Mark Knopfler – Kill To Get Crimson (2007)

MarkKnopflerFrontCover1Kill to Get Crimson is the fifth solo studio album by British singer-songwriter and guitarist Mark Knopfler, released on 17 September 2007 by Mercury Records internationally, and by Warner Bros. Records in the United States. The album’s title comes from a line in the song “Let It All Go”. The album cover image is taken from the painting Four Lambrettas and Three Portraits of Janet Churchman by John Bratby, painted in 1958. The first singles from the album were “True Love Will Never Fade” in Europe, and “Punish The Monkey” in North America. The album debuted at number 26 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling about 23,000 copies in its first week. The Kill to Get Crimson Tour promoting the album started on 29 March 2008 in Amsterdam, Netherlands and ended on 31 July 2008 in Miami Beach, Florida. The album was released on CD, CD/DVD, double vinyl LP, and a Deluxe Set of 180g vinyl LP and CD.Kill to Get Crimson is the fifth solo studio album by British singer-songwriter and guitarist Mark Knopfler, released on 17 September 2007 by Mercury Records internationally, and by Warner Bros. Records in the United States. The album’s title comes from a line in the song “Let It All Go”. The album cover image is taken from the painting Four Lambrettas and Three Portraits of Janet Churchman by John Bratby, painted in 1958. The first singles from the album were “True Love Will Never Fade” in Europe, and “Punish The Monkey” in North America. The album debuted at number 26 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling about 23,000 copies in its first week. The Kill to Get Crimson Tour promoting the album started on 29 March 2008 in Amsterdam, Netherlands and ended on 31 July 2008 in Miami Beach, Florida.

MarkKnopflerThe album was released on CD, CD/DVD, double vinyl LP, and a Deluxe Set of 180g vinyl.

Knopfler supported the release of Kill to Get Crimson with the Kill to Get Crimson Tour of Europe and North America, which started on 29 March 2008 in Amsterdam, and included 94 concerts in 88 cities, ending in on 31 July 2008 in Miami Beach, Florida. The tour lineup included Mark Knopfler (guitars, vocals), Richard Bennett (guitars), Danny Cummings (drums), Guy Fletcher (keyboards), Matt Rollings (keyboards), Glenn Worf (bass), and John McCusker (fiddle, cittern). The tour included a six-night run at the Royal Albert Hall in London, with Bap Kennedy as the supporting act. Jesca Hoop was the opening act for the North America leg of the tour. (by wikipedia)

Given that Kill to Get Crimson follows Mark Knopfler’s yearlong collaboration with Emmylou Harris — inaugurated by the album All the Roadrunning and followed by a tour, subsequently documented on the live set Real Live Roadrunning — it might be reasonable to presume that it bears a slightly heavier folk influence, as if Emmylou had rubbed off on the guitarist. And that’s true to a certain extent: “Heart Full of Holes” has an old-timey carnivalesque lilt to its middle section and “Secondary Waltz” is simple, low-key two-step driven by accordions, while “The Fish and the Bird” is a spare allegory that recalls old folk tunes, as does the stately grace of “Madame Geneva’s.” Also, “Let It All Go” (the song that bears the lyric that lends the album the title) is a minor key dirge that could be seen as a winding folk tune, but it hearkens back to the evocative mood pieces that often up ate up large sections of the second side of a Dire Straits album, and that’s hardly the only time either Knopfler’s old band or his solo works are brought to mind here.

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Despite the few folk trappings, most of Kill to Get Crimson resembles nothing so much as another tastefully low-key album from Knopfler, one that resides comfortably in his mellow Americana niche, where country, blues, and rock gently blend into a sound that resembles no particular style but evokes plenty of past sounds. Knopfler rides this soft groove as easily as he ever has, maybe even a little easier than usual, but the big difference here is although mood is key — as it always is on a Knopfler solo album — the emphasis is not on guitar; it’s on the song. Thing is, the mood tends to trump the sound unless the album is heard closely, which is something Knopfler’s dedicated cult will surely do, but less dedicated listeners can’t be blamed if they enjoy this merely as background music if they choose to enjoy this at all. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Danny Cummings (drums, percussion)
Guy Fletcher (keyboards)
Mark Knopfler(vocals, guitar)
Ian Lowthian (accordion)
John McCusker (violin, cittern)
Frank Ricotti (vibraphone)
Steve Sidwell (trumpet)
Chris White (flute, saxophone, clarinet)
Glenn Worf (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. True Love Will Never Fade 4.24
02. The Scaffolder’s Wife 3.54
03. The Fizzy And The Still 4.10
04. Heart Full Of Holes 6.38
05. We Can Get Wild 4.21
06. Secondary Waltz 3.46
07. Punish the Monkey 4.40
08. Let It All Go 5.21
09. Behind with the Rent 4.51
10. The FishAnd The Bird 3.47
11. Madame Geneva’s 4.01
12. In the Sky 7.31

All songs were written by Mark Knopfler

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The Clash – Sandinista! (1980)

FrontCover1Sandinista! is the fourth studio album by English rock band the Clash. It was released on 12 December 1980 as a triple album containing 36 tracks, with 6 songs on each side. Anticipating the “world music” trend of the 1980s, it features funk, reggae, jazz, gospel, rockabilly, folk, dub, rhythm and blues, calypso, disco, and rap. For the first time, the band’s traditional songwriting credits of Strummer and Jones were replaced by a generic credit to the Clash, and the band agreed to a decrease in album royalties in order to release the 3-LP at a low price.
The title refers to the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, and its catalogue number, ‘FSLN1’, refers to the abbreviation of the party’s Spanish name, Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional.
Sandinista! was voted best album of the year in the Pazz & Jop critics poll in The Village Voice, and was ranked number 404 on the Rolling Stone list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time” in 2003. Slant Magazine listed the album at number 85 on its “Best Albums of the 1980s” list in 2012.

