James Gang – Rides Again (1971)

FrontCover1James Gang Rides Again (alternatively known as simply Rides Again) is the second studio album by American rock band James Gang. The album was released in mid 1970, on the label ABC Records. It is the James Gang’s first album to feature bassist Dale Peters.

Writing for AllMusic, critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine wrote of the album “With their second album Rides Again, the James Gang came into their own… Walsh’s songwriting had improved, giving the band solid support for their stylistic experiments. What ties the two sides of the record together is the strength of the band’s musicianship, which burns brightly and powerfully on the hardest rockers, as well as on the sensitive ballads.”

JamesGang01On the initial pressings of James Gang Rides Again, a 1:25 electric rendition of Maurice Ravel’s “Boléro” is interpolated into the song “The Bomber.” Ravel’s estate threatened suit against both the James Gang and ABC Records for its unauthorized use. As a result, the track was edited, and the “Boléro” section was removed on most subsequent pressings of the album. The edited song’s running time on such pressings is 5:39. Some late 70’s LP pressings included “Boléro” by mistake, and the most recent CD re-issue of Rides Again contains the full version of “The Bomber,” with the “Boléro” section restored. (by wikipedia)

With their second album Rides Again, the James Gang came into their own. Under the direction of guitarist Joe Walsh, the group — now featuring bassist Dale Peters — began incorporating keyboards into their hard rock, which helped open up their musical horizons. For much of the first side of Rides Again, the group tear through a bunch of boogie numbers, most notably the heavy groove of “Funk #49.” On the second side, the James Gang departs from their trademark sound, adding keyboard flourishes and JamesGang02elements of country-rock to their hard rock. Walsh’s songwriting had improved, giving the band solid support for their stylistic experiments. What ties the two sides of the record together is the strength of the band’s musicianship, which burns brightly and powerfully on the hardest rockers, as well as on the sensitive ballads. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Led by future Eagle Joe Walsh, the James Gang establishes a power-trio template for all times on it’s 1970 sophomore album. Home to the top-down favorite ‘Funk #49,’ Rides Again sparks with a stylistic versatility, hard-rocking edge, and balladic vulnerability united by tight-knit musicianship. The quartet’s penchant for crunch-laden boogies and focused jamming pours out on the first half of the record before the band pulls it’s trick bag out on the second half and injects keyboards into the stylistically varied mix. From start to finish, Rides Again is a 70s rock classic – and, now, one that at last features first-rate sonics to match the music.

JamesGang03The FM radio staple ‘Funk #49’ – kick-started by the irresistible declaration ‘I sleep all day, out all night/I know where you’re goin’ – continues to be identified by many as a Walsh solo tune. Yet it, as well as the sexual thrust of the head-bobbing ‘Woman’ and proto-metal slash of the multi-part ‘The Bomber,’ fully represents the pure chemistry and locomotive momentum of the James Gang. With Walsh’s Echoplex-equipped slide guitar making psychedelic- and blues-leaning comments, his mates pick up on the direction and answer with melodic responses. Throughout the record, the trio’s synergy clicks at every turn. Such interplay extends to the more diverse, country-tinged fare on Side B. Streaked with throaty organ passages and reflective moods, sincere midtempo ballads like ‘Tend My Garden’ tease with rave-up structures and express a softer side of the group. Similarly, the acoustic-based ‘Garden Gate’ and Jack Nitzsche-orchestrated ‘Ashes the Rain and I’ showcase sincerity and diversity suggesting the James Gang prepared to defy limitations afforded most of it’s peers. Yet Walsh’s departure in 1971 changed the group’s fortunes – and, by extension, upped the value of Rides Again, which survives as a near-flawless example of earnest 70s rock and organic playing. Experience this stellar album …

Listen to “Tend My Garden” and you´ll hear a guitar … years later a group called “Boston” made this sound very popular …

And … “The Bomber” is one of the most exciting hard rock songs ever recorded ! The song is a monster James Gang combines heavy metal guitar riffs with Ravels “Bolero” … Listen and enejoy !

JamesGang04

Personnel:
Jim Fox (drums, vocals, percussion, keyboards)
Dale Peters (bass, vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion)
Joe Walsh (guitar, vocals, keyboards, percussion)
+
Rusty Young (pedal steel guitar on 07.)

