The Pretty Things – Balboa Island (2007)

3227 - CD Covers AWBalboa Island, released in 2007, is the eleventh studio album by the English rock band The Pretty Things.

A problem with bands that have been on the scene for over 40 years (count ’em) is that they can sometimes still write songs with titles like “The Beat Goes On” and “Buried Alive,” as if those tropes hadn’t lost their edge several decades ago. On the other hand, when a band has played together for four decades its members have often learned one of rock & roll’s great lessons: how to create maximum groove with minimal ingredients. So when the Pretty Things lay down a song as thunderous as “Livin’ in My Skin,” they do so with the ponderous grace and inexorable momentum of an elephant walking to water. They’ve also been around long enough to have heard some of their source material at the source, which means that they can deliver an ancient Delta blues like “Feel Like Going Home” with a certain arch authority.

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(And if you want more cowbell, these guys can deliver that with authority as well — check out the raunchy period piece “Mimi.”) On the downside, they sometimes abuse their elder-statesmen status to impose eight minutes of two-chord vamp on their hapless listeners (“[Blues For] Robert Johnson”), and the title track, which closes the album, does so with much more of a whimper than a bang. Not bad at all, but unless you’re a die-hard fan you’ll want to be a little selective. (by Rick Anderson)

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Personnel:
Skip Alan (drums, percussion)
Frank Holland (guitar, vocals)
Phil May (vocals)
Jon Povey (keyboards, vocals)
Dick Taylor (guitar)
Wally Waller (bass, guitar, vocals)
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James Cheetham (keyboards)
Rupert Cobb (trumpet)
Mark St. John (drums, vocals)
Duncan Taylor-Jones (vocals on 11.)
Scarlett Wrench (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. The Beat Goes On (May/St. John) 4.14
02. Livin’ In My Skin (May/Holland) 3.57
03. Buried Alive (May/Holland) 3.36
04. (Blues For) Robert Johnson (May/Holland) 8.00
05. Mimi (Taylor) 2.35
06. Pretty Beat (May/Taylor/St. John) 2.52
07. The Ballad Of Hollis Brown (Dylan) 6.30
08. In The Beginning (May/Holland) 4.42
09. Feel Like Goin’ Home (Morgenfield) 2.39
10. Freedom Song (Traditional) 4.46
11. Dearly Beloved (May/Povey) 4.59
12. All Light Up (May/Holland/St. John) 4.30
13. Balboa Island (Holland) 4.42

 

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Rush – Same (1974)

FrontCover1Rush is the debut studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released on March 1, 1974 by the band’s own label Moon Records in Canada and by Mercury Records in the United States and internationally. Their first release shows much of the hard rock sound typical of many of the popular rock bands emerging earlier in the decade. Rush were fans of such bands as Led Zeppelin and Cream, and these influences can be heard in most of the songs on this album.Rush is the debut studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released on March 1, 1974 by the band’s own label Moon Records in Canada and by Mercury Records in the United States and internationally. Their first release shows much of the hard rock sound typical of many of the popular rock bands emerging earlier in the decade. Rush were fans of such bands as Led Zeppelin and Cream, and these influences can be heard in most of the songs on this album.
Original drummer John Rutsey performed all drum parts on the album, but was unable to go on extended tours because of complications with his diabetes and so he retired from the band after the album was released. Rutsey contributed to the album’s lyrics, but never submitted the work to the other members of the band. The lyrics were instead entirely composed by Lee and Lifeson. Rutsey was soon replaced by Neil Peart, who has remained the band’s drummer as well as their primary lyricist.

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Originally the recording sessions were produced by Dave Stock at Eastern Sound Studios in Toronto. They were scheduled late at night during the ‘dead’ time in studios because of the band’s low budget and the rates during this period were the cheapest. Stock had also worked on the band’s debut single (a cover of Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away”, with an original composition, “You Can’t Fight It”, on the B-side). “You Can’t Fight It” was to be included on the album but was scrapped. Two of the Eastern Sound recordings, “In the Mood” and “Take a Friend” were included on the final album.

However, Rush were unhappy with the quality of the first sessions. They moved to Toronto Sound Studios and produced the next sessions themselves while achieving a significant improvement in recording quality. They added new overdubs to existing backing tracks of “What You’re Doing”, “Before and After” and “Working Man”. The tracks with the most advanced production were recorded entirely at Toronto Sound: “Finding My Way”, “Need Some Love” and “Here Again”. These new songs took the place of recordings from the earlier sessions. Both studios used 8-channel multitrack recorders, which was quite primitive for 1973, but the group quickly learned to make the best use of the technology that was available.