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The album was recorded over most of 1980, in London, Manchester, Jamaica and New York. It was produced by the band (which essentially meant Mick Jones and Joe Strummer), recorded and mixed by Bill Price, and engineered by Jeremy “Jerry” Green (Wessex Sound Studios), J. P. Nicholson (Electric Lady Studios), Lancelot “Maxie” McKenzie (Channel One Studios), and Bill Price (Pluto + Power Station Studios). Dub versions of some of the songs and toasting was done by Mikey Dread, who had first worked with the band for their 1980 single “Bankrobber”. With Sandinista! the band reached beyond punk and reggae into dub, rhythm and blues, calypso, gospel and other genres.[8] The album clearly displays the influence of reggae and producer Lee “Scratch” Perry (who had worked with the band on their 1977 single “Complete Control” and who had opened some of the band’s shows during its stand at Bond’s in New York in 1980), with a dense, echo-filled sound on even the straight rock songs.

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When recording began in New York bass guitarist Paul Simonon was busy making a film called Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, and he was replaced briefly by Ian Dury and the Blockheads bassist Norman Watt-Roy; this later caused some bad feeling when Watt-Roy and keyboard player Mickey Gallagher, a fellow Blockhead, claimed they were responsible for co-composing the song “The Magnificent Seven”, as the song was based on a tune of theirs. Dread, too, was upset that he was not credited as the album’s producer, although he was credited with “Version Mix”. Other guests on the album include singer Ellen Foley (Jones’ partner at the time), guitarist Ivan Julian formerly of the Voidoids, former Eddie and the Hot Rods member Lew Lewis, and Strummer’s old friend and musical collaborator Tymon Dogg, who plays violin, sings on and wrote the track “Lose This Skin”; he later joined Strummer’s band the Mescaleros. Gallagher’s children also made appearances: his two sons, Luke and Ben, singing a version of “Career Opportunities” from the band’s first album, and his daughter Maria singing a snippet of “The Guns of Brixton”, from London Calling, at the end of the track “Broadway”.

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This is also the only Clash album on which all four members have a lead vocal. Drummer Topper Headon made a unique lead vocal contribution on the disco song “Ivan Meets G.I. Joe”, and bassist Paul Simonon sings lead on “The Crooked Beat”.Release
According to Joe Strummer, the decision to release a triple-LP was the their way of mocking CBS for resisting their desire to release London Calling as a double album, then releasing Bruce Springsteen’s double album The River, also on CBS, less than a year later. The band’s wish to release the album at a low price was also met with resistance, and they had to forego any royalties on the first 200,000 copies sold in the UK and a 50% cut in royalties elsewhere.
Four singles were released from the Sandinista! sessions in the UK: “Bankrobber” (which did not appear on the album), “The Call Up”, “Hitsville UK”, and “The Magnificent Seven”.
A single disc promotional sampler called Sandinista Now! was sent to press and radio. The side one track listing was “Police on My Back”, “Somebody Got Murdered”, “The Call Up”, “Washington Bullets”, “Ivan Meets G.I. Joe” and “Hitsville U.K.”. The side two track listing was “Up in Heaven (Not Only Here)”, “The Magnificent Seven”, “The Leader”, “Junco Partner”, “One More Time” and “The Sound of Sinners”.

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The song “Washington Bullets” was lyricist Joe Strummer’s most extensive—and most specific—political statement to date. In it, Strummer name checks conflicts or controversies from around the world; namely in Chile, Nicaragua, Cuba, Afghanistan and Tibet. (In reference to the first three, Strummer seems to side with what he sees as popular leftist movements or governments, while in the latter two, he sharply criticises the policy of Moscow’s and Beijing’s communist governments for what he sees as their imperialist actions). The Rolling Stone review of Sandinista! calls “Washington Bullets”, along with “The Equaliser” and “The Call Up”, “the heart of the album”.
The original, 3-disc vinyl release of Sandinista! included a tri-fold lyric sheet cleverly titled The Armagideon Times, no. 3 (a play on “Armagideon Time”, the b-side from the single London Calling.) Armagideon Times, nos. 1 and 2 were Clash fanzines. The lyric sheet featured cartoons credited to Steve Bell, as well as hand-written (but still legible) lyrics of all the original songs. The 2-CD release contains a facsimile of the lyric sheet considerably reduced in size.

