Frankie Miller – Amsterdam (1979)

FrontCover1Francis John Miller (born 2 November 1949) is a Scottish rock singer-songwriter.

Miller wrote for and performed with many recording artists and is best known for his album Full House, the single “Darlin'” and his duet with Phil Lynott on the Thin Lizzy song “Still in Love with You”. In 1978 Bob Seger remarked that Miller “was a huge influence” on him.

Miller, with elder sisters Letty and Anne, was raised in Colvend Street, Bridgeton in Glasgow, by his parents, Cathy and Frank. He played football for the school team and Harmony Row Boys Club, his love of football probably inherited from his maternal grandfather Archie Kyle who was signed to Glasgow Rangers FC. He attended Sacred Heart Primary School and was an altar boy at the Sacred Heart church.

He first became aware of rock and R&B through his mother’s record collection. She had a fondness for Ray Charles while his sisters introduced him to Little Richard and Elvis Presley. He identified instinctively with Little Richard’s flamboyant aggression, once saying “The music was alive, exciting, I loved it. I realised later that I could get my own aggression out through music. R&B and Soul Music, I just knew was what I really loved”. He started writing songs at the age of nine after being given a guitar by his parents and wrote “I Can’t Change It” when he was twelve years old, this song was later recorded by Ray Charles. At 16 years of age, whilst still at school, Miller had his first audition in the Manhattan Club, Bridgeton, Glasgow, and was chosen in preference to Saul Byron to sing with The Deljaks. After a couple of years it was on to West Farm Cottage and then a soul outfit called Sock It To ‘Em JB which featured good friend Jimmy Dewar.

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Miller began singing professionally as a teenager with a Glasgow band called The Stoics. In mid 1970, he moved to London to further his career.[3] In 1971, he joined forces with the guitarist Robin Trower, who had just left Procol Harum. Miller introduced fellow Glaswegian bassist and vocalist James Dewar to Trower and the three of them, along with ex Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker, formed Jude in July 1971, but despite significant coverage in the British music press, they broke up in April 1972 without recording an album.[3] The Miller and Trower composition “I Can’t Wait Much Longer” later appeared on Trower’s first solo album Twice Removed from Yesterday.

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Later in 1972, Miller signed a solo recording contract with Chrysalis Records, and recorded his first LP Once in a Blue Moon, with record producer Dave Robinson. The album was an early example of pub rock, and featured backing by the pub rock band Brinsley Schwarz. Miller received consistently good reviews, although his singles and albums were not chart hits, Chrysalis continued to invest in his talent. In 1974 Miller sang “Still in Love with You”, as a duet with Phil Lynott; the song appeared on the Thin Lizzy album, Nightlife. Miller’s second album High Life, was produced and partly written by Allen Toussaint and recorded in Atlanta, Georgia during 1974. Although two album tracks, “Shoorah Shoorah” and “Play Something Sweet”, subsequently provided hits for Betty Wright and Three Dog Night respectively, the album was not a commercial success.
Miller’s next album The Rock (1975) was recorded in San Francisco using the producer Elliot Mazer, who had co-produced Harvest for Neil Young. The next album Full House (1977),[7] was produced by Chris Thomas. The lead off track “Be Good To Yourself” became Miller’s first UK Top 40 hit, peaking at No. 27 in the UK Singles Chart during June that year. In 1978 Miller hit the UK Top 10 with the song “Darlin’ “, which peaked at No. 6 on 14 October 1978. “Darlin’ ” also made the Billboard “Bubbling Under” chart in the US, peaking at No. 103. The next single penned by Miller “When I’m Away From You” rose to No. 42 in UK, but failed to chart in US. A few years later, the song became a US Country No. 1 hit for The Bellamy Brothers.

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Miller suffered a brain haemorrhage in New York City on 25 August 1994, while writing material for a new band he and Joe Walsh of the Eagles had formed with Nicky Hopkins and Ian Wallace. Miller spent five months in a coma; when he emerged, he was unable to speak or sing. He then went through rehabilitation The BBC Television documentary Stubborn Kinda Fella (1999), featured Miller and his battle to recover. In this documentary, Rod Stewart stated that Miller “was the only white singer to have brought a tear” to his eye.