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The band and its management formed their own company, Moon Records, and released the album in Canada. Only 3,500 copies of the original Moon Records LP (catalogue number MN-100) were pressed. The first version of the LP has a cream-coloured label with a blue Moon Records logo and black type.
The album was soon picked up by WMMS, a radio station in Cleveland, Ohio. Donna Halper, a DJ working at the station, selected “Working Man” for her regular play list. Every time the song was played the station received phone calls asking where to buy the record. Copies of the Moon Records album were imported to the Cleveland area and quickly sold out.

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In the 2010 documentary film Rush: Beyond the Lighted Stage, Halper says that “Working Man” was the perfect song for the Cleveland rock audience, as it was still mostly a factory town in 1974. WMMS later sponsored one of Rush’s first performances in the United States, on August 26, 1974 in Cleveland.
The record’s popularity in Cleveland quickly led to the re-release of the album by Mercury Records. The first Canadian Mercury release on the standard red Mercury label is nearly as rare as the Moon version. It also had the Moon number MN-100 between the run-out grooves, indicating that it was pressed from the same metal stampers as the Moon disc. “A special thank you to Donna Halper” was added to the album credits of this and all later versions.
At this point manager Ray Danniels scraped together an additional $9,000 for producer Terry Brown to professionally re-mix all of the recordings for better sound quality. This remix version was used for later releases most of which used the Mercury “skyline” record label instead of the red label. A later Moon Records version of undetermined origin has a pink label with grey moon craters.
The original album logo was red, but a printing error made it appear more pink in colour. This is one of two Rush albums where the cover artwork had printing errors (the other album is Caress of Steel). (by wikipedia)

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Rush’s self-titled debut is about as uncharacteristic of their renowned heavy progressive rock (perfected on such future releases as Hemispheres, Moving Pictures, etc.) as you can get. Instead of complex arrangements and thoughtful lyrics, Rush sounds almost identical to Led Zeppelin throughout — bluesy riffs merged with “baby, baby” lyrics. The main reason for the album’s different sound and direction is that their lyricist/drummer, Neil Peart, was not in the band yet, skinsman John Rutsey rounds out the original line-up, also consisting of Geddy Lee (bass/vocals) and Alex Lifeson (guitar). It’s nearly impossible to hear the anthemic “Finding My Way” and not picture Robert Plant shrieking away, or Jimmy Page riffing on the jamfest “Working Man,” but Rush was still in their formative stages. There’s no denying that Lee and Lifeson were already strong instrumentalists, but such predictable compositions as “In the Mood” and “What You’re Doing” prove that Peart was undoubtedly the missing piece to the puzzle. While longtime Rush fans can appreciate their debut because they never returned to this style, newcomers should stick with their classics from later years. (by Greg Prato)

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Personnel:
Geddy Lee (vocals, bass)
Alex Lifeson (guitar, background vocals)
John Rutsey (drums, percussion, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Finding My Way (Lee/Lifeson) 5.07
02. Need Some Love (Lee/Lifeson)  2:16
03. Take A Friend (Lee/Lifeson) 4:27
04. Here Again (Lee/Lifeson) 7:30
05. What You’re Doing (Lee/Lifeson) 4:19
06. In The Mood (Lee) 3:36
07. Before And After (Lee/Lifeson) 5:33
08. Working Man (Lee/Lifeson)  7:07

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Country Joe &The Fish – Electric Music For The Mind And Body (1967)

FrontCover1Electric Music for the Mind and Body is Country Joe and the Fish’s debut album. Released in May 1967 on the Vanguard label, it was one of the first psychedelic albums to come out of San Francisco.Electric Music for the Mind and Body is Country Joe and the Fish’s debut album. Released in May 1967 on the Vanguard label, it was one of the first psychedelic albums to come out of San Francisco.
Tracks from the LP, especially “Section 43”, “Grace”, and “Not So Sweet Martha Lorraine” were played on progressive FM rock stations like KSAN and KMPX in San Francisco, often back-to-back. A version of the song “Love” was performed at the 1969 Woodstock Festival.
“Grace” is a tribute to Jefferson Airplane’s lead singer, Grace Slick.

