American singer, songwriter, pianist and guitarist who had success in the mid-1950s and 1960s as one of the first popular female rockabilly singers, and a pioneering rock-and-roll artist. She is known to many as the “Queen of Rockabilly” or the “First Lady of Rockabilly”.

Jackson mixed country music with fast-moving rockabilly, often recording them on opposite sides of a record. As rockabilly declined in popularity in the 1960s, she moved to a successful career in mainstream country music with a string of hits between 1961 and 1973, including “Right or Wrong”, “Tears Will Be the Chaser for Your Wine”, “A Woman Lives for Love” and “Fancy Satin Pillows”.

She had a resurgence in popularity in the 1980s among rockabilly revivalists in Europe and younger Americana fans. In 2009, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the category Early Influence.

On March 27, 2019, Jackson announced her official retirement from performing.

Jackson was born to Tom Robert Jackson (March 24, 1915 – October 1985) and Nellie Vera Jackson (December 19, 1913 – January 14, 2011) in Maud, Oklahoma, in 1937. She has lived much of her life in Oklahoma City. Her father, a musician, moved the family to Bakersfield, California, during the 1940s in hopes of a better life. Two years later, he bought Jackson a guitar and encouraged her to play. He also took her to see performances by Spade Cooley, Tex Williams and Bob Wills, which left a lasting impression. In 1948, when she was 11, the family moved back to Oklahoma. In 1956, she won a talent contest which led to her own radio program, soon extended by 30 minutes.

WandaJacksonMid50´s

Wanda Jackson in the mid 50′ s

Jackson began her professional career while still attending Capitol Hill High School in Oklahoma City after being discovered by Hank Thompson in 1954, who heard her singing on a local radio station, KLPR-AM, and invited her to perform with his band, the Brazos Valley Boys. She recorded a few songs on their label, Capitol Records, including “You Can’t Have My Love”, a duet with Thompson’s bandleader, Billy Gray. The song was released as a single in 1954 and reached number 8 on the country chart. Jackson asked Capitol to sign her but was turned down by producer Ken Nelson, who told her, “Girls don’t sell records.” She signed with Decca Records instead.

After graduating from high school, Jackson began to tour with her father as manager and chaperon. She often shared the bill with Elvis Presley, who encouraged her to sing rockabilly. She briefly dated Presley while touring. She was a cast member of ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee in Springfield, Missouri, from 1955 to 1960. In 1956 she signed with Capitol, recording a number of singles mixing country with rock and roll. “I Gotta Know”, released in 1956, peaked at number 15.

Jackson’s stage outfits in these years were often designed by her mother. Unlike the traditional clothing worn by female country music singers of the time, she wore fringed dresses, high heels and long earrings. She has claimed she was the first woman to put “glamour into country music.”

She continued to record more rockabilly singles through the decade with the producer Ken Nelson. Jackson insisted that Nelson make her records sound like those of label mates Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps. Nelson brought in many experienced and popular session players, including the rock-and-roll pianist Merill Moore and the then-unknown Buck Owens. With a unique vocal style and upbeat material, Jackson created some of the most influential rock and roll of the time.

WandaJackson01In the late 1950s, Jackson recorded and released a number of rockabilly songs, including “Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad”, “Mean, Mean Man”, “Fujiyama Mama” (which hit number 1 in Japan) and “Honey Bop”. The songs were only regional hits. She toured Japan in February and March 1959.

In 1960, Jackson had a Top 40 pop hit with “Let’s Have a Party”, a song Presley had recorded three years earlier.[10] She was headlining concerts with her own band, which she dubbed the Party Timers. Prominently featured were the pianist Big Al Downing and the guitarist Roy Clark, who was virtually unknown at the time.[14] Her country music career also began to take off with the self-penned “Right or Wrong”, a number 9 hit, and “In the Middle of a Heartache”, which peaked at number 6. Both records also had Top 40 success.

The unexpected success of her records led Capitol to release a number of albums composed of her 1950s material, including Rockin’ with Wanda (1960) and There’s a Party Goin’ On, which included “Tongue Tied” and “Hard-Headed Woman”. Her 1961 and 1962 albums, Right or Wrong and Wonderful Wanda, featured her two top-ten country hits from 1961. In 1963, Jackson recorded another album, Two Sides of Wanda, which included both rock and roll and country music, including a cover of Jerry Lee Lewis’s “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On”. The album earned Jackson her first Grammy nomination, for Best Female Country Vocal Performance.

By 1965, Jackson was focusing more exclusively on traditional country music as rockabilly declined in popularity, and had a string of Top 40 hits during the next ten years. In 1966, she released two singles that peaked in the country top 20, “Tears Will Be the Chaser for Your Wine” and “The Box It Came In”.

