Various Artists – The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones (2015)

FrontCover1This is a great sampler from Mexico !

The Rolling Stones have become the reincarnation of rock itself, being the representation, both musically and in terms of image and behavior, what rock & roll represents. In The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones, we will highlight their side-projects, their roots, their favorite songs and even a brand new song, which becomes and event in itself, for all the Stones’ fans around the world. The idea sounds wonderful right?. Well, The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones will meet the expectations of even the most demanding Stones fan. We have a lost recording by Leslie West (Mountain’s guitarist) with Mick Jagger playing guitar, a duet by Keith Richards with Ian McLagan (Faces’ keyboardist), and also the hard-to-find single versions of Bill Wyman’s solo hits.

Also we have Mick Jagger and Keith Richards all time favorite songs (handpicked by themselves), and an extremely rare track titled Catch As Catch Can, that was released only in a limited edition in France as a 7″ and never previously available on CD single, by musician and producer Robin Millar (Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel, Sade) recorded in 1973 along with Mick Taylor, Bobby Keys and Mick Jagger!!!.

Finally, we have the originals versions of the best songs the Stones covered during his long and illustrious career. This is a marvelous project that with remastered sound, beautiful cover art extended liner notes is an essential addition to your collection. (promo text)

Yes, yes, yes … a real great and intersting Project … Listen and discover the many faces of The Rolling Stones !
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Tracklist:

CD 1:
The Adventures Of The Stones:
01. Leslie West feat. Mick Jagger:High Roller (Jagger/Richards/Laing/Palmer) 4.13
02. Ron Wood & Ian McLagan: She Stole It (McLagan) 3.45
03. Bill Wyman: Monkey Grip (single edition) (Wyman) 3.17
04. Ian McLagan & Keith Richards: Truly (McLagan) 5.58
05. Toots & The Maytals feat. Keith Richards:- Careless Ethiopians (Hibbert) 3.22
06. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Had Me A Real Good Time (Lane/Wood) 4.45
07. Ian McLagan feat. Bobby Keys: Somebody (McLagan) 3.00
08 .British Invasion All-Stars feat. Dick Taylor: Gimme Some Loving (Winwood) 4.15
09. Bill  Wyman: (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star (single edit) (Wyman) 3.23
10. Robin Millar feat. Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins & Bobby Keys: Catch As Catch Can (Millar)  3.33
11. John Phillips feat. Mick Jagger, Mick Taylor & Keith Richards:- Zulu Warrior (Phillips/Jagger) 3.30
12. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 5.09
13. Chris Farlowe produced by Mick Jagger: Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
14. Johnny Winter: Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 4.42
CD 2:
Mick & Keith’s Favourite Tracks:
01. Little Walter: I Go To Go (Walter)  2.41
02. Muddy Waters: Forty Days And Forty Nights (Roth) 2.50
03. Robert Johnson: Stones In My Passway (Johnson) 2.28
04. Ray Charles: Lonely Avenue (Pomus) 2.34
05. Z.Z. Hill: Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson /Horton) 4.57
06. Blind Willie Johnson: Dark Was The Night (Cold Was The Ground) (Johnson) 3.20
07. Howlin’ Wolf: Forty Four (Burnett) 2.48
08. Jesse Fuller: Stagolee (Traditional) 3.44
09. Bill Broonzy: When Did You Leave Heaven (Bullock/Whiting) 3.29
10. Elmore James:- It Hurts Me Too (Red/James/London)  3.19
11. Little Walter: Key To The Highway (Segar) 2.45
12. Erna Franklin: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 2.38
13. Chuck Berry: Memphis (Berry) 2.14
14. Robert Johnson: 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 2.52
CD 3:
The  Originals:
01. Chuck Berry: Around And Around (Berry) 2.40
02. Larry Williams: She Said Yeah (Jackson/Williams) 1.50
03. Nat King Cole Trio: Route  66 (Troup) 3.01
04. Muddy Waters:  Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 2.51
05. Howlin’ Wolf: Little Red Rooster (Burnett/Dixon) 2.26
06. Buddy Holly: Not Fade Away (Holly/Petty) 2.23
07. Jimmy  Reed: Honest I Do (Reed/Abner) 2.42
08. Dale Hawkins: Suzie Q (Hawkins/Lewis/Broadwater)  2.19
09. The Coasters: Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.42
10. Jim Harpo: I’m A King Bee (Harpo) 3.04
11. Robertt Johnson: Love In Vain (Johnson) 3.20
12. Bo Diddley: Mona (McDaniel) 3.39
13. Gene Allison: You Can Make It If You Try (Jarrett) 2.09
14. Eric Donaldson: Cherry Oh, Baby (Donaldson) 3.07
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Straw – Shoplifting (1999)