Miller is no longer able to perform, but a new album containing old takes with Frankie was released 2016. The album, “Double Take” contain 19 songs brilliantly mastered and produced with artist like Rod Stewart, Bonnie Tyler, Joe Walsh, Elton John, Kid Rock among others who are performing duets with Frankie. (by wikipedia)

And here´s one of his finest bootlegs, recored live at the famous and legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam during his very sucessful European Tour in 1979 …

What a sjow, what a concert … including his excellent band …

Listen to one the finest singers of good ol´ Scotland !

And enjoy these rare recordings !

Recorded live at The Paradiso Club, Amsterdam, May 11th, 1979
Excellent FM Radio Broadcast

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Personnel:
Fran Bryne (drums)
Tex Commer (bass)
Ed Deane (guitar)
Nick Judd (keyboards)
Frankie Miller (vocals, guitar)
Steve Simpson (guitar, accordion, violin)

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Tracklist:
01. Pappa Don’t Know (Miller) 3.42
02. When I’m Away From You (Miller) 3.19
03. Cold Turkey (Lennon) 5.10
04. Ann Eliza Jane (Miller) 4.03
05. Falling In Love With You (Miller) 6.36
06. When Something Is Wrong With My Baby (Hayes/Porter) 5.17
07. Be Good To Yourself (Fraser) 3.02
08. Is This Love (Marley) 3.40
09. Ain’t Got No Money (Miller) 5.58
10. Down The Honky Tonk (Miller) 5.27
11. Let’s Spend The Night Together (Jagger/Richards) 3.34

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Dave Mason – California Jam II (1978)

FrontCover1One of the best performances from this memorable event was delivered by Dave Mason, who was then riding the crest of one of his most successful albums, Let It Flow which had been released the previous year and spawned no less than three charting singles, including “We Just Disagree,” his biggest hit to date. By this point in his career, Mason had established quite the pedigree, having been a founding member of Traffic, a traveling member of Delaney & Bonnie’s road band and having recorded and shared the stage with some of the most high profile Los Angeles musicians, including Mama Cass Elliot and Crosby, Stills and Nash, who all helped champion his music.

By 1978, when this performance was recorded, Mason had assembled a well-seasoned band that featured his longtime guitar playing partner, Jim Krueger on second guitar and one of the era’s most talented keyboard players, Mike Finnigan, who had played on countless sessions, including Jimi Hendrix’s classic Electric Ladyland album, on which Mason also contributed (Mason played the acoustic guitar on “All Along The Watchtower” and Finnigan played organ on “Rainy Day, Dream Away”). With the tight rhythm section of Gerald Johnson and Rick Jaeger on board, Mason’s band was a force to be reckoned with.

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Personnel:
Mike Finnigan (keyboards, vocals)
Rick Jaeger (drums)
Gerald Johnson (bass, vocals)
Jim Krueger (vocals, guitar, vocals)
Dave Mason (vocals, guitar)

Alternate front + backcover:

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction 0.55
02. Feelin’ Alright (Mason) 5.04
03. Pearly Queen (Winwood/Capaldi) 4.08
04. Let It Go, Let It Flow (Mason) 3.34
05. Look At You, Look At Me (Mason/Capaldi) 7.12
06. We Just Disagree (Krueger) 3.20
07. So High (Rock Me Baby And Roll Me Away) (Williams/Conrad) 5.09
08. Taking The Time To Find (Mason) 6.25
09. All Along The Watchtower (Dylan) 2.27
10. Gimme Some Lovin’ (S.Winwood/M.Winwood/Davis) 10.05
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11. California Jam II (1978) (complete show – uncut version) 49.45

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Jimi Hendrix – Rainbow Bridge (1971)