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John Piccarella, in a review for Rolling Stone headlined “The Clash Drop The Big One”, argued that in effect, the band said “to hell with Clash style, there’s a world out there.” Some critics have argued that the album would have worked better as a less-ambitious, smaller project, while Piccarella (in his Rolling Stone review) and others think of the album as a breakthrough that deserves comparison to the Beatles’ White Album. Robert Christgau wrote in The Village Voice, “if this is their worst—which it is, I think—they must be, er, the world’s greatest rock and roll band”.
The triple album won several “best of the year” critics polls in 1981. It was voted the best album of the year in The Village Voice’s Pazz & Jop critics poll. Dave Marsh noted that it was a record whose topic was as many years ahead of its time as its sound.Alternative Press magazine included Sandinista! on its 2000 list of the “10 Essential Political-Revolution Albums” In 2003, the album was ranked number 404 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The College Media Journal ranked Sandinista! number two on its list of the “Top 20 Most-Played Albums of 1981”.
The Sandinista! Project, a tribute to the album featuring the Smithereens, Camper Van Beethoven, Jon Langford (Mekons) and Sally Timms, Amy Rigby, Katrina Leskanich (of Katrina and the Waves), Wreckless Eric, Willie Nile, Matthew Ryan, Stew, Mark Cutler, Sex Clark Five, Sid Griffin & Coal Porters, Haale, the Blizzard of 78 featuring Mikey Dread, Ruby on the Vine, and many others, was released on 15 May 2007, on the 00:02:59 Records (a label named after a lyric from the Sandinista! song “Hitsville U.K.”). The album also features a collaboration by Soul Food and Mickey Gallagher on “Midnight Log”. (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Topper Headon (drums, lead vocals on “Ivan Meets G.I. Joe” and “Look Here”)
Mick Jones (guitar, vocals)
Paul Simonon (bass, backing vocals, lead vocals on “The Crooked Beat” and “Look Here”)
Joe Strummer (vocals, guitar)
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Noel “Tempo” Bailey (guitar)
Arthur Edward “Bill” Barnacle (trumpet on 04. 06., 09., 17., 25. + 27.)
Gary Barnacle (saxophone on 04. 06., 09., 17., 25. + 27.)
Tymon Dogg (vocals on 25., violin on 03.,  10.,  11., 21., 25. +  27.,  keyboards on 18,)
Mikey Dread (vocals on 08.,  09., 11. 32.)
Ellen Foley (vocals on 02.)
Maria Gallagher (vocals on 24.)
Mickey Gallagher (keyboards)
Rick Gascoigne (trombone on 04., 06., 25., 27. + 30.)
Den Hegarty (vocals)
Ivan Julian (guitar)
Lew Lewis (harmonica on 03., 08., 15., 20., 21., 31. + 34.)
Jody Linscott (percussion)
Davey Payne (saxophone on. 04. 06., 09., 17., 25. + 27.)
Norman Watt-Roy (bass guitar on 01.)

Anthony Nelson Steelie (Wycliffe Johnson of Steely and Clevie)
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Luke & Ben Gallagher (vocals on 35.)
Band Sgt. Dave Yates (Drill Sergeant on 22.)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Magnificent Seven (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Watt-Roy/Gallagher) 5.34
02.. Hitsville UK (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.22
03. Junco Partner (Traditional) 4.52
04. Ivan Meets G.I. Joe (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.06
05. The Leader (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 1.42
06. Something About England (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.43
07. Rebel Waltz (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.26
08. Look Here (Allison) 2,45
09. The Crooked Beat (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 5.28
10. Somebody Got Murdered (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.34
11. One More Time (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon/Dread) 3.32
12. One More Dub (dub version of One More Time) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon/Dread) 3.37
13. Lightning Strikes (Not Once but Twice) (Reprise Of The Magnificent Seven) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Watt-Roy/Gallagher)4.51
14. Up In Heaven (Not Only Here) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.32
15. Corner Soul (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 2.43
16. Let’s Go Crazy (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon)  4.24
17. If Music Could Talk (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon/Dread) 4.37
18. The Sound Of Sinners (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.02

CD 2:
19. Police On My Back (Grant) 3.18
20. Midnight Log (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 2.10
21. The Equaliser (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 5.47
22. The Call Up (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 5.28
23. Washington Bullets” (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.52
24. Broadway”(features an epilogue of The Guns of Brixton sung by Maria Gallagher) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 5.49
25.  Lose This Skin (Dogg) 5.09
26. Charlie Don’t Surf (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.54
27. Mensforth Hill (Something About England backwards with overdubs) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.42
28. Junkie Slip (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 2.49
29. Kingston Advice (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 2.37
30. The Street Parade (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.28
31. Version City (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.23
32. Living In Fame (dub version of If Music Could Talk) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon/Dread) 4.53
33. Silicone On Sapphire (dub version of Washington Bullets) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 4.14
34. Version Pardner (dub version of Junco Partner) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon)  5.23
35. Career Opportunities (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 2.30
36. Shepherds Delight (dub version of Police & Thieves) (Jones/Strummer/Headon/Simonon) 3.29

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Inlets

Savoy Brown – Looking In (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgLooking In is the sixth album by the band Savoy Brown.

It was released by Decca in 1970 (SKL 5066). For release in the USA and Canada tapes were leased to Parrot Records (PAS 71042).