FrontCover1Straw was an English post-Britpop band that released one album, Shoplifting, in 1999.
Straw was formed in Bristol by Mattie Bennett (vocals/guitar) and Roger Power (bass/guitar), formerly of The Blue Aeroplanes. Later adding keyboardist Mark “Duck” Blackwell, the group signed to Arista Records under the moniker “Please” with a different lead vocalist. They recorded an album in Boston with American record producers Sean Slade and Paul Q. Kolderie. Unhappy with the results, however, the band was dropped by the label after releasing a single, “If I Was God…” (1995, Sugarscoop Records).
When Arista kept Please’s singer under contract, Bennett stepped into the lead vocalist role, the band adding drummer Andy Nixon and re-christening themselves Straw. This newly revitalised line-up was quickly signed to WEA and issued its debut single “Weird Superman” in the summer of 1998. Two more singles and one EP were released: “The Aeroplane Song,” (charting at no. 37 in the UK Singles Chart on 6 February 1999), “Moving to California” (charting at no. 50 on 24 April 1999), and Soundtrack of the Summer (including “The World Is Not Enough” — a James Bond theme attempt) in 1999 before Straw released their first full-length effort, Shoplifting.

Throughout 1998 and 1999 the band toured extensively with Puressence, Space and Feeder alongside emerging future stars Muse and gigs with Supergrass, Alanis Morissette, Fountains of Wayne and Reef. The extensive touring and television appearances (including the O-Zone and TFI Friday) took their toll, and differences broke out in the band resulting in the dismissal of Power after the band’s final appearance of 1999 at the Glastonbury Festival. They were also subsequently dropped by WEA. They recruited new bassist Dan McKinna, and self-funded (and self-produced) the recording of several new tracks in the basement studio of Pete Thomas’ house. On the strength of this new material they were signed to Columbia in 2000 and released the 4-track EP Home Work and the single “Sailing Off the Edge of the World” to critical acclaim. A second album, Keepsakes, was slated for release later that year but they were dropped by Columbia and went their separate ways shortly afterwards.

Singles

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Andy Nixon and Dan McKinna went on to play in The Jeevas with Crispian Mills of Kula Shaker and then onto The Magic Bullet Band. McKinna has been a session player for many bands including James Morrison, Ben’s Brother, Stuart Staples (Tindersticks), A Man Called Adam and Farrah. Blackwell, after producing Straw, The Jeevas and The Magic Bullet Band, continues to work as a record producer and songwriter. Bennett is currently an English and media teacher at Bodmin College in Cornwall. (by wikipedia)
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Straw’s Shoplifting was truly one of the gems of late-1990s Britpop. While the British sound had more or less turned its back on pop music (with mainstream artists like Blur shunning their pop roots for more experimental territory), it’s refreshing to hear a band as unpretentious and shamelessly poppy as Straw. From the opening notes of “Dracula Has Risen From the Grave,” it’s obvious that this album is all about fun sound clips from old movies and video games, which abound on the album from start to finish. “Weird Superman” and “The Aeroplane Song” are catchy, if somewhat conventional, anthems, while the searing “Wake Up (Miss Venezuela)” is good disco-pop. Part of the true magic in Shoplifting, however, is its depth. Straw may be a pop band, but they aren’t superficial. Tender, emotional moments like “Kill Your Boyfriend” and “We Don’t Belong” show that this band has a lot more to offer than just shiny pop tunes; they go deeper, and this disc is one that’s worth diving into. (by Jason Damas)

