The Candymen – Bring You Candy Power (1968)

frontcover1Bring You Candy Power is the second and last album by the American Sunshine-Pop Band The Candymen.

The Candymen started as a Rockabilly influenced Pop Band in the Mid-60′s on the American State of Alabama, as The Webs. They were heavily inspired by figures like Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley, but also by the Pop Sound that had came with the new Generation, which ended up creating a very appealing sound to the Locals, leading to them being picked up by Local Producers to make a couple recordings and enabling them to live off their act. When Roy Orbison was looking for a Band to back him on his American Concerts, he chose The Webs to do it, leading to the name change to The Candymen. It was the worst moment in Orbison’s career, and although his Albums and Concerts were getting a lot of attention in Europe, his American gigs went unnoticed, and so did The Candymen, never getting a huge amount of attention from anyone (they had a reputation as a very good live Band it seems). ABC Records picked them up and recorded two LP’s with them (The Candymen and Bring You Candy Power), which never achieved any kind of success. Eventually, by the end of the 60′s, they merged into what was to become the Atlanta Rhythm Section. (by 60-70rock.blogspot)

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The Candymen with Roy Orbinson

The Candymen were really journeymen: several were formerly with Roy Orbison’s backing band, the Candy Men, and broke away to do their own thing. They got one minor national hit out of it: “Georgia Pines” got to #81(a bigger hit in their native south than anywhere else), but little else. Their debut Lp got to #195. Their only other album, THE CANDYMEN BRING YOU CANDYPOWER(ABC ABC/ABCS-633)didn’t chart at all. Why? Possibly because a good single(“Sentimental Lady”/”Ways”)didn’t take off, and the cover art suggested a psych band, while their name suggested the nascent bubblegum genre. Too bad, because it’s a pretty good Lp(“Sentimental Lady” is not to be confused with Bob Welch’s Fleetwood Mac/solo song, also very good).

This one’s a bit dated by “The Great Society” and a pity-me-I’m-headed-to-the-chair death song, “Goodbye Mama,” but otherwise has its moments, including Rodney Justo wailing on “Crowded Room”(which almost sounds like a tune-up for Three Dog Night), and a cover of Dylan’s “Memphis Blues Again.”

Three of the group would go on to help form the Atlanta Rhythm Section, which signed to Decca(it would take years for them to make it, and they’d go to Polydor to get there). The early ARS isn’t much unlike the Candymen sound, and a bit of southern cool followed these guys wherever they went. Solid musicians and decent songwriters, but at the time, America wasn’t interested. (by Ed Bishop)

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Personnel:
John Rainey Adkins (guitar)
Dean Daughtry (keyboards)
Billy Gilmore (bass)
Rodney Justo (vocals)
Bob Nix (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Ways (Buie/Adkins) 2.25
02. Great Society (Buie/Cobb) 2.23
03. Sentimental Lady (Buie/Cobb) 3.10
04. Crowded Moon (Buie/Cobb) 2.04
05. Candyman (Clark) 2.00
06. Blues At Midnight (Hunter) 3.16
07. The Memphis Blues Again (Dylan) 2.26
08. I’ve Lost My Mind (Gilmore/Buie/Adkins) 2.27
09. Goodbye Mama (Buie/Cobb) 2.56
10. Bottled Up (Buie/Adkins) 2.30
11. I’ll Never Forget (Gilmore/Buie/Nix) 2.02

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Steve Miller Band – Live (1983) (VHS rip)

frontcover1Steve Miller Band Live! is a 1983 live album by the Steve Miller Band. Recorded live at the Pine Knob Amphitheater, Clarkston, MI on September 25, 1982.

In 1982, just at the time of the release of »Abracadabra«, the Steve Miller Band played two shows at the Amphitheater in Detroit. Some tracks of the show of September 25th were then released in 1983 as »Steve Miller Live« with worlwide phenomenal success. It is still one of the best selling live albums ever, with worldwide chart entries.
Released in 1983 Steve Miller Band: Live! is culled from a concert, or several concerts, that SMB gave on the supporting tour for Abracadabra. They run through all the big hits — the most obscure this gets is “Mercury Blues,” from their most popular album, Fly Like an Eagle — in performances that pretty much stick to the record. There’s not much here that’s different and, accordingly, there are zero revelations, but this is pleasant and enjoyable. There’s no real reason to get the record, since it isn’t even infused with much live energy, but once it’s playing, it’s easy to get sucked into the greatest-hits set list. (By the way, the town where SMB performed is not listed in the liners, but the crowd does give a hearty cheer for “Detroit City” in “Rock ‘n Me,” so maybe that’s where it was cut.) (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

I can´t agree with Stephen Thomas Erlewine … this is a fucking good concert by The Steve Miller Band and the music is till today just fantastic !

