Zakk Wylde – Book Of Shadows (1996)

FrontCover1Zakk Wylde (born Jeffrey Phillip Wielandt on January 14, 1967) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and occasional actor who is best known as the guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne, and founder of the heavy metal band Black Label Society. His signature bulls-eye design appears on many of his guitars and is widely recognized. He was the lead guitarist and vocalist in Pride & Glory, who released one self-titled album in 1994 before disbanding. As a solo artist he released Book of Shadows and Book of Shadows II.

Book of Shadows is the first solo studio album by the heavy metal guitarist Zakk Wylde. The album was first released in 1996, and was reissued by Spitfire in 1999 with the bonus disc containing “Evil Ways” (the Japanese bonus track from the album’s original release), “The Color Green”, and “Peddlers of Death” (an acoustic version of a track that features on Black Label Society’s Sonic Brew).

Unlike his work with Ozzy Osbourne and Black Label Society, here Zakk Wylde shows a different side to his music; an introspective and mostly acoustic style recalling many of the lighter moments from his previous project, Pride & Glory as well as classic folk rock artists such as Neil Young.

SinglePromotional singles were released for “Between Heaven and Hell” and “Way Beyond Empty”, the latter of which also had an accompanying music video.

“Throwin’ It All Away” was written about the death of Shannon Hoon from the band Blind Melon. Shannon and Zakk had lived together and became close friends a few months before he died of a drug overdose. (by wikipedia)

After spending several years with Ozzy Osbourne and recording one album with the heavy Southern rock trio Pride & Glory, guitarist Zakk Wylde released his debut solo album, Book of Shadows, in June of 1996. Naturally, the album is a guitar showcase, with each song boasting a dazzling guitar solo or two. That much was expected. What is a surprise is the musical diversity apparent throughout the album. Wylde does kick out some heavy riff-driven rockers, but he also detours into blues, country, and folk on occasion. That diversity ensures that Book of Shadows is more listenable for the average listener than most guitarist-led albums. However, Wylde’s songwriting skills remain weak; although the playing is memorable, the melodies rarely are. Nevertheless, there’s enough prime instrumental work here to make it a very worthwhile listen for guitar aficionados and a few of the tracks should satiate fans of straight-ahead heavy boogie rock.(by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

This isn´t a hevy rock album, it´s an album full with ballads with very pensive thoughts.

BackCover1

Personnel:
James LoMenzo (bass)
Joe Vitale (drums, keyboards, piano on “I Thank You Child”)
Zakk Wylde (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica, bass on 10.)
+
John Sambataro (background vocals on 05.)

Zakk Wylde

Tracklist:
01. Between Heaven And Hell 3.26
02. Sold My Soul (feat. Guiggs) 4.52
03. Road Back Home 5.48
04. Way Beyond Empty 5.25
05. Throwin’ It All Away 5.47
06. What You’re Look’n For 5.31
07. Dead As Yesterday 2.51
08. Too Numb To Cry 2.23
09. The Things You Do 4.11
10. 1,000,000 Miles Away 6.29
11. I Thank You Child 4.41

All songs written by Zakk Wylde

CDs

Two different labels

*
**

Advertisements

Santana – Santana III (1971)

FrontCover1Santana is the third studio album by Santana. The band’s second self-titled album, it is often referred to as III or Santana III to distinguish it from the band’s 1969 debut album. The album was also known as Man with an Outstretched Hand, after its album cover image. It was the third (and until the group’s 2016 reunion, the last) album by the Woodstock-era lineup, and it was also considered by many to be the band’s peak commercially and musically, as subsequent releases aimed towards more experimental jazz fusion and Latin music. The album featured two singles, “Everybody’s Everything”, which hit #12 in October 1971, and “No One to Depend On”, a staple in FM radio. The album also marked the addition of 17-year-old guitarist Neal Schon (who performed notable solos on both singles) to the group.Santana is the third studio album by Santana. The band’s second self-titled album, it is often referred to as III or Santana III to distinguish it from the band’s 1969 debut album. The album was also known as Man with an Outstretched Hand, after its album cover image. It was the third (and until the group’s 2016 reunion, the last) album by the Woodstock-era lineup, and it was also considered by many to be the band’s peak commercially and musically, as subsequent releases aimed towards more experimental jazz fusion and Latin music.

