The Murgatroyd Band (Spencer Davis Group) – Magpie + Twice A Week (1971)

frontcover1Let´s take a look back in the history of British TV Shows:

Magpie was a British children’s television programme shown on ITV from 30 July 1968 to 6 June 1980. It was a magazine format show intended to compete with the BBC’s Blue Peter, but attempted to be more “hip”, focusing more on popular culture. The show’s creators Lewis Rudd and Sue Turner named the programme Magpie as a reference to the magpie’s habit of collecting small items, and because of “mag” being evocative of “magazine”, and “pie” being evocative of a collection of ingredients.
The programme, made by Thames Television, was first transmitted on 30 July 1968 which was Thames Television’s first day of broadcasting, and was shown weekly until 1969. From that point, until it ended on 6 June 1980, it went out twice a week with approximately 1,000 episodes being made, each 25 minutes in duration. It was not fully networked to all other ITV companies until the autumn of 1969.
The first presenters were the former BBC Radio 1 disc jockey Pete Brady, Susan Stranks and Tony Bastable. Brady left the show in 1969 to be replaced by Douglas Rae, and Bastable left in 1972 when he was replaced by Mick Robertson. Jenny Hanley replaced Susan Stranks in 1974. This lineup remained until 1977, when Tommy Boyd replaced Rae.
Like Blue Peter, Magpie featured appeals for various causes and charities. Notably, however, it asked for cash donations rather than stamps or secondhand goods, familiar on Blue Peter. The cash totaliser was a long strip of paper which ran out of the studio and along the adjacent corridor walls. Unlike the BBC programme, Magpie was unscripted and the presenters were free to improvise the presentation of the show.
The show’s mascot was a magpie called Murgatroyd.
promolabela
Extremely rare promo Label

The theme tune was played by the Spencer Davis Group under the alias of The Murgatroyd Band, and composed by Eddie Hardin (lead voc., keyb.), Ray Fenwick (harm. voc., guit.) and Spencer Davis (harm. voc.guit.). The main lyric was cribbed from an old children’s nursery rhyme:

    One for sorrow
Two for joy
Three for a girl
Four for a boy
Five for silver
Six for gold
Seven for a story never to be told
Eight for Heaven
Nine for Hell
Ten for the Devil himself.
or, alternatively,
    Eight for a wish
Nine for a kiss, and
Ten for a big surprise!
The first seven lines of this song (from “One for sorrow” to “Seven for a secret never to be told”) have been used in the last verse of the song “Magpie”, by Patrick Wolf.
The rhyme refers to an old English superstition concerning the portent of the number of magpies seen together in a flock. The TV programme version altered the final lines to:
    Eight’s a wish and
Nine a kiss
Ten is a bird you must not miss.
(by wikipedia)
And here´s one of the rarest recordings by The Spencer Davos Group … the single to this TV Show ..
Side one is a more or less psychedelic track … and side two is fun, just fun !.
I guess they had to use the pseudonym “The Murgatroyd Band” because of the fact, they a in 1968/69 a contract with United Artists and not with Decca Records.
thecrew
The Magpie Crew
Personnel:
Spencer Davis (guitar, background vocals)
Ray Fenwick (guitar)
Eddie Hardin (keyboards, vocals)
Pete York (drums)
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Tracklist:
01. Magpie (Fenwick/Hardin/Davis) 2.26
02. Twice A Week (Hardin/York/Fenwick) 3.01

Vincent Crane (feat Arthur Brown) – Taro Rota (1997)