This is a VHS rip from my collection of old VHS tapes.

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Personnel:
Byron Allred (keyboards)
Norton Buffalo (harmonica)
Gerald Johnson (bass)
Kenny Lee Lewis (guitar)
Gary Mallaber (drums, percussion, keyboards)
John Massaro (guitar)
Steve Miller (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Macho City (intro) (Miller)
02. Gangster Of Love (Watson)
03. Rock ‘N Me (Miller)
04. Living in the U.S.A.(Miller)
05. Fly Like An Eagle (Miller)
06. Jungle Love (Douglass/Turner)
07. The Joker (Curtis/Ertegun/Miller)
08. Mercury Blues (Douglas/Geddins)
09. Take The Money And Run (Miller)
10. Abracadabra (Miller)
11. Jet Airliner (Miller/Pena)
12. Buffalo´s Serenade (Miller/Buffalo)

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Jan Akkerman – Tabernakel (1973)

frontcover1This album — which, despite being third in most discographies, was actually Jan Akkerman’s first official solo album — must have been a real shocker to a lot of Focus. Rather than working from the flashy, electric guitar side of the group’s sound, Akkerman chose to expand on the lute sound that he’d explored on Focus III’s “Elspeth of Nottingham.” Tabernakel represented Akkerman at his most formalistic, playing almost entirely in a classical idiom on lute and acoustic and electric guitars (with one brief side trip to the bass). The repertory is drawn largely from 16th century Tudor England, including compositions by John Dowland and Antony Holborne, rearranged by Akkerman and harpsichord virtuoso and scholar George Flynn. He gives one major concession to progressive rock in the form of the fuzz-laden reinterpretation of “House of the King,” which misses the flute part from the Focus original but is still worth hearing as a guitar showcase. Tabernakel is otherwise the real article as far as its classicism — the 14-minute-long “Lammy” comes close to being pretentious without quite crossing the line, and all of the album is a fascinating solo departure for the guitarist. What makes this album doubly intriguing is that apart from Flynn, Akkerman’s accompanists come entirely from the rock world: Tim Bogert, Carmine Appice, and veteran R&B drummer Ray Lucas, none of whom seems to skip a beat in their work here. Recorded at Atlantic Records’ studios in New York and released in 1974, when Focus was still near the peak of its fame, Tabernakel sold reasonably well at the time, but had been unavailable from the late ’70s until 2002, when Wounded Bird Records reissued it in a good-sounding CD edition. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Jan Akkerman (guitar, lute, bass, harpsichord, piano, glockenspiel, percussion)
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Robert Alexander (trombone on 01. +08.)
Carmine Appice (drums on 04. + 10.)
Harold Bennett (flute on 01., 04. + 08.)
Lawrence Bennett (tenor vocals on 10.)
Eugene Bianco (harp on 08.)
Albert Block (flute on 08.)
Philip Bodner (oboe on 08.)
Tim Bogert (bass on 04. + 10.)
Raymond Crisara (trumpet on 01.)
Richard Davis (bass on 08. + 10.)
George Flynn (harpsichord on 08. + 10., glockenspiel on 08., piano on 08.)
Dominick Gravine (trombone on 01. + 08.)
Stephen M. Johns (tuba on 08.)
Elliot Levine (bass vocals on 10.)
Ray Lucas (drums on 01. + 10.)
Walter Kane (bassoon on 08.)
Josephine Mongiardo (soprano vocals on 10.)
Alan Rubin (trumpet on 08.)
Charles Russo (clarinet on 10.)
Russell Savakus (bass on 01. + 04.)
Daniel Waitzman (flute on 10.)
Joseph Wilder (trumpet on 01.)
William Zukof (countertenor vocals on 10.)
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cello:
Charles McCracken – George Koutzen – George Ricci – Gloria Lanzarone – Jesse Levy – Kermit Moore – Lucien Schmit
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viola:
Alfred Brown – David Sackson – Emanuel Vardi – Richard Maximoff – Selwart Clarke –  Seymour Berman
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violin:
Arnold Eidus – Carmen Malignaggi – David Kunstler – Elliot Rosoff – Frederick Buldrini – Gene Orloff – Guy Lumia – Harold Kohon – Harry Cykman – Joseph Malignaggi – Kathryn Kienke – Lewis Eley – Norman Carr – Raoul Poliakin
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french horn:
Earl Chapin – James Buffington – Ray Alonge – Tony Miranda
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George Flynn (conducter)
Gene Orloff (concertmaster)