CarlosSantana01

The album featured two singles, “Everybody’s Everything”, which hit #12 in October 1971,[1] and “No One to Depend On”, a staple in FM radio. The album also marked the addition of 17-year-old guitarist Neal Schon (who performed notable solos on both singles) to the group.
The original album was recorded at Columbia Studios, San Francisco, and released in both stereo and quadraphonic.
Santana III was also the last Santana album to hit #1 on the charts until Supernatural in 1999. According to Guinness Book of World Records 2005, this is the longest delay between #1 albums ever occurring. The original album was re-released in 1998 with live versions of “Batuka”, “Jungle Strut” and a previously unreleased song, “Gumbo”, recorded at Fillmore West in 1971 which features lead guitar solos by both Santana and Schon. /by wikipedia)

Singles

Singles from all over the world

Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band’s second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon — who was 17 years old — into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist Thomas “Coke” Escovedo was brought in to replace (temporarily) José Chepitó Areas, who had suffered a brain aneurysm, yet who recovered quickly and rejoined the band. The rest were Carlos, organist Gregg Rolie, drummer Michael Schrieve, bassist David Brown, and conguero Michael Carabello. “Batuka” is the powerful first evidence of something being very different. The band was rawer, darker, and more powerful with twin leads and Schon’s harder, edgier rock & roll sound paired with Carlos’ blend of ecstatic high notes and soulful fills.

Booklet01A

It cooks — funky, mean, and tough. “Batuka” immediately transforms itself into “No One to Depend On,” by Escovedo, Carabello, and Rolie. The middle section is highlighted by frantic handclaps, call-and-response lines between Schon and Rolie, and Carlos joining the fray until the entire track explodes into a frenzied finale. And what’s most remarkable is that the set just keeps on cooking, from the subtle slow burn of “Taboo” to the percussive jam workout that is “Toussaint l’Overture,” a live staple in the band’s set list recorded here for the first time (and featuring some cooking Rolie organ work at its beginning). “Everybody’s Everything” is here, as is “Guajira” and “Jungle Strut” — tunes that are still part of Santana’s live show.

Booklet03A

With acoustic guitars, gorgeous hand percussion, and Santana’s fragile lead vocal, “Everything’s Coming Our Way” is the only “feel good” track here, but it’s a fitting way to begin winding the album down with its Schon and Santana guitar breaks. The album ends with a completely transformed reading of Tito Puente’s “Para los Rumberos,” complete with horns and frantic, almost insanely fast hand drumming and cowbell playing. It’s an album that has aged extremely well due to its spare production (by Carlos and the band) and its live sound. This is essential Santana, a record that deserves to be reconsidered in light of its lasting abundance and vision. (by Thom Jurek)

Booklet02A

Personnel:
José “Chepito” Areas (percussion, conga, timbales, drums)
David Brown (bass)
Mike Carabello (percussion, conga, tambourine, vocals)
Gregg Rolie (vocals, keyboards)
Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals)
Neal Schon (guitar)
Michael Shrieve (drums, percussion)
+
Greg Errico (tambourine)
Thomas “Coke” Escovedo (percussion, vocals)
Luis Gasca (trumpet on 09.)
Mario Ochoa (piano on 06.)
Rico Reyes (percussion, vocals on 06.)
Linda Tillery (background vocals)
+
Tower Of Power (horn section on 08.)

LPBooklet

Tracklist:
01. Batuka (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve) 3.35
02. No One to Depend On (Carabello/Rolie/Escovedo) 5.31
03. Taboo (Areas/Rolie) 5.34
04. Toussaint L’Overture (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve/C.Santana) 5.56
05. Everybody’s Everything (C.Santana/Brown/Moss) 3.31
06. Guajira (Areas/Brown/Reyes) 5.43
07. Jungle Strut (Ammons) 5.20
08. Everything’s Coming Our Way (C.Santana) 3.15
09. Para los Rumberos (Puente) 2.47
+
10. Batuka (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve) 3.41
11. Jungle Strut (Ammons) 5.59
12. Gumbo (Santana/Rolie) 5.26

The three bonus tracks were recorded live at the Fillmore West, San Francisco, California, July 4, 1971

LabelB1

*
**

Front+BackCover

Don Nix – Gone Too Long (1976)

FrontCover1.JPGDon Nix (born September 27, 1941, Memphis, Tennessee) is an American songwriter, composer, arranger, musician, and author. Although cited as being “obscure”[by whom?], he is a key figure in several genres of Southern rock and soul, R&B, and the blues. He was instrumental in the creation of the distinctive “Memphis soul” developed at Stax Records.

