Sammy Hagar – All Night Long (1978)

frontcover1All Night Long (Loud & Clear in the UK) is Sammy Hagar’s first live album. The album contains no overdubs. The album was recorded during concerts in San Francisco, San Antonio, San Bernardino, Santa Cruz and Santa Monica.
All Night Long is better than most hard rock live albums not only because Sammy Hagar is at his best when he’s on stage, but because the set list includes only his best songs, eliminating the filler that tends to clutter his albums. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)
Sammy is now such a household name that it is nearly impossible to think of him as a guy that used to be in the band Montrose and later struggling with a solo career.  That’s just where he was when this live sucker came out.  Hagar was following up his third solo studio effort when he recorded All Night Long.  The year was 1978 and Sammy was close to breaking out big.
The album contains “I’ve Done Everything for You” which would become a huge hit for Rick Springfield a few years later.  The Montrose classic “Bad Motor Scooter” also is in the set list but there are plenty of other great musical moments.  Check out “Red” which is one of the Red Rocker’s best.  “Young Girl Blues” is another killer song that builds in energy as it continues.  “Rock ‘N’ Roll Weekend” is pure Hagar and “Turn Up the Music” is a true anthem.
This one is a must-own for Sammy’s early hardcore fans but it is also a great place for his younger fans to start when digging back through his past catalogue.
A live concert in every sense of the word, delivered with energy and class, which are two words that sum up what The Red Rocker is all about.
Turn this sucker up! (by classicrockrevisited.com)
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Personnel:
Denny Carmassi (drums)
Bill Church (bass, background vocals)
Alan Fitzgerald (keyboards, background vocals)
Sammy Hagar – lead vocals, guitar
Gary Pihl – guitar, Background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. Red (Carter/Hagar) 5.03
02. Rock ‘N’ Roll Weekend (Hagar) 3.41
03. Make It Last/Reckless (Hagar) 6.40
04. Turn Up The Music (Carter/Hagar) 5.45
05. I’ve Done Everything For You (Hagar) 3.29
06. Young Girl Blues (Leitch) 8.58
07. Bad Motor Scooter (Hagar) 7.03

 

Status Quo – On The Level (1975)

frontcover1On the Level is the eighth studio album of English rock band Status Quo. It features Francis Rossi, Richard Parfitt, Alan Lancaster and John Coghlan. The album’s cover art features band members in an Ames room, and on the original vinyl release, the inner gatefold sleeve consisted of informal photos members of the group had taken of each other.
In November 1974 the band released the only single from the album, an edited version of a Rossi/Young song entitled “Down Down”. The single gave the band their only #1 hit to date. Its b-side was the Parfitt/Young album track “Nightride”.
When the album was released in February 1975, the group were more or less at the peak of their career, record sales-wise. The album entered the chart at #1. All tracks were written or co-written by the group including unofficial fifth member, Robert Keith Young, apart from “Bye Bye Johnny”, which was a Chuck Berry composition.
If any single song sums up Status Quo in the hearts and the minds of the millions, it’s “Down Down.” Other songs may have been bigger, others may have more resonance, and some (“Rocking All Over the World ” comes to mind) may be so permanently ingrained that it’s hard to remember that Status Quo cut anything else. But, if you want to nail the very essence of Status Quo, only “Down Down” will do. It was their first British number one and their first all-time classic. And it was also their first grinning, winking acknowledgement that not only was there a formula to the records they made, but they were not afraid to list its ingredients. “Down Down” is the perfect Status Quo record, and the fact that it doesn’t arrive until six songs into the band’s eighth album just proves how much fun it had coming up with it.
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On the Level is Quo at its single-minded best. It doesn’t matter whether its driving the boogie through your skull with the relentless precision of “Little Lady” and “Over and Done,” lurching loosely around the ghosts of blues and ballads (“Most of the Time” and a positively maniacal finale of “Bye Bye Johnny”), or even glancing back to their days as one of British psych’s finest pop bands (“What to Do”). Still, all roads lead back to “Down Down,” a dynamic riff, a perplexing lyric, and a mood that’s so compulsive that you’ll still be shaking your head in time long after all your hair’s fallen out. And, just to make it even better, the album version’s almost two minutes longer than the familiar hit, littered with false starts, fake endings, and one of the cruelest fade-outs in recorded history. It comes just as you’re really getting into the groove. (by Dave Thompson)
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The rare live EP from 1975
Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, guitar, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Tracklist:.
01: Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.03
02. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.22
03. I Saw The Light (Rossi/Young) 3.40
04. Over And Done (Lancaster) 3.55
05. Nightride (Parfitt/Young) 3.54
06. Down Down (Rossi/Young) 5.25
07. Broken Man (Lancaster) 4.14
08. What To Do (Rossi/Young) 3.07
09. Where I Am (Parfitt) 2.45
19. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 5.21
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20. Down Down (Single Version) (Rossi/Young) 3.50
21. Roll Over Lay Down (Live Version from the Live EP) (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 5.41
22. Gerdundula (Live Version from the Live EP)  (Manston/James) 2.35
23. Junior’s Wailing (Live Version from the Live EP) (White/Pugh) 3.57
24. Roadhouse Blues [Live Version) (Morrison/Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek) 12.24
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Live in Mainz/Germany (22/02(1975)25.
25. Backwater (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.56
26. Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 3.41
27. Claudie (Rossi/Young) 4.37
28. Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.27
29. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.20
30. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 6.35