frontcover1Properly termed a Vincent Crane solo album, but so dominated by Arthur Brown’s preternatural vocals that the billing has been totally flipped, the oft misspelled Taro Rota album was originally conceived around 1975, when Crane and wife-to be Jeannie Crane found their shared interest in Tarot cards spilling over into their songwriting. (The pair used to offer Tarot readings at fetes and fairs.) A 22-minute opus arranged for orchestra and more, Taro it was a fascinating piece of work, but far too ambitious to ever be realized. Even Crane’s otherwise-enthusiastic publishers were willing only to fund a ten-minute demo, which was recorded later in 1975 with Arthur Brown and a full band — it is this piece which leads off the 1997 Voiceprint CD, alongside Crane’s own piano demo of the full work. The original Taro Rota did not remain entirely unheard. Atomic Rooster’s valedictory Headline News album lifted elements for the songs “Time” and “Machine,” although little more than the melody will prepare the listener for the full Taro Rota experience. Nor, of course, does the music presented here. Despite a spellbinding Brown recital, the band performance is just a shade too clunky to capture the full dynamic of the Cranes’ vision, while the piano rendition is by necessity too Spartan. But both allow one to dream of what could have been — and it is a wonderful dream. (by Dave Thompson)

vincentjeannie

Vincent + Jeannie Crane, April 15th, 1977 
Vincent and I composed this piece way back in 1976, especially for Arthur Brown. There is a ten minute demo with Arthur on vocals, but unfortunately, due to contractual reasons, at the last minute it couldn’t be included on the CD. At the moment the Taro Rota Suite is an impressive 23 minutes of Vincent doing the whole thing! Hopefully this will be amended later this year!
Taro RotaOne day a charity bazaar was held in the grounds of a very large and beautiful house and Vincent and I went along to do Tarot Readings.Inside the conservatory, surrounded by lush hangings of grape vine, we spread the cards time and time again. We told story after story for an endless queue of people but the day was just was not long enough to be with everyone. So, when everyone else had left, the remaining books had been packed, the paintings put away and the money counted, we lay out a spread of cards for all the people we didn’t see. It told us your story and it told you ours. We called it Taro Rota. (Jeannie Crane, 1997)
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Incorrectly and repeatedly billed as a joint effort with Arthur Brown. Whilst that was the original plan, this is ostensibly a solo effort by Vincent Crane. The shorter Part two is Crane with a band doing a re-visit of Atomic Rooster’s biggest hit, “Tomorrow Night”.
Overall this is a very good album. Many have panned it but I will take anything by the late great, and much lamented, keyboard maestro. The two long songs do drag ever so slightly, in that their is little variation and much repetition. What there is does highlight Crane’s virtuosity as a piano player and I will always wish that circumstances had prevailed to give him more success, especially within the Atomic Rooster framework. He remains one of my few heroes and this album only serves to prolong and enhance his stature with me. His suicide is still a matter of supreme sadness and he left the world with a huge dose of “what could and, indeed, what should have been”. (by Crazyworldof)
Vincent Crane  of Atomic Rooster,Copenhagen 1972

Personnel:
Vincent Crane piano, organ, vocals)
+
unknown studio musicians on 02.
+
no Arthur Brown !

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Tracklist:
01. Part 1 22.30
02. Part 2 (“Tomorrow Night”) 3:21
03. Part 3 22:29 01.