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Tracklist:
01. Britannia (Dowland) 3.58
02. Coranto For Mrs. Murcott (Pilkington) 1,30
03. The Earl Of Derby, His Galliard (Dowland) 2.00
04. House Of The King (Akkerman) 2.25
05. A Galliard (Holborne) 2.13
06. A Galliard (Dowland) 1.35
07. A Pavan (Morley) 3.07
08. Javeh (Akkerman/Flynn) 3.24
09. A Fantasy (Laurencini Of Rome) 3.22
10. Lammy: (14.01)
10.01. I Am (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.02.Asleep, Half Asleep, Awake (Akkerman)
10.03. She Is (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.04. Lammy (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.05. We Are (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.06. The Last Will And Testament (Holborne)
10.07. Amen (Flynn/Akkerman)

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Atomic Rooster – Live At The Marquee 1980 (2002)

Muro do Classic RockLive at the Marquee 1980 is a live album by British rock band Atomic Rooster, recorded at London’s Marquee Club. No known live soundboard recordings exist of the 1980 (Crane/Du Cann/Hammond) lineup of Atomic Rooster and the source cassette tape, belonging to Du Cann, was recorded via a single onstage microphone. (by wikipedia)

These are the last-ever live recordings from the classic Rooster line-up of John Du Cann, Vincent Crane and Paul Hammond, recorded at the Marquee Club in London where they played regularly.

This 1980 gig is drawn from the personal archives of John Du Cann. It marks the return of original drummer Paul Hammond.

John Du Cann has said that the band used up so much energy that immediately on leaving the stage they would feel like collapse, and that the thought of an encore was crippling. (Promotion text)

This rare concert from 1980 features the classic line-up of Vincent Crane on Hammond organ, John Du Cann on guitar and vocals, and Paul Hammond on drums. While the sound quality is average (along the lines of a good bootleg) there is no denying the raw power and energy this band was able to muster on the stage.

Muro do Classic RockMany Atomic Rooster favorites are covered here, including “Death Walks Behind You”, “Tomorrow Night”, “Seven Streets”, and the bands lone hit single “Devil’s Answer.” While earlier live recordings showed the band a bit tighter and Du Cann’s voice in better form, there are still tons of monolithic riffs here, like on “In the Shadows”, and evil Hammond sounds from the master Crane. Some of the more effective tunes in this set happen to be “Gershatzer” and “I Can’t Take No More”, where the band gets to stretch out a bit and jam. Du Cann’s guitar style is like a cross between early Tony Iommi and Jimmy Page, and his bluesy riffs and solos are all over tracks like the raw ‘They Took Control of You” and the tasty instrumental “Watch Out”, where he trades licks with Crane’s funky Hammond lines. Hammond makes his presence felt throughout the set with his maniacal style that for many fans helped ease the loss of Carl Palmer back in the early days of the band.

For Atomic Rooster collectors, this is a must have, but those new to this influential band would be better starting with their first three studio albums first. Despite the average sound quality and cheesy booklet notes, this is a nice package, and a decent live document of an important band in heavy metal and progressive rock history. (Pete Pardo)

Raw and exciting !

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JohnDuCann + Vincent Crane, 1980

Personnel:
John Du Cann (guitar, vocals)
Vincent Crane (organ
Paul Hammond (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. They Took Control Of You (J.Du Cann/C. Du Cann) 7.15
02. Death Walks Behind You (Du Cann/Crane) 6.40
03. Watch Out! (Crane) 4.48
04. Tomorrow Night (Crane) 6.29
05. Seven Lonely Streets (Du Cann) 8.37
06. Gershatzer (Crane) 10.04
07. I Can’t Take No More (Du Cann) 8.51
08. In The Shadows (Du Cann) 11.24
09. Devil’s Answer (Du Cann) 5.58
10. Do You Know Who’s Looking For You? (Crane/Du Cann) 4.40
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The Rolling Stones – It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll (1974)

frontcover1It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll is the 12th British and 14th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. It was the last Rolling Stones album for guitarist Mick Taylor and the songwriting and recording of the album’s title track had a connection to Taylor’s eventual replacement, Ronnie Wood. It also marked the 10th anniversary since the band’s debut album. The album has a firmer rock sound than the band’s previous album, the more funk- and soul-inspired Goats Head Soup. The album reached #1 in the US and #2 in the UK.