The album was recorded during the first week of February 1967 at Sierra Sound Laboratories, Berkeley, California, by Robert DeSouza, with production by Samuel Charters. It was released on May 11, 1967, on the Vanguard label.  (by wikipedia)

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Their full-length debut is their most joyous and cohesive statement and one of the most important and enduring documents of the psychedelic era, the band’s swirl of distorted guitar and organ at its most inventive. In contrast to Jefferson Airplane, who were at their best working within conventional song structures, and the Grateful Dead, who hadn’t quite yet figured out how to transpose their music to the recording studio, Country Joe & the Fish delivered a fully formed, uncompromising, and yet utterly accessible — in fact, often delightfully witty — body of psychedelic music the first time out. Ranging in mood from good-timey to downright apocalyptic, it embraced all of the facets of the band’s music, which were startling in their diversity: soaring guitar and keyboard excursions (“Flying High,” “Section 43,” “Bass Strings,” “The Masked Marauder”), the group’s folk roots (“Sad and Lonely Times”), McDonald’s personal ode to Grace Slick (“Grace”), and their in-your-face politics (“Superbird”). Hardly any band since the Beatles had ever come up with such a perfect and perfectly bold introduction to who and what they were, and the results — given the prodigious talents and wide-ranging orientation of this group — might’ve scared off most major record labels. Additionally, this is one of the best-performed records of its period, most of it so bracing and exciting that one gets some of the intensity of a live performance. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Bruce Barthol (bass, harmonica)
David Cohen (guitar, organ)
Gary “Chicken” Hirsh (drums)
Country Joe McDonald (vocals, guitar, bells, tambourine)
Barry Melton (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Flying High (McDonald) 2.37
02. Not So Sweet Martha Lorraine (McDonald) 4.20
03. Death Sound Blues (McDonald) 4.22
04. Porpoise Mouth (McDonald) 2.47
05. Section 43 (McDonald) 7.22
06. Super Bird (McDonald) 2.02
07. Sad And Lonely Times (McDonald) 2.22
08. Love (McDonald/Melton/Cohen/Barthol/Gunning/Hirsh) 2.19
09. Bass Strings (McDonald) 4.58
10. The Masked Marauder (McDonald) 3.08
11. Grace (McDonald) 7.02

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Chicken Shack – Unlucky Boy (1973)

LPFrontCover1Unlucky Boy is the sixth studio album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1973

Originally released in 1973, but reissued with two extra  in 1994, Chicken Shack’s Unlucky Boy finds guitarist/vocalist/songwriter and band founder Stan Webb in fine form. Only drummer Paul Hancox remains from the uneven Imagination Lady, and indeed the horn-oriented approach here is much different than the plodding Led Zeppelin-isms of the previous disc. Webb contributes six originals, and even though they are derivative of Savoy Brown (a band he joined for the Boogie Brothers album just a year later), his approach here is much more subtle and controlled than on his last effort.

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Very rare factory sample discs

Chris Mercer’s saxes, often double tracked to sound like a horn section, bring a tough R&B to the mix, and drummer Hancox is a controlled powerhouse. Webb also reigns in his impulse to overextend guitar solos so prevalent on Imagination Lady, whipping off tight, controlled leads instead.

Articel1973_02Producer Neil Slaven contributes honest, witty, and often self-deprecating liner notes that help explain why two of these songs suffer from poor mixes (basically, he had consumed various substances and couldn’t salvage the songs after the fact). Strings on “As Time Goes Passing By,” (also included in a shorter single version) are a nice touch and bring a bit of class to the proceedings while maintaining the R&B slant of the disc. Two unedited studio jams make the cut as “Stan the Man” and the seven-minute “Jammin’ with the Ash,” both featuring pianist Tony Ashton, who really lets loose on the latter.

Things get stripped down for an unusually delicate version of Lonnie Johnson’s “Too Late to Cry” with just strummed guitar and bass. The opening trio of Webb-penned tunes shows some of his best songwriting with the instrumental “Prudence’s Party” a terrific capsule of Webb’s stinging, gritty guitar style. The album sounds dated but harkens back to a particular time in British blues that is charming in its anything goes attitude. That helps make this one of Stan Webb’s more consistent and successful offerings. (by Hal Horowitz)

This is the Masterpiece of Rock and on e of the best Blues-Rock
Album of All Time. Stan Webb, British Halfgod on Guitar in exciting form. (by Dani Rocksaurier)

This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less:

Ah, the wonderful Chicken Shack re-mastered, good news for blues freaks (such as myself)  … Here´s Chicken Shack with their charismatic frontman and lead guitarist Stan Webb. Webb was famous for his live performance, running down the aisles (before the wireless) with a mega long guitar wire, going banana while playing electrifying guitar soli!