BackCover1.jpg
Tracklist:
01. Funk #49 (Fox/Peters/Walsh) 3.56
02. Asshtonpark (Fox/Peters/Walsh) 2.02
03. Woman (Fox/Peters/Walsh) 4.38
04. The Bomber: Closet Queen/Boléro/ Cast Your Fate To The Wind (Fox/Peters/Wals/Ravel/Guaraldi) 7.05
05. Tend My Garden (Walsh) 5.40
06. Garden Gate (Walsh) 1.42
07. There I Go Again (Walsh) 2.50
08. Thanks (Walsh) 2.20
09. Ashes The Rain And I (Peters/Walsh) 4.59

LabelB1

*
**

“The Bomber (Closet Queen / Bolero / Cast Your Fate To The Wind)”:

When I became of age, my mama sat me down
She said, “Son, you’re growing up, it’s time you looked around.”
So I began to notice some things I’ve never seen before
That’s what brought me here knockin’ at your back door
Oh, yeah

A closet queen, a bus stop fiend
It wants to shake my hand.
I don’t want to be there, she decides she can
It’s Apple Dan, he’s just the man to pick fruit off your branches
I can’t sleep and we can’t keep this cattle off our ranches
Oh, oh… yeah

[Instrumental Bridge – Bolero – Cast Your Fate To The Wind]

It’s too strong, something’s wrong, I guess I lost the feeling
I don’t mind the games you play, but I don’t like you dealing
The cards looked bad, the luck’s been had and there’s nothing left to smoke
We’ll all be back tomorrow for the punchline of the joke

Oh, Oh… Oh, Oh…

 

Advertisements

Robert Plant – The Principle Of Moments (1983)

FrontCover1The Principle of Moments is the second solo studio album by the English singer Robert Plant, formerly of Led Zeppelin. It was Plant’s second Top 10 album in the US and UK. It also gave him his first solo Top 40 hit with “Big Log”. The most popular track on album-oriented rock radio in the US was “Other Arms”, which reached number-one on the Billboard Top Tracks chart. Genesis’ drummer Phil Collins played drums for six of the album’s eight songs (as he did on Pictures at Eleven). On the other two tracks former Jethro Tull drummer Barriemore Barlow performed.

Like Plant’s first solo album, Pictures at Eleven, the songs departed from the hard rock sound of Led Zeppelin. Following the strength of these albums, Plant launched a successful tour in 1983. Phil Collins was the drummer for Plant’s band for the North American portion of the tour. Collins was content to perform in the background, despite his own enormous success as a solo artist and with Genesis at the time. Little Feat’s Richie Hayward played drums for the remaining dates.

In 1983, Robert Plant went on a tour to promote the album, starting on August 26 in Peoria, Illinois, and ending on October 1 in Vancouver, British Columbia.(by wikipedia)

RobbieBlunt-RobertPlant

Robert Plant’s follow-up to Pictures at Eleven implements much of his debut’s style and vocal meandering into a new and more exciting bunch of songs. The mysteriousness of “Big Log,” the album’s first single, reached the Top 20 in the United States and in the U.K., while “In the Mood” is The Principle of Moments’ finest offering, proving that Plant could roam freely with his voice and still have it work effectively. But Plant doesn’t stop here, as he gives tracks like “Wreckless Love,” “Stranger Here…Than Over There,” and “Other Arms” an equal amount of curt abstractness and rock appeal. Because Plant’s voice is so compelling in any state, the convolution of his writing tends to take a back seat to his singing in most of his solo work, which is definitely the case in most of the songs here. Plant went on tour with the Honeydrippers within the same year of The Principle of Moments’ release, adding another facet to his already diverse solo repertoire. (by Mike DeGagne)

The 1983 release of The Principle of Moments was the second solo album by Robert Plant, following the disbandment of Led Zeppelin in late 1980. The album follows close on the heels of Plant’s debut, Pictures At Eleven and employs the same musicians and RobertPlantproduction team. Recorded in Wales, the production was polished and clinical while maintaining enough rock edge to keep it original and interesting. Plant had declined to tour following his debut because he didn’t want to perform any Led Zeppelin songs live and didn’t yet have enough original solo material to justify a tour. With the release of this second album, Plant’s second life as a major recording artist took was fully spawned.

The Principle of Moments was the first release on Plant’s independent label Es Paranza Records, after the folding of Led Zeppelin’s label Swan Song, which was also the label from Plant’s debut. Swan Song ceased operations due to the failing health of Zeppelin manager Peter Grant. When Swan Song’s offices were cleared out in 1983, early demos from Iron Maiden, Heart and other popular bands were found.