Work began on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll following the Rolling Stones’ fall 1973 European tour. Production began in November at Munich, Germany’s Musicland Studios. According to guitarist Keith Richards, “We were really hot (off the road) and ready just to play some new material.”[1] The recording sessions were attended by Belgian painter Guy Peellaert, who Mick Jagger invited to do the album cover after seeing his work in the book Rock Dreams, which featured illustrations of various rock musicians such as the Stones. Peellaert eventually painted the band as “rock deities”, descending a temple staircase, surrounded by young girls and women worshipping them in Grecian clothing. The artist refused to sign a deal of exclusivity, and in 1974 provided another album art, David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs.

The album was at first developed as a half-live, half-studio production with one side of the album featuring live performances from the Stones’ European tour while the other side was to be composed of newly recorded cover versions of the band’s favourite R&B songs. Covers recorded included a take of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, Shirley & Company’s “Shame, Shame, Shame”, and The Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”. Soon the band began working off riffs by Richards and new ideas by Mick Jagger and the original concept was scrapped in favour of an album with all-new material. The cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” was the only recording to make the cut, while the “Drift Away” cover is a popular bootleg.

rollingstones1974_01It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll marked the Stones’ first effort in the producer’s chair since Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the first for Jagger and Richards under their pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins”. On the choice to produce, Richards said at the time:

“I think we’d come to a point with Jimmy (Miller) where the contribution level had dropped because it’d got to be a habit, a way of life, for Jimmy to do one Stones album a year. He’d got over the initial sort of excitement which you can feel on Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Also, Mick and I felt that we wanted to try and do it ourselves because we really felt we knew much more about techniques and recording and had our own ideas of how we wanted things to go. Goats Head Soup hadn’t turned out as we wanted to – not blaming Jimmy or anything like that… But it was obvious that it was time for a change in that particular part of the process of making records.”

Starting with this release, all future Rolling Stones albums would either be produced by them or in collaboration with an outside producer.

Most of the album’s backing tracks were recorded first at Musicland; solo vocals were recorded later by Jagger, about whom Richards would say, “he often comes up with his best stuff alone in the studio with just an engineer.”

The song “Luxury” showed the band’s growing interest in reggae music, while “Till the Next Goodbye” and “If You Really Want to Be My Friend” continued their immersion in ballads. Seven of the album’s ten songs crack the four-minute mark, a feature that would come to be disparaged during the rising punk rock scene of the late 1970s.

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Ronnie Wood, a longtime acquaintance of the band, began to get closer to the Rolling Stones during these sessions after he invited Mick Taylor to play on his debut album, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do. Taylor spent some time recording and hanging out at Wood’s house The Wick. By chance, Richards was asked one night by Wood’s wife at the time, Krissy, to join them at the guitarist’s home. While there, Richards recorded some tracks with Wood and quickly developed a close friendship, with Richards going as far as moving into Wood’s guest room. Jagger soon entered the mix and it was here that the album’s lead single and title track, “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”, was first recorded. Wood worked closely on the track with Jagger, who subsequently took the song and title for their album. The released version of this song features Wood on twelve-string acoustic guitar.

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was Mick Taylor’s last album with the Rolling Stones, and he played on just seven of the ten tracks (he did not play on tracks 2, 3, and 6). Due to Taylor’s absence, Richards is responsible for the brief lead guitar break on “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, the distorted electric guitar on the title track which includes the solo, and played both rhythm and lead guitar tracks on the “Luxury” studio recording. However, on the occasional live performances of “Luxury” during the Tour of the Americas ’75, lead guitar was provided by Ron Wood. Even though Mick Taylor is present on “Short and Curlies”, his slide guitar playing panned onto the right channel/speaker is mostly buried underneath Richards’ own lead guitar throughout most of the track which is panned to the left channel/speaker.

Similar to receiving no writing credits on the Stones’ previous album, Goats Head Soup, Taylor reportedly had made songwriting contributions to “Till the Next Goodbye” and “Time Waits for No One”, but on the album jacket, all original songs were credited to Jagger/Richards. Taylor said in 1997:

“I did have a falling out with Mick Jagger over some songs I felt I should have been credited with co-writing on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. We were quite close friends and co-operated quite closely on getting that album made. By that time Mick and Keith weren’t really working together as a team so I’d spend a lot of time in the studio.”