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Personnel:
Mattie Bennett (vocals, guitar)
Mark “Duck” Blackwell (keyboards)
Andy Nixon (drums)
Roger Power (bass)
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Tracklist:
01. Dracula Has Risen From The Grave 3.42
02. Weird Superman 4.10
03. The Aeroplane Song 4.05
04. Moving To California 6.04
05. Shoplifting 3.54
06. Kill Your Boyfriend 3.56
07. Anthem For The Low In Self-Esteem 3.29
08. United States Of Amnesia 4.02
09. Postcards From Hell 4.28
10. Soundtrack Of The Summer 4.42
11. Wake Up (Miss Venezuela) 4.02
12. We Don’t Belong 5.04
13. Galveston 4.05

All Songs written by Mattie Bennett . Mark “Duck” Blackwell – Andy Nixon – Roger Power
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Neil Young & Crazy Horse – Rust Never Sleep (1979)

FrontCover1Rust Never Sleeps is an album by Canadian singer-songwriter Neil Young and American band Crazy Horse. It was released on July 2, 1979, by Reprise Records. Most of the album was recorded live, then overdubbed in the studio. Young used the phrase “rust never sleeps” as a concept for his tour with Crazy Horse to avoid artistic complacency and try more progressive, theatrical approaches to performing live.
The bulk of the album was recorded live at San Francisco’s Boarding House and during the Neil Young/Crazy Horse tour in late 1978, with overdubs added later. Audience noise is removed as much as possible, although it is clearly audible at certain points, most noticeably on the opening and closing songs. The album is half acoustic and half electric, opening and closing with different versions of the same song: “Hey Hey, My My”.

“My My, Hey Hey (Out of the Blue)”, “Thrasher” and “Ride My Llama” were recorded live at the Boarding House in early 1978 and all of side two was recorded during the late 1978 tour. Two songs from the album were not recorded live: “Sail Away” was recorded without Crazy Horse during or after the Comes a Time recording sessions, and “Pocahontas” had been recorded solo around 1975.

Young also released a film version of the album under the same title. Later on in 1979, Young and Crazy Horse released the album Live Rust, a compilation of older classics interweaving within the Rust Never Sleeps track list. The title is borrowed from the slogan for Rust-Oleum paint, and was suggested by Mark Mothersbaugh of the new wave band Devo. It is also an aphorism describing Young’s musical self-renewal to avert the threat of irrelevance.

Live

In a contemporary review for The Village Voice, Robert Christgau called Rust Never Sleeps Young’s best album yet and said although his melodies are unsurprisingly simple and original, his lyrics are surprisingly and offhandedly complex. “He’s wiser but not wearier”, Christgau wrote, “victor so far over the slow burnout his title warns of”.

Paul Nelson, writing in Rolling Stone magazine, found its first side virtuosic because of how Young transcends the songs’ acoustic settings with his commanding performance and was impressed by its themes of personal escape and exhaustion, the role of rock music, and American violence: “Rust Never Sleeps tells me more about my life, my country and rock & roll than any music I’ve heard in years.”

Rust Never Sleeps was voted the second best album of 1979 in The Village Voice’s annual Pazz & Jop critics poll. Christgau, the poll’s creator, ranked it second on his own list for the poll, as did fellow critic Greil Marcus. The album also won Rolling Stone magazine’s 1979 critics poll for Album of the Year. In a decade-end list for The Village Voice, Christgau named it the ninth best album of the 1970s.

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In 2003, Rust Never Sleeps was ranked number 350 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In a retrospective review, Greg Kot of the Chicago Tribune said that the acoustic and electric sides were both astounding.

AllMusic’s William Ruhlmann viewed that Young reinvigorated himself artistically by being imaginative and bold, and in the process created an exemplary album that “encapsulated his many styles on a single disc with great songs—in particular the remarkable ‘Powderfinger’—unlike any he had written before.”[8] Rob Sheffield, writing in The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004), felt that “Powderfinger”, “Pocahontas”, “Thrasher”, and “Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)” were among Young’s greatest songs.