FrontCover1Rainbow Bridge is a compilation album by American rock musician Jimi Hendrix. It was the second posthumous album release by his official record company and is mostly composed of recordings Hendrix made in 1969 and 1970 after the breakup of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Despite the cover photo and subtitle Original Motion Picture Sound Track, it does not contain any songs recorded during his concert appearance for the 1971 film Rainbow Bridge.Rainbow Bridge is a compilation album by American rock musician Jimi Hendrix. It was the second posthumous album release by his official record company and is mostly composed of recordings Hendrix made in 1969 and 1970 after the breakup of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Despite the cover photo and subtitle Original Motion Picture Sound Track, it does not contain any songs recorded during his concert appearance for the 1971 film Rainbow Bridge.
Continuing in the vein of The Cry of Love, the first official posthumous Hendrix album, Rainbow Bridge explores new guitar styles and textures. All the songs, except for a solo studio version of “The Star Spangled Banner”, are written by Hendrix and mostly performed with Mitch Mitchell on drums and Billy Cox on bass.
The songs on Rainbow Bridge represent material in various stages of development and were never finalized or approved for release by Hendrix. Four of the songs on the album, along with the ten songs from The Cry of Love and three from War Heroes, were planned for Hendrix’s follow-up album to the live Band of Gypsys, released in March 1970. These songs were later included on Voodoo Soup in 1995 and First Rays of the New Rising Sun in 1997, which were attempts at completing the double album Hendrix was working on at the time of his death.

Despite the title, Rainbow Bridge was not a soundtrack to the film of the same name but rather a compilation of one live song and studio recordings from a number of sources between 1968 and 1970, including some for his planned but unfinished double album Hendrix01First Rays of the New Rising Sun. “Look Over Yonder” began as “Mr. Bad Luck” while Hendrix was performing in Greenwich Village, New York City, with his group Jimmy James and the Blue Flames in the summer of 1966. The version included on Rainbow Bridge was recorded by the Experience in 1968.[5] Two songs by the Band of Gypsys, “Room full of Mirrors” and “Earth Blues” date from 1969, although the latter has subsequent drum overdubs by Mitchell. “The Star Spangled Banner” is a 1969 solo studio recording by Hendrix. The remainder of the songs were recorded with the “Cry of Love” group (Mitchell and Cox) in 1970: “Dolly Dagger”, “Pali Gap”, and “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)”. “Hear My Train A Comin'” is a live recording from the first show on May 30, 1970, at the Berkeley Community Theatre. An edited version appears in the 1971 concert film Jimi Plays Berkeley.
The album was the second to be produced by Eddie Kramer and Mitch Mitchell, with John Jansen assisting. It was released in October 1971 in the US, and the following month in the UK where it reached numbers 15 and 16 respectively in the album charts. “Dolly Dagger” with “The Star Spangled Banner” as the B-side was released as a single in the US in October 1971. It appeared at number 74 in the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart. In 2014, the original Rainbow Bridge album was reissued in both CD and LP formats.
According to Setting The Record Straight by John McDermott with Eddie Kramer, Izabella and Stepping Stone were pulled from the track listing in the final stages and replaced with the live version of Hear My Train A Comin’ from Berkeley. Izabella and Stepping Stone were instead used the improve the next posthumous release War Heroes per Mike Jeffery. Bleeding Heart was also considered but ultimately used on War Heroes. In a contemporary review for Rolling Stone magazine, Tony Glover wrote favorably of the songs on side one, particularly the “really majestic version” of “The Star-Spangled Banner”. Robert Christgau said in a retrospective review that The Cry of Love (1971) had highlighted Hendrix’s abilities as a songwriter, but Rainbow Bridge showcased his guitar playing:
Rich stuff, exploring territory that as always with Hendrix consists not merely of notes but of undifferentiated sound, a sound he shapes with a virtuosity no one else has ever achieved on an electric instrument. (by wikipedia)

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Back when Rainbow Bridge was originally released, it was actually among the best of the posthumous Hendrix releases. Billed as “the original motion picture soundtrack” (it wasn’t, really), it was a mix of excellent, finished studio tracks and a couple of live tracks. Despite this, it’s understandable why it didn’t appeared in the digital realm until 2014 (officially, at least).

Once the estate went back to the Hendrix family in the ’90s, three of the tracks from Rainbow Bridge were used on the album First Rays of the New Rising Sun, which had previously only existed as Jimi’s hand-written track listing. The remaining tracks were orphaned out on various box sets and compilations. So while all the tracks on Rainbow Bridge have been made available elsewhere, it’s nice to finally have it assembled the way the original LP was, with excellent remastered sound (not just for the old-timers who had the LP the first time around, but for others who don’t necessarily want to shell out for the box set needed to gather these tracks). Highlights include overlooked gems like “Pali Gap” and Jimi’s rarely heard studio version of “The Star Spangled Banner,” which is made of multi-tracked guitars and basses. (by Sean Westergaard)

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Personnel:
Billy Cox (bass)
Jimi Hendrix (guitar, vocals) backing vocals
Mitch Mitchell (drums)
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Buddy Miles (drums on 04., background vocals on 02.)
Noel Redding (bass on 06.)
Juma Sultan (percussion on 01., 03. + 06.)
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background vocals:
The Ghetto Fighters (Albert Allen and Arthur Allen) on 01.
The Ronettes (Veronica Bennett, Estelle Bennett, Nedra Talley) on 02.

