Al Kooper – You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (1969)

FrontCover1You Never Know Who Your Friends Are is the second solo album by American multi-instrumentalist Al Kooper, issued in 1969 on Columbia Records.

Kooper wasted no time recording this album, coming just seven months after his debut release. It is a continuation of sorts of his debut; the album contains another eclectic mix of rock, rhythm and blues, jazz, pop, and blues, though without the psychedelics that had somewhat permeated through I Stand Alone. Utilizing a large group of musicians under the direction of Charlie Calello, known collectively as “The Al Kooper Big Band”, Kooper also strayed away from the heavy string orchestrations of his debut.

Relying on more original compositions, with nine of twelve tracks by Kooper, and the remaining three by Harry Nilsson and Motown Records staff songwriters, the album further helped to cement Kooper’s reputation. The album reached #125 on the Billboard 200 on October 25, 1969, and was on the charts for six weeks. (by wikipedia)

AlKooper02Al Kooper’s second solo album is a bit more uneven than its predecessor, I Stand Alone, for understandable reasons — it would have been nothing less than a miracle for Kooper to have matched the consistency and daring of that album, and he doesn’t have quite the same array of memorable tunes here. He’s still ranging freely, however, through pop, jazz, R&B, and soul, with some songs that are among the most glorious of his output. “Magic in My Sock” is a good enough opener, making up in its virtuoso horn parts and guitar for what it lacks in melodic invention; “Lucille” is hardly the best ballad that Kooper has ever written, but it forms a good bridge to “Too Busy Thinkin’ About My Baby,” a Motown cover that’s one of the highlights of Kooper’s entire output — from a black singer this track would be a priceless gem, but coming from Kooper it’s extraordinary in its every nuance. You get some blues instrumental (principally piano-based) and an abortive but entertaining effort at pop/rock with the title tune, and then Kooper plunges into arty balladry with the hauntingly beautiful “The Great American Marriage/Nothing.” He goes back into Motown territory, just as successful as before, on “I Don’t Know Why I Love You,” and back to moody art-song with Harry Nilsson’s “Mourning Glory Story.” Kooper returns to the soulful side of rock on “Anna Lee (What Can I Do for You)” and finishes with “I’m Never Gonna Let You Down” — the latter would be worth the price of the album by itself, a soaring, more lyrical and moody original classic that manages to be unpretentious yet epic in its treatment. by Bruce Eder)

AlKooper01

Personnel:
Ralph Casale (guitar)
Eric Gale (guitar)
Paul Griffin (keyboards)
Ernie Hayes (keyboards)
Jerry Jemmott (bass)
Al Kooper (keyboards, guitar, ondioline, vocals)
John Miller (bass)
Frank Owens (keyboards)
“Pretty” Purdie (drums)
Chuck Rainey (bass)
Al Rodgers (drums)
Stu Scharf (guitar)
Walter Sears (synthesizer)
+
trumpet:
Bernie Glow – Ernie Royal – Marvin Stamm

trombone:
Ray Desio – Jimmy Knepper – Bill Watrous – Tony Studd

saxophone:
George Young – Sol Schlinger – Seldon Powell – Joe Farrell

background vocals:
Hilda Harris – Connie Zimet – Albertine Harris – Lois Winter – Mike Gately – Lou Christie – Robert John – Charlie Calello

BackCover
Tracklist:
01. Magic In My Socks (Kooper) 3,57
02. Lucille )Kooper) 3.29
03. Too Busy Thinkin’ ’bout My Baby (Whitfield/Bradford) 3.24
04. First Time Around (Kooper) 2.52
05. Loretta (Union Turnpike Eulogy) (Kooper) 3.51
06. Blues, Part IV (Blues) 5.08
07. You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (Kooper) 2.56
08. The Great American Marriage / Nothing (Kooper) 4.51
09. I Don’t Know Why I Love You (Hardaway/Hunter/Riser/Wonder) 3.25
10. Mourning Glory Story (Nilsson) 2.19
11. Anna Lee (What Can I Do for You) (Kooper) 3.20
12. I’m Never Gonna Let You Down (Kooper) 4.38

LabelB1

*
**

Advertisements

The Kinks – Paranoia & Destroyer (1988)

TheKinksFrontCover1Jim Rodford, a founding member of Argent and bassist for the Kinks and the Zombies, died last Saturday at the age of 76.

Rodford’s cousin and longtime band mate Rod Argent confirmed Rodford’s death on the Zombies’ Facebook page, with Argent adding that Rodford died Saturday following “a fall on the stairs.”