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Taylor’s statement contradicts Jagger’s earlier comment concerning the album. Jagger stated in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview about “Time Waits for No One” that Taylor “maybe threw in a couple of chords”.

Alongside the usual outside contributors, namely Billy Preston, Nicky Hopkins and unofficial member Ian Stewart, Elton John sideman Ray Cooper acted as percussionist for the album. Several songs were finished songs and overdubs and mixing were performed at Jagger’s home, Stargroves, in the early summer of 1974.

In July, the lead single, “It’s Only Rock ’n Roll (But I Like It)”, was released, and despite the familiar sound, it surprised many by failing to reach the top 10 in the US (although it did reach the top 10 in the UK). With its sing-along chorus, it has become a staple at Rolling Stones concerts. The B-side “Through the Lonely Nights” dates back to the previous year’s Goats Head Soup sessions. A cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, originally a 1966 hit by The Temptations, was released as the second single in the US only, where it also became a top 20 hit. Its parent album appeared in October with brisk initial sales, reaching number two in the UK (breaking a string of number-one albums that stretched back to 1969’s Let It Bleed) and number one in the US, where it eventually went platinum.

Reviews were largely positive, with Jon Landau calling It’s Only Rock ’n Roll “one of the most intriguing and mysterious, as well as the darkest, of all Rolling Stones records.”[12] However rock critic Lester Bangs disparaged the album in The Village Voice, much like Goats Head Soup, saying, “The Stones have become oblique in their old age, which is just another word for perverse except that perverse is the corniest concept extant as they realized at inception… Soup was friendly and safe. I want the edge and this album doesn’t reassure me that I’ll get it, what a curious situation to be stuck in, but maybe that’s the beauty of the Stones, hah, hah, kid? This album is false. Numb. But it cuts like a dull blade. Are they doing the cutting, or are we?”

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Author James Hector added that It’s Only Rock ’n Roll was a definitive turning point for the band. “The album marked the band’s decisive entry into a comfortable living as rock’s elder statesmen. From this point on, their youth culture importance vanished, and there would be few musical surprises in the future.” Hector concluded with “On It’s Only Rock ’n Roll, the band had become what they imagined their mass audience desired them to be. They were wrong.”

Instead of immediately touring to promote the album, the band decided to head back into the Munich studios to record the next album, to Mick Taylor’s disappointment and subsequent resignation from the band. A tour didn’t happen until the following summer in the US, the ‘Tour of the Americas ’75’, with future member Ronnie Wood taking Taylor’s place on guitar.

The title track became a permanent staple of the band’s live setlist, but apart from some performances of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “If You Can’t Rock Me” on the Licks Tour, none of the other tracks have been performed since 1977. “Till The Next Goodbye”, “Time Waits For No-One”, “If You Really Want To Be My Friend” and “Short and Curlies” have never been played live.

In order to promote the album, music videos were filmed for several of the songs. The most commonly seen video from the album was the video for “It’s Only Rock’n’Roll (But I Like It)”, featuring the band (in sailor suits) playing in a tent, which gradually fills with soap bubbles (Taylor is featured in the video but did not actually play on the recorded cut). Videos were also filmed for “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “Till The Next Goodbye”.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals; guitar on 04. + 10.)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals; bass on 01.)
Mick Taylor (guitar, slide-guitar, synthesizer on 05., congas on 07.,  bass on 10.)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer on 10.)
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Ray Cooper (percussion)
Nicky Hopkins (piano on 04. – 06., 08. + 10.)
Charlie Jolly (tabla on 10.)
Ed Leach (cowbell on 02.)
Blue Magic (background vocals on 08.)
Billy Preston (piano on 01., 02., 10., clavinet on 02., organ on 08.)
Ian Stewart (piano on 03., 07. + 09.)

Basic track on “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”:
David Bowie (background vocals)
Kenney Jones (drums)
Willie Weeks (bass)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. If You Can’t Rock Me (Jagger/Richards) 3.48
02. Ain’t Too Proud To Beg (Whitfield/Holland) 3.30
03. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) (Inspiration by Ronnie Wood) (Jagger/Richards)     5.07
04. Till The Next Goodbye (Jagger/Richards) 4.39
05. Time Waits For No One (Jagger/Richards) 6.48
06. Luxury (Jagger/Richards) 5,03
07. Dance Little Sister (Jagger/Richards) 4.12
08. If You Really Want To Be My Friend (Jagger/Richards)  6.19
09. Short And Curlies (Jagger/Richards) 2.45
10. Fingerprint File (Jagger/Richards) 7.01

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Marianne Faithful – Broken English (1979)

faithfullfrontcover1Broken English is the seventh studio album by English singer Marianne Faithfull (born December 29, 1946). It was released on 2 November 1979 by Island Records. The album marked a major comeback for Faithfull after years of drug abuse, homelessness, and suffering from anorexia. It is often regarded as her “definitive recording” and Faithfull herself described it as her “masterpiece”.