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Personnel:
Ralph Molina (drums, background vocals)
Frank “Poncho” Sampedro (guitar, background vocals)
Billy Talbot (bass, background vocals)
Neil Young (vocals, guitar, harmonica, organ, percussion)
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Karl T. Himmel (drums on 05.)
Nicolette Larson (vocals on 05.)
Joe Osborn (bass on 05.)

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Tracklist:
01. My My, Hey Hey (Out Of The Blue) (Young/Blackburn) 3.45
02. Thrasher (Young) 5.38
03. Ride My Llama (Young) 2.29
04. Pocahontas (Young) 3.22
05. Sail Away (Young) 3.46
06. Powderfinger (Young) 5.30
07. Welfare Mothers (Young) 3.48
08. Sedan Delivery (Young) 4.40
09. Hey Hey, My My (Into The Black) (Young/Blackburn) 5.18
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Teddy Thompson – A Piece Of What You Need (2008)

FrontCover1Called “one of the most gifted singer-songwriters of his generation,” by The New York Times, singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson is a native Englishman who has adopted New York City as his home; famously the son of singer-songwriters Richard and Linda Thompson, he emigrated to the States almost twenty years ago, barely out of his teens, to embark on a career of his own.
He was heavily influenced not by folk music but by such artists as Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and the Everly Brothers.  As NPR reported, “He has said he didn’t listen to any music made after 1959 until he was 16. As a kid, he listened to early rock ‘n’ roll and country music exclusively.”  This resulted in a unique voice that is at once rock and country, then pop and folk.
While music is in his DNA, Thompson sings with his own voice, a powerfully understated, emotional, echoey croon.  (The Guardian)

Since arriving in the United States, he has released five albums to critical acclaim and has contributed to many works, including his solo “I Don’t Want to Say Goodbye” and duet “King of the Road,” with Rufus Wainwright, from the soundtrack to the Golden Globe- and Bafta-winning film Brokeback Mountain.  He has also collaborated on projects with Rufus and Martha Wainwright, Jenni Muldaur, and others.  Thompson recorded two solo songs for the soundtrack to the Leonard Cohen tribute I’m Your Man:  “Tonight Will be Fine” and “The Future.”  He also contributed two songs to the album The Songs of Nick Drake: Way to Blue, a retrospective on the late singer.
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The Thompson Family

In 2015, Teddy and his family released the album Family, a collaborative project in which each member of the extended family wrote and recorded two songs–from wherever they live.  This meant that recording took place from Los Angeles to London, then the final product was produced by Teddy in New York.  It was released in early 2015 under the name Thompson.
Thompson is based out of New York City, where in his free time, he performs with his rockabilly cover band, Poundcake. (take from the Teddy Thompson Website)
A Piece of What You Need is the fourth studio album by singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson. The album contains all new Teddy originals and was produced by Marius De Vries, whom Teddy met while recording background vocals on Rufus Wainwright’s Want records in 2002. Included are new songs Teddy had been testing out live, such as “Turning the Gun On Myself”, “In My Arms” and “Can’t Sing Straight”.
The album debuted on the UK Albums Chart at #10. The first single from A Piece of What You Need is “In My Arms”. The music video features a cameo appearance by Rufus Wainwright dressed up as Elvis Presley. The song entered the UK Singles Chart at #107 (by wikipedia)

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The son of folk-rock titans Richard and Linda, Teddy Thompson hated his 2000 debut, but has described his fourth album as “close to the record I’ve always wanted to make”. Producer Marius de Vries (Rufus Wainwright/Björk) delivers a cinematic soundscape, but Thompson’s golden voice is always centre-stage. With hints of Roy Orbison and early Bruce Springsteen, the chugging rhythms and instantly memorable melodies conceal real emotional drive. Concerning loss, regret and bad decisions made at life’s crossroads, these are songs that radiate anguish but don’t sound too down about it. Indeed, several of them – especially the turbo-crooned Don’t Know What I Was Thinking – deserve to be sung from speeding cars. Thompson has emerged from his parents shadows to deliver one of this year’s best. (by theguardian.com)
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Teddy Thompson with his parents, Richard and Linda Thompson