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This of course do not apply to the studio albums, which actually didn’t get nowhere near their live performances! This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less, good clean blues tracks! Get their first album or a live session, If you want the Shack on fire!!  (by Tonny Larsen)

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Personnel:
Bob Daisley (bass)
Paul Hancox (drums, percussion)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)
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Tony Ashton (piano)
Chris Mercer (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. You Know You Could Be Right (Webb) 3.47
02. Revelation”(Webb) 5.13
03. Prudence’s Party (Webb) 3.13
04. Too Late To Cry (Johnson) 3.09
05. Stan The Man (Webb) 4.25
06. Unlucky Boy (Thornton/Dupree) 2.34
07. As Time Goes Passing By (Webb) 4.46
08. Jammin’ With Ash” (Webb) 7.04
09. He Knows The Rules (McCracklin) 4.05
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10. As Times Goes Passing By (single version) (Webb) 3.32
11. Doctor Brown (Brown) 3.05

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Bob Daisley & Stan Webb

Handwritten track list

A handwritten track list
and letter from Decca stating this was the first test pressing.

Back Street Crawler – Second Street (1976)

LPFrontCover12nd Street is a 1976 album by Back Street Crawler and was released on the Atco Records label. It was released after Paul Kossoff’s death in March 1976, ans is dedicated to him. The album is regarded as a considerable advance on their 1975 debut The Band Plays On, but Kossoff’s involvement in it is limited to lead guitar lines over the completed tracks. (by wikipedia)

This is simply one of the great-underrated rock albums of the 1970’s and the last album to feature Paul Kossoff on guitar. He actually died before the album was released due to a heroin addiction. It almost seems as if Koss knew this was to be his last effort and his playing is of an unusually melancholic and lilting quality on tracks like, “Blue Soul”, “Some Kind Of Happy” and particularly the end portion of “Leaves in the Wind.”

Blending beautifully with Koss’ guitar is the keyboard work of John ‘Rabbit’ Bundrick. He has a haunting and equally reflective style that embraces aspects of melancholy and longing. His unique style brought a similar layer of sophistication to Free’s final album “Heartbreaker.” In more recent years, he has been the regular touring keyboard player with The Who.

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Paul Kossoff + Terry Wilson-Slesser, 1975

Of equal importance are the powerful, soulful and curiously unaffected vocals of Terry Wilson Slesser. His voice is just perfect for these well-crafted songs that vary between the funky “Stop Doing What Your Doing”, the acoustic driven “Raging River” and the pleading “Some Kind Of Happy.” The latter song also features some nice blending of his voice with some impassioned female back-up singers. His voice never falls into any overwrought bellowing or bluster and always provides what the song needs without drawing special attention to his voice. A perfect example of this is on the song “Just for you” which many other singers of the era would have delivered in an overdone bluesy growl. Here Slesser sings like a man truly pining for a woman he has recently lost. No bravado just a wish unfulfilled.

Two real highlights are the last two songs, “On Your Life” and “Leaves in the Wind.” “On Your Life” is a perfect example of this band working as one with no showboating. The keyboards blend perfectly with the vocals, and the drumming of Tony Braunagel is tight but never intrusive. It’s a sad remembrance captured in song. “Leaves In The Wind” starts out as a nice funky groove with some tasty bass from Terry Wilson (like this band in general, an underrated bass player) before moving into its reflective second half where, appropriately, Paul Kossoff shows off his lilting guitar playing in all its glory.

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This is simply one of the great-underrated rock albums of the 1970’s and the last album to feature Paul Kossoff on guitar. He actually died before the album was released due to a heroin addiction. It almost seems as if Koss knew this was to be his last effort and his playing is of an unusually melancholic and lilting quality on tracks like, “Blue Soul”, “Some Kind Of Happy” and particularly the end portion of “Leaves in the Wind.”