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Tracklist:
01. Dolly Dagger (Hendrix) 4:45
02. Earth Blues (Hendrix)  4:20
03. Pali Gap (Hendrix) 5:05
04. Room Full Of Mirrors (Hendrix) 3:17
05. Star Spangled Banner (studio version) (Smith)  4:07
06. Look Over Yonder (Hendrix) 3:28
07. Hear My Train A Comin’ (live) (Hendrix) 11:15
08. Hey Baby (New Rising Sun) (Hendrix) 6:05

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Recording details:
Tracks 1, 3 and 8:
recorded at Electric Lady Studios, New York City, July 1, 1970

Track 2:
recorded at Record Plant Studios, New York City, December 19, 1969 and Electric Lady Studios, July 1970

Track 4:
recorded at Record Plant Studios, November 17, 1969 and Electric Lady Studios, July 1970

Track 5;
recorded at Record Plant Studios, March 18, 1969

Track 6:
recorded at TTG Studios, Hollywood, October 22, 1968

Track 7:
recorded at Berkeley Community Theatre, Berkeley, California, May 30, 1970 (first show)

 

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Land & Synir – Herbergi 313 (1999)

FrontCover1This is the first time I can present a band … and what a band ! from Iceland …

The band Land og Synir was founded in 1997 in Hvolsvollur by few Southeners and two of them are still in the band, Hreimur Ö. Heimisson singer and Jón Guðfinnsson bassist.

The band had a hitter that summer with the song Vöðvastæltur which was extreamly popular. In the beginning of the year 1998 occured some personnel changes in Land & synir, Birgir Nielsen drummer and Gunnar Þ. Eggertsson, gitarist joined the band along with Dísellu Lárusdóttur wichc played trumpet and keyboard. But in April ´98 Dísella quit the band and Njáll Þórðarson took her place. (by dalurinn.is)

This is the second album of Land & Synir and it´s an album full of magic … a powerful, a peaceful album with a very unique sound … strong melodies and great vocals …

Iceland must be a great country !

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Personnel:
Gunnar Þ. Eggertsson (guitar)
Jón Guðfinnsson (bass)
Hreimur Ö. Heimisson (vocals)
Birgir Nielsen (drums)
Njáll Þórðarson (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Undraland (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.02
02. Allt Á Hreinu (Heimisson) 3.06
03. Freistingar (Heimisson) 3.50
04. Saga (Heimisson) 4.03
05. Örmagna (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.35
06. Lending 407 (Heimisson/Eggertsson/Guðfinnsson) 4.35
07. Eitthvað Nýtt (Heimisson/Guðfinnsson) 3.16
08. Hvað Er Að (Heimisson) 3.11
09. Stríð (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 3.36
10. Fordómar (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.49
11. Örmagna II (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.38

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Pete Haycock Band – Livin´ It (1992)

FrontCover1It´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock !!!

Peter John Haycock (4 March 1951 – 30 October 2013) was an English musician and film score composer. He began his career as lead guitarist, vocalist, and founding member of the Climax Blues Band.

Haycock was born in Stafford, and here he attended St. John’s Primary School and King Edward VI Boys Grammar School. As a child, he was impressed by the guitar solos of Hank Marvin of The Shadows. He played his first electric guitar at a miners club when he was 12. He then played guitar at school and college dances. Along with local boys, he formed a blues band, the Mason–Dixon Line.[3] In 1967, Haycock met Colin Cooper and joined his soul band The Gospel Truth.[2] In 1968, they founded a new band, the Climax Chicago Blues Band, and then they eventually changed its name to the Climax Blues Band, in 1970. The band’s original line-up consisted of Haycock (lead guitar, vocals), Cooper (harmonica, vocals), Derek Holt (guitar, vocals), Richard Jones (bass), Arthur Wood (keyboards), George Newsome (drums).