Broken English was Faithfull’s first major release since her album Love in a Mist (1967). After ending her relationship with Mick Jagger in 1970 and losing custody of her son, Faithfull’s career went into a tailspin as she suffered from heroin addiction and lived on the streets of London. Severe laryngitis, coupled with persistent drug abuse during this period, permanently altered Faithfull’s voice, leaving it cracked and lower in pitch. She attempted to make a comeback in 1976 with the release of Dreamin’ My Dreams, which noted only a small success. Shortly afterwards, Faithfull began working with musician Barry Reynolds who initially produced the songs “Broken English” and “Why D’Ya Do It?”. The demos attracted the attention of Chris Blackwell who signed Faithfull to his record label Island Records.

The album was recorded at Matrix Studios in London. Faithfull collaborated with producer Mark Miller Mundy with whom she recorded all songs for the album. After having the whole album recorded, he suggested that the music should be “more modern and electronic” and brought in Steve Winwood on keyboards. Musically, Broken English is a new wave rock album with elements of other genres, such as punk, blues and reggae.

mariannefaithful01After its release, Broken English received critical acclaim. It peaked at number eighty-two on the Billboard 200, becoming her first album to chart in the United States since Go Away from My World (1965) and giving Marianne Faithfull a first nomination for the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. In the United Kingdom, it reached number fifty-seven and was also successful worldwide peaking into the top five in countries, such in Germany, France and New Zealand. Broken English was certified platinum in Germany and France and sold over one million copies worldwide. Two singles were released from the album, with “The Ballad of Lucy Jordan” peaking at number forty-eight on the UK Singles Chart. The album was included on NME magazine’s list of “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” and in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Faithfull’s immediately preceding albums, Dreamin’ My Dreams and Faithless, had been in a relatively gentle folk or country and western style. Broken English was a radical departure, featuring a contemporary fusion of rock, punk, new wave and dance, with liberal use of synthesizers. After years of cigarette smoking, Faithfull’s voice was in a lower register, far raspier, and had a more world-weary quality than in the past that matched the often raw emotions expressed in the newer songs.

The backing band of Barry Reynolds, Joe Mavety (guitars), Steve York (bass) and Terry Stannard (drums) had been formed in 1977 to tour Ireland with Faithfull promoting Dreamin’ My Dreams.

Marianne Faithfull recounted how Mark Mundy was brought on as the album’s producer: “I don’t think I could have handled Broken English without a producer. You can’t imagine what it was like. There I am with no respect at all within the music business. … So I found somebody who wanted the break, and that was Mark Mundy. He wanted to be a record producer, and he had some great ideas.”

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The album’s title track took inspiration from terrorist figures of the time, particularly Ulrike Meinhof of the Baader-Meinhof group. “Guilt” was informed by the Catholic upbringing of the singer and her composer Barry Reynolds. “The Ballad of Lucy Jordan”, originally performed by Dr Hook, is a melancholy tale of middle class housewife’s disillusionment; Faithfull’s version became something of an anthem[citation needed] and was used on the soundtracks to the films Montenegro (1981) and Thelma & Louise (1991). “What’s the Hurry?” was described by Faithfull as reflecting the everyday desperation of the habitual drug user. Her cover of John Lennon’s “Working Class Hero” was recorded as a tribute to her own heroes such as Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, David Bowie and Iggy Pop, and Lennon himself.