“Jim was not only a magnificent bass player, but also from the first inextricably bound to the story of The Zombies. An enormous enabler for us,” Argent wrote in his long tribute to Rodford. “To the end, Jim’s life was dedicated to music. He was unfailingly committed to local music – an ever present member of the local scene in St.Albans, where he had spent his whole life.”

The Kinks, who recruited Rodford following bassist John Dalton’s permanent exit from the band in 1978, also paid tribute to Rodford on Twitter. “It is with deep sadness that we have learned that Jim Rodford passed away – he toured and recorded with the Kinks for many years and will be greatly missed. He was much loved by all of us,” the band wrote.

Jim Rodford02

Rodford spent 18 years as the Kinks’ bassist, performing on every album from 1979’s Low Budget to 1993’s Phobia, the band’s final LP before their breakup three years later.

As Argent wrote in his tribute to his cousin, Rodford was the first musician Argent attempted to add to his then-fledgling Zombies, but the bassist ultimately turned down the job since he was already a member of the popular British band the Bluetones. However, Rodford was instrumental in the development of the Zombies, lending the group the Bluetones’ equipment, orchestrating the Zombies’ early shows and “passing judgment” on their breakout 1964 single “She’s Not There,” penned by Argent.

Rodford also served as bassist in the Mike Cotton Sound before the Zombies’ initial breakup in 1967; two years later, Argent would finally unite with his cousin to co-found Argent alongside drummer Bob Henrit and singer/guitarist Russ Ballard. Rodford would appear on all seven Argent albums – including the band’s best-known song “Hold Your Head Up” – before that band dissolved in 1976.

Jim Rodford03.jpg

Two years later, Rodford embarked on his nearly two-decade-long tenure with the Kinks. Dave Davies tweeted of Rodford Saturday, “I’m devastated Jim’s sudden loss I’m too broken up to put words together it’s such a shock I always thought Jim would live forever in true rock and roll fashion – strange – great friend great musician great man – he was an integral part of the Kinks later years.”

Rodford also played bass in the Kast Off Kinks, a group made up of Kinks expats like Mick Avory and Ian Gibbons, beginning in the late 2000s.

Over 40 years after he was first asked, Rodford finally joined the Zombies when Argent and singer Colin Blunstone revived the band in 2004; Rodford and his son, drummer Steve Rodford, remained members of the Zombies’ touring unit until the bassist’s death. Rodford also appeared on the group’s 2015 comeback LP Still Got That Hunger.

Argent continued in his tribute to Rodford, “Jim was a wonderful person, loved by everybody. When Colin [Blunstone] and I, shocked and hardly able to talk, shared the news this morning, Colin said ‘I’ve never heard anyone say a bad word about him…’ He will be unbelievably missed. Goodnight and God Bless dear friend.” (by Rolling Stone)

And here´s a rare and brilliant Kinks Radio Show (recorded for the legendary Westwood One label) …

Jim Rodford04

Recorded live At The Fox Theatre, St. Louis, Missouri, 14 April 1988
(Excellent FM broadcast)

AlternateFront+BackCover

Alternate front+back cover

Personnel:
Dave Davies (guitar, vocals)
Ray Davies (vocals, guitar)
Ian Gibbons (keyboards)
BobHenrit (drums)
Jim Rodford (bass, vocals)

Jim Rodford05

Tracklist:
01. Destroyer 5.26
02. Low Budget 5.46
03. Apeman 5.12
04. Sleepwalker 2.48
05. Art Lover 7.50
06. Come Dancing 4.06
07. Sleepwalker  4.04
08. Welcome To Sleezy Town 7.56
09. Think Visual 3.33
10. Living On A Thin Line 4.27
11. A Well Respected Man 1.58
12. It (She Wants It) 9.23
13. Guilty 4.40
13. All Day And All Of The Night
14. You Really Got Me 3.56
15. Celluloid Heroes 5.46
16. Lola 9.35

All songs written by Ray Davies, except “Living On A Thin Line” and “Guilty” which was written by Dave Davies
Jim Rodford06

And here´s the best live version of “All Day And All Of The Night” (featuring Jim Rodford):

 

*
**

Jim Rodford07

James Walter Rodford (7 July 1941 – 20 January 2018)

Rod Stewart – Unplugged … And Seated (1993)

FrontCover1Unplugged…and Seated is a live album released by British musician Rod Stewart on 24 May 1993. It is Stewart’s second live album and his first (and only) appearance on MTV Unplugged. The album was released by Warner Bros. Records (WEA 9362-45289-1/2). The unplugged versions of “Have I Told You Lately” by Van Morrison, “Reason to Believe”, “Having a Party”, and “People Get Ready” were released as singles, with “Have I Told You Lately” and “Having a Party” reaching success as singles. A special collector’s edition was released in March 2009 on Rhino Records. This two-disc package included the DVD of the MTV performance with 13 songs while the CD contained 17 tracks including two songs (“Gasoline Alley” and “Forever Young”) not on the original 1993 release.