The sound of The Principle of Moments fuses new wave rock with some elements of reggae and abstract motifs and is percussion heavy with sharp, high-pitched guitars, led by guitarist Robbie Blunt and drummer Phil Collins. While not as dynamic as in the heart of the Zeppelin years, Plant’s vocals are melodic and refined. The album’s title comes from the scientific Varignon’s Theorem, which states that the moment of any force is equal to the algebraic sum of the moments of the components of that force. With the experimental tracks on this album, Plant seems to be declaring his independence from the Zeppelin sound and celebrating his own “moment” in time.

CollinsPlant

Although not officially released as a single, the opener “Other Arms” reached number one on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart. Musically, the song continues the style of Pictures at Eleven, melodic and heavy on the chorus backing vocals, a long way from the improvised arrangements of Zeppelin’s early days. “In the Mood” (which was officially released as a single) follows and marks the point where the album starts to distinguish itself. Built on bassist Paul Martinez’s very simple yet infectious bass line, with Blunt’s simple, strummed chords on top and a strong percussion presence by Collins in contrast to laid back music and vocals. Plant’s melody rhythm is almost like blue-eyed rap and this translated into a Top 40 single on the pop charts.

Keyboardist Jezz Woodroffe shines brightest on the ballad “Through with the Two Step”, where Plant’s melodic verse vocals drip with melancholy sweetness to the waltz of Woodroffe’s wafty keyboards and in contrast to Blunt’s excellent lead later in the song. “Horizontal Departure” is a very upbeat and entertaining, sex-infused rock song, like a new wave version of Zeppelin;s “Whole Lotta Love”. Again Collins has a very strong and dynamic performances on drums, contrasting against the very measured riffs of Blunt and Martinez.

RobertPllantThe album’s biggest hit is the closer “Big Log”. Reflective and somber, this is a mature song in every respect, musically, lyrically and production-wise. It employs some of the better synth-era techniques – the rubber kick effect, snappy top beat – along with well refined guitars, a swell of long synths, and vocal choruses by session singers John David and Ray Martinez. But this song is a true showcase for Robbie Blunt, one of rock’s forgotten great guitarists, whose cleaver latin phrasing leaves the most indellible mark in this truly unique composition.

The Principle of Moments includes a trio of experimental songs. “Messin’ With the Mekon” starts with an almost Jimmy Page-like riff before giving way to a moderate Caribbean groove with measured beats, although the arrangement does seems hollow when trying too hard to fit odd pieces together. “Wreckless Love” contains a mixture of electronic and Middle Eastern textures and other highly experimental arrangement that only gels due to Plant’s strong melody. The song features Barriemore Barlow, formally of Jethro Tull, on drums, as does “Stranger Here…Then Oven There”. Another experimental song with some brilliant verse vocals, this song also suffers from too many superfluous effects and arrangements, which do little more than interrupt the reggae beat and flow of the song’s core.

With two Top 10 albums under his belt, Plant launched a successful tour in late 1983, taking the stage for the first time since Zeppelin’s Knebworth concerts in 1979. In the following years Plant would work with his former bandmates sporadically, starting with the short-lived oldies project The Honeydrippers, while continuing to build his solo career. (by classicrockreview.com)

RobertPlant2

Personnel:
Robbie Blunt (guitar)
Phil Collins (drums)
Paul Martinez (bass, background vocals)
Robert Plant (vocals)
Jezz Woodroffe (keyboards)
+
Barriemore Barlow (drums on 04. + 07.)
John David -(background vocals)
Bob Mayo (guitar; keyboards; background vocals on 09. -11.)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Other Arms (Plant/Blunt) 4.21
02. In The Mood (Plant/Blunt/Martinez) 4.23
03. Messin’ With The Mekon (Plant/Blunt/Martinez) 4.40
04. Wreckless Love (Plant/Blunt) 5.18
05. Thru’ With The Two Step (Plant/Blunt/Martinez) 5.34
06. Horizontal Departure (Plant/Blunt/Martinez/Woodroffe) 4.20
07. Stranger Here… Than Over There (Plant/Blunt/Martinez/Woodroffe)  4,19
08. Big Log (Plant/Blunt/Woodroffe) 5.05
+
09. In the Mood (Plant/Blunt/Martinez) 7.34
10. Thru’ With The Two Step (Plant/Blunt/Martinez) 11.09
11. Lively Up Yourself (Marley) 3.02
12. Turnaround (Plant/Blunt/Martinez/Woodroffe) (previously unreleased studio track) 4.55

(Tracks 09. – 11,  recorded live at the Summit, Houston, TX, September 20, 1983)

LabelB1

*
**

Review

J. Geils Band – Live – Blow Your Face Out (1976)

FrontCover1Blow Your Face Out is the eighth album (and second live album) by American rock band The J. Geils Band, released in 1976.