The album reached no. 50 in the UK. (by wikipedia)

Savoy Brown’s blues-rock sound takes on a much more defined feel on 1970’s Looking In and is one of this band’s best efforts. Kim Simmonds is utterly bewildering on guitar, while Lonesome Dave Peverett does a fine job taking over lead singing duties from Chris Youlden who left halfway through the year. But it’s the captivating arrangements and alluring ease of the music that makes this a superb listen. The pleading strain transformed through Simmonds’ guitar on “Money Can’t Save Your Soul” is mud-thick with raw blues, and the comfort of “Sunday Night” is extremely smooth and laid back.

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“Take It Easy” sounds like it could have been a B.B. King tune as it’s doused with relaxed guitar fingering. The entire album is saturated with a simple, British blues sound but the pace and the marbled strands of bubbly instrumental perkiness fill it with life. Even the Yardbirds-flavored “Leaving Again” is appealing with its naïve hooks, capped off with a heart-stopping guitar solo. This album along with Street Corner Talking best exemplify Savoy Brown’s tranquilizing style. (by Mike DeGagne)

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Personnel:
Lonesome Dave (vocals, guitar)
Roger Earl (drums)
Kim Simmond (guitar, piano)
Tony Steven (bass)
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Owen Finnegan (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Gypsy (Simmonds) 1.02
02. Poor Girl (Stevens) 4.09
03. Money Can’t Save Your Soul (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.32
04. Sunday Night (Simmonds) 5.25
05. Looking In (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.19
06. Take It Easy (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.44
07. Sitting An’ Thinking (Simmonds) 2.54
08. Leavin’ Again (Peverett/Simmonds) 8.30
09. Romanoff (Simmonds) 1.02

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More Savoy Brown:

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Destroy All Monsters – November 22, 1963 (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgDestroy All Monsters were an influential Detroit band existing from 1973 to 1985, with sporadic performances since. Their music touched on elements of punk rock, psychedelic rock, heavy metal and noise rock with a heavy dose of performance art. They described their music as “anti-rock.”

Destroy All Monsters never found mainstream success, but earned some notoriety due to members of notable rock groups The Stooges and MC5 who joined the group.

Although Destroy All Monsters never recorded a proper album, Sonic Youth singer/guitarist Thurston Moore released a three compact disc compilation of the group’s music in 1994.

Formed in 1973, the first edition of Destroy All Monsters was formed by University of Michigan art students Mike Kelley, Jim Shaw, Niagara (Lynn Rovner) and filmmaker Cary Loren. They performed in the Ann Arbor area from 1973–1976, and their only release was a one-hour cassette of their recordings available only through Lightworks magazine. Their early music was influenced by Sun Ra, Velvet Underground, ESP-Disk, monster movies, beat culture and futurism. Their sound was experimental, psychedelic, darkly humorous and droning.

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On New Year’s Eve of 1973, the first Destroy All Monsters concert was held at a comic book convention in Ann Arbor, Michigan. At the time the instruments were a violin, a sax, a vacuum cleaner and a coffee can. They performed a demented version of Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man” and were asked to leave after ten minutes. The group performed “guerilla style”, setting up free at parties and playing for food along Ann Arbor’s frat row. They used modified instruments, a drum box, tape loops, hot-wired toys, cheap keyboards and broken electronic devices. Aside from the comic convention, the group’s only formal gig in this era was at the Halloween Ball at the University of Michigan art school in 1976.

Kelley and Shaw left the band during the summer of 1976 to attend graduate school at CalArts in Los Angeles, California. Both have gone on to lead successful solo careers in the art world. Their work is held in major collections around the world.

Niagara, Ron Asheton and unidentified drummer, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, Spring of 1982

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In 1977, Niagara and Loren recruited guitarist Laurence B. (Larry) Miller and saxophonist Benjamin (Ben) Miller; both had been in the short-lived Sproton Layer with their brother Roger Miller (who later went on to found Mission of Burma). They invited Mike (Jett) Powers on bass but he soon left for Harvard University. Not long after, members of two important Detroit-based groups signed on: guitarist Ron Asheton, earlier of The Stooges, and bass guitarist Michael Davis of the MC5. Their presence garnered the group more attention than ever before. Shortly thereafter, Ron asked drummer Rob King to join the band.

In 1978, Destroy All Monsters were preparing to release “Bored”, their first official recording, when the group began to fall apart. Niagara ended her romance with Loren in favor of a new relationship with Asheton; Loren quit the group, with the Miller brothers leaving after the band’s Halloween gig at EMU, in 1978. The “Bored”/”You’re Gonna Die” single earned some attention in the UK music press, and the band was able to capitalize on the notoriety.

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Niagara, Ron Asheton and unidentified drummer,
Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, Spring of 1982

In late 1978, Loren issued a live DAM EP known as “Days of Diamonds” on his Black Hole label. Another EP followed in 1979, “Blackout in the City” under the name XANADU with the Miller Brothers, Loren and Rob King. Niagara and Ron Asheton carried on with various personnel releasing a total of three 7″ singles on the IDBI label. Between 1982 and 1984, Destroy All Monsters played in bars and nightclubs in Ann Arbor and Detroit. Personnel: Bill Frank on drums, Mike Davis on bass, Ron Asheton on guitar, and Niagara on vocals. In May 1983, the band recorded and videotaped the song called “Make Mine Japanese.” Released in December 1983, this video can now be seen on-line. The Monsters broke up in 1985. The Asheton singles were released by Cherry Red Records on CD.