Music Vincent Crane
Lyrics Vincent Crane + Jeannie Crane

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I don’t really know what I’m doing,
I don’t really care what you say.
Following the signs of illusion,
Dancing in the sun on my way.
See a light burn in the darkness,
Quicksilver sky, clouds of fire.
Hear a door close in the silence,
Echoes of dreams and desire.
Mountains of stone turn to ashes,
Ribbons of gold turn to clay,
River of life overflowing
Trapped in the dreams of today.
I don’t really know what I’m doing,
I don’t really care what you say.
Following the signs of illusion,
Dancing in the sun on my way.
I don’t know what’s wrong,
With reality.
I don’t know what’s wrong,
Is it only me?
Time to get over this feeling again.
Life is stealing away.
I keep on feeling life stealing away,
Stealing away while I dream of today.
Time to break out of it,
Must get away.
Get away!
See a light burn in the darkness,
Quicksilver sky, clouds of fire.
Hear a door close in the silence,
Echoes of dreams and desire.
Mountains of stone turn to ashes,
Ribbons of gold turn to clay,
River of life overflowing
Trapped in the dreams of today.
I don’t really know what I’m doing,
I don’t really care what you say.
Following the signs of illusion,
Dancing in the sun on my way.
Magician or fool!
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro Rota, Arot Taro.
I’m walking in a dream,
Places where I’ve been fade away,
Floating from rhyme or reason,
Future will unfold flowers of gold.
I see the world below, I know that it is turning,
But circles of the wheel turn slowly,
And nothing is explained just light forever burning
And time is going by, so slowly.
Fly in the sky on wings that are so weary,
‘Til the eagle’s nest comes in sight.
Time in a word and that word simply nothing,
Watch the water flow, silent snow.
I see the world below, I know that it is turning,
But circles of the wheel turn slowly,
And nothing is explained just light forever burning
And time is going by, so slowly.
Time for the reason, I feel free.
I’m just the last one to find I’m me.
Veils of illusion set me free.
My eyes are open and I can see.
Time for the reason, I feel free.
I’m just the last one to find I’m me.
Veils of illusion set me free.
My eyes are open and I can see.
Stealing over me,
Sleeping endlessly,
River flow to the sea,
Time is free.
Stealing over me,
Sleeping endlessly,
River flow to the sea,
Let me dream.
Let me dream….
Hell train,
See the demons dance.
Hell train,
See the demons dance.
Hell train,
See the demons dance.
Hell train,
See the demons dance.
In your mind,
Mirrors of your mind.
In your mind,
Mirrors of your mind.
Taro Rota, Arot Taro,
Taro, Rota, Arot Taro……..
You have summoned me,
But I am not in your control.
I will eat your mind
And then destroy your very soul
Though you stand within
The circle I won’t stay my hand,
For the very stones
You stand on are at my command.
‘Cos you’re mine!
Yes, you’re mine!
You have summoned up
A power that is beyond your will.
You have brought to life
A force that death itself can’t kill.
See your useless symbols
Turn to dust before your eyes,
Feel my power engulf you,
Laughter drown your helpless cries.
‘Cos you’re mine!
Yes, you’re mine!
You are a ma-chine,
You are a ma-chine,
You are a ma-chine………..
You’re dreaming,
Is this real?
Illusion,
Confuse your mind.
Hold fast now,
Thoughts shifting patterns.
Hold fast now
And then let go.
Stare into the sun,
Become one incandescent ray of your creation.
Watch the water flow
And sink below a single drop in one vast ocean.
Fly into the air,
Ensnare your mind upon a pin of concentration,
Deep inside the earth,
Rebirth, the rotten coffin breaks the maggots welcome.
You’re dreaming,
Is this real?
Illusion,
Confuse your mind.
Hold fast now,
Thoughts’ shifting patterns.
Hold fast now,
And then let go…………..
Time is going through the motion,
Drowning tears in one vast ocean,
Rivers flee from valley fire,
Can the mountains climb no higher?
Frozen in a sea of sorrow,
Dream away forget tomorrow,
Words will always be unspoken,
Promises will soon be broken.
Driving down the endless highway,
Time is starting to go my way.
Find the people who will know why,
Love will lose and time will go by.
Circling in an endless season,
Stop and ask yourself the reason.
Time marches on!
Life’s illusions melting away,
Now is the time for change,
Changing,
Everything remains the same,
You will find,
Though the stars lose their brightness
One by one.
Come!
Fly, Fly away!!!

Steve Marriott – Marriott (1976)