The album was recorded at two concerts held in November 1975. The first show was at the Boston Garden in the band’s hometown (Boston, Massachusetts) on November 15th, and recorded by Record Plant East Remote with David Hewitt. The second was recorded by Metro Audio Detroit four nights later at Cobo Hall in Detroit, Michigan, where the band’s other two live albums “Live” Full House (1972) and Showtime! (1982) were also recorded. (by wikipedia)

Double-album live sets came into vogue in 1976 after Peter Frampton’s sales went through the roof for A&M, Bob Seger found fame with Live Bullet on Capitol, and the J. Geils Band released its second in-concert document in four years, Blow Your Face Out. There is great power in these grooves recorded over two nights, November 15 and November 19, at the now deconstructed Boston Garden and in Detroit at Cobo Hall. ConcertFlyer1976Here’s the beautiful dilemma with the Geils band: Live: Full House, recorded in Detroit in April of 1972, contains five songs that became J. Geils standards, and none of them overlap on the 1982 EMI single live disc, Showtime, chock-full of their latter-day classics. Can you believe there is absolutely no overlap from the first or third live album on this double disc, which came in between (except for “Looking for a Love,” uncredited, which they slip into the intro of “Houseparty” on side two)? The Rhino CD contains Jeff Tamarkin’s liner notes, while the original Atlantic album has an exquisite gatefold chock-full of photos, and inner sleeves with priceless band memo stuff à la Grand Funk’s Live Album. Sides one and two are great, and three and four are even better. “Detroit Breakdown” rocks and grooves, with tons of audience applause…Wolfy and the polished authority of his monologues are in command as the band oozes into “Chimes” from 1973’s Ladies Invited. About three and a half minutes longer than the five-minute original, it is one of many highlights on this revealing pair of discs. A precursor to 1977’s title track, “Monkey Island,” “Chimes” gives this enigmatic PromotionAdband a chance to jam out slowly and lovingly over its groove. There is so much to this album: the Janis Joplin standard “Raise Your Hand” written by Eddie Floyd, Albert Collins’ “Sno-Cone” from their first album, and “Truck Drivin’ Man” beating Bachman-Turner Overdrive to the punch. B.B. King producer Bill Szymczyk does a masterful job bringing it all together, and the band photos on back look…roguish. “Must of Got Lost,” “Where Did Our Love Go,” and “Give It to Me” are here in all their glory, a different glory than the studio versions, on an album that should have done for Geils what Live Bullet and Frampton Comes Alive did for their respective artists. If only a legitimate release of their 1999 tour would be issued to stand next to this monster — during that tour they combined the best elements of all three of their previous live discs. The J. Geils Band is more important and influential than the boys have been given credit for. It will be the live documents that ensure they eventually get their due, and Blow Your Face Out is a very worthy component that can still frazzle speakers. (by Joe Viglione)

A hell of a record … one of the finest live-albums ever !

JGeilsBand

Personnel:
Stephen Bladd (drums)
Magic Dick (harmonica)
J. Geils (guitar)
Seth Justman (keyboards)
Danny Klein (bass)
Peter Wolf (vocals)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Southside Shuffle (Justman/Wolf) 4.18
02. Back To Get Ya (Justman/Wolf) 4.36
03. Shoot Your Shot (Walker/Graves/Horn) 3.48
04. Must Of Got Lost (Justman/Wolf) 6.34
05. Where Did Our Love Go (B.Holland/Dozier/E.Holland) 3.51
06. Truck Drivin’ Man (Fell) 1.51
07. Love-Itis (Scales/Vance) 4.07
08. Lookin’ For A Love (Alexander/Samuels) +  Ain’t Nothin’ But A Houseparty (Sharh/Thomas) 7.04
09. So Sharp (Christian) + Detroit Breakdown (Justman/Wolf) 8.11
10. Detroit Breakdown (Reprise) (Justman/Wolf) 0.33
11. Chimes (Justman/Wolf) 8.54
12. Sno-Cone (Collins) 3.07
13. Wait (Justman/Wolf) 3.29
14. Raise Your Hand (Cropper/Floyd/Isbell) 4.13
15. Start All Over + Give It To Me (Justman/Wolf) 8.38
+
16. Blow Your Face Out (uncut version) 1.14.49