In 1994, Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Byron Coley and Thurston Moore compiled a three-CD boxed set of music, artwork and extensive liner notes as Destroy All Monsters: 1974-1976 on Moore’s Ecstatic Peace! label.

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Single “Bored” bw “You´re Gonna Die” (1978)

The original lineup (Kelley, Loren, Niagara and Shaw) reformed for reunion shows in 1995. Loren republished the six issues of the Destroy All Monsters Magazine (1976–1979) with added DAM student artwork, flexi disc and history in the book DESTROY ALL MONSTERS:GEISHA THIS — four VHS tapes of DAM films were also issued. An exhibition of their artwork followed at the Book Beat Gallery as well as live performances in Detroit, Los Angeles and San Diego. A live CD, “Silver Wedding Anniversary”, resulted from these concerts and was released in 1996 on the Sympathy for the Record Industry label.

In 1996, the group (sans Niagara) performed in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan. A display of DAM artwork was held at the Deep Gallery in Tokyo. At the invitation of Ben Schot and Ronald Cornelissen for the “I Rip You, You Rip Me” festival and seminar at the Boijman’s Museum in Rotterdam, DAM began work on the installation and film known as Strange Früt: Rock Apochrypha, an investigation of Detroit culture. This exhibition was shown and completed in 2000 at COCA (Center on Contemporary Art) in Seattle, WA., and in 2001 at the DAM Collective: Artists Take On Detroit at the Detroit Institute of Arts. This work was also selected for inclusion in the 2002 Whitney Biennial of Art in NYC.

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Single “Nov. 22” bw “Meet The Creeper” (1979)

In 2006, the “Strange Früt” exhibition and the bands archives traveled to the Magasin Center for Contemporary Art in Grenoble, France. DAM performed at the “All Tomorrow’s Parties” festivals in Los Angeles as guest artists of Sonic Youth, and in London, UK as guest artists selected by Dino and Jake Chapman. A selection of the band’s archives was on exhibition as part of the “Theater Without Theater” show at MACBA in Barcelona, Spain opening May 25, 2007. The exhibit traveled to Lisbon, Portugal in the fall of that year.

Since 1995, the band has released five full-length CDs on their own label(s) [The End is Here]: Radio Teardrop 1996, Backyard Monster Tube and Pig 1998, Swamp Gas 2001, and on [Compound Annex]: Detroit Oratorio 2003, DAM: Live in Tokyo 2003.

DAM04A reprint of the first six issues of DAM Magazine with added band artwork, history, poster and a flexi disc was published by Book Beat in 1995 as Destroy All Monsters: Geisha This, and reprinted in three different editions. A DVD of selected DAM films was released in 2007 by MVD video as: “Grow Live Monsters” featuring early 8mm & 16mm films taken in 1971-1976.

Ron Asheton died on January 1, 2009, aged 60, of an apparent heart attack.

In 2009 the Printed Matter bookstore in NYC mounted the Destroy All Monsters exhibit Hungry for Death curated by James Hoff and Cary Loren featuring the group’s collected work.[2] The exhibition toured to White Flag Projects in St Louis, 0047 in Oslo, SPACE Gallery in London, The American Academy in Rome, Italy, Galerie 1m3 in Lausanne, Switzerland, AMP Gallery in Athens, Greece (2010), galerie du jour agnès b in Paris, France (2011) and the Boston University Art Gallery (2011). To coincide with the Hungry for Death exhibition Printed Matter released a 1975 recording Double Sextet as a vinyl album. The band also re-released the Destroy All Monsters: 1974 – 1976 compilation, without booklet, in a limited edition of 1000. In 2011, the Boston University Art Gallery released “Hungry for Death: Destroy All Monsters”, with essays by Byron Coley and Branden Joseph. This catalog included a detailed discography and a CD titled “Get Out of My Bedroom” of unreleased DAM music spanning over thirty years of band history.[3]

A facsimile reprint of the Destroy All Monsters Magazine 1976-1979 was published by Primary Information in the May 2011.

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An exhibition curated by Mike Kelley and Dan Nadel titled “Return of the Repressed: Destroy All Monsters 1973-1977” showing work by Mike Kelley, Jim Shaw, Cary Loren and Niagara opened at PRISM in Los Angeles on November 19, 2011 and ran through January 7, 2012. Accompanying the exhibition was a catalog published by PRISM and PictureBox, edited by Mike Kelley and Dan Nadel with an essay by Nicole Rudick.

Mike Kelley was found dead in South Pasadena, California, on February 1, 2012, aged 57, having committed suicide. Sixteen days later, on February 17, 2012, Michael Davis died of liver failure, aged 68. (by wikipedia)

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When it comes to Detroit-area, proto-punk supergroups, I like Destroy All Monsters more than Sonic’s Rendezvous Band. The energy, the passion, the fire; it’s all just booming in this band. On the other hand, Sonic’s Rendezvous Band got a little dad-rock sounding at times, and it was pretty formulaic throughout. Destroy All Monsters were anti-rock, meaning they just did what they wanted pretty much, and in doing so, they came up with some fantastic riffs, and some fantastic melodies.