“File under: Pop” a polite message reads on the back cover of Teddy Thompson’s fourth full-length album, A Piece of What You Need, and in this case no one can accuse the product of not living up to its billing. Thompson’s first two albums were beautiful collections of moody folk-leaning indie pop that confirmed it was possible to sound dour and passionate at the same time, and his third set, Upfront & Down Low, was a glorious celebration of heartache as portrayed in 11 classic country weepers, but A Piece of What You Need finds him sounding unexpectedly upbeat for a change, and the shift in attitude works remarkably well. “What’s this? What’s this? Am I happy or something?” Thompson asks on the disc’s second tune, and while much of the time he still seems to be having trouble in the eternal search for the woman of his dreams, with producer Marius de Vries behind the controls (who has previously worked with David Gray, Melanie C, Josh Groban, and Thompson’s pal Rufus Wainwright), most of these meditations on the joys and pitfalls of romance have a good beat and you can even dance to them. “What’s This?!!” and “In My Arms” sound like potential hit singles, complete with snappy beats and slick harmonies, but de Vries has also made the most of Thompson’s rich, strong voice, and the melodies are well served by the sweet but intelligent arrangements and production. And it’s clear de Vries hasn’t forced a more polished sound on Thompson against his will; “Where to Go from Here” and “Slippery Slope” would have sounded right at home on Thompson’s sadly overlooked debut, “Turning the Gun on Myself” is just as lovely and severe as it needs to be, and “Jonathan’s Book” could be “Paperback Writer” from the other side of the camera. Teddy Thompson has taken a more user-friendly approach on A Piece of What You Need, but he hasn’t sold his soul or lost what makes him special along the way, and this is a clever, adventurous, and thoroughly engaging exercise in smart pop that’s as thoughtful as it is pleasurable. (by Mark Deming)

Teddy Thompson

Personnel:
Jeff Hill (bass)
Matt Johnson (drums, percussion)
Jack Petruzzeli (guitar, mandolin)
Teddy Thompson (guitar, vocals, mandolin, ukulele)
Marius de Vries (keyboards, synthesizer, Percussion)
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Dave Lee (french horn on 04., 06., 09.)
Justin McDermid (trumpet on 04., 06., 09.)
David Powell (tuba on 04., 06.), 09.
Neil Sidwell (trombone on 04., 06., 09.)
Chris Storr (trumpet on 04., 06., 09.)
Richard Thompson (guitar on 05., 07.)
Fayyaz Virgi (trombone on 04., 06., 09.)
Phil Woods (french 0n 04., 06., 09.)
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background vocals:
Jenni Muldaur – Kamila Thompson – Jenn Turner

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Alternate frontcover
Tracklist:
01. The Things I Do 3.44
02. What’s This?!! 3.23
03. In My Arms 3.14
04. Where To Go From Here 3.13
05. Don’t Know What I Was Thinking 3.53
06. Can’t Sing Straight 3.43
07. Slippery Slope (Easier) 4.13
08. Jonathan’s Book 4.40
09. One Of These Days 2.50
10  Turning The Gun On Myself 4.20
11. A Piece Of What You Need 5.01
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12. The Price Of Love (hidden track) 3.38

All Songs written by Teddy Thompson excact “The Price Of Love”, which was written by Don and Phil Everly (The Everly Brothers)
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Southern Cross – Same (1976)