Blending beautifully with Koss’ guitar is the keyboard work of John ‘Rabbit’ Bundrick. He has a haunting and equally reflective style that embraces aspects of melancholy and longing. His unique style brought a similar layer of sophistication to Free’s final album “Heartbreaker.” In more recent years, he has been the regular touring keyboard player with The Who.

Of equal importance are the powerful, soulful and curiously unaffected vocals of Terry Wilson Slesser. His voice is just perfect for these well-crafted songs that vary between the fune use…Leaves in the wind” with Kossoff’s sad guitar weeping along it’s true magic and a perfectly fitting end to a very brief life, of not only Paul Kossoff, but a band with great promise. Of course, the band would carry on under the shortened moniker Crawler, with a new guitarist, but the rare magic captured here was never quite matched again. The only negative about this album is that it is too short! (source: unknown)

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Personnel:
Tony Braunagel (drums, vocals)
John “Rabbit” Bundrick (keyboards, vocals)
Paul Kossoff (guitar)
Terry Wilson (bass, guitar)
Terry Wilson Slesser (vocals)
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Snuffy Walden (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Selfish Lover (Bundrick) 3.24
02. Blue Soul (Wilson) 3.43
03. Stop Doing What You’re Doing (Braunagel/Bundrick/Kossoff/Wilson/Wilson-Slesser) 3.25
04. Raging River (Wilson) 3.10
05. Some Kind Of Happy (Wilson) 4.55
06. Sweet Beauty (Wilson) 3.13
07. Just For You John (Bundrick/Rutherford) 6.21
08. On Your Life (Bundrick) 3.57
09. Leaves In The Wind (Bundrick/Rutherford) 5.08

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Rainbow – On Stage (1977)

OriginalFrontCover1Captured from various performances on the 1976 Rainbow world tour, ‘Rainbow On Stage’ showcases the power and improvisation displayed by Rainbow’s Mk.II line up. Not content with merely replicating the original recorded work, Blackmore would extend many numbers into lengthy guitar showcases lasting up to 20 minutes on some occasions.

The album was mixed and edited by Martin Birch, once again given sole duties at the production helm. The overall sound is impressive for a live show, although it later transpired that several performances had been edited together to create better versions of some songs. This was fairly standard practice for live albums, however, as it was unlikely that a single show would ever be good enough as a stand alone performance to be released as an album (e.g. Deep Purple’s ‘Made In Japan’ was compiled from three separate shows). Other well known sections of the Rainbow live set were cut altogether, such as Cozy Powell’s ‘1812 Overture’ drum solo and recent tracks off the ‘Rainbow Rising’ LP, namely ‘Do You Close Your Eyes’ and ‘Stargazer’. Some of these decisions were made in order to get the tracks to fit on a double LP, some because the performances weren’t quite good enough; ‘Stargazer’ was a tough one to replicate live without the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra filling out the sound as on the ‘Rising’ album…! The running order was also chopped around to fit across 4 sides of vinyl, and again, many purists felt disappointed at the final representation of a Rainbow gig.

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Taking that aside, the sound and individual performance of each song in its own right, is exemplary of the energy and quality of 1976 Rainbow at its peak.

‘Kill The King’ explodes as an opening track as the strains of the famous ‘Wizard Of Oz’ soundtrack introduction fade away. This song had been specifically written to open live shows and would not be committed to vinyl as an album track until 1978. Then a storming version of ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’, with much more power and vigour than the original studio cut, segueing into a familiar ‘Blues’ that Blackmore had introduced into Deep Purple Mk. III live shows 2 years earlier, a brief snippet of ‘Starstruck’ follows, which doesn’t quite seem to hit the mark or demonstrate the prowess displayed on ‘Rainbow Rising’, leading back into the closing finale of side 1 with Dio proclaiming “You’re all…the men…” and the closing ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’ riffs.

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Side 2 opens in a restrained manner with Blackmore displaying his classical prowess and performing a reasonable section of Bach’s ‘Das Wohltemperierte Klavier’ to introduce ‘Catch The Rainbow’. A storming vocal performance from Dio and sublime phased guitar from Blackmore with a lengthy solo to extend the track to a single side of vinyl.

The iconic Deep Purple ‘Mistreated’ number opens side 3 with a dynamic, echo-laden introduction. Dio seems to add an extra dimension to the vocal and again, Blackmore extends this into a personal showcase. Impressive.