The last track, the six-and-a-half-minute “Why’d Ya Do It?”, is a caustic, graphic rant of a woman reacting to her lover’s infidelity. The lyrics began with the man’s point of view, relating the bitter tirade of his cheated-on lover. It was set to a grinding tune inspired by Jimi Hendrix’s recording of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower”. Poet and writer Heathcote Williams had originally conceived the lyrics as a piece for Tina Turner to record, but Faithfull succeeded in convincing him that Turner would never record such a number. Its plethora of four-letter words and explicit references to oral sex caused controversy and led to a ban in Australia. (by wikipedia)

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Although the boundaries have shifted in the decades since this album’s release, Broken English has lost none of its trenchant appeal. And despite Courtney Love and many angry grrrl groups using explicit lyrics, Why d’Ya Do It? still sounds fresh, perhaps because it originally was written as a poem by Heathcote Williams. Her version of Lennon’s Working Class Hero sounds as sharp as ever, while the brooding title track is still relevant today. On the melodic side, Lucy Jordan has become quite a standard and could easily be considered a country weepie, while Witches Song remains eerie and anthemic. The sound is typical 80’s rock with tight musicianship supporting this classic monument to decadence and despair. This is probably her best selling album of all time for all the wrong reasons! The other two works from the same period, A Child’s Adventure and Dangerous Acquaintances, are equally excellent and will richly reward the listener. Nevertheless, Broken English stands tall as a masterpiece of broken taboos, subversive poetics and timeless songs. (Peter Uys )

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Personnel:
Jim Cuomo (saxophone)
Marianne Faithfull (vocals)
Guy Humphries (guitar)
Joe Mavety (guitar)
Barry Reynolds (guitar)
Morris Pert (percussion)
Terry Stannard (drums)
Steve York (bass)
Darryl Way (violin)
Steve Winwood (keyboards)
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background vocals:
Dyan Birch – Frankie Collins – Isabella Dulaney

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Tracklist:
01. Broken English (Faithfull/Reynold/Mavety/York/Stannard) 3.45
02. Witches’ Song (Faithfull/Reynold/Mavety/York/Stannard) 4.43
03. Brain Drain (Brierley) 4.13
04. Guilt (Reynolds) 5.05
05. The Ballad Of Lucy Jordan (Silverstein) 4.09
06. What’s The Hurry (Mavety) 3.05
07. Working Class Hero (Lennon) 4.40
08. Why D’Ya Do It (William/Reynold/Mavety/York/Stannard/Faithfull) 6.45

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY MARIANNE FAITHFUL !

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John Du Cann – The World’s Not Big Enough (1977)

frontcover1John William Cann (5 June 1946 – 21 September 2011), later known by his stage name John Du Cann, was an English guitarist primarily known through his work in the 1970s band Atomic Rooster. His early bands included the Wiltshire-based The Sonics (not to be confused with the 1960s US band of the same name) and London-based The Attack, which released “Hi Ho Silver Lining” a few days prior to Jeff Beck. He went on to lead a psychedelic, progressive, hard rock band called Andromeda, before being asked to join Atomic Rooster, featuring re-recorded guitar parts and vocals for their 1970 self-titled debut album, and the albums Death Walks Behind You (1970) and In Hearing of Atomic Rooster (1971).

Upon departing Atomic Rooster in 1971 he formed Daemon, later renamed Bullet, then Hard Stuff, releasing two albums based more heavily on aggressive guitar work. In 1974 he was a temporary guitarist in Thin Lizzy for a tour of Germany. Sometime following this, his manager suggested a name change for him from John Cann to John Du Cann.

As a result of being signed to the same management company, 1977 saw the pairing of Du Cann with Francis Rossi of the British rock band Status Quo. Rossi was invited to produce Du Cann’s proposed new album, The World’s Not Big Enough, which remained unreleased until 1992. The session musicians for this album included Rossi on guitar, Andy Bown on keyboards, future Quo drummer Pete Kircher and bassist John McCoy. The album was described in Record Collector magazine at the time as sounding like “Quo mixed with the Sex Pistols”.

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Atomic Rooster in 1969: John Du Cann, Vincent Crane & Carl Palmer

In September 1979 Du Cann had a hit on the UK Singles Chart with “Don’t Be A Dummy”, an unreleased version of which (featuring vocals by Gary Numan) had featured in a Lee Cooper Jeans television advertisement in 1978. The single reached number 33 in the UK Singles Chart.

In 1979, Cann and Crane re-formed Atomic Rooster with Preston Heyman on drums (with whom they recorded their 1980 self-titled album). Following this, after a brief spell with former Cream drummer Ginger Baker (who was released after only three weeks), Paul Hammond returned to his place on the drums, and the band released two more singles on Polydor with minimal success. In 1981, the band were booked at the last minute at the Reading Festival, but Cann was unable to make it, and Mick Hawksworth sat in with the band on bass guitar, while Crane took over on lead vocals. In late 1982, Cann had had enough of the non-success of the band, and left for the final time.