frontcover1In 1975, Humble Pie came sputtering to a halt after a series of less than inspiring albums. Surprisingly, frontman Steve Marriott’s first solo album after the split, 1976’s Marriott, is a sprightly, rollicking affair that is light on the blues-rock of Humble Pie and heavy on soul, funk, and hard-charging rock & roll. The album is divided into a British side (recorded by Marriott’s band that included ex-T. Rex guitarist Mickey Finn) and an American side (with backing by a raft of West Coast session players including Michael Nesmith sidekick Red Rhodes on pedal steel). The British side is a rocked-out blast of noise with Marriott’s wailing vocals sounding rejuvenated and his live-wire guitar playing fully to the front. Tracks like “East Side Struttin’,” “Lookin’ for a Love,” a fully fleshed-out version of a Small Faces track, “Wam Bam Thank You Ma’am,” and “Midnight Rollin'” equal the best moments of Humble Pie, and only the blues ballad “Help Me Through the Day” lets the side down. The American side is unsurprisingly a much slicker proposition, relying on backing vocalists and synths to flesh out the sound. Marriott’s ragged soul shines through, however, on rollicking tracks like “Star in My Life,” the disco-fied “Late Night Lady,” and a slinky cover of Freddie Scott’s “Are You Lonely for Me Baby.” Again, the ballad drags things down as the cheesy arrangement of “You Don’t Know Me” shows that maybe Marriott should have steered clear of the ballads — the cheesy arrangement is pure supper club, and Marriott sounds very out of place. Batting .800 is nothing to look sideways at, though, and Marriott is a stunning return to form and a powerful two-finger salute to anyone who had written the lad off as washed up. He’s dirty as ever and on top of his game, and the album flat out rocks. ( by Tim Sendra)

steve-marriott
Personnel:
Ben Benay (guitar on 06. – 10.)
Alan Estes (percussion on 06. – 10.)
Mickey Finn (guitar on 01. – 05.)
David Foster (keyboards on 06. – 10.)
Dennis Kovarik (bass on 06. – 10.)
Steve Marriott (guitar, vocals)
Greg Ridley (bass, background vocals on 01. – 05.)
Red Rhodes (guitar, pedal steel-guitar on 06. – 10.)
David Spinozza (guitar on 10.)
Ian Wallace (drums, Percussion on 01. – 05.)
Ernie Watts (Saxophone on 06. – 10.)
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background vocals:
Carlena Williams – Greg Ridley – Maxayn Lewis – Venetta Fields
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Tracklist:

British Side:
01  East Side Struttin’ (Finn/Marriott) 4.55
02. Lookin’ For A Love (Alexander/Samuels) 3.51
03. Help Me Through The Day (Russell) 6.01
04. Midnight Rollin’ (Stephens/Marriott) 3.36
05. Wam Bam Thank You Ma’am (Lane/Marriott) 4.03

 American Side:
06. Star In My Life (Wallace/Marriott) 3.37
07. Are You Lonely For Me Baby (Burns) 3.58
08. You Don’t Know Me (Walker/Arnold) 5.03
09. Late Night Lady (Ridley/Marriott/Hinkley) 3.07
10. Early Evening Light (Marriott) 4.08

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Eagles – One Of These Nights (1975)

frontcover1One of These Nights is the fourth studio album by the Eagles, released in 1975. The record would become the Eagles’ first number one album on Billboard’s album chart in July that year, and yielded three Top 10 singles, “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Take It to the Limit”. Its title song is the group’s second number one single on the Billboard Hot 100. The album sold four million copies and was nominated for Grammy Album of the Year. A single from the album, “Lyin’ Eyes”, was also nominated for Record of the Year, and won the Eagles’ first Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