In early 1965, Jackson was invited by the German distribution partner of Capitol Records, Electrola, to record in German. Jackson’s German-language debut single, “Santo Domingo” (backed with “Morgen, ja morgen”), recorded at Electrola’s studios in Cologne, peaked at number 5 on the official German charts and at number 1 on the charts of Germany’s most influential teen magazine, Bravo. In the first months following the chart success of Santo Domingo, Jackson also re-recorded some of her German songs in Dutch and Japanese. The success of Santo Domingo prompted the recording of eight further German-language singles until 1968, which were also released on an album, Made in Germany. Her last German single was recorded in 1970.

WandaJackson1958

In 1967, she recorded two albums, and released a string of singles during the next few years that often asserted a fiery and violent persona, including 1969’s “My Big Iron Skillet”, a top 20 hit, which threatened death or assault for cheating on a spouse. In 1970 and 1971, she had her final top 20 country hits with “A Woman Lives for Love” (her second Grammy nomination) and “Fancy Satin Pillows”. Jackson was a premier attraction in Las Vegas. She followed Kitty Wells’s lead as only the second country female vocalist to have her own syndicated television show, Music Village, from 1967 to 1968.

In the early 1970s, at her children’s request, Jackson and her husband began to regularly attend church and became Christians. She began recording gospel songs and albums, including Praise the Lord for Capitol in 1972. After Capitol dropped her, she recorded a number of albums for small religious labels and set up evangelical church tours across the country with her husband. Jackson wanted to record a mix of country and gospel music for her albums; however, religious labels were not interested.

WandaJackson1970In the early 1980s, Jackson was invited to Europe to play and record rockabilly material when revivalists sought her out. She regularly toured Scandinavia, England, and Germany during the decade. Now embracing her rock-and-roll history, Jackson released the album Rockabilly Fever in 1984 (later issued by Rounder Records as Rock N’ Roll Your Blues Away in 1986), her first secular album in a decade and her first recording of rock music in over twenty years.

Cyndi Lauper acknowledged Jackson’s classic rockabilly records were a major influence and inspiration for her during this period, and Jackson’s fans also included a new generation of country music female vocalists, among them Rosanne Cash, Pam Tillis, Jann Browne and Rosie Flores. Jackson recorded a duet with Browne on a 1987 album by Browne, and in 1995 she sang two duets with Flores on her 1995 album, Rockabilly Filly, and then embarked on a United States tour with her, her first American tour since the 1970s.

She played at the Rockabilly Festival in Jackson, Tennessee, in 2001 with The Cadillac Angels. Jackson, then in her early 60s, continued touring. She again played Jackson’s International Rockabilly Hall of Fame show in August 2013, a show which also featured new inductee Terry Manning.

Jackson released her first studio album since 1987, Heart Trouble  on CMH Records. The sixteen-track album included guest appearances by Elvis Costello, the Cramps and Rosie Flores. The singer Amy LaVere portrayed a young Jackson in the Johnny Cash biopic, Walk the Line (2005).

WandaJackson03

Jackson was interviewed about the origins of rockabilly in the award-winning Canadian documentary Rockabilly 514 (2008), directed by Patricia Chica and Mike Wafer.

She returned to England on October 28, 2008, for an appearance at the London Rock ‘n’ Roll Festival with Jerry Lee Lewis and Linda Gail Lewis at the London Forum.

In 2009, she teamed up with Jack White to record The Party Ain’t Over. The album, released in 2011, marked Jackson’s first charting on the Billboard Hot 200 LP chart, peaking at number 58. The album also broke Mae West’s long-standing record for being the oldest female vocalist to make the chart with her 1966 album Way Out West. Jackson was 73, being a year older than West, at the time. To promote The Party Ain’t Over, she performed with White on both the Late Show with David Letterman and Conan.

Wanda’s song “Funnel of Love” appeared in Guy Ritchie’s film RocknRolla in 2008 and was included on the film’s soundtrack. An episode of the HBO program Entourage in 2010 featured the same song as the music to the ending credits.

WandaJackson06

Jackson appeared on the BBC’s Hootenanny at the end of 2010, performing her version of “Let’s Have a Party” and a cover of the Amy Winehouse song “You Know I’m No Good” with Jools Holland and his orchestra. The following year, after Winehouse’s death, she took part in an Amy Winehouse tribute performance with Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings at the VH1 Divas Live 2011.

Jackson released her thirty-first studio album Unfinished Business in 2012 for Sugar Hill Records. The album goes back to her rockabilly and country roots and was produced by Americana singer-songwriter Justin Townes Earle. The album became Jackson’s first in 39 years to make the Billboard Hot Country LP chart.

Following the announcement of her retirement, Jackson revealed in an interview with Rolling Stone that a previously undisclosed stroke that occurred in August 2018 was partially to blame for the decision. She did, however, reiterate that she is in the process of recording a new album produced by Joan Jett which she hopes to complete in 2019.