In the late 1990s he was introduced to the Angel Air record label by John McCoy. He was later active cataloguing and remastering his personal tape archive and compiling reissues for the label, for which he received full credit and royalties.

johndu-cann01Du Cann died on 21 September 2011 after a heart attack. As he died without heirs the bulk of his personal collection of 75 guitars, 30 amplifiers, records and CDs was auctioned in January 2012. An original copy of the Andromeda LP made £800, whilst his well used 1963 Fender Strat sold for £6500.

he World’s Not Big Enough is the only solo album by John Du Cann, who was best known as guitarist and vocalist with Atomic Rooster and Hard Stuff in the 1970s. The album was recorded in 1977, but remained unreleased until 1992, and was remastered in 1999.

During the mid-1970s, Du Cann was signed to Quarry Management, who also handled Status Quo. When Du Cann presented some demo tracks to Arista Records, it was suggested that he record them in a studio with Status Quo guitarist Francis Rossi acting as producer. A group was assembled to record the album, including bass guitarist John McCoy, who later played with Ian Gillan; Liverpool Express and Original Mirrors drummer Pete Kircher, and keyboard player Andy Bown who was also a member of Status Quo. Ex-Atomic Rooster drummer Paul Hammond also played on several tracks. The band subsequently performed concerts in London, but Arista ultimately decided not to release the album.

The album was eventually released in 1992, and featured Du Cann’s 1979 UK hit single “Don’t Be a Dummy”, which he performed on Top of the Pops. The 1999 CD version also featured a number of bonus tracks, mostly demos and rough versions of songs not featured on the original album.

“She’s My Woman” and “Where’s the Show!” were re-recorded when Du Cann rejoined Atomic Rooster, and were released on the band’s 1980 album Atomic Rooster. ((by wikipedia)

Du Cann’s shelved 1977 album includes the singles “Don’t Be a Dummy,” “Throw Him in Jail,” and “Where’s the Show!” It’s peculiar, though not half-bad, power pop/new wave with a mainstream slant. Sometimes it exhibits a glammish, cheerfully snide attitude that isn’t too far removed from an early-’70s Bowie influence. No doubt it’s the kind of thing that will have the experts sniffing out whiffs of inauthenticity immediately (especially when they become aware of Du Cann’s hard rock past), but it’s not as ridiculous as might have been anticipated. Let it not be said that Angel Air is unwilling to pull out all the stops for such a not-in-demand project; it’s added a dozen bonus tracks of undocumented source and vintage material that is generally less impressive than the material from the unreleased LP. These are closer to hard rock in mood, with Du Cann handling all the vocals, guitars, and bass on most of them, and ex-Atomic Rooster bandmate Paul Hammond doing most of the drums. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Andy Bown (keyboards on 01. + 15. + 26.)
John Du Cann (guitar, vocals; bass 16. – 25.)
Paul Hammond (drums, percussion on 13. + 16. – 25.)
Pete Kircher (drums, percussion on on 01. + 15. + 26.)
John McCoy (bass  on 01. + 15. + 26.)
Francis Rossi (guitar on 01. + 15. + 26.)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Be A Dummy (Bond) 3.05
02. You Didn’t Know Any Better (Cann) 3.23
03. Fashion Fantasy  (Cann) 2.34
04. When I Was Old (Cann) 2.35
05. Only One Night (Cann) 3.00
06. Where’s The Show! (Cann) 2.25
07. She’s My Woman 2.30
08. Throw Him In Jail (Cann) 2.28
09. Evil You (Part 1) (Cann) 2.42
10. Don’t Talk (Cann) 2.25
11. Your Application Failed (Cann) 2.52
12. If I’m Makin’ (Cann) 2.58
13. Street Strutter (Cann) 2.22
14. Evil You (Part 2) (Cann) 2.42
15. Hesitation (Cann) 2.26
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16. Exodus (Johnny and His Epic Guitars) (Gold) 2.41
17. Moody Child (Cann) 3.24
18. Truck Stop (Cann) 2.48
19. Well Let’s Go (Cann) 3.56
20. Paradise (Cann) 2.47
21. I Want To Be Alone (Cann) 2.28
22. Ode To Mai West (Cann) 2.30
23. Wise Man (Cann) 2.56
24. Ooh Be Doo (Cann) 3.39
25. Thanx For Nothing (Cann) 3.59
26. Who Cares? (Cann) 2.07
27. The Door (Cann) 0.21

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single

Single from 1977