A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Nix came from a musical family (his brother, Larry Nix, became a mastering engineer for Stax and for the Ardent Recording Studios in Memphis). Don Nix began his career playing saxophone for the Mar-Keys, which also featured Steve Cropper, Duck Dunn and others. The hit instrumental single “Last Night” (composed by the band as a whole) was the first of many successful hits to Nix’s credit. Without Nix, the Mar-Keys evolved into Booker T. & the M.G.’s.

Markeys

The Mar-Keys in the studio, from left, Charlies “Packy” Axton, Wayne Jackson, Donald “Duck” Dunn, Don Nix, Terry Johnson, Steve Cropper and Jerry Lee “Smoochie” Smith. (Phillip Rauls photo)

As a producer, Nix worked with other artists and producers, such as Leon Russell of Shelter Records; Gary Lewis and the Playboys in Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars; George Harrison, of the Beatles; and John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers. One notable achievement was his collaboration with Harrison, Russell, and many others in the production of the “Concert for Bangladesh”, a star-studded benefit concert at Madison Square Garden in 1971.

DonNix01Throughout his career, Nix worked behind the scenes as producer, arranger, and musician and in other roles for artists including Lonnie Mack, Furry Lewis, Freddie King, Albert King, Delaney, Bonnie & Friends, Isaac Hayes, the Staple Singers, Jeff Beck, Brian May, Eric Clapton, and many others. He wrote and produced albums for solo artists and for groups, such as Don Nix and the Alabama State Troupers, John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers, the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, and Larry Raspberry and the Highsteppers.

The song “Going Down”, originally released by the band Moloch on their eponymous album in 1969, has become a rock-and-roll standard, having been covered by Freddie King, Jeff Beck, Deep Purple, JJ Cale, Marc Ford, Chicken Shack, Bryan Ferry, Pearl Jam, Gov’t Mule, Sam Kinison, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Joe Satriani, the Who, Led Zeppelin, Sammy Hagar, Joe Bonamassa, Sturgill Simpson, and others. Nix released a version of the song as a single for Elektra Records in 1972. The song “Black Cat Moan” was covered on the 1973 album Beck, Bogert & Appice. The Rolling Stones performed “Goin’ Down” with John Mayer and Gary Clark, Jr. live on Pay-Per-View television on December 15, 2012, as part of the Stones’ 50th Anniversary Tour.

He did the first time performance in Japan, Tokyo and Kobe, in March 2013 with his friends Terry Wall and Joel Williams.

In 2014, “Alabama State Troupers Road Show” was released as a CD. A celebration event was held in Stax Museum in Memphis (by wikipedia)

DonNix02

And here´s another solo album by Don Nix … a brilliant nix between Rock, Blues, Gospel and S misuc ..Soul music … he was one of the most underrated musicians in the history of this music !!!

DonNix03

George Harrison & Don Nix

Personnel:
Don Nix (vocals, saxophone)
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians (with spiritual guidance from George Harrison)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Goin’ Thru Another Change (Nix) 3.02
02. Feel A Whole Lot Better (Clark) 3.55
03. Gone Too Long (Nix) 3.16
04. Backstreet Girl (Jagger/Richards) 4.01
05. Rollin’ In My Dreams (Nix) 2.50
06. Yazoo City Jail (Nix) 3.37
07. Harpoon Arkansas Turnaround (Nix) 2.28
08. Forgotten Town (Nix) 3.14
09. A Demain (Until Tomorrow) (Denimal/Nix) 4.53

LabelB1.JPG

 

*
**

Don Nix talks …

Bob Dylan – Between Saved and Shot (1999)

FrontCover1Here´s a nice Bob Fylan bootleg with studio outtakes from his “Saved” and “Shot Of Love” period:

Studio outtakes from March-May 1981. Nice quality. It’s taken from the soundboard, but from a fourth generation analog tape… so the quality isn’t crystal clear. There is a slight white noise throughout. Vocals are rarely up to proper mix level. This is a great collection for fans of the studio process outtake. Gospel era fans will have some interest as well. However, all should keep in mind that these are unfinished songs. Some are little more than ideas. There are no hidden ‘gems’ here that have missed official release, and those seeking the powerful Christian dogma of Saved will be disappointed. Highlights are the bosa nova tune Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away, and the bonus tracks.