LabelD1

*
**

MadeLoud

JGeils02

 

Dave Mason – Alone Together (1970)

FrontCover1Alone Together is the debut solo album by former Traffic member Dave Mason, released in 1970. Mason was joined on the album by a roster of guest musicians, including Bonnie Bramlett, Leon Russell, Jim Capaldi, Rita Coolidge, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon. The song “Only You Know and I Know” reached number #42 on the Billboard charts in the US and was the record’s major commercial success.

About 30% of the records were produced in so-called marble vinyl,[citation needed] a swirled mix of pink, brown and beige, rather than the usual black vinyl.[3] The original record jacket is a tri-fold with a half-pocket on the inside to hold the record (originally issued without a paper inner sleeve). The top of the tri-fold has a die-cut image of Mason in a top hat, collaged behind a rocky outcrop, and there is a small die-cut hole at the top to permit the jacket to be hung on the wall as a poster.

MarbleDisc

Dave Mason’s first solo album was one of several recordings to come out of the Leon Russell/Delaney & Bonnie axis in 1970. (Other notables included Eric Clapton’s solo debut and Joe Cocker’s Mad Dogs & Englishmen.) Alone Together contains an excellent batch of melodically pleasing songs, built on a fat bed of strumming acoustic guitars with tasteful electric guitar accents and leads. Mason’s vocals are embellished with harmonies from Rita Coolidge, Claudia Lennear, and Delaney & Bonnie.

DaveMason
Besides the well-known semi-hit “Only You Know and I Know,” and which was also a number 20 hit for Delaney & Bonnie, highlights include the bouncy gospel-inflected “Waitin’ on You” and the banjo-bejeweled “Just a Song.” “Look at You Look at Me” and the wonderfully wah-wahed “Shouldn’t Have Took More Than You Gave” are reminiscent of Mason’s former band, Traffic, whose drummer, Jim Capaldi is among the all-star cast assembled here. Alone Together represents Dave Mason at his peak. Later releases would betray lyrical shallowness, forced rhymes, and clichéd guitar licks. But here, everything comes together perfectly. The original vinyl release of Alone Together was also noteworthy for the marble grain of the record itself — as the record played on the turntable, the tone arm appeared to be floating through the clouds. (by Jim Newsom)

BackCover1

Personnel:
John Barbata (drums)
Jim Capaldi (drums)
Michael DeTemple (guitar)
Chris Ethridge (bass)
Jim Gordon (drums)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Larry Knechtel (bass)
Dave Mason (guitar, vocals)
Don Preston (keyboards)
Carl Radle (bass)
Leon Russell (keyboards)
John Simon (keyboards)
+
background vocals:
Bonnie Bramlett – Rita Coolidge – Mike Coolidge – Claudia Lennear – Lou Cooper – Bob Norwood – Jack Storti

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Only You Know And I Know (Mason) 4.07
02. Can’t Stop Worrying, Can’t Stop Loving (Mason) 3.03
03. Waitin’ On You (Mason) 3.03
04. Shouldn’t Have Took More Than You Gave (Mason) 6.01
05. World In Changes (Mason) 4.32
06. Sad And Deep As You (Mason) 3.36
07. Just A Song (Mason) 3.01
08. Look At You Look At Me (Mason/Capaldi) 7.38

LabelA1

*
**

One of the finest songs, Dave Mason ever written:

Lips that are as warm could be
Lips that speak too soon
Lips that tell a story
Sad and deep as you

Smile that’s warm as summer sun
Smile that gets you through
Smile that tells a story
Sad and deep as you

Eyes that are the windows
Eyes that are the view
Eyes that tell a story
Sad and deep as you

Tears that are unspoked words
Tears that are the truth
Tears that tell a story
Sad and deep as you

Big Country – Steeltown (1984)

FrontCover1Steeltown is the second studio album by Scottish band Big Country. The album was recorded at ABBA’s Polar Studios in Stockholm with Steve Lillywhite producing. It was released on 19 October 1984, in the UK and 29 October 1984, in the United States. It was released on CD only in Germany, as well as remastered and reissued there.