The album was recorded on 5 February 1993 at Universal Studios, Los Angeles as part of MTV’s Unplugged series. The event aired on television on 5 May of the same year. Unplugged finds Stewart reunited, for the first time in nearly twenty years, with Ronnie Wood, a fellow Faces band member. Stewart performs some of the classics from his repertoire such as “Tonight’s the Night” and “Maggie May”, but also adds some new material such as “Having a Party” and “Highgate Shuffle”. The album title comes from a joke Stewart made during the taping about “Stay With Me” being difficult to perform while sitting down. Six songs were taped but not included on the subsequent album release, though “It’s All Over Now” was included as the B-side to the single for “Reason to Believe”. (by wikpedia)

Booklet02A

Eric Clapton’s Unplugged turned the MTV series into a pop culture phenomenon, one that was especially appealing to veteran rockers because all they had to do was dust off their old hits and give them a nice, relaxed reading — the perfect re-imagining for middle-aged rock stars. Rod Stewart leaped at the opportunity and, in many ways, he seemed even better suited for the gig than Clapton as much of his ’70s prime prominently featured acoustic guitars, including “Maggie May” and “Every Picture Tells a Story.” Stewart upped the ante by reuniting with his old friend and Faces bandmate Ron Wood, giving Unplugged…and Seated the appearance of an event…an appearance that was entirely intentional. That Unplugged…and Seated falls well short of actually being an event is a disappointment but also inevitable. Where Clapton’s Unplugged was a natural phenomenon, a blockbuster delivered with no preconceived notions, Unplugged…and Seated is designed as a hits revue, playing upon nostalgia while delivering mellow sounds for middle age.

Rod Steward01.jpg

This is no bad thing, necessarily, particularly when the song selection is so strong — all the big hits from that early-’70s golden age, plus Rod’s recent cover of Van Morrison’s “Have I Told You Lately,” Tom Waits’ “Tom Traubert’s Blues,” and a reworked version of the folk standard “Highgate Shuffle” thrown in for good measure — and the chemistry between Stewart and Wood is still so cheerful. Occasionally, this frivolity is a wee bit forced but that’s not quite as big of a problem as the punchy, professional production; these are ultimately nothing more than mild signs of road wear on a record that’s a nice night out with the boys, nothing more, nothing less. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

And for me this album is a very sentimental trip … from “Tonight´s The Night” (Spread your wings and let me come inside) to “The First Cut Is The Deepest” … many songs from this album was very important songs … I guess … they told the story of my life …

Rod Stewart … what a a voice !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Jim Cregan (guitar)
Jeff Golub (guitar)
Charles Kentiss III (keyboards)
Phil Parlapiano (accordion, mandolin)
Carmine Rojas (bass)
Kevin Savigar (keyboards, accordion)
Rod Stewart (vocals, banjo)
Don Teschner (guitar, mandolin, violin)
Ronnie Wood (guitar)
+
background vocals:
Dorian Holley – Darryl Phinnessee – Fred White
+
string section conducted by Jeremy Lubbock:
Marilyn Baker – Haim Shtrum – Mari Tsumura – Jay Rosen – Kwihee Shamban – Miran Kojian- Brian Leonard – Jean Hugo – Joel Derouin – Bruce Dukov – Joseph Meyer – Ronald Clark – Joan Elardo – David Shostac – Norman Ludwin – Drew Dembowski – David Shamban – Suzie Katayama – James Ross – Larry Corbett.

Booklet01A

Tracklist;
01. Hot Legs (Rod Stewart/Grainger) 4.25
02. Tonight’s The Night (Stewart) 4.04
03. Handbags And Gladrags (d’Abo) 4.25
04. Cut Across Shorty (Walker/Wilkin) 4.58
05. Every Picture Tells A Story (Stewart/Wood) 4.45
06. Maggie May (Stewart/Quittenton) 5.45
07. Reason To Believe (Hardin) 4.07
08. People Get Ready (Mayfield) 4.59
09. Have I Told You Lately (Morrison) 4.08
10. Tom Traubert’s Blues (Waltzing Matilda) (Waits) 4.40
11. The First Cut Is The Deepest (Stevens) 4.12
12. Mandolin Wind (Stewart) 5.23
13. Highgate Shuffle (Traditional)) 4.04
14. Stay With Me (Stewart/Wood) 5.27
15. Having A Party (Cooke) 4.44

CD1

*
**

Booklet03A

 