FrontCover1Southern Cross was an Austalian heavy rock band formed by ex-Buffalo members Alan Milano and John Baxter.
Milano was co-vocalist on Dead Forever while John Baxter was responsible for Buffalo’s heavy rock guitar sound. By the time this recording came about Baxter had left to be replaced by Bruce Cumming.
Alongside the likes of Finch, The Angels, Kevin Borich Express, Rose Tattoo, and Chariot, Southern Cross swiftly became one of the most popular hard rock bands on the Sydney scene.
They were signed to the independent Living Sound/Laser label where they issued their debut single towards the end of 1976, followed by their self-titled debut album in early 1977.
The album features melodic, raunchy hard rock in the vein of Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs and UK band Bad Company. It mixed flat out riff-rockers with moody rock ballads.
The album scored only minimal sales, despite its strong content and by 1978 they had broken up with Cumming and Brouet moving on to The Press, another Sydney based band with a punk edged heavy metal sound. (by silveradoraremusic.blogspot)
Okay thehard and heavy period of the Seventies is over … but this album is one of all theese forgotten pearls …
On YouTube, lisaveg1    wrote: “A mix of Eagles and Lynyrd Skynyrd….:))”
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Personnel:
Jeff Beacham (drums)
Michel Brouet (bass, vocals)
Bruce Cumming (guitar)
Alan Milano (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Money Maker (Beacham/Cumming/Milano) 4.42
02. You Need It (Baxter/Brouet/Cumming/Milano) 5.21
03. Jessie (Cumming/Milano) 5.24
04. What Am I Waiting For? (Beacham/Brouet/Cumming/Milano) 5.31
05. Harris Street (Beacham/Brouet/Cumming/Milano) 4.51
06. Story Teller (Cumming/Milano) 5.23
07. Games (Baxter/Beacham/Brouet/Cumming/Milano) 9.20
08. Stormy Lady (Beacham/Brouet/Cumming/Milano) 4.57

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Scorpions – Crazy World (1990)

frontcover1Crazy World is the eleventh studio album by German hard rock band Scorpions, released on November 6, 1990.[5] The album peaked at No. 21 on the Billboard 200 chart for albums in 1991. That same year, the song “Wind of Change” reached No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100[6] and “Send Me an Angel” reached No. 44 on the same chart.[6] Crazy World was the last album to feature bassist Francis Buchholz, and by that extent, the last to feature the band’s classic lineup. It also has the only Scorpions track to credit Buchholz, “Kicks After Six”. This album was the band’s first album in a decade and a half to not be produced by Dieter Dierks and is widely considered to be the last “classic” Scorpions album. In the UK, it remains the only Scorpions album to attain Silver certification (60,000 units sold) by the British Phonographic Industry, achieving this in November 1991.
“Hit Between the Eyes” was played during the ending credits of the 1992 film Freejack. “Send Me an Angel” was played at the closing scene in an episode of the show Cold Case. “Wind of Change” was also used during the 2009 film Gentlemen Broncos and towards the end of the 2014 film The Interview. (by wikipedia)

After the release of Savage Amusement in 1988, the Scorpions expressed disdain toward the album, feeling that it was too polished when compared to their other work. Their longtime producer, Dieter Dierks, was replaced with well-known rock producer Keith Olsen, who would produce Crazy World and assist in making it one of the Scorpions’ greatest recordings. Their music had certainly changed since Savage Amusement, sounding a little bit heavier and less glamorous. But even with the metal sound, the songs remain melodic and catchy. The power ballads on the album, “Wind of Change” and “Send Me an Angel,” are arguably two of the band’s greatest slow numbers, boasting soothing harmony and lyrics. Crazy World remains the Scorpions’ finest ’90s album and is sure to please its listeners. (by Barry Weber)
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Personnel:
Francis Buchholz (bass, background vocals)
Matthias Jabs (guitar, background vocals)
Klaus Meine (vocals)
Herman Rarebell (drums, background vocals)
Rudolf Schenker (guitar, background vocals)
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Koen van Baal (keyboards on (04.)
Robbie Buchanan (keyboards on 04.)
Jim Vallance (keyboards on 11.)
Michael Thompson (guitar on 04.)
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background vocals:
Claudia Frohling – Tony Ioannoua – Cliff Roles – Jim Lewis – Dries van der Schuyt
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Tracklist:
01. Tease Me Please Me (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance/Jabs) 4.44
02. Don’t Believe Her (Rarebell/Meine/Vallance/R.Schenker) 4.55
03. To Be With You In Heaven (Meine/Schenker  4:48
04. Wind Of Change (Meine) 5.10
05. Restless Nights (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance/R.Schenker) 5:44
06. Lust Or Love (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance) 4.22
07. Kicks After Six (Rarebell/Meine/Vallance/Buchholz)  3.49
08. Hit Between The Eyes”  Rarebell, Meine, Vallance  Schenker  4:33
09. Money And Fame  (Jabs/Rarebell) 5.06
10. Crazy World (Meine/R.Schenker/Rarebell/Vallance) 5.08
11. Send Me An Angel (Meine/Schenker) 4.32
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The Murgatroyd Band (Spencer Davis Group) – Magpie + Twice A Week (1971)