Steeltown is the band’s only UK number 1 album, topping the chart for 1 week in October 1984. The title track Steeltown was written about the town of Corby, telling how many Scots went to work at the Stewarts & Lloyds steelworks when it opened in 1935, at the height of the Great Depression, but later found themselves unemployed when the steelworks declined in the early 1980s. (Source: Melody Maker, 1984)

The 1996 reissue contains all of the B-sides from the album’s single releases as well as the extended version of “Wonderland”

“East Of Eden” was the only Top 20 single from the album, reaching #17 in the UK chart. (by wikipedia)

Ad“Clanging and crackling with energy, this second album from Big Country rings natural evolutionary changes on the band’s stirring twin-guitar sound even as it frames still better news: bandleader Stuart Adamson has rapidly matured into a songwriter capable of bringing meticulous craft to his obvious passion. (Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone)

For their second album, Big Country took a heavier direction, both in terms of sound and in lyrical content. Where their exuberant, mega successful 1983 debut, `The Crossing’, used their bagpipe guitar technique to tell somewhat mythical `Boys Own’ stories of heroic soldiers, ships and soaring romance, `Steeltown’ was a darker, more political work. It was full of social observation and examinations of the problems of the British working classes. The romance was still there, but it had become muted and tragic, the soldiers angry and disillusioned. In a way, `The Crossing’ could be seen as a patriotic call to arms and `Steeltown’ the awful post-war reality of husbands killed in war, dole queues and domestic violence.

Lead singer and guitarist, Stuart Adamson’s lyrics are more developed and poetic on `Steeltown’, telegraphing that he had very serious intentions for this band, which went far beyond the gimmick of their guitar sound. In grand imagery, the soaring hard rock attack of the opening track, `Flame of the West’, tells the tale of a visit by a rich politician or industrialist (US movie star President, Ronald Reagan?), to the impoverished mining towns. Adamson sets the tone for the album here – it is working class outrage. The slower, dirgier second track, `East of Eden’, is beautiful and angry, as he takes on the part of a worker in the modern industrial machine (“I looked west in search of freedom and I saw slavery, I looked east in search of answers and I saw misery”). Then the aggression of the towering, anthemic title track makes it abundantly clear that exploitation of the working classes is his main concern this time out (“We built all this with our own hands, But who could know we built on sand”).

Singles

The songs that follow look at the hypocrisy used to motivate young men to go to battle (`Where the Rose is Sown’), the plight of a young mother whose husband is killed in war (`Come Back to Me’) and the frustration of dead end work that ends in relationship breakdown (`Just a Shadow’). Other songs are less overt, but take on a resonance from those around them (`The Girl with Grey Eyes’, `The Great Divide’).

Adamson’s vocals are an impassioned cry on much of this album, but beautifully tender and sadly contemplative on the slower tracks (`The Girl with Grey Eyes’, `Just a Shadow). The musicianship is first rate throughout and Mark Brzezicki’s drumming is fantastic. Steve Lillywhite (U2, Peter Gabriel, Souxie and the Banshees, XTC) once again produces, coating proceedings with a slick sheen while retaining just enough grit to keep it sounding authentic.

MC

Though `Steeltown’ indisputably retains the Big Country sound, it is not an immediately accessible album, but it is one that delivers great rewards with repeated listens. (by B S Marlay)

I added the remastert versions from this LP as a bonus.

BackCover1

Personnel:
Stuart Adamson (guitar, piano, vocals)
Mark Brzezicki (drums, percussion, vocals)
Tony Butler (bass, vocals)
Bruce Watson (guitar, mandolin, sitar, vocals)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Flame Of The West 5.01
02. East Of Eden 4.29
03. Steeltown 4.39
04. Where The Rose Is Sown 4.58
05. Come Back To Me 4.35
06. Tall Ships Go 4.38
07. Girl With Grey Eyes 4.47
08. Rain Dance 4.19
09. The Great Divide 4.50
10. Just A Shadow 5.38

Music: Stuart Adamson – Mark Brzezicki – Tony Butler – Bruce Watson
Lyrics: Stuart Adamson

LabelB1

*
**

More Big Country, one of my favorite bands from the 80´s (click on the pic):

MoreBigCountry

The Count Bishops – Same (1977)

FrontCover1The Count Bishops were a British rock band, formed in 1975 in London and which broke up in 1980. The Count Bishops had limited commercial success, but forged an important stylistic and chronological link between the root rhythm and blues band Dr. Feelgood and the proto punk sound of Eddie and the Hot Rods; together forming the foundation of the pub-rock scene, which influenced the emergence of punk rock. The group made history in England by releasing the first record from independent label Chiswick Records. They splintered following the death of guitarist Zenon DeFleur on 18 March 1979.