One of These Nights is the last Eagles album to feature guitarist Bernie Leadon, who was later replaced by Joe Walsh. Leadon left the band after the One Of These Nights tour. The seventh track, “Visions”, is the only Eagles song on which lead guitarist Don Felder sang the lead vocals, despite his desire to write and sing more songs. The album was the band’s commercial breakthrough, transforming them into international superstars and establishing them as America’s number one band. They went on a worldwide tour to promote the Album.
The Eagles began working on their fourth album in late 1974. Glenn Frey and Don Henley wrote four of the nine songs by themselves, and they also collaborated with other members of the band on three other songs. Many of the songs were written while Frey and tshirtHenley were sharing a house in Beverly Hills, including “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, “Take It To The Limit” and “After The Thrill Is Gone”. Henley joked in an interview with Cameron Crowe that it was their “satanic country-rock period” because “it was a dark time, both politically and musically” in America, referring to the turmoil in Washington and disco music starting to take off. He added: “We thought, “Well, how can we write something with that flavor, with that kind of beat, and still have the dangerous guitars?” We wanted to capture the spirit of the times.”
Frey said that “One Of These Nights was the most fluid and ‘painless’ album [they] ever made”, and thought that the quality of the songs he wrote with Henley had improved dramatically. However, Leadon was becoming increasingly unhappy during the making of the album. He wrote three of the nine songs, none of which was released as a single. He was unhappy with the more rock direction of the band that Frey preferred, at one time walking out of a meeting to discuss which take to use after the recording of a rock track. Leadon would leave the band in late 1975, after the album was released.
Frey also began to sing less as a lead singer starting with this album, singing solo lead on only one song (“Lyin’ Eyes”) and sharing lead vocals with Henley on another (“After the Thrill Is Gone”). Henley later said: “[Glenn] was generous in that respect … If I began to do more than he did, it was because if someone had a strong suit he would play that card. ‘You sing this, you sing it better,’ that kind of thing.” Randy Meisner sings lead on two songs, one of which, “Take it to the Limit”, a composition he co-wrote with Frey and Henley, was released as the third single from the album. It is the only Eagles single on which Meisner sings lead.
singles
The cover for the album is an image of an artwork by Boyd Elder, also known as “El Chingadero”. Elder created artwork of painted skulls in the early 1970s, and pieces of his work, titled “American Fetish”, were exhibited in an art gallery in Venice, California in 1972. Among those who attended the opening were members of the Eagles who performed “Witchy Woman” at the show, an early appearance by the band as the Eagles. Elder was also a friend of the album cover designer Gary Burden, who had been responsible for the Eagles’ three previous albums and who was interested in using one of Elder’s pieces for this cover.[10] Elder presented two of his works to the Eagles in Dallas in late 1974, one of which was then chosen for the cover of One of These Nights. Later another work of Elder, an image of an eagle’s skull, would be used for the cover of Their Greatest Hits album. The painted animal skull motif was also used in the cover for their compilation album The Very Best of, and the skull of One of These Nights was used for the cover of the documentary History of the Eagles.
eagleslive1975