Ron Wood & Rod Stewart

Jethro Tull – Aqualung (1971)

LPFrontCover1Aqualung is the fourth studio album by the rock band Jethro Tull. Released in 1971, Aqualung, despite the band’s disagreement, is regarded as a concept album featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”. The album’s “dour musings on faith and religion” have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Aqualung’s success signalled a turning point in the band’s career, who went on to become a major radio and touring act.Aqualung is the fourth studio album by the rock band Jethro Tull. Released in 1971, Aqualung, despite the band’s disagreement, is regarded as a concept album featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”. The album’s “dour musings on faith and religion” have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Aqualung’s success signalled a turning point in the band’s career, who went on to become a major radio and touring act.
Recorded at Island Records’ studio in London, it was their first album with John Evan as a full-time member, their first with new bassist Jeffrey Hammond, and last album featuring Clive Bunker on drums. Something of a departure from the band’s previous work, the album features more acoustic material than previous releases; and—inspired by photographs of homeless people on the Thames Embankment taken by singer Ian Anderson’s wife Jennie—contains a number of recurring themes, addressing religion along with Anderson’s own personal experiences.

IslandLabels
Aqualung has sold more than seven million units worldwide according to Anderson, and is thus Jethro Tull’s best selling album. The album was generally well-received critically, and has been included on several music magazine “best of” lists. The album spawned two singles, “Hymn 43” and “Locomotive Breath”.

After an American tour in 1970, bass player Glenn Cornick was fired from the band,[4] and was replaced with Jeffrey Hammond, an old friend of Ian Anderson’s. Aqualung would be the first recording Hammond would do with the band. It would also mark the first time John Evan had recorded a full album with the band, as his only prior involvement was to provide several keyboard parts on the previous 1970 album, Benefit.

CoverIllustration1

The album was one of the first to be recorded at the newly opened studios of Island Records in Basing Street, London. Led Zeppelin were recording their untitled fourth album at the same time. In an interview on the 25th anniversary edition of the album, Tull’s bandleader Ian Anderson said that trying to record in that studio was very difficult, because of its “horrible, cold, echoey” feel. There were two recording studios at the location; Led Zeppelin worked in the smaller studio while Tull got the larger, which was the main body of a converted church. The orchestrals were arranged by David Palmer, who had worked with the band since 1968’s This Was, and would later join as a keyboard player. Aqualung would be the last Jethro Tull album to include Clive Bunker as a band member, as he retired shortly after recording to start a family.

CoverIllustration2.jpg

The songs on the album encompass a variety of musical genres, with elements of folk, blues, psychedelia, and hard rock.[8] The “riff-heavy” nature of tracks such as “Locomotive Breath”, “Hymn 43” and “Wind Up” is regarded as a factor in the band’s increased success after the release of the album, with Jethro Tull becoming “a major arena act” and a “fixture on FM radio” according to AllMusic.[2][9] In a stylistic departure from Jethro Tull’s earlier albums, many of Aqualung’s songs are acoustic. “Cheap Day Return”, “Wond’ring Aloud” and “Slipstream” are short, completely acoustic “bridges”, and “Mother Goose” is also mostly acoustic. Anderson claims his main inspirations for writing the album were Roy Harper and Bert Jansch.
Aqualung has widely been regarded as a concept album, featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”. The album’s “dour musings on faith and religion” have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Academic discussions of the nature of concept albums have frequently listed Aqualung amongst their number.

In The Beginning
The initial idea for the album was sparked by some photographs that Anderson’s wife Jennie took of homeless people on the Thames Embankment. The appearance of one man in particular caught the interest of the couple, who together wrote the title song “Aqualung”. The first side of the LP, titled Aqualung, contains several character sketches, including the eponymous character of the title track, and the schoolgirl prostitute Cross-Eyed Mary, as well as two autobiographical tracks, including “Cheap Day Return”, written by Anderson after a visit to his critically ill father.

JethroTull01
The second side, titled My God, contains three tracks—”My God,” “Hymn 43” and “Wind-Up”—that address religion in an introspective, and sometimes irreverent, manner. However, despite the names given to the album’s two sides and their related subject matter, Anderson has consistently maintained that Aqualung is not a “concept album”. A 2005 interview included on Aqualung Live gives Anderson’s thoughts on the matter:

I always said at the time that this is not a concept album; this is just an album of varied songs of varied instrumentation and intensity in which three or four are the kind of keynote pieces for the album but it doesn’t make it a concept album. In my mind when it came to writing the next album, Thick as a Brick, was done very much in the sense of: ‘Whuh, if they thought Aqualung was a concept album, Oh! Okay, we’ll show you a concept album.’ And it was done as a kind of spoof, a send-up, of the concept album genre. … But Aqualung itself, in my mind was never a concept album. Just a bunch of songs.