The Count Bishops formed in spring 1975 when members of the group Chrome joined the American vocalist Mike Spenser. In July of that year, Spenser (née Scolnick) called fellow countryman Johnny Guitar from Paris for five days straight and finally convinced him (guitar) to pack up two Les Pauls and fly to the UK and join up with Spenser and Zenon DeFleur (so named by Johnny after seeing him passed out on the floor at their first recording session). They found Steve Lewins (bass) and Paul Balbi (drums) within a few weeks. The new line-up recorded the next month at Pathway Studios with Barry Farmer at the desk and of these 13 tracks, four became the Speedball EP, the first release of Chiswick Records.

TheCountBishops02

Shortly before the release (on Dutch label Dynamite) of the single “Taking it Easy” (released in the UK as “Train, Train”), Spenser left the band after an incident involving a glass door and his boot. Johnny and Zen handled lead vocals for the next year, including on the Dutch release “Good Gear” on the Dynamite label. After recording the backing tracks for their first LP on Chiswick, they decided to bring over Dave Tice (formerly of Australian band Buffalo). With this lineup, the group finished recording its debut UK album, and toured heavily making a name for themselves and bringing to a new level their traditional influences of the 1960s: beat music (the Beatles, the Rolling Stones) and garage rock (the Standells, the Strangeloves).

For the rest of 1977, the Count Bishops toured continuously (including the support slot on the first Motörhead tour and John Cale’s tour that year, as well as their own shows) and built a formidable army of fans – despite the fact that they did not fit the mold considered against the backdrop of old-fashioned punk movement. In the spring of 1978, they signed up for a live album with the participation of six groups of the Chiswick Records roster. The project was not fully realised, but the label released it as a mini-album called Live Bishops, reducing the band name to the Bishops. With this material (and a new bass player Pat McMullan, who replaced Steve Lewins) the Count Bishops toured extensively.

TheCountBishops03

In 1978, two singles (“I Take What I Want” and “I Want Candy”) led the Count Bishops to an appearance on the TV show Top of the Pops. A few days after the release of their album Cross Cuts, which had been a year and a half in production, Zenon Hierowski crashed his Aston Martin and died on March 17, 1979, and instead of the anticipated “breakthrough”, the Bishops were forced to retrench. They toured with Blitz Krieg (of Blast Furnace fame) deputising for Zen, and then Paul Balbi (drums) was deported back to Australia after returning from a Spanish festival. The band carried on with Charlie Morgan (Tom Robinson Band, Elton John) on drums and just Johnny on guitar for some months, including a tour of Australia with Balbi, but Zen’s death had taken much of the impetus away and they split up. (by wikipedia)

TheCountBishops01

Kicking off with a great cover of the Kinks’ “I Need You,” this solid, unpretentious debut album belongs in the home of every fan of English R&B from the Yardbirds to the Pretty Things to Dr. Feelgood. Guitarists Johnny Guitar and Zenon de Fleur keep it tight and simple, never wasting a note, and vocalist Dave Tice is so macho, it’s enough to make you laugh. The originals are OK if somewhat predictable blues-based rave-ups, but the energy and good cheer more than make up for the album’s derivative nature. Not a deep album by any stretch of the imagination, just good dirty fun. (by John Dougan)

Ladies and gentlemen: Loud & proud, hot & dirty: The Count Bishops now !

TheCountBishops04

Personnel:
Paul Balbi (drums)
Zenon De Fleur (guitar, slide-guitar)
Johnny Guitar (guitar, vocals)
Steve Lewins (bass)
Dave Tice (vocals)
+
Julian Holland (piano on 06.)