The album cover for One of These Nights is the last Eagles album design on which Burden was involved. He made the skull stand up off the page by debossing large areas together with detailed and elaborate embossing in the wings and feathers. According to Burden, the cover image represents where the band was coming from and where they were going – “The cow skull is pure cowboy, folk, the decorations are American Indian inspired and the future is represented by the more polished reflective glass beaded surfaces covering the skull. All set against the dark eagle feather wings that speak of mysterious powers.” The album artwork received a Grammy nomination for Best Album Package.
Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone, in an early review of the album, expressed a liking for the album for its relative lack of conceptual pretension compared to the Eagles’ previous albums, but did not consider it a great album. He thought the band’s ensemble playing “unprecedentedly excellent” but they “lack an outstanding singer”, and that while “many of their tunes are pretty, none are eloquent.” He added: “And for all their worldly perceptiveness, the Eagles’ lyrics never transcend Hollywood slickness. Their hard rock has always seemed a bit forced, constructed more from commercial considerations than from any urgent impulse to boogie. And when the Eagles attempt to communicate wild sexuality, they sound only boyishly enthused. These limitations, however, seem built-in to the latter-day concept of Southern California rock, of which the Eagles remain the unrivaled exponents.
eagleslive1975_02
“The Rolling Stone Album Guide judged the album to be the band’s “most musically adventurous outing yet, flirting with disco on the title song, a waltz on “Take It to the Limit”, and bluegrass psychedelia on Leadon’s “Journey of the Sorcerer”.
William Ruhlmann of AllMusic in a retrospective review was more favorable; he thought that it had more original material and that the material was more polished. He wrote: “One of These Nights was the culmination of the blend of rock, country, and folk styles the Eagles had been making since their start; there wasn’t much that was new, just the same sorts of things done better than they had been before. In particular, a lyrical stance—knowing and disillusioned, but desperately hopeful—had evolved, and the musical arrangements were tighter and more purposeful. The result was the Eagles’ best-realized and most popular album so far.”
The album first entered the Billboard 200 chart at No. 25 the week of its release, and climbed to No. 1 in its fourth week on the chart, where it then stayed the next four weeks. It is the first of the four consecutive No. 1 albums by the Eagles. The album was certified Gold three weeks after its release on June 30, 1975, and it received its 4× Platinum certification on March 20, 2001, signifying shipment of over 4 million copies in the United States.
eagles1975
Personnel:
Don Felder (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar,  piano, harmonium)
Don Henley (vocals, drums, percussion, tabla)
Bernie Leadon (vocals, guitar, banjo, mandolin, pedal steel-guitar)
Randy Meisner (vocals, bass)
+
David Bromberg (fiddle on 04.)
Albhy Galuten – Synthesizer on 03.)
Jim Ed Norman – piano on 05. + 06.)
+
The Royal Martian Orchestra conducted by Jim Ed Norman (04.)
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Tracklist:
01. One Of These Nights (Henley/Frey) 4.51
02. Too Many Hands (Meisner/Felder) 4.43
03. Hollywood Waltz (B.Leadon/T.Leadon/Henley/Frey) 4.04
04. Journey Of The Sorcerer (B. Leadon) 6.40
05. Lyin’ Eyes (Henley/Frey) 6.22
06. Take It To The Limit (Meisner/Henley/Frey) 4.49
07. Visions (Felder/Henley) 3.58
08. After The Thrill Is Gone (Henley/Frey) 3.56
09. I Wish You Peace (Davis/B. Leadon) 3.45
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Good Charlotte – Good Morning Revival (2007)