frontcover1Let´s take a look back in the history of British TV Shows:

Magpie was a British children’s television programme shown on ITV from 30 July 1968 to 6 June 1980. It was a magazine format show intended to compete with the BBC’s Blue Peter, but attempted to be more “hip”, focusing more on popular culture. The show’s creators Lewis Rudd and Sue Turner named the programme Magpie as a reference to the magpie’s habit of collecting small items, and because of “mag” being evocative of “magazine”, and “pie” being evocative of a collection of ingredients.
The programme, made by Thames Television, was first transmitted on 30 July 1968 which was Thames Television’s first day of broadcasting, and was shown weekly until 1969. From that point, until it ended on 6 June 1980, it went out twice a week with approximately 1,000 episodes being made, each 25 minutes in duration. It was not fully networked to all other ITV companies until the autumn of 1969.
The first presenters were the former BBC Radio 1 disc jockey Pete Brady, Susan Stranks and Tony Bastable. Brady left the show in 1969 to be replaced by Douglas Rae, and Bastable left in 1972 when he was replaced by Mick Robertson. Jenny Hanley replaced Susan Stranks in 1974. This lineup remained until 1977, when Tommy Boyd replaced Rae.
Like Blue Peter, Magpie featured appeals for various causes and charities. Notably, however, it asked for cash donations rather than stamps or secondhand goods, familiar on Blue Peter. The cash totaliser was a long strip of paper which ran out of the studio and along the adjacent corridor walls. Unlike the BBC programme, Magpie was unscripted and the presenters were free to improvise the presentation of the show.
The show’s mascot was a magpie called Murgatroyd.
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Extremely rare promo Label

The theme tune was played by the Spencer Davis Group under the alias of The Murgatroyd Band, and composed by Eddie Hardin (lead voc., keyb.), Ray Fenwick (harm. voc., guit.) and Spencer Davis (harm. voc.guit.). The main lyric was cribbed from an old children’s nursery rhyme:

    One for sorrow
Two for joy
Three for a girl
Four for a boy
Five for silver
Six for gold
Seven for a story never to be told
Eight for Heaven
Nine for Hell
Ten for the Devil himself.
or, alternatively,
    Eight for a wish
Nine for a kiss, and
Ten for a big surprise!
The first seven lines of this song (from “One for sorrow” to “Seven for a secret never to be told”) have been used in the last verse of the song “Magpie”, by Patrick Wolf.
The rhyme refers to an old English superstition concerning the portent of the number of magpies seen together in a flock. The TV programme version altered the final lines to:
    Eight’s a wish and
Nine a kiss
Ten is a bird you must not miss.
(by wikipedia)
And here´s one of the rarest recordings by The Spencer Davos Group … the single to this TV Show ..
Side one is a more or less psychedelic track … and side two is fun, just fun !.
I guess they had to use the pseudonym “The Murgatroyd Band” because of the fact, they a in 1968/69 a contract with United Artists and not with Decca Records.
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The Magpie Crew
Personnel:
Spencer Davis (guitar, background vocals)
Ray Fenwick (guitar)
Eddie Hardin (keyboards, vocals)
Pete York (drums)
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Tracklist:
01. Magpie (Fenwick/Hardin/Davis) 2.26
02. Twice A Week (Hardin/York/Fenwick) 3.01