BackCover1
Tracklist:
01. I Need You (Davies) 2.22
02. Stay Free (De Fleur) 3.08
03. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 2.52
04. Talk To You (Lewins) 3.45
05. Shake Your Moneymaker (James) 2.31
06. Down The Road Apiece (Raye) 2.51
07. Baby You’re Wrong (De Fleur) 2.44
08. Don’t Start Crying Now (Moore/West) 2.05
09. Someone’s Got My Number (Lewins) 2.33
10. Good Guys Don’t Wear White (Cobb) 2.47
11. You’re In My Way (Lewins) 3.11
12. Taste & Try (Youlden) 2.33

LabelB1

*
**

JapanesEdition

The Japanese edtion

Steve Winwood – Live At The Telluride Festival (2014)

FrontCover1No, Steve Winwood isn´t a blues grass artists, but he appears at the legendary Telluride Festival in

Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy.

When you hear the name Steve Winwood, where do you go? Back to Blind Faith? On the Arc of A Diver? Do you play Traffic in your head? Or do you think about the kid who was the driving force of the Spencer Davis Group? Wherever Steve Winwood’s impressive output takes you, it’s pure gold. Creatively restless and curious, the hallmark of Steve’s musical journey has been one of exploration and testing boundaries. The albums he’s made with Blind Faith and Traffic set him apart as a musician who reaches out to other, equally adventurous souls – Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Rick Grech, Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood – to make records that remain as fresh and exciting as the first time you dropped the needle in the groove. Then as now, there’ve been no other recordings quite like John Barleycorn Must Die, or Blind Faith’s sole eponymous record. Musical conventions of the day were challenged by the sheer audacity of their compositions, range of influences, and stellar musicianship. What remains are classic records that reside in every serious listener’s collection.

Winwood01His solo records unleashed the Grammy tide – in the late 70s and 1980s, his melodic songs were radio staples and a career that at that time was already 20 years on, exploded. A wickedly talented multi-instrumentalist, Steve might be best known for his distinctive Hammond organ sound, a sound he has lent to Jimi Hendrix on “Voodoo Chile,” and as recently as on Miranda Lambert’s hit, “Baggage Claim.” You hear it and just know it’s Mr. Winwood.

In Steve Winwood’s music there is a vast range of influences and styles. He’s explored Delta blues, English folk, Afro-Caribbean rhythms and melds them into his own inventive songs. Chances are, you know the words to all of them. We’re honored to have Steve Winwood play for you. (Festival announcement for 2018)

Map

Steve Winwood, showing no signs of age or wear on his beautiful voice, closed the second day with an awesome set of rock and roll that touched on songs from his careers with Blind Faith, Traffic, the Spencer Davis Group, and his solo career. One highlight was the blistering take on “The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys” that jammed into “Empty Pages.” Winwood alternated between organ and guitar, playing a blistering solo on the latter during “Dear Mr. Fantasy,” and even picked up a mandolin for a soulful take on “Back in the High Life.” (Reviews from the 2014 concert at the Telluride Festival by Candace Horgan)

What another great concert by Steve Winwood, including rare live performances of “Rainmaker” and “Medicated Goo” …

Recorded live at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Telluride, CO; June 20, 2014. Very good to excellent web stream.

José Neto

José Neto

Personnel:
Richard Bailey (drums)
Paul Booth (saxophone, flute, keyboards, vocals, irish whistle)
Cafe DeSilva (percussion)
José Neto (guitar)
Steve Winwood (organ, mandolin, electric guitar, vocals)

Winwood02

Tracklist:
01. Introduction 2.27
02. Rainmaker (Winwood/Capaldi) 6.28 (*)
03. I’m A Man (Winwood/Miller) 6.02
04. Fly (Winwood/Godwin/Neto) 8.45
05. Can’t Find My Way Home (Winwood) 6.29
06. Medicated Goo (Winwood/Miller) 5.18
07. The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys (Winwood/Capaldi) 7.46
08. Empty Pages (Winwood/Capaldi)  5.49
09. Light Up or Leave Me Alone (Capaldi) 16.24
10. Band introductions 0.49
11. Dear Mr Fantasy (Winwood/Capaldi/Wood) 8.55
12. Back In The High Life Again (Winwood/Jennings) 8.51
13. Gimme Some Lovin’(S.Winwood/M.Winwood/Davis) 6.09
14. Closing Radio Banter 1.09

(*) “During Rainmaker, there were some slight chirp sounds and the volume fluctuated during stream.”

Winwood03

*
**

FestivalArea.jpg
The festival area in Telluride