Singles
Drummer Clive Bunker believes that the record’s perception as a concept album is a case of “Chinese whispers”, explaining “you play the record to a couple of Americans, tell them that there’s a lyrical theme loosely linking a few songs, and then notice the figure of the Aqualung character on the cover, and suddenly the word is out that Jethro Tull have done a concept album”.
The thematic elements Jethro Tull explored on the album—those of the effects of urbanisation on nature, and of the effects of social constructs such as religion on society—would be developed further on most of the band’s subsequent releases. Ian Anderson’s frustration over the album’s labelling as a concept album directly led to the creation of Thick as a Brick (1972), intended to be a deliberately “over the top” concept album in response.

JethroTull02

“Lick Your Fingers Clean” was recorded for Aqualung, but was not included on the album. The song was drastically re-worked as “Two Fingers” for Tull’s 1974 album, War Child. “Lick Your Fingers Clean” was eventually released in 1988 on the 20 Years of Jethro Tull collection. It was then released as a bonus track on the 1996 and 2011 reissues of Aqualung.

Another song, “Wond’ring Again” was recorded in early sessions in 1970 and considered for release on the album before Anderson decided to drop it from the final track listing. It was subsequently released on the compilation album, Living in the Past, in 1972. However, elements of the song—essentially its coda—were included on Aqualung as “Wond’ring Aloud”. Glenn Cornick played bass on the song and says it is his favourite song he recorded with the band.[6] Cornick also played bass on early studio recordings of “My God” and “a couple of other songs”, though he did not say which they were.

JethroTull03

The album’s original cover art by Burton Silverman features a watercolour portrait of a long-haired, bearded man in shabby clothes. The idea for the cover came from a photograph Anderson’s wife took of a homeless man on Thames Embankment, and Anderson later felt it would have been better to have used the photograph rather than commission the painting. Ian Anderson recalls posing for a photograph for the painting, though Silverman claims it was a self-portrait. The artwork was commissioned and purchased by Chrysalis Records head Terry Ellis. Artist Silverman claims the art was only licensed for use as an album cover, and not for merchandising; and approached the band seeking remuneration for its further use. Silverman and Anderson have different accounts of level of enmity involved in this. The original artwork for both the front and back covers are now privately owned by an unknown family, apparently having been stolen from a London hotel room.
In April 1971, Aqualung peaked at number four on the UK Album Chart; when the CD version was released in 1996, it reached number 52. It peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Music Charts’ North American pop albums chart; the single “Hymn 43” hit No. 91 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The album would go on to sell over seven million copies, and is the band’s best-selling album. Aqualung was one of only two Jethro Tull albums released in quadraphonic sound, the other being War Child (1974). The quadraphonic version of “Wind Up”, which is in a slightly higher key, is included on the later CD reissue of the album as “Wind Up (quad version)”.

Inlets

The single “Hymn 43” was released on 14 August 1971, and reached number 91 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, spending two weeks in the chart. The song was the first single released by the band in the United States. It was later included in the video game Rock Band 2 as downloadable content; which also featured the album’s title track.
The album was re-released in a 40th anniversary edition on 31 October 2011. The release contains a new stereo and 5.1 surround remix of the album by British musician and producer Steven Wilson, and comes in two different editions—a “collector’s edition” containing the album on LP and two CDs, as well as DVD and Blu-ray discs and a hardback book; and a “special edition” containing the two CDs and an abridged version of the book.

Justifying the remix, Steven Wilson said: “Jethro Tull’s Aqualung is … a masterpiece, but was sonically a very poor-sounding record. So, some didn’t rate it as highly as they should have. What we did with Aqualung was really make that record gleam in a way it never gleamed before. I think a lot of people, including myself, have come around to thinking that the album is a lot better than they even gave it credit for previously. So, there is certainly something very gratifying about being able to polish what was already a diamond and making it shine in a way it never has before”. Additionally, according to mastering engineer Steve Hoffman there were tape stretching problems with the original session mixdown master, implying that many editions of the album used multigeneration copies as their source.