The bonus tracks are releasable quality. Much better than the proceeding tunes. Mystery Train is a nice rendition of the classic Sam Phillips tune with the sound and feel of the Shot of Love tunes. The outtakes are slightly more laid back, and less angry sounding than the released versions. There seems to be a better flow of the vocals. All are at least as good as the official versions. (by www.bobsboots.com)

AlternateCD

Alternate CD

Personnel:
Steve Douglas (saxophone)
Tim Drummond (bass)
Donald “Duck” Dunn (bass)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar (guitar)
Carl Pickhardt (piano)
Steve Ripley (guitar)
William D. “Smitty” Smith (organ)
Fred Tackett (guitar)
Benmont Tench (keyboards)
Monalisa Young (vocals)
+
background vocals:
Carolyn Dennis – Clydie King – Regina McCrory – Madelyn Quebec

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Is It Worth It 4.22
02. High Away 8.15
03. Hallelujah 2.48
04, Magic 4.41
05. You’re Still A Child To Me 2.10
06. Wind Blows On The Water 3.02
07. All The Way Down
08. My Oriental Home
09. We’re (Living) On Borrowed Time
10. I Want You To Know I Love You
11. On A Rockin’ Boat
12. Movin’ (On The Water)
13. Almost
14. Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away
+
15. Mystery Train
16. Heart Of Mine
17. Watered Down Love
18. Shot Of Love

All songs written by Bob Dylan, except “Mystery Train” which was written by Phillips/Parker)

CD

*
**

Beggars Opera – Get Your Dog Off Me (1973)

FrontCover1Get Your Dog off Me, the final real studio album of Scots prog band Beggars Opera, was a disappointment when it came out — and it remains one decades later. Indeed, they never captured the spirit of Act One in any of their further releases, and it’s easy to see why they called this the end of the road (although guitarist Ricky Gardiner and mellotronist Virginia Scott kept the band name going with two German albums later in the decade). The dramatics, which had been quite sly before, descend into melodrama here, and there’s a dearth of songwriting ideas (which was also true on the previous record, where the standout was a cover of “MacArthur Park”). They can still slip in a good hook here and there, and there’s no fault in the playing, with Gardiner in particular showing himself to be an excellent, thoughtful soloist. But on the evidence of the material and arrangements here, this was a band past its sell-by date. The newer harmony style — influenced by bands like the Eagles, is quite at odds with any kind of grandeur. This is really one just for the die-hard fans and obsessives. (by Chris Nickson)

And maybe I´m a die-hard fan, because this album is a pretty good one … listen to “Requiem” the titeltrack or to “Two Timing Woman”).

Beggars Opera

Personnel:
Colin Fairlie (drums, percussion, vocals)
Ricky Gardiner (guitar, vocals)
Alan Park (keyboards, harpsichord, synthesizer)
Linnie Paterson (vocals)
Gordon Sellar (bass, vocals)
+
Raymond Wilson (drums, on 01., 02., 04. 07., 08. + 10.)

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Get Your Dog Off Me (Park/Ainsworth) 3.43
02. Freestyle Ladies (Scott) 4.20
03. Open Letter (Smith) 4.34
04. Morning Day (Scott) 4.34
05. Requiem (Gardiner) 2.17
06. Classical Gas (Williams) 4.30
07. Sweet Blossom Woman (Grabham) 4.09
08. Turn Your Money Green (Park/Ainsworth) 4.08
09. La Di-Da (Park/Fairlie/Sellar/Paterson/Gardiner) 2.53
10. Working Man (Ainsworth/Sellar) 4.34
+
11. Two Timing Woman (Singe A-Side, 1973) (Fairley) 3.47
12. Lady Of Hell Fire (Singe B-Side, 1973) (Park/Fairlie/Sellar/Paterson/Gardiner) 3.43

LabelB1

*
**

Steppenwolf – Fillmore West (1968)

FrontCover1This performance captures Steppenwolf at a pivotal time, early in their career, as the band was experiencing their first tastes of commercial success from the single off their debut album: the blazing biker anthem “Born To Be Wild.” They had recorded but not yet released their second album (which contained the single “Magic Carpet Ride”), and were beginning to perform the more adventurous and experimental material to be included on that album, in addition to staples from their debut LP. This is an excellent performance that grabs you and doesn’t let go.