During the early 1970s, the Climax Blues Band went through a few personnel changes, before arriving at their most stable, creative, and successful line-up, which consisted of Haycock, Cooper, Holt (switched to bass guitar), and John Cuffley (drums). In 1976, the line-up with keyboardist Richard Jones wrote the band’s biggest hit “Couldn’t Get It Haycock02Right”. The song included the vocal harmonies of Haycock and Holt, behind Cooper’s lead. Haycock, an underrated vocalist, sang lead on several of the band’s tracks, particularly on the Sense of Direction (1974), Stamp Album (1975), Gold Plated (1976), Shine On (1978), and Flying The Flag (1980). albums. The band with the core line-up of Haycock, Cooper, Holt, and John Cuffley toured heavily in the 1970s and 1980s. During much of this period, Haycock played concerts with his rare trademark instrument, a gold-plated Veleno guitar, which was also on the cover of the album Gold Plated.

Holt and Cuffley left in 1983. Haycock and Cooper went their separate ways after their final Climax Blues Band album together, 1983’s Sample and Hold.

In May 2012, the Major League Productions Ltd record label released an until-then unknown vault recording of a 1976 live performance, featuring the Climax Blues Band at the top of their game: Climax Blues Band / World Tour 1976. Haycock provided some insightful liner notes for the CD’s insert, and the recording further demonstrates the tight musicianship that was found in the band’s line-up at that time.

In March 2015, a 4-CD retrospective was released entitled Live, Rare, and Raw 1973-1979, featuring the band at the height of their powers, in a variety of Live settings. This release would parallel the ferocity and acclaim of Climax Blues Band’s 1973 album, FM/Live. The band produced more than 15 successful albums in their heyday.

Though another group of musicians, which at one time was led by late former bandmate Colin Cooper, is currently calling themselves “Climax Blues Band”, their lineup does not consist of any founding members, and has not found the commercial success or following that the original, “true” Climax Blues Band enjoyed during Haycock’s years with the band. Cooper died in 2008.

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In 1984, the bandmembers went their separate ways, and Haycock went on to record several solo projects, the first of which was the album Total Climax (1986) recorded with his new band, Pete Haycock’s Climax. Pete Haycock’s Climax toured extensively in Europe, including Communist East Germany, as well as a well-received tour in Australia, also releasing The Soft Spot (1987). During this period, Haycock was asked by former Climax Blues Band manager, Miles Copeland, to record an instrumental album for I.R.S. No Speak, Guitar and Son, and Night of the Guitars, a live album from the tour of the same name.[9] After that tour, in 1989, Haycock teamed up with Holt and guitarist Steve Hunter to record an album under the name H Factor. The Pete Haycock Band consisted of the musicians from the Total Climax lineup, and went on to record a live album entitled Livin’ It in 1992. Copeland also signed Gary Numan to I.R.S. with whom Haycock collaborated with in the 1988 album Metal Rhythm.

Haycock was approached by Bev Bevan, formerly of Electric Light Orchestra, to join the newly formed Electric Light Orchestra Part II. The group toured and recorded with Haycock in the early 1990s, releasing both a live CD and video of their performance with the Moscow Symphony Orchestra. They recorded and toured together until 1993.

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In the early 1990s, Haycock was asked by Hans Zimmer to collaborate on film scores for K2 (1991), and Toys (1992). Other film scores they worked on were for Drop Zone (1994), and The Dilemma (2011), among others. Haycock’s slide guitar contributed to Thunderbird, the theme music for the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise.[2] Haycock was asked by Zimmer to re-create his performance, with a live symphony orchestra for the recording of Wings of a Film, which was a compilation album of Zimmer’s successful film scores.[citation needed]

Haycock began composing music of his own for film and television. Along with Holt, he composed music for the 1992 film One False Move. More scores would follow, and Haycock helped produce recordings for other artists.

Haycock05.jpgIn 2005, Haycock supplied all the music for the Hollister Independence Motorcycle Rally DVD charity project, for producer Jeff Byler, with proceeds benefiting Emmaus House, a shelter for battered women and children. When the DVD’s producer suggested a follow-up soundtrack to the project, Haycock went back into the studio to complete the album that became Bikers’ Dozen, which featured a vocal performance by John Fiddler (Medicine Head).