31. Down Down (Demo Version) (Rossi/Young) 5.29

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young – Deja Vu (1970)

frontcover1Déjà Vu is the second album by Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their first in the quartet configuration of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. It was released in March 1970 by Atlantic Records, catalogue SD-7200. It topped the pop album chart for one week and generated three Top 40 singles: “Woodstock”, “Teach Your Children”, and “Our House”. It was rereleased in 1977 as SD-19188 and the cover was changed from black to brown. In 2003, the album was ranked #148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Certified 7x platinum by the RIAA, the album’s sales currently sit at over 8 million copies. It remains the highest selling album of each member’s career to date.
Déjà vu was greatly anticipated after the popularity of the first CSN album and given the addition of Young to the group. Stills estimates that the album took around 800 hours of studio time to record; this figure may be exaggerated, even though the individual tracks display meticulous attention to detail.[5] The songs, except for “Woodstock”, were recorded as individual sessions by each member, with each contributing whatever was needed that could be agreed upon. Young appears on only half of the tracks, and drummer Dallas Taylor and bassist Greg Reeves are credited on the cover with their names in slightly smaller typeface. Jerry Garcia plays pedal steel on “Teach Your Children” and John Sebastian plays harmonica on the title track.
Four singles were released from the album with all but the last, “Carry On,” charting on the Billboard Hot 100. The popularity of the album contributed to the success of the four albums released by each of the members in the wake of Déjà vu — Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush, Stephen Stills’ self-titled solo debut, David Crosby’s If I Could Only Remember My Name, and Graham Nash’s Songs for Beginners.
In 2003, the album was placed at number 148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The same year, the TV network VH1 named Déjà vu the 61st greatest album of all time. (by Wikipedia)
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CSN & Y with Greg Reeves + Dallas Taylor, 1970
One of the most hotly awaited second albums in history — right up there with those by the Beatles and the Band — Déjà Vu lived up to its expectations and rose to number one on the charts. Those achievements are all the more astonishing given the fact that the group barely held together through the estimated 800 hours it took to record Déjà Vu and scarcely functioned as a group for most of that time. Déjà Vu worked as an album, a product of four potent musical talents who were all ascending to the top of their game coupled with some very skilled production, engineering, and editing. There were also some obvious virtues in evidence — the addition of Neil Young to the Crosby, Stills & Nash lineup added to the level of virtuosity, with Young and Stephen Stills rising to new levels of complexity and volume on their guitars. Young’s presence also ratcheted up the range of available voices one notch and added a uniquely idiosyncratic songwriter to the fold, though most of Young’s contributions in this area were confined to the second side of the LP. Most of the music, apart from the quartet’s version of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock,” was done as individual sessions by each of the members when they turned up (which was seldom together), contributing whatever was needed that could be agreed upon. “Carry On” worked as the album’s opener when Stills “sacrificed” another copyright, “Questions,” which comprised the second half of the track and made it more substantial. “Woodstock” and “Carry On” represented the group as a whole, while the rest of the record was a showcase for the individual members. David Crosby’s “Almost Cut My Hair” was a piece of high-energy hippie-era paranoia not too far removed in subject from the Byrds’ “Drug Store Truck Drivin’ Man,” only angrier in mood and texture (especially amid the pumping organ and slashing guitars); the title track, also by Crosby, took 100 hours to work out and was a better-received successor to such experimental works as “Mind Gardens,” out of his earlier career with the Byrds, showing his occasional abandonment of a rock beat, or any fixed rhythm at all, in favor of washing over the listener with tones and moods.
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“Teach Your Children,” the major hit off the album, was a reflection of the hippie-era idealism that still filled Graham Nash’s life, while “Our House” was his stylistic paean to the late-era Beatles and “4+20” was a gorgeous Stephen Stills blues excursion that was a precursor to the material he would explore on the solo album that followed. And then there were Neil Young’s pieces, the exquisitely harmonized “Helpless” (which took many hours to get to the slow version finally used) and the roaring country-ish rockers that ended side two, which underwent a lot of tinkering by Young — even his seeming throwaway finale, “Everybody I Love You,” was a bone thrown to longtime fans as perhaps the greatest Buffalo Springfield song that they didn’t record. All of this variety made Déjà Vu a rich musical banquet for the most serious and personal listeners, while mass audiences reveled in the glorious harmonies and the thundering electric guitars, which were presented in even more dramatic and expansive fashion on the tour that followed. (by Bruce Eder)
In other words: one of the most important albums in the history of rock music !
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Personnel:
David Crosby (guitar, vocals)
Graham Nash (vocals, guitar, Percussion on 01. + 02.)
Greg Reeves (bass)
Stephen Stills (guitar, vocals, keyboards on 01., bass on 01., 02. + 06., percussion on 01.)
Dallas Taylor (drums, percussion)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, Keyboards, harmonica on 09.)