Steppenwolf headlined the Fillmore West on this night, with an early, pre-signed incarnation of Santana opening, followed by The Staple Singers. This performance captures Steppenwolf at a pivotal time, early in their career, as the band was experiencing their first tastes of commercial success from the single off their debut album: the blazing biker anthem “Born To Be Wild.” They had recorded but not yet released their second album (which contained the single “Magic Carpet Ride”), and were beginning to perform the more adventurous and experimental material to be included on that album, in addition to staples from their debut LP.

Following the introduction, the set begins with a highly expanded version of “Your Wall’s Too High,” a popular track from their first album. John Kay then proceeds to speak to the audience about the band’s experiences traveling through the United States; the monologue is evocative, and speaks volumes about the social and political climate of the times. Fans of the pre-Steppenwolf blues band the Sparrow, who were transplants from Toronto but became popular during the early Bay Area music scene, are catered to with the cover “Hoochie Coochie Man.” A strong supporter of his former bandmates, Kay clues the audience in to the other Sparrow members’ current situations following the tune. This open-minded attitude would foster many great collaborations a few years later, when many of the San Francisco bands were dissolving.

Steppenwolf01Next up is the classic “Born To Be Wild,” here expanded to over twice its original length, giving the group another chance to jam a bit before they slow things down with the introspective “Desperation.” They continue with another Sparrow-era song that closed the first Steppenwolf LP, “The Ostrich,” featuring lyrics with political commentary, a common thread that would continue in Steppenwolf’s future material. Next up is “Tighten Up Your Wig,” a song that is essentially Junior Wells’ “Messin’ With The Kid,” with new lyrics by Kay.

At this point the audience is treated to a four song sequence from the group’s yet to be released second album. This is quite interesting as it shows the group becoming more adventurous with their music, and like many bands in 1968, beginning to think of albums as a whole, rather than a collection of single songs. They close the set by going back to their blues roots with “Baby Please Don’t Go,” another song often played by the Sparrow and used as a vehicle for jamming. This leaves the audience demanding more and the band obliges with a cover of Hoyt Axton’s anti-hard drug song, “The Pusher,” to end the night.

In 1968 Steppenwolf had an undeniable flair for creating music that was heavier than the usual AM radio fare, yet transcended those limitations and became hugely popular in both AM and FM radio formats. They were highly original and were one of the pioneers of the “hard rock” that would eventually be known as “heavy metal” – a term, in fact, that was coined directly from the “heavy metal thunder” phrase in the lyrics to “Born To Be Wild.”

Indeed, a thunderous set from an accomplished, influential group. )by

Alternate Frontcover

Alternate frontcover

Personnel:
Jerry Edmonton (drums, background vocals)
John Kay (vocals, guitar, harmonica
Goldy McJohn (keyboards)
Michael Monarch (guitar)
Rushton Moreve (aka John Russell Morgan) (bass, background vocals)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Your Wall’s Too High (Kay) 12.22
02. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 5.42
05. Born To Be Wild (Bonfire) 7.09
06. Desperation (Kay) 6.03
07. The Ostrich (Kay) 8.51
08. Tighten Up Your Wig (Kay) 3.47
09. Disappointment Number (Unknown) (Kay) 4.02
10. Lost And Found By Trial And Error (Kay) 2.22
11. Hodge Podge, Strained Through A Leslie (Kay) 9.59
12. Resurrection (Kay) 3.21
13. Baby Please Don’t Go (Williams) 9.40
14. The Pusher (Axton) 5.47

MoreAlternate Frontcovers

More alternate frontcovers

*
**

More Steppenwolf:

MoreSteppenwolf

 

 

Hot Tuna – First Pull Up, Then Pull Down (1971)

FrontCover1First Pull Up, Then Pull Down is the second album by Hot Tuna, released in 1971 as RCA Victor LSP-4550. The album was recorded live with electric instruments, instead of the acoustic instruments used on the previous album, Hot Tuna. The album rose to #43 on the Billboard charts. In 1996, RCA released the CD box set Hot Tuna in a Can, which included a remastered version of this album, along with remasters of the albums Hot Tuna, Burgers, America’s Choice and Hoppkorv.Helmut Qualtinger (Remigius)First Pull Up, Then Pull Down is the second album by Hot Tuna, released in 1971 as RCA Victor LSP-4550. The album was recorded live with electric instruments, instead of the acoustic instruments used on the previous album, Hot Tuna. The album rose to #43 on the Billboard charts.  (by wikipedia)