frontcover1Good Morning Revival is the fourth studio album by American pop punk band Good Charlotte and the follow-up to the 2004 release The Chronicles of Life and Death. It is the first album to feature Dean Butterworth on drums, who joined the band in March 2005 after former drummer Chris Wilson departed in 2005. Billy Martin has mentioned in an interview that Benji Madden came up with the name for the album. This style can be heard in the album’s third single, “Dance Floor Anthem”, which is the most successful song on the album by debuting at No. 2 on the Australian charts and reaching No.25 on the Billboard Hot 100. It is the final album by Good Charlotte to be released through Daylight Records; they subsequently signed a deal with Capitol. (by wikipedia)
It’s not that Good Charlotte is incapable of writing good pop songs, it’s that the band’s music has never had any authenticity to it. The high-gloss pop rock of 2002’s The Young and the Hopeless masqueraded as punk, cynically emphasizing image over music, while 2004’s bloated The Chronicles of Life and Death attempted to show growth musically, and save for the odd pleasant surprise (the oddly contagious “I Just Wanna Live”, for instance), it sputtered, trying far too hard to seem more profound than the band actually is. Whether it’s Joel Madden’s persistently flat singing voice that sounds devoid of any personality, the hackneyed lyrics and song titles, or his band’s constant hopping onto whatever the musical trend is at the moment, Good Charlotte has all the focus of the MySpace and Facebook-addled children the band caters to, appropriating whatever’s in fashion, mangling it all in a soul-killing process of musical mastication and masturbation, and spewing out a product whose triteness is overshadowed only by its complete lack of sincerity.
goodcharlotte01
This time around, it’s the kid-friendly angst of Fallout Boy, the post-punk-infused pop of Panic! At the Disco, and the slick flamboyance of the Killers that the band is keen on grabbing a slice of, but unlike past efforts, the scary thing about Good Morning Revival is just how close these boys have come to actually succeeding. The hooks are there, the production, courtesy Linkin Park producer Don Gilmore, is there, the window dressing is all there (dance-inspired beats, soaring emo choruses), but there’s not a second where we believe that Good Charlotte means it, and their complete inability to show any eloquence in their lyrics makes this record ring all the more hollow. If you’re going to sing banal lyrics, you had damn well better sell it like it’s gospel, but Madden simply mails it all in, as if he’s seeing the words for the first time as he sings them.
For three quarters of the album, as mentioned, this is very catchy music. Backed with sequenced beats, blips, and synth chords, “Misery” boasts a borderline gorgeous chorus, but is completely undermined by Madden’s witless diatribe about “plastic people” and how, you guessed it, miserable he is. The pulsating “The River” is watered down thanks to Madden’s imitation of Brandon Flowers imitating Bruce Springsteen, while “Keep Your Hands Off My Girl” boasts a killer falsetto hook, but we can’t tell if the song’s posturing is supposed to be genuine or satire. If there’s one song that comes closest to getting it right on all levels, it’s “Dance Floor Anthem”, which audaciously swipes the Rapture’s tiresome dance-punk gimmickry and leans heavily on Good Charlotte’s goofiest chorus to date (“Everybody put your hands up / Say, I don’t wanna be in love”) to great effect. And buried late in the album, long after we’ve given up hope, lies the oddly charming “Something Else”, a little tune that nicely mimics the ebullient pop of Fountains of Wayne, from the call-and-response vocals to the undulating Moog synth.
single
Too often, though, we get dragged down into the depressing morass of Good Charlotte’s faux-profundity. “Where Would We Be Now” shamelessly rips off Coldplay’s piano-driven balladry, “Victims of Love” takes the dance shtick too far, and “March On”‘s attempt at a populist anthem falls flat. Nothing can quite compare to the level of ridiculousness the band stoops to on the unintentionally hilarious “All Black”, a flirtation with goth rock that has us wincing from the bombastic, pseudo-orchestral intro, and guffawing by the time we hear those lyrics: “Take a look at my life, all black / Take a look at my clothes, all black / Like Johnny Cash, all black / Like the Rolling Stones / Wanna paint it black”. Please, Joel, just stop.
Going back to that album five years ago, it’s clear Good Charlotte knows how to come up with a good melody or two, but they either need to make what for them would be a quantum leap in the lyric writing department, or find a singer who can convince us that such schlock is genuine. We can live with the genre-hopping; you have to do what you can to stay in the heads of the kids these days. Just try and sound like you mean it, alright? (Adrien Begrand)
In other words: This is the perfect power-pop-rock Album !
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Personnel:
Dean Butterworth (drums, percussion)
Benji Madden (guitar, background vocals)
Joel Madden (vocals)
Billy Martin (lead guitar, keyboards)
Paul Thomas (bass)
+
Synyster Gates (lead guitar, background  vocals on 03.)
M. Shadows (vocals on 03.)
+
The Incognito Horns (horn on 08.)