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Jerry Garcia (pedal steel guitar on 02.)
John Sebastian (harmonica on 06.)

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Tracklist:
01. Carry On (Stills) 4.26
02. Teach Your Children  (Nash) 2.53
03. Almost Cut My Hair (Crosby) 4.31
04. Helpless (Young) 3.33
05. Woodstock (Mitchell) 3.54
06. Déjà Vu (Crosby) 4.12
07. Our House (Nash) 2.59
08. 4 + 20  (Stills) 2.04
09. Country Girl
09.1.Whiskey Boot Hill
09.2.Down Down Down
09.3. Country Girl (I Think You’re Pretty)) (Young) 5.11
10. Everybody I Love You  (Stills/Young) 2.21
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Many years later ….

Sweet d’Buster – Friction (1978)

frontcover1“Friction” – an album released in 1978 by the Dutch group Sweet d’Buster. The collective was formed three years earlier and, most interestingly, they have included in its membership the former musicians very badsome commands such as: Golden Earring, Chain of Fools and Supersister! In Sweet d’Buster joined forces Bertus Borgers (vocals, saxophone, previously consisted of Mr. Albert Show, Sail and Watermelon), Paul Smeenk (guitar), Herman Deinum (bass, ex. Party Chain Of Fools), Hans Lafaille (drums, and this of Chain Of Fools) and Robert-Jan Stips (vocals, organ, percussion, ex. Supersister party and Golden Earring).
• Performed Sweet d’Buster quirky mix of funk, progressive and hard rock real hard and enjoyed popularity in native land. Their songs the band chose to perform in English, they have shown on his ring debut album (released in 1976). To record their second album, “Friction”, they say, it took almost half a year! Maybe that’s why meticulous audiophiles immediately rated it much higher than the debut. Group clearly progressed, but along with this confusion began with changes in the composition. Releasing the live album “Gigs” and third album “Shot Into the Blue” (1979) musicians dispersed to other teams (according to the information on alexgitlin.com, it happened at the end of 1980).
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 Two favorite tracks to choose from Sweet d’Buster’s “Friction” was released in early 1978, is actually impossible. On this album nine magnificent pieces. The band grew out of two solo projects (which Bertus Borgers – sax and that of Robert Jan Stips – keys), was “Friction” came out, a well-oiled music machine. Especially the work of Paul Smeenk – guitar provided the swinging – at abutting funk sound. But the rhythm tandem Herman Deinum – bass and Hans Lafaille – drums, since 1966 in Blues Dimension played together, provided a solid foundation. About a month after I had bought this album, I was present at a concert of Sweet d’Buster in Almelo. And live when they drove very energetic live testament to how good they were responding to each other. That concert was much better than what gets on their live album “Gigs” would appear.
• The opener “Friction”, Angel is a true overture, beautiful swinging and thrusting. With Can not Buy Me Love is just a small step back, but Sweet d’Buster’s design makes this Beatles song into a real experience. Hard Stone Jungle swings again like a train at the end Still Believe begins quietly – to catch our breath, but quickly picks up this laid back soulfull song you. With Money Song is the A side of this LP soulfull swinging closed.
• And then begins side B. Stir Up The Fire begins quietly, but gradually the fire higher and higher stoked … until … Ahhh, what a beautiful piece. With Smash the Mirror – a piece of R.J. Stips about Elvis among others – is a step backwards. I’ve Gotta Know brings the swing slowly back to a good preparation for the next piece to finish.
• And that is: It Takes a Lot of Time (To Let All The People Know). It is a R.J. Stips classic of his first solo album “Never Greens”, but in a more swinging Sweet d’Buster package. All burn audible to their contribution. A wonderful finale of this five-star album!
In other words: That´s what I call music ! And if you likeDutch groups like Focus or Alquin … you should listen !
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Personnel:
Bertus Borgers (vocals, saxophone)
Herman Deinum (bass)
Hans Lafaille (drums)
Paul Smeenk (guitar, vocals)
Robert Jan Stips (keyboards, synthesizer, vocals)
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background vocals:
Josee Van Iersel – Meike Touw
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Tracklist:
01. Angel (Borgers/Deinum) 5.19
02. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 4.47
03. Hard Stone Jungle (Borgers/Smeenk) 5.03
04. Still Believe (Borgers/Smeenk) 4.05
05. Money Song (Borgers) 3.45
06. Stir Up The Fire (Borgers/Lafaille/Stips) 5.41
07. Smash The Mirror (Link/Stips) 4.12
08. I’ve Gotta Know (Link/Smeenk) 5.47
09. It Takes A Lot Of Time (To Let All People Know) (Deinum/Stips) 4.48