While the first Hot Tuna album had comprised an acoustic trio featuring Jorma Kaukonen, Jack Casady, and Will Scarlet, the second album added violinist Papa John Creach and drummer Sammy Piazza, and most significantly, it added electricity. Now the sound was closer to Kaukonen’s features in Jefferson Airplane. The highlight was the eight-minute “Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning,” although “Candy Man” also became a concert favorite. (by William Ruhlmann)

HotTuna01
The name First Pull Up, Then Pull Down reminds me of uh, an aerobics class! I can totally see the instructor giving the students athletic lessons that require several up and down movements. I’m sure the album title means something else entirely though. This is a pretty good live album. Not as good as their self-titled live album where the songwriting was a little sharper, but still very very impressive. An authentic blues/country album. At least it’s more energetic compared to their debut with a greater variety of instruments. Sometimes these songs drag due to jamming a bit longer than necessary, but otherwise a pretty good album.

“John’s Other” is a great instrumental. At first it seems like the kind of instrumental that might drag or seem too obvious. By that I mean for example the violin playing in the beginning. The notes aren’t very impressive and it feels safe. You’ve heard violins like this a lot. However as the song moves forward the violin gradually gets more intense, a guitar solo comes in that’s even better and the harmonica part is probably my favorite aspect of the song. Still, I wish for more violin perhaps because it’s not a very popular instrument in the world of rock compared to guitars and harmonicas so I secretly desire more of it. An impressive song either way.

HotTuna02

“Come Back Baby” is plodding sloppy blues with more splendid guitar playing, but at 9 minutes it’s a bit much to take. It should’ve probably been shortened a few minutes. Not one of my favorite songs. The vocal melody is typical blues and nothing extraordinary. Even the violin and harmonica plays it safe and that’s just wrong! The guitar solo in the middle and again later on is really good however. “Candy Man” opens with a gentle series of country guitar notes before the steady rhythm comes in. The vocal melody is pretty good though nothing brilliant or anything, clearly influenced by the country genre. Enjoyable harmonica too. Of course the violin is the best part. Too bad that part doesn’t jam longer! Oh wow, the bass part at the end is pretty awesome too. The violin comes back in a subtle way which is unique.

“Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning” is a familiar song. I probably heard it a bunch of times several years ago somewhere. I love the guitar intro that always reminded me of somewhere down south in the deep woods. The steady foot-tapping pace of the rhythm is really good as well. The vocals are kind of tucked in the back behind the guitar work and drumming so it’s hard to make out the lyrics, but otherwise a terrific song. The violin solo makes a wonderful appearance a few minutes in, and it’s my favorite part (especially when the pace picks up). Then again how cool is the violin/guitar jam occurring at the same time? VERY cool indeed! The song remains jamming the entire way through.

HotTuna03

“Want You to Know” opens with a nice guitar part. Really solid vocal melody too. This song blends country with blues in a really magnificent, stunning and authentic kind of way. One of the most underrated songs on the album. The violin even tears a hole wide open and explodes in all kinds of beauty when it makes an appearance. “Been So Long” is vocally sentimental but perhaps not quite as hard-hitting on an emotional level as the band is going for. Then again silly me! I’m still expecting Jefferson Airplane-level quality songwriting with psychedelic leanings. “Never Happen No More” is lazy day blues. Not bad but nothing that blows me away either. The song moves along at a pretty good pace at least. It does improve in a big way once the vocals come in however.

Overall First Pull Up, Then Pull Down is a mighty good Hot Tuna album. It’s not their best effort but even a weaker Hot Tuna album is enjoyable to some extent anyway right? (by Bryanam)

HotTuna04

Hot Tuna in 1972. Casady and Kaukonen are in front; Creach and Piazza are in back.

Personnel:
Jack Casady (bass)
Papa John Creach (violin)
Jorma Kaukonen – vocals, guitar)
Sammy Piazza (drums)
+
Will Scarlett (harmonica)

BackCover
Tracklist:
01. John’s Other (Creach)  8.22
02. Candy Man (Davis) 5.53
03. Been So Long (Kaukonen) 3.45
04. Want You To Know (Carter) 4.36
05. Keep Your Lamps Trimmed And Burning (Davis) 8.19
06. Never Happen No More (Blake) 3.54
07. Come Back Baby (Traditional) 9.39

LabelB1

*
**