Haycock signed on as a major contributor to the LovePower and Peace[ charity CD project in 2009, which was spearheaded by fellow musician Robin George, and was built around George’s hit song, “LovePower and Peace”. Haycock contributed many trademark slide guitar tracks and donated studio time to the project, a charity effort to benefit children with cancer and other terminal diseases.

This collaboration, which included the donated talents of scores of veteran musicians,[14] also resulted in the forming a “super group” called The LovePower Band, which landed a major record deal and completed its first album, which was released in 2011.

After an absence from the stage and live performances, Haycock formed a new band, Pete Haycock’s True Blues (featuring Glen Turner). In 2008, they toured Europe and released their first recording together: Pete Haycock’s True Blues Live (featuring Glen Turner).[16][17] In April 2009, Haycock, in an interview talked about the early days with the Climax Blues Band, the transition to studio work (with and without Hans Zimmer), and his return to the stage with his new band, after an absence from live performances of fourteen years.

Haycock continued to record, and perform live, and had been a featured guest performer with the Siggi Schwarz’ band, and was on the same bill with ZZ Top and Johnny Winter in 2012.

Haycock012013 found Haycock coming full-circle with the formation of a super-group recording and scheduled for touring as Pete Haycock’s Climax Blues Band featuring Robin George, with Haycock being joined by a lineup of musicians including George, with whom he had collaborated on the LovePower Band, and other projects. Haycock envisioned this project as a return to the “true” Climax Blues Band, and he had just completed the new album, Broke Heart Blues, before his death.

Haycock built a recording studio in Frankfurt, Germany where he lived for several years until his death. He died of a heart attack on 30 October 2013 in Frankfurt. The news was posted on the group’s official website. He was 62. (by wikipedia)

And this is one of his rarest album, only released in Germany. It was recorded live at a samll club called “Die Neue Kulisse”, Pirmasens / Germany in June 1992 and when I wrote it´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock … you will undertand me … after listening thiis album.

Pete Haycock … one of the most underrated musician in the history of Rock & Blues !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Livingstone Brown (bass, keyboards, vocals on 5)
Pete Haycock (guitar, vocals)
Clive Mayuyu (drums)
Mike Stevens (saxophone, flute, keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Liberty (Haycock) 3.29
02. So Many Roads (Marshall) 11.11
03. Communication (Haycock) 6.47
04. Medley: 6.48
04.1. Come On In My Kitchen (Johnson)
04.2. Country Hat (Haycock)
05. The Thrill Is Gone /Hawkins/Darnell) 13.09
06. Lucienne (Haycock) 10.41
07. Dr. Brown, I Presume (Haycock) 6.00
08. Blackjack And Me (Haycock) 5.32

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REO Speedwagon – Hi Infidelity (1980)

FrontCover1Hi Infidelity is the ninth studio album by the band REO Speedwagon, it was released on November 21, 1980 (see 1980 in music). The album became a big hit in the United States peaking at number one on the Billboard 200. It went on to become the biggest selling rock albums of 1981, eventually being certified nine times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. From the singles released, the band got their first of two number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100, “Keep On Loving You”.Hi Infidelity is the ninth studio album by the band REO Speedwagon, it was released on November 21, 1980 (see 1980 in music). The album became a big hit in the United States peaking at number one on the Billboard 200. It went on to become the biggest selling rock albums of 1981, eventually being certified nine times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. From the singles released, the band got their first of two number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100, “Keep On Loving You”.

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The album title is a play on the term Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and the album art is an illustration of this pun where an act of sexual infidelity is occurring while the man is putting a record LP to play on the hi-fi stereo.

From the album six songs charted Billboard charts, including “Keep On Loving You” which was the band’s first Number 1 hit, and “Take It on the Run”, which reached No. 5 on the charts. The song “Tough Guys” uses an audio clip from the 1938 Our Gang episode “Hearts Are Thumps”.