WandaJackson05In 1955, Jackson briefly dated Elvis Presley while on tour with him. She married former IBM programmer Wendell Goodman in 1961, who served as her manager. He died on May 21, 2017. The couple had two children. As of the 2000s she lives in Oklahoma City.

At the 7th Annual Grammy Awards in 1964, Jackson was nominated in the category of Best Country & Western Vocal Performance – Female for her album Two Sides of Wanda. At the 13th Annual Grammy Awards in 1970, she was nominated in the Best Country Vocal Performance, Female category for the song “A Woman Lives for Love”.

Jackson is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, The International Rockabilly Hall of Fame, and the Oklahoma Music and Oklahoma Country Music halls of fame, as well as the International Gospel and the German Music halls of fame.

Jackson ranked number 35 on CMT’s 2002 special, “The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music”.

She is a recipient of a 2005 National Heritage Fellowship awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which is the United States’ highest honor in the folk and traditional arts.

WandaJackson07

She was nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005 but was not elected. In September 2008, she was nominated for a second time; and was inducted on April 4, 2009 as an Early Influence. She was the first addition to the category in nine years.

In 2006 Alfred Publishing acknowledged her influence on young musicians by publishing The Best of Wanda Jackson: Let’s Have a Party, a songbook with music and lyrics to thirteen songs associated with Jackson. It was the first songbook ever published on Jackson.

In 2009, Oklahoma City named an alley for her in the Bricktown entertainment district. “Wanda Jackson Way” was officially christened with a live performance by Jackson in her “Way” on September 30, 2009. Besides this street in Oklahoma City, the city of Maud, Oklahoma, where she was born, has named one of its streets, Wanda Jackson Boulevard.

On September 9, 2010, she was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Performance at the Americana Music Honors & Awards by Jack White on behalf of the Americana Music Association.

In 2013, she was inducted into the Iowa Rock and Roll Music Association (IRRMA) Hall of Fame in the category “Women Who Rock”.

In 2016, Jackson received the “Founder of the Sound” award at the Ameripolitan Music Awards. (by wikipedia)

WandaJackson02

Okay … this is one of her countless albums from her early days … the two sides of Wanda Jackson: the sentimental side and her rockin´ side …

Close your eyes and drift away … enjoy this sentimental journey.

BackCover1

Personnel:
Wanda Jackson (vocals)
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians
Tracklist:

Sentimental Side:
01. Right Or Wrong (W.Jackson) 2.39
02. Why I’m Walkin’ (Endsley/S.Jackson) 2.33
03. So Soon (Tillis/Walker) 2.23
04. The Last Letter (Griffin) 3.01
05. I May Never Get To Heaven (Anderson/Killen) 2.36
06. The Window Up Above (Jones) 2.40

Rockin’ Side:
07. Sticks And Stones (Turner) 2.11
08. Stupid Cupid (Sedaka7Greenfield) 2.16
09. Slippin’ And A Slidin’ (Collins/Bocage/Smith/Penniman) 2.11
10. Brown Eyed Handsome Man (Berry) 2.16
11. Who Shot Sam (Edwards/Jones/Jackson) 2.23
12. My Baby Left Me (Crudup) 2.11

LabelB1

*
**

The Playtones – Rock’N’Roll Christmas Party (2010)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Playtones is a Swedish 1950s rock n roll band formed in 2008 in Kallinge. Their music is influenced by rockabilly. It was called Boppin’ Steve & The Playtones before 2008. The Playtones won the dansband competition Dansbandskampen in 2009.[1] 2011 the band appeared in Melodifestivalen, the Swedish preselection for the Eurovision Song Contest. (by wikipedia)

Originally known as Boppin’ Steve & The Playtones, under which name they released their first two albums, The Playtones have gone on to become one of Sweden’s most popular bands.
They have even taken their 1950s style Rock ‘n’ Roll sound to Number One in the national album charts.
Rock ‘n’ Roll Christmas Party is exactly what the title suggests – a rockin’ collections of Christmas Rock ‘n’ Roll songs which mixes rockin’ oldies with brand new Christmas rockers. (raucousrecords.com)

Don´t wait … join this funny Christmas party !

Ads1

Personnel:
Jonas Holmberg (guitar)
Stefan Jonasson – vocals, piano
Mattias Schertell (bass)
Johan Svensson (drums)

Ads2
Tracklist:
01. Here Comes Santa Claus Again 2.14
02. Fira Jul På Fyra Hjul 2.44
03. Christmas Time Has Found Me 3.18
04. Trucking Trees For Christmas 2.01
05. Tomten Är Aldrig Sen 2.43
06. Run Run Rudolph 2.40
07. Ingen Jul Utan Dig 3.39
08. Santa’s On The Go 2.31
09. All I Want For Christmas Dear Is You 2.29
10. Christmas Bug 2.35
11. Julnatt 3.00
12. Julmedley 4.39
13 Santa Looked A Lot Like Daddy 3.02

Ad6A

 

*
**