I listened to this, and it finally struck me – Sonic Youth is a complete rip-off of Destroy All Monsters. They both have that crazy, manic type sound, and Kim Gordon is a dead ringer for Niagra; vocally that is. In fact, Thurston Moore actually released everything Destroy All Monsters had ever done on a box set, so you know the influence was definitely there.

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Musically, this thing is way chaotic, and it even rocks more than The Stooges at points. It’s loaded with fuzzy guitar, and crazy free saxophone going off in each and every direction. I really like it. Especially the song “Bored”; boy does that rock. Other highlights are “Nobody Knows”, “What Do I Get”, and “Anyone Can Fuck Her”. This is crazy, testosterone-pumping rock with a female vocal lead, and it’s probably the sexiest thing ever conceived by mankind.

A sweating recommendation goes out to you rock lovers! Wooooooeeeeee!!!! (Seattle_Junkie_Queen)

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Personnel:
Ron Asheton (guitar, background vocals, bass on 09. – 11.)
Michael Davis (bass)
Rob King (drums)
Lynn “Niagara” Rovner (vocals)
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Bill Franck (drums on 09. – 11.)
Ben Miller (saxophone on 01. – 04.)
Larry Miller (guitar on 01. – 04.)
Charlie Tyfklind (saxophone on 10.)

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Tracklist:
01 Bored (Asheton/Rovner) 3.56
02. You’re Gonna Die (Loren/Asheton/Rovner) 2.49
03. Meet The Creeper (Davis) 4.57
04. November 22, 1963 (Asheton/Rovner) 4.24
05. Jesus Is A Shotgun (King/Asheton/Rovner) 2.56
06. Nobody Knows (Davis/Rovner) 3.27
07. What Do I Get (Asheton/Rovner) 4.16
08. These Boots Are Made For Walking (Hazlewood) 5.40
09. Anybody Can (Fuck Her) Asheton/Rovner)  3.33
10. Party Girl Asheton/Rovner) 3.43
11. A/D (Angel In The Daytime, Devil At Night) (Franck/Asheton/Rovner) 2.38

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Niagara in 1974

The Other Half – Mr. Pharmacist (Same) (1968)

FrontCover1The Other Half was an American psychedelic garage rock band, based in San Francisco, and active in the mid-to-late 1960s. The band gained interest after one of the Nuggets compilations in the 1980s included their single, “Mr. Pharmacist”.

The Other Half formed in Los Angeles Southern California, but later moved to San Francisco. They played several shows at Chet Helms Family Dog shows at the Avalon Ballroom. Their music was strongly influenced by Yardbirds and Rolling Stones. Guitarist Randy Holden had been offered the chance to replace Jeff Beck in the Yardbirds before joining The Other Half. The Other Half were at their peak when the music scene was at its height in San Francisco and the Flower Power movement in full swing in Haight Ashbury. Their style changed from an earlier vocal based garage band, to the loudest big stage band sound of the time, taken in that direction by former Sons of Adam guitarist Randy Holden. Their sound has been compared to The Yardbirds, and contained elements of blues, hard rock, and Eastern melodic influences.[3] Holden left the band after their debut album was recorded, dissatisfied with the recording and the guitar he was playing at the time, later stating “I was trying to accommodate everyone else, at the expense of my own soul and happiness”. Despite Holden’s misgivings, the album has been described as “awesome incendiary rock”.

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Holden went on to join Blue Cheer before embarking on a solo career.

The band’s “Mr. Pharmacist” was included on one of the Nuggets compilations in the early 1980s, Volume 12: Punk Part Three, and was later covered by The Fall, becoming a number 75 UK chart hit. A collection of their recordings, titled Mr. Pharmacist was issued in 1982. This included their entire 1968 album and several tracks from singles. Two songs, “Bad Day” and “Oz Lee Eaves Drops” appear in the 1968 pilot episode of The Mod Squad. (by wikipedia)

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This obscure San Francisco (by way of L.A.) ’60s band gained a degree of notoriety in the ’80s when their punk-garage single “Mr. Pharmacist” was included on one of Rhino’s Nuggets compilations and covered by the Fall. Actually, most of the Other Half’s material was far less garage than psychedelic, featuring the sustain-laden guitar of Randy Holden, one of the best Jeff Beck-inspired axemen of the ’60s. Boasting a just-out-of-the-garage approach to Haight-Ashbury psychedelia, the group cut a little-heard, fairly strong album, as well as a few rare singles, in 1967 and 1968. Holden, who had previously played in the L.A. psychedelic garage band Sons of Adam, went on to join Blue Cheer and record on his own. (by Richie Unterberger)

This album has been kicking around for ages, first in cut-out bins in the 1970s and subsequently on want lists, ever since “Mr. Pharmacist” (which was not on this long-player) turned up on Rhino’s Nuggets, Vol. 12. It turns out to be not at all bad, if not exactly distinguished — the Other Half were a much better garage band than they were a psychedelic outfit, their frantic, crunchy rockers (which dominate this record) being far more memorable and impressive than their efforts at trippy, spaced out, languid psych (“Wonderful Day”). “I Need You,” and “Feathered Fish” give lead guitarist Randy Holden the opportunity to stretch out in the best Jeff Beck manner (circa the Yardbirds’ Roger the Engineer), and even their more primitive numbers, such as “Oz Lee Eaves Drops,” are good showcases for the group.