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“Tough Guys” was one of two songs from the album that charted on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart despite not being released as singles. Music critic Robert Christgau called “Tough Guys” his favorite song from the album but suggested that the line “They think they’re full of fire/She thinks they’re full of shit” would prevent the song from reaching the pop Top 40.
In October 2004, the band recorded the songs of this album live from beginning to end for an XM Radio “Then Again Live” special. (by wikipedia)

Singles

Many albums have scaled to the top of the American charts, many of them not so good, but few have been as widely forgotten and spurned as REO Speedwagon’s Hi Infidelity. In a way, the group deserved this kind of success. They had been slogging it out in the arenas of the U.S., building up a sizeable audience because they could deliver live. And then, in 1980, they delivered a record that not just summarized their strengths, but captured everything that was good about arena rock. This is the sound of the stadiums in that netherworld between giants like Zeppelin and MTV’s slick, video-ready anthems. This is unabashedly mainstream rock, but there’s a real urgency to the songs and the performances that gives it a real emotional core, even if the production keeps it tied to the early, previsual ’80s. And so what if it does, because this is great arena rock, filled with hooks as expansive as Three Rivers Stadium and as catchy as the flu. That, of course, applies to the record’s two biggest hits — the power ballad “Keep on Loving You” and the surging “Take It on the Run” — which define their era, but what gives the album real staying power is that the rest of the record works equally well.

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That’s most apparent on the Bo Diddley-inspired opener, “Don’t Let Him Go,” whose insistent beat sent it to the album rock charts, but also such great album tracks as “Follow My Heart,” the sun-kissed ’60s homage “In Your Letter,” and “Tough Guys.” What’s really great about these songs is not just the sheen of professionalism that makes them addictive to listen to, but there’s a real strain of pathos that runs through these songs — the album’s title isn’t just a clever pun, but a description of the tortured romantic relationships that populate this record’s songs. This is really arena rock’s Blood on the Tracks, albeit by a group of guys instead of a singular vision, but that makes it more affecting, as well as a killer slice of ear candy. It’s easy to dismiss REO Speedwagon, since they weren’t hip at the time, and no amount of historical revisionism will make them cool kitsch. And, let’s face it, their records were usually hit-and-miss affairs. But they did get it right on. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Neal Doughty (keyboards)
Alan Gratzer (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Bruce Hall (bass, background vocals, vocals on 09.)
Kevin Cronin (vocals, guitar, piano)
Gary Richrath (guitar)
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Steve Forman (percussion)
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background vocals:
He-Man Broken Hearts Club Choir – Tom Kelly – Richard Page – N. Yolletta

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Let Him Go (Cronin) 3.46
02. Keep On Loving You (Cronin) 3.23
03. Follow My Heart (Kelly/Richrath) 3.51
04. In Your Letter (Richrath 3.18
05. Take It On The Run (Richrath) 3.01
06. Tough Guys (Cronin) 3.51
07. Out Of Season (Cronin/Kelly) 3:07
08. Shakin’ It Loose (Richrath) 2:27
09. Someone Tonight (Bruce/Hall) 2.41
10. I Wish You Were There (Cronin) 4.27

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Gary Dean Richrath (October 18, 1949 – September 13, 2015)

AC/DC – The Razors Edge (1990)

FrontCover1The Razors Edge is an album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was the band’s eleventh internationally released studio album and the twelfth to be released in Australia. It was a major comeback for the band, featuring the hits “Thunderstruck” and “Are You Ready”, which reached #5 and #16 respectively on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart, and “Moneytalks”, which peaked at #23 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album went multi-platinum (5 million copies sold) and reached the US top ten. The album reached #2 on the US Billboard 200 and #4 in the UK, a smash commercial success that returned the band to the popularity of its glory years of the late 1970s and early 1980s. The album has been certified 5x platinum (5 million copies sold) in the US, and was re-released in 2003 as part of the AC/DC Remasters series. The album was produced by Bruce Fairbairn.

The Razors Edge was recorded at Windmill Road Studios in Dublin, Ireland and Little Mountain Studios in Vancouver, BC, Canada, and was mixed and engineered by Mike Fraser and produced by Bruce Fairbairn, who had previously worked with Aerosmith and Bon Jovi. According to the book AC/DC: Maximum Rock & Roll, George Young was involved early on but had to bow out because of personal issues. Lead singer Brian Johnson was unavailable for several months while finalising his divorce, so the Young brothers wrote all the songs for the next album, a practice they continued for all subsequent releases (In a 1995 interview, Johnson told Guitar World that he was relieved at not having to deal with the pressure of writing the lyrics anymore).