JethroTull04

Aqualung received mixed to favourable reviews from contemporary music critics. Rolling Stone magazine’s Ben Gerson lauded its “fine musicianship”, calling it “serious and intelligent”, although he felt that the album’s seriousness “undermined” its quality. Sounds said that its “taste and variety” made it the band’s “finest” work. Aqualung was voted the 22nd best album of 1971 in The Village Voice’s annual Pazz & Jop critics’ poll.[34] Robert Christgau, the poll’s creator, was more critical of the album in a 1981 review, and described Anderson’s undeveloped cultural interests and negative views on religion and human behaviour as both boring and pretentious.
In retrospective reviews the album is generally lauded and viewed as a classic. AllMusic’s Bruce Eder called Aqualung “a bold statement” and “extremely profound”. In a review of the album’s 40th anniversary re-release, Sean Murphy of PopMatters said that Aqualung “is, to be certain, a cornerstone of the then-nascent prog-rock canon, but it did—and does—exist wholly on its own terms as a great rock album, period”. Murphy also praised the additional material featured on the release, finding that the new content was “where a great album gets even better”.

JethroTull05

Steve Harris, the bass player for the heavy metal band Iron Maiden, has called Aqualung “a classic album”, lauding its “fantastic playing, fantastic songs, attitude [and] vibe”. Iron Maiden would go on to cover “Cross-Eyed Mary” as the B-side of their 1983 single “The Trooper”.
Aqualung has also been appraised highly in retrospective listings, compiled by music writers and magazines (see Accolades). Even Martin Barre’s solo on the album’s title track was included in Guitarist magazine’s list of “The 20 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time” at number 20. (by wikipedia)

Without any doubt … Aqualung ist one of the most important albums of the early 70´s.

And … in my first band, called “Dying Sun” we played a wild version of “Locomotive Breath”, but, to be honest — the original version was much better *smile*

LPBackCover

Personnel:
Ian Anderson (vocals, guitar, flute)
Martin Barre (guitar, recorder)
Clive Bunker (drums, percussion)
John Evan (keyboards)
Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond (bass, recorder, background vocals on 04.)
Clive Bunker (drums, percussion)

Inlay1

Tracklist:
01. Aqualung (I.Anderson/J.Anderson) 6.37
02. Cross-Eyed Mary (I.Anderson) 4.10
03. Cheap Day Return (I.Anderson) 1.23
04. Mother Goose (I.Anderson) 3.53
05. Wond’ring Aloud (I.Anderson) 1.56
06. Up To Me (I.Anderson) 3.15
07. My God (I.Anderson) 7.13
08. Hymn 43 (I.Anderson) 3.19
09. Slipstream (I.Anderson) 1.13
10. Locomotive Breath (I.Anderson) 4.27
11. Wind-Up” (I.Anderson) 6.08
+
12. Lick Your Fingers Clean (I.Anderson) 2.46
13. Wind Up (Quad Version) (I.Anderson) 5.24
14. Excerpts from the Ian Anderson Interview (Mojo Magazine) 13.59
15. Song For Jeffrey (BBC) (I.Anderson) 2.51
16. Fat Man (BBC) (I.Anderson) 2.57
17. Bouree (BBC) (Bach) 3.58

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988)

FrontCover1In the 80´s & 90´s I was a real serious audience tape collector and I had contact with many other maniac collectors of rare audience tapes.

So here´s one of these tapes, recorded live with two very fine musicians:

Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg:

Peter Edward “Ginger” Baker (born 19 August 1939) is an English drummer, best known as the founder of the rock band Cream. His work in the 1960s earned him praise as “rock’s first superstar drummer,” although his individual style melded a jazz background with his interest in African rhythms. Baker is credited as a pioneer of drumming in genres like jazz fusion, heavy metal and world music.

Baker began playing drums at age 15 around 1954, and later took lessons from Phil Seamen. In the 1960s, he joined Blues Incorporated, where he met bassist Jack Bruce. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in the Graham Bond Organisation and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with Eric Clapton in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but only lasted until 1968, in part due to Baker’s and Bruce’s volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in Blind Faith and leading Ginger Baker’s Air Force, Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with Fela Kuti, in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music.[3] Among Baker’s other collaborations are his work with Gary Moore, Masters of Reality, Public Image Ltd, Atomic Rooster, Bill Laswell, jazz bassist Charlie Haden, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and another personally led effort, Ginger Baker’s Energy.

GingerBaker1980.jpg

Baker’s drumming attracted attention for his style, showmanship, and use of two bass drums instead of the conventional one. In his early days, he performed lengthy drum solos, most notably in the Cream song “Toad”, one of the earliest recorded examples in rock music. Baker is an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Cream, of the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 2008, and of the Classic Drummer Hall of Fame in 2016 (by wikipedia)

Jonas Hellborg (born 7 June 1958) is a Swedish bass guitarist. He has collaborated with John McLaughlin, Ustad Sultan Khan, Fazal Qureshi, Bill Laswell, Shawn Lane, Jens Johansson, Anders Johansson, Ginger Baker, Michael Shrieve, V. Selvaganesh, Jeff Sipe, Mattias IA Eklundh, Public Image Ltd, and Buckethead. (by wikipedia)

BakerHellborg01.jpg

And here´s not only a very rare audience tape from a concert in 1988, but a real superb audience recording from this concert.