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Holden and rhythm guitarist Geoff Westen also get into some entertaining faux mandolin sounds on “Morning Fire,” but when the band tries to get too serious, as on the two-part “What Can I Do for You,” the results are fairly dire, which makes the last ten minutes of the original LP (which didn’t even run 30 minutes) easily dispensable. (by by Bruce Eder)

Randy Holden sure was an underrated guitarist. He had a good power tone, a sense of raw energy just like the vocalist goes for. “Introduction” feels like a warm-up to an actual song, and the audience overdubs derogate. Their cover of “Feathered Fish” is nearly as good as the original; actually it has a more lively vocal than the original. “Flight Of the Dragon Lady” could have been a Yardbirds number, but probably wouldn’t have been as heavy. The vocalist puts in a spirited performance for “Wonderful Day” but his voice just isn’t good enough for it, more so during the verses.

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“I Need You” is tough-riffed rocker with a blistering bridge; a better sound mix could help clean up some of the guitar’s crude roughness. “Oz Lee Eaves Drops” is a fine rocker and one of two songs, along with the other standard blues-rocker “Bad Day”, to be be featured in the pilot episode of The Mod Squad, where you also see the band perform them. “Morning Fire” is unfortunately marred by the vocalist, seeing as the Arabian guitar riff is really cool. I don’t like the jagged groove of “What Can I Do For You, The First Half”. Randy runs wild on the closer, going through a turbulent pattern of licks in his rich timbre. I only wish the rhythm section could’ve kept up with him like Mitchell did with Hendrix. A faster pace overall would’ve been better too. (z-Man)

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Personnel:
Larry Brown (bass)
Randy Holden (guitar, vocals)
Jeff Nowlen (vocals)
Geoff Westen (guitar, vocals)
Danny Woody (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction (Nowlen/Westen) 1.53
02. Feathered Fish (McDonald) 2.31
03. Flight Of The Dragon Lady (Holden/Westen/Nowlen/Blown/Woody) 2.29
04. Wonderful Day (Holden) 2.17
05. I Need You (Port/Holden) 2.41
06. Oz Lee Eaves Drop (Nowlen/Westen) 2.28
07. Bad Day (Holden/Bowlen) 2.15
08. Morning Fire (Nowlen) 2.33
09. What Can I Do For You, First Half (Nowlen/Westen) 2.43
10. What Can I Do For You, The Other Half (Nowlen/Westen) 6.49
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11. I’ve Come So Far (Nowlen) 2.22
12. Mr Pharmacist (Nowlen) 2.30
13. No Doubt About It (Nowlen) 2.37
14. It´s Too Hard (Without You) (Nowlen) 2.14
15. I Know (Nowlen) 2.42

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Nona Hendryx – Skin Diver (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgNona Hendryx (born October 9, 1944), is an American vocalist, record producer, songwriter, musician, author, and actress.

Hendryx is known for her work as a solo artist as well as for being one-third of the trio Labelle, who had a hit with “Lady Marmalade.” Her music has ranged from soul, funk, and R&B to hard rock, new wave, and New Age. She stated in an interview that her family’s last name was originally spelled with an “i” and that she was a distant cousin of American music legend Jimi Hendrix. (by wikipedia)

A transitional album from the word go, Hendryx plays synthesizer and works with producer and former Tangerine Dream member Peter Baumann, and the result is this lush (at times too lush) pop record that sounds unlike anything else Hendryx recorded. Fans of her previous work may be taken aback by this record, but the dense, almost ambient, soundscapes she constructs and her always great singing make this a satisfying foray into uncharted territory. (by John Dougan)

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“Skindiver” is, for me, a personal journey through the various stages, and resultant upheavals, of love in its many manifestations – from the yearning ‘Off The Coast Of Love’ (The Master – is love, according to Nona), to her cry for help ‘6th Sense’ (“Can anybody feel me/ Does anybody care”) to empiric rebirth in ‘New Desire’ (“I’m tenderly falling/ Into your arms, Catch me I’m falling”). ‘Women Who Fly’ and ‘No Emotion’ stand out for their sheer intensity and contrasting styles – the former’s percussion driven inner dialogue versus the latter’s guitar grinding highs and synthesized mellows exploring the divide people face at the end of bad relationships and wasted lives.