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The instantly recognizable opening riff to “Thunderstruck” features Young alternating between fretted notes and playing the open string. In a 1993 interview with Guitar World’s Alan Di Perna, the guitarist recalls, “I was just fiddling with my left hand when I came up with that riff; I played it more by accident than anything. I thought, ‘not bad,’ and put it on a tape. That’s how me and Malcolm generally work. We put our ideas down on tape and play them for one another.” He expanded in greater detail in the liner notes of the 2003 re-release of The Razor’s Edge:

It started off from a little trick I had on guitar. I played it to Mal and he said ‘Oh, I’ve got a good rhythm idea that will sit well in the back.’ We built the song up from that. We fiddled about with it for a few months before everything fell into place. Lyrically, it was really just a case of finding a good title…We came up with this thunder thing and it seemed to have a good ring to it. AC/DC = Power. That’s the basic idea.”

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“Moneytalks” is also one of AC/DC’s biggest hits, breaking the top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100, the UK Singles Charts, and the Australian ARIA Singles Chart. It is still the band’s highest charting single in the United States, at number 23 (no other AC/DC single has even cracked the top 30). During their subsequent world tour, thousands of “Angus Bucks” were dropped on the audience during the song. A music video of the song, directed by David Mallet, was also released, featuring a live performance during the tour. Author Murray Engleheart states in his band memoir AC/DC: Maximum Rock & Roll: “On songs like ‘Mistress for Christmas’ and “Moneytalks,’ Malcolm and Angus showed their working-class roots, despite multi-millionaire selling albums, by taking aim at the high flyers in the business world.”

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In a February 1991 interview with Guitar World Angus Young stated, “I think the funniest song on this album is ‘Mistress For Christmas.’ That song’s about Donald Trump. He was big news at the time, so we thought we’d have a bit of fun and humor with it.” In the same interview, he declared that his best guitar solo on the LP was on the song “The Razors Edge,” which also features a rare foray into finger picking. Although AC/DC had always remained apolitical when it came to their music, the title track was a commentary of sorts, with Young explaining to Muchmusic in 1992:

“The Razors Edge” comes from an old saying farmers used to use in Britain where you’d have a fine sunny day, you know, a very good day with a hot sun, and then all of a sudden right in the distance you could see these black clouds coming over the horizon, an ominous thing…I thought it was a great title. The world was at peace again and everyone thought, “Ah, the Berlin Wall’s come down and it’s all gonna be fun and games, a party every night,” and you can see now that it’s not that way. It’s just our way of saying the world’s not perfect and never will be. (by wikipedia)

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Although AC/DC’s popularity had decreased by the early ’90s, the band still had a lot of life left in it. Arguably the Australian headbangers’ strongest album in over half a decade, The Razor’s Edge is quintessential AC/DC — rowdy, abrasive, unapologetically fun metal full of blistering power chords, memorable hooks, and testosterone-driven lyrics. Lead singer Brian Johnson sounds more inspired than he had since 1983’s Flick of the Switch, and lead guitarist Angus Young isn’t about to take any prisoners on such hard-hitting material as “Shot of Love,” the menacing title song, and the appropriately titled “Got You By the Balls.” Although not quite in a class with Back in Black, Highway to Hell, or Let There Be Rock — all of which would, for novices, serve as fine introductions to the distinctive band — The RazoYear Of Recording: 1990r’s Edge was a welcome addition to AC/DC’s catalog. (by Alex Henderson)

The 57th Annual GRAMMY Awards - Telecast

Personnel:
Brian Johnson (vocals)
Chris Slade (drums, percussion)
Cliff Williams (bass, background vocals)
Angus Young (lead guitar)
Malcolm Young (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Thunderstruck 4.52
02. Fire Your Guns 2.53
03. Moneytalks 3:48
04. The Razors Edge 4.22
05. Mistress For Christmas 3.59
06. Rock Your Heart Out 4.06
07. Are You Ready 4.10
08. Got You By The Balls 4:30
09. Shot Of Love 3.56
10. Let’s Make It 3.32
11. Goodbye & Good Riddance To Bad Luck 3.13
12. If You Dare 3.08

All songs written by Angus Young and Malcolm Young

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