Let´s talk about the freedom of music … and you´ll hear the magic of jamming … including two Hendrix compositions …

Enjoy the music

Recorded live at Neuried, June 27, 1988

BakerHellborg02

Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums)
Jonas Hellborg (bass)
André Louis (keyboards, vocals)

MCCover2.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Intro Jam (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.46
02. Who Knows (Hendrix) 9.47
03. Instrumental (1) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis)
04. Little Wing (Hendrix) 21.58
05. Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Clapton) +  Instrumental (2) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.28
+
06. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 1) 38.42
07. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 2)

MC1A
*
**

MCCover1

Eric Clapton – 24 Nights (1991)

ECFrontCover124 Nights is the fifth live album by Eric Clapton, recorded at the Royal Albert Hall in London, England, in 1990 and 1991. It was released on 8 October 1991.

The album is a “best of” from the 42 concerts Eric Clapton did at the Royal Albert Hall in those two years. Clapton set a record by playing a run of 24 nights at the London Royal Albert Hall between 5 February and 9 March 1991, following an 18-night run in 1990. Clapton reportedly was not satisfied with the 1990 concert recordings and delayed the release of a CD until after the “24 Nights” of the 1991 dates. These concerts were performed with 4 different instrumental formations, 4-piece, blues, 9-piece and orchestra nights, the last featuring the National Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Michael Kamen. The cover illustration is by Peter Blake.

The 4-piece recordings “Running on Faith”, “White Room” and “Sunshine of Your Love” included on the CD and DVD were recorded on 24 January 1990. The band consisted of Clapton with bassist Nathan East, drummer Steve Ferrone and keyboardist Greg Phillinganes. The Blues Band titles “Worried Life Blues”, “Watch Yourself” and “Have You Ever Loved a Woman” Clapton recorded with Buddy Guy and Robert Cray were shot and recorded on 5 February 1990. The last of the 1990 live recording session took place on 9 February 1990 recording the Orchestra Night. “Bell Bottom Blues”, “Hard Times” and “Edge of Darkness” were used on both the CD and video recording.

Labels

On 10 February 1991, Clapton recorded “Badge” for the CD release. Eight days later the concert for “Pretending”, “Bad Love”, “Old Love” and “Wonderful Tonight” featuring the 9-piece band lineup took place. “No Alibis”, “I Shot The Sheriff” and “Cocaine” had been released on various CD singles of “Wonderful Tonight” since. The versions of “Old Love”, “Wonderful Tonight” and “Pretending” (2nd solo only) on the “24 Nights” video are different from their album counterparts, but they were not taken from the previous night’s show. They may even have been taken the year before. The song “Hoodoo Man” featuring Jimmie Vaughan was recorded on 28 February 1991. (by wikipedia)

ClaptonLive

Eric Clapton, who had not released a live album since 1980, had several good reasons to release one in the early ’90s. For one thing, his spare backup band of keyboardist Greg Phillinganes, bassist Nathan East, and drummer Steve Ferrone was his best live unit ever, and its powerful live versions of Cream classics like “White Room” and “Sunshine of Your Love” deserved to be documented. For another, since 1987 Clapton had been playing an annual series of concerts at the Royal Albert Hall in London, putting together various special shows (blues nights, orchestral nights, etc.). 24 Nights, a double album, was culled from two years of such shows, 1990 and 1991, and it demonstrated the breadth of Clapton’s work, from his hot regular band to assemblages of bluesmen like Buddy Guy and Robert Cray to examples of his soundtrack work with an orchestra led by Michael Kamen.

EricClapton1990

The result was an album that came across as a lavishly constructed retrospective and a testament to Clapton’s musical stature. But it made little impact upon release (though it quickly went gold), perhaps because events overcame it — three months later, Clapton’s elegy for his baby son, “Tears in Heaven,” was all over the radio, and a few months after that he was redefining himself on MTV Unplugged — a live show as austere as 24 Nights was grand. Still, it would be hard to find a more thorough demonstration of Clapton’s abilities than the one presented here. (by William Ruhlmann)

EricClapton1990_02

Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar, vocals)
Nathan East (bass, vocals)
Steve Ferrone (drums)
Greg Phillinganes (keyboards, background vocals)
+
Alan Clark (keyboards on 14.)
Ray Cooper (percussion on 09. – 15.)
Richard Cousins (bass on 05. – 07.
Robert Cray (guitar on 05 – 07.
Buddy Guy (guitar, on 05. – 07
Johnnie Johnson (piano on 05. – 08.
Chuck Leavell (keyboards on 08. – 15.)
Jamie Oldaker (drums on 05. – 08.
Phil Palmer (guitar on 09. – 15.)
Jerry Portnoy (harmonica on 08.)
Ed Shearmur (keyboards on 14. + 15.)
Joey Spampinato (bass on 08.)
Jimmie Vaughan (guitar on 08.)
+
background vocals (on 09. – 15.)
Katie Kissoon – Tessa Niles
+
The National Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Micheal Kamen (on 14. + 15.)