Finally, onto side 4, and two more re-energised classics from the debut Rainbow album. Blackmore deftly intro’s with the original ‘Greensleeves’ tune before launching into a much more powerful and pacy version of ‘Sixteenth Century Greensleeves’. ‘Still I’m Sad’ is likewise, and with the stunning vocals from Dio again, one wonders why the now seemingly rather tame instrumental version was ever considered for the original album. An awesome display, but this track does seem disjointed where the drum solo has been edited out.

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According to the excellent book ‘Rainbow Rising’ by Roy Davies, his lengthy research has worked out where the tracks were used from each show:

Kill The King – opening first minute or so from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976) and the rest of the song from Munich (29th September 1976)

Man On The Silver Mountain section – from the afternoon and evening shows in Tokyo (16th December 1976)

Catch The Rainbow – mostly unedited from Hiroshima show (14th December 1976)

Mistreated – edited version from Cologne (25th September 1976)

Sixteenth Century Greensleeves – unedited version from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976)

Still I’m Sad – edited version from Munich (29th September 1976)

Blackmore had become frustrated at the lack of improvisational ability of Tony Carey during the tour, claiming he just played the same stuff over and over again, so Carey would become the next casualty of the Rainbow personnel changes, along with Jimmy Bain who Blackmore stated “couldn’t handle the complicated stuff…” (ritchieblackmoresrainbow.wordpress.com)

In other words: One of the finest hard & heavy live albums all time !

Recorded: September – December 1976, Germany, Tokyo

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Personnel:
Jimmy Bain (bass)
Ritchie Blackmore (guitar)
Tony Carey (keyboards)
Ronnie James Dio (vocals)
Cozy Powell (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro: Over The Rainbow (Arlen/Harburg)/Kill The King (Blackmore/Dio/Powell) 5.32
02. Man On The Silver Mountain (Blackmore/Dio)/Blues (Blackmore)/Starstruck (Blackmore/Dio) 11.13
03. Catch The Rainbow (Blackmore/Dio) 15.36
04. Mistreated (Blackmore/Coverdale) 13.03
05. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves (Traditional/Blackmore/Dio)
06. Still I’m Sad (McCarthy/Smith) 11.01

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Alquin – Best Kept Secret (1976)

FrontCover1This is the last Alquin studio album from the Seventies … and even it´s not so best Alquin  album … it´s a damn good album …

This fourth album is the logical follower of Nobody but that also means that it out of the scope of this site as this is rather poor in Prog contents : I would diagnose less than 5% which means that you will never overdose of it but will likely get bored before reaching the fatal level. Don’t get me wrong , this is correct FM rock along the lines of Foreigner (actually, they spring to mind quite often when I hear Alquin) . Even the longer tracks divided into subsection are relatively uninteresting for the proghead. Another comparison would be their great fellow Dutchmen Golden Earring (not any proggier but one hell of more adventure and inspiration , though). In another site , i might have given this a third star. (by Sean Trane)

And I can´ agree with this review … this is another pretty good album by Alquin … one of the best dutch groups from the Seventies …

Listen and enjoy … to songs like “L.A. Rendez-Vous”, “Fool In The Mirror” or “One More Night” and you´ll know what I mean …

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Personnel:
Ferdinand Bakker (guitar, violin, background vocals)
Michel van Dijk (vocals)
Dick Franssen (keyboards)
Ron Ottenhof  (saxophone, flute)
Job Tarenskeen (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Jan Visser (bass, background vocals, percussion)
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horns on 01.:
Buddy Beadle – Geoff Wright – Martin Droner – Steve Gregory
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The Deadcenter Boys (on 05.)

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Tracklist:
01. Fool In The Mirror:
01.1. Sham Fight (Bakker/v. Dijk)
01.2. Stars End (Franssen/Visser/Ottenhoff) 3.01
02. Central Station Hustle (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk) 5.58
03. L.A. Rendez-Vous (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 4.39
04. High Rockin’ (Bakker/Ottenhoff) 5.29
05. One More Night:
05.1. Bootleg Ballet (Franssen/Visser/Ottenhoff)
05.2. Laserlights (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk)
05.3. Back At The Losing End (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk) 9.02
06 Amy (Bakker/v. Dijk) 4.21
07. Take Any Road (Bakker/v. Dijk) 5.50

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More Alquin albums:

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