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background vocals:
Bobbi Page – Carmen Carter – Maxine Waters – Terry Wood
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Tracklist:
01. Good Morning Revival (J,Madden/B.Madden) 0.56
02. Misery (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 3.49
03. The River (J,Madden/B.Madden) 3.15
04. Dance Floor Anthem (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 4.04
05. Keep Your Hands Off My Girl (J,Madden/B.Madden) 3.25
06. Victims Of Love  (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 3.45
07. Where Would We Be Now (Martin/J,Madden/B.Madden) 3.58
08. Break Apart Her Heart (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore(Thomas) 3.19
09. All Black (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 4.19
10.Beautiful Place (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 3.50
11. Something Else (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore)  3.19
12. Broken Hearts Parade (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 3.15
13. March On (J,Madden/B.Madden/Gilmore) 3.13
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Alquin – Nobody Can Wait Forever (1975)

frontcover1Alquin is a band from The Netherlands whose debut album is a versatile, Canterburish album. Alquin’s second album is the best in their catalogue. With the third album there were some changes. The band wanted to make less complicated music, and more rock music. To achieve this they asked producer Rodger Bain. They also had a new vocalist, Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). He had a more powerful voice, than Tarenskeen, and this fitted the music they were aiming for better.
The opener still sounds like the old Alquin, keyboard orientated music with good guitar and sax solos. Compared to the first two albums, the tracks are more vocal orientated. After the opener it is more straightforward rock as in Mr Widow and Farewell, Miss Barcelona, or even hardrock in Wheelchair Groupie. There are however still beautiful instrumental passages and great solos (for instance in the middle part of Stranger). The best track on this album and the most progressive is the last one. Still a good album, but not as impressive as their second one. (by Agemo)
This is the best Alquin album. On this album are some powerfull tracks like New Guinea Sunrise, Stranger, Darling Superstar, Revolution’s Eve and the single Wheelchair Groupie. Alquin plays progressive rock with some blues influences. Your hear the hammond organ, sax and guitar as the main instruments together with the beautiful voice of Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). A good album is it’s predecessor Mountain Queen. (by hcklvanzessen )
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Although less progressive than the two previous albums, this is by far my favourite ALQUIN record. This is the first album that feature vocalist Michael Van Dijk, his versatile performance in addition to the new approach of the compositions gives a powerful and overall fresher sound to the band. Highlights are the album opener, the almost hard-rocker Stranger and the album closer Revolution’s Eve, coincidentaly the proggiest tracks on this record.
While most people may enjoy the two previous albums better, I prefer the less complicated compositions featured on this album, as I said before ALQUIN managed to sound really fresh and powerful but keeping their progressive influences. (by Prosciutto)
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Personnel:
Ferdinand Bakker (guitar, piano, vocals)
Michel van Dijk (vocals)
Dick Franssen (keyboards, synthesizer)
Hein Mars (bass)
Ronald Ottenhoff (Saxophone, flute)
Job Tarenskeen (saxophone, vocals, drums, percussion)
Paul Weststrate (drums)
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The Thunderthighs (background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. New Guinea Sunrise (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 6.37
01.1. Sunrise
01.2.Wake Me Up
02. Mr. Widow (Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 3.32
03. Stranger (Bakker/v.Dijk) 6.41
03.1. Stranger
03.2. You Might As Well Fall
04. Darling Superstar (Bakker/v.Dijk)
05. Farewell, Miss Barcelona (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 2.58
06. Wheelchair Groupie (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 3.12
07. Revolution’s Eve 7.27
07.1.Revolution’s Theme (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff)
07.2. Nobody Can’t Wait Forever (Bakker/Tarenskeen)
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She moved her chair up on the stage
Her Hasselblad was on her knees
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Her wonderboy came down the stairs
With silver pants and golden hair
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Watch it . . .

Sammy Hagar – All Night Long (1978)

frontcover1All Night Long (Loud & Clear in the UK) is Sammy Hagar’s first live album. The album contains no overdubs. The album was recorded during concerts in San Francisco, San Antonio, San Bernardino, Santa Cruz and Santa Monica.
All Night Long is better than most hard rock live albums not only because Sammy Hagar is at his best when he’s on stage, but because the set list includes only his best songs, eliminating the filler that tends to clutter his albums. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)
Sammy is now such a household name that it is nearly impossible to think of him as a guy that used to be in the band Montrose and later struggling with a solo career.  That’s just where he was when this live sucker came out.  Hagar was following up his third solo studio effort when he recorded All Night Long.  The year was 1978 and Sammy was close to breaking out big.
The album contains “I’ve Done Everything for You” which would become a huge hit for Rick Springfield a few years later.  The Montrose classic “Bad Motor Scooter” also is in the set list but there are plenty of other great musical moments.  Check out “Red” which is one of the Red Rocker’s best.  “Young Girl Blues” is another killer song that builds in energy as it continues.  “Rock ‘N’ Roll Weekend” is pure Hagar and “Turn Up the Music” is a true anthem.
This one is a must-own for Sammy’s early hardcore fans but it is also a great place for his younger fans to start when digging back through his past catalogue.
A live concert in every sense of the word, delivered with energy and class, which are two words that sum up what The Red Rocker is all about.
Turn this sucker up! (by classicrockrevisited.com)
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Personnel:
Denny Carmassi (drums)
Bill Church (bass, background vocals)
Alan Fitzgerald (keyboards, background vocals)
Sammy Hagar – lead vocals, guitar
Gary Pihl – guitar, Background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. Red (Carter/Hagar) 5.03
02. Rock ‘N’ Roll Weekend (Hagar) 3.41
03. Make It Last/Reckless (Hagar) 6.40
04. Turn Up The Music (Carter/Hagar) 5.45
05. I’ve Done Everything For You (Hagar) 3.29
06. Young Girl Blues (Leitch) 8.58
07. Bad Motor Scooter (Hagar) 7.03