The inarguable gem of this collection, however, is ‘Through The Wire’. The ethereal quality of the music alone is stunning. Interwoven with Nona’s deft vocal stylings that are, in a word, breathtaking on every other track for their sheer emotional clarity, and you have a masterpiece that, in my humble opinion, I cannot imagine any other artist performing. (M.Nichols)

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Personnel:
Rusty Anderson (guitar)
Peter Baumann (drum programming, programming, synthesizer)
Devra (piano)
Nona Hendryx (vocals, drum programming, piano, synthsizer)
Raymond Jones (piano)
John Pierce (bass)
Jerry Steckling (drum programming, programming, synthesizer)
Michael Thompson (guitar)
Kurt Wortman (percussion)
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background vocals
The Carole Lombard Quartet
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B.J. Nelson – Carole Pope

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Tracklist:
01. Off the Coast Of Love 4.33
02. Women Who Fly 5.13
03. No Emotion 5.30
04. Love Is Kind 3.39
05. Tears 4.34
06. Skin Diver 5.09
07. 6th Sense 6.01
08. Through the Wire 4.45
09. Interior Voices 4.50
10. New Desire 5.07

All songs written by Nona Hendryx

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No Dice – Same (1977)

FrontCover1.jpgIn 1975, from the ashes of a band you’ve never heard of (March Hare) Gary Strange and Dzal Martin added Roger Ferris and Chris Wyles to themselves and formed the fledgling No Dice, a blues/rock band in Stones/Faces style but with room to manoeuvre into more adventurous musical seas if the urge took them. After some demos and one single release ‘I need someone’ on DJM records, they sat out a not

After some club gigs and an opening stint for UFO, in the year Elvis succumbed to one hamburger too many, they lock themselves away in Abbey Road and Island studios ‘til all hours making ‘No Dice’ their imaginatively titled debut album, produced by Steve Smith and engineered by Phill Brown. Tours supporting Eddie and the Hotrods, the Tom Robinson Band, a Reading festival appearance and a lengthy jaunt round Europe with Status Quo, all lead up to a 10-week tour of America. Support slots with Foghat, REO Speedwagon, Judas Priest, Rainbow, Eddie Money, Black Oak Arkansas & Cheap Trick,ensure the band are playing from 400 to 20,000 seat halls and stadiums.

But wait – all is not well back home, the dark forces of punk are rising! No Dice return from America to record their second LP (with Munch Moore now firmly ensconced on keyboards) a rock opus done on the Rolling Stones mobile and mixed in New York entitled ‘2 Faced’ (with Rupert Holmes in the production chair and incidentally writing ‘The Pina Colada Song’ whilst producing the band on location in the green valleys of rural Wales!) The British music press hate it – and them. How dare they perpetuate the heresy of playing unfashionably well, writing tunes and having fun??

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Things begin to fall apart – Chris leaves at the end of the tour and management and record co’s are suffering from frozen feet. No Dice sail on alone picking up new hands – Frankie Hepburn on guitar and Jakko,Saxophone. Spinal Tap drummer-syndrome affliction sees Tony Fernandez and John Richardson pass through the rhythm seat.
But to no avail: 2 independently released singles (‘How About You/ No conversation’ and ‘One More Night/ There goes another Girl’) and an aborted 3rd album fail to dig the Dice out of the hole of ‘nearly were’ and the band fold at a final show in the legendary Marquee Club in Wardour Street in 1982 (or was it 83?).

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After some club gigs and an opening stint for UFO, in the year Elvis succumbed to one hamburger too many, they lock themselves away in Abbey Road and Island studios ‘til all hours making ‘No Dice’ their imaginatively titled debut album, produced by Steve Smith and engineered by Phill Brown. Tours supporting Eddie and the Hotrods, the Tom Robinson Band, a Reading festival appearance and a lengthy jaunt round Europe with Status Quo, all lead up to a 10-week tour of America. Support slots with Foghat, REO Speedwagon, Judas Priest, Rainbow, Eddie Money, Black Oak Arkansas & Cheap Trick,ensure the band are playing from 400 to 20,000 seat halls and stadiums. Loadsa fun.

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Things begin to fall apart – Chris leaves at the end of the tour and management and record co’s are suffering from frozen feet. No Dice sail on alone picking up new hands – Frankie Hepburn on guitar and Jakko,Saxophone. Spinal Tap drummer-syndrome affliction sees Tony Fernandez and John Richardson pass through the rhythm seat.
But to no avail: 2 independently released singles (‘How About You/ No conversation’ and ‘One More Night/ There goes another Girl’) and an aborted 3rd album fail to dig the Dice out of the hole of ‘nearly were’ and the band fold at a final show in the legendary Marquee Club in Wardour Street in 1982 (or was it 83?). (taken from the No Dice websie)

And here´s the great debut album of No Dice !

Review

Source: glorydazemusic.com

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Personnel:
Roger Ferris (vocals)
Dave Martin (guitar)
Gary Strange (bass)
Chris Wyles (drums)
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Jimmy Jewell (saxophone on 04.)
Dave Moore (keyboards)
Stevie Smith (harmonica on 08.)
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background vocals:
The Dice-Section

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Tracklist:
01. Why Sugar (Strange) 3.51
02. Happy In The Skoolyard 4:24
03. You Can’t Help Yourself (Martin) 2.55
04. People That Make The Music (Strange) 5.01
05. Fooling 3:25
06. So Why I 2.55
07. Murder In The Rain 5:42
08. Silly Girl (Strange)  3.36
09. Counting On A Good Sign 4:36
10. Down And Dry 4:03
11. Shadows (Strange) 5.11LabelB1

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