Booklet05A

Tracklist:
01. Badge (Clapton/Harrison) 6.51
02. Running On Faith (Williams) 6-49
03. White Room (Bruce/Brown) 6.10
04. Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Brown/Clapton) 9.07
05. Watch Yourself (Guy) 5.39
06. Have You Ever Loved A Woman (Myles) 6.52
07. Worried Life Blues (Merriweather) 5.28
08. Hoodoo Man (Wells) 5.40
09. Pretending (Williams) 7.08
10. Bad Love (Clapton/Jones) 6.25
11. Old Love (Clapton/Dray) 13.01
12. Wonderful Tonight (Clapton) 9.07
13. Bell Bottom Blues (Clapton) 6.38
14. Hard Times (Charles) 3.45
15. Edge Of Darkness (Clapton/Kamen) 6.29
CD1A
*
**

Ticket

The Cranberries – Everybody Else Is Doing It So Why Can’t We (The Complete Sessions) (1993)

OriginalFRontCover1Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? is the debut studio album by the Irish rock band The Cranberries. Released on 1 March 1993, it was their first full-length album after having released four EPs, and is also their first major label release. The album was written entirely by the band’s lead singer Dolores O’Riordan and guitarist Noel Hogan. It reached number one in the UK and the Irish Albums Chart. At the end of 1995, it ranked as the 50th best selling album in Australia. It reached number 18 on the US Billboard 200 albums chart and sold over five million copies there.

Re-release The album was re-released in 2002, under the title Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? (The Complete Sessions 1991–1993). This version of the album featured bonus tracks as well as B-sides from the singles lifted off the album.(by wikipedia)

Booklet02A

Title aside, what the Cranberries were doing wasn’t that common at the time, at least in mainstream pop terms; grunge and G-funk had done their respective big splashes via Nirvana and Dr. Dre when Everybody came out first in the U.K. and then in America some months later. Lead guitarist Noel Hogan is in many ways the true center of the band at this point, co-writing all but three songs with O’Riordan and showing an amazing economy in his playing, and having longtime Smiths/Morrissey producer Stephen Street behind the boards meant that the right blend of projection and delicacy still held sway. One can tell he likes Johnny Marr and his ability to do the job just right: check out the quick strums and blasts on “Pretty” or the concluding part of the lovely “Waltzing Back.” O’Riordan herself offers up a number of romantic ponderings and considerations lyrically (as well as playing perfectly fine acoustic guitar), and her undisputed vocal ability suits the material perfectly.

OriginalBackCover.jpg

The two best cuts were the deserved smashes: “Dreams,” a brisk, charging number combining low-key tension and full-on rock, and the melancholic, string-swept break-up song “Linger.” If Everybody is in the end a derivative pleasure — and O’Riordan’s vocal acrobatics would never again be so relatively calm in comparison — a pleasure it remains nonetheless, the work of a young band creating a fine little synthesis. (by Ned Raggett)

Ticket

Personnel:
Mike Hogan (bass)
Noel Hogan (guitar, background vocals)
Fergal Lawler (drums, percussion)
Dolores O’Riordan (vocals, guitar)
+
Mike Mahoney (additional vocals)

Tray1

Tracklist:
01. I Still Do (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3:16
02. Dreams O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 4:32
03. “Sunday O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3:30
04. “Pretty (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 2:16
05. “Waltzing Back (O’Riordan) 3:38
06. “Not Sorry O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 4:20
07. Linger (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 4:34
08. “Wanted O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 2:07
09. “Still Can’t … O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3:38
10. “I Will Always (O’Riordan) 2:42
11. How (O’Riordan) 2:51
12. “Put Me Down (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3:33
+
13. Reason (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 2.02
14. Them (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3.42
15. “What You Were (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3:41
16. “Liar (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 2:22
17. “Pretty” (Prêt-à-Porter Movie Remix) (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 3.41
18. “How” (Radical Mix) (O’Riordan/N.Hogan) 2,58

“Liar” was featured in the 1995 film Empire Records and  “Linger” was featured in the 2006 film Click.

Original'CD
*
**

Dolores O'Riordan01Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan (6 September 1971 – 15 January 2018)