Eric Burdon And The Animals – Roadrunners! Rare Live And Studio Recordings (1990)

front-cover1Eric’s at his wild best in these rare recordings-many never heard by even the most ardent Animals collector! Four tracks are British radio broadcasts from ’66, one is from German TV in ’67; the rest are all live, from Monterey in ’67, London in ’67 (including Inside Looking Out ) and Stockholm in ’68 ( San Franciscan Nights; Monterey , and more). And the rarest of the rare: six live cuts from Melbourne, Australia in ’67, including See See Rider and When I Was Young .
This is a mixed bag of live and BBC recordings from both the post-Alan Price edition of the original band, and the later New Animals of “San Franciscan Nights” fame. Sound quality varies, but the obscurity of these tracks more than compensates. The Beeb tracks include one Price number, a faithful rendition of “Heartbreak Hotel.” Other highlights include gritty takes on “Inside Looking Out” and “Maudie” plus a fantastic version of “Jailhouse Rock” that comes within shouting distance of Elvis (honestly!). Barry Jenkins almost steals the show with his knockout drumming, and Zoot Money’s organ washes are utterly scintillating. There’s also a raw set culled from the New Animals’ tour of Australia, highlighted by spirited versions of standards like “Shake Rattle and Roll” and “See See Rider.” The version of “When I Was Young” is also strong and the groovy radio announcer at the end is a trip. Burdon’s Monterey appearance is showcased in a pair of freakout versions of “Ginhouse Blues” and “Hey Gyp”, both of which are way too long and too self-indulgent. This is the weakest part of the album by far. New Animals fans will adore the 1968 tracks from Stockholm which feature the band at its psychedelic apex. As goofy as it sounds on WINDS OF CHANGE, “Yes I’m Experienced” really rocks on stage (especially the killer feedback rave up—and Eric’s rap at the end is hilarious), and the other tracks (“Paint It Black”, “San Franciscan Nights” and “Monterey”) are faithful, though edgier recreations of the group’s studio versions. Vic Briggs always claims the band was much better on stage than in the studio and this set backs him up, mainly because Burdon’s often wearying improvisations are kept to a reasonable minimum. Grab it if you dig Burdon’s post-1966 work (although Glen A. Baker’s liner notes are so fawning they’re worthless).(by an amazon customer

booklet01aPersonnel:
Various Animals line-ups

booklet03aTracklist:

Broadcasts:
BBC 1966:

01. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden) 2.40
02. The Work Song (Adderley/Brown) 2.52
03. Corrina Corrina (Traditional) 2.46
04. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) 2.52

German TV 1967:
05. Roadrunner (McDaniel) 2.53

Concerts:
Monterey 1967:
06. Gin House Blues (Troy/Henderson) 5.51
07. Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness) (Leitch) 8.24

Festival Hall, Melbourne, 1967:
08. Shake, Rattle & Roll (Calhoun) 4.25
09. When I Was Young (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.15
10. See See Rider (Rainey) 4.02
11. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 2.36
12. Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) 5.37
13. So Long (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.46

Live London, 1967:
14. Inside Looking Out (L.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 3.04
15. Maudie (Hooker) 4.15

Live Stockholm, 1968:
16. San Franciscan Nights (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 4.33
17. Monterey (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 6.16
18. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 6.28

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Chris Rea – Dancing With Strangers (1987)

frontcover1Dancing with Strangers is the ninth studio album by Chris Rea, released in 1987.

It became Rea’s first major success in UK, peaking at #2, behind Michael Jackson’s Bad, and spent 46 weeks in the charts, achieving Platinum accreditation.

It reached the Top 10 in six other countries, including New Zealand where it became a number one album.

“Let’s Dance” was released as the first single and, like the album, became a major hit for Rea in UK, peaking at #12.

In tone with the success of the album, “Let’s Dance” became a major hit in New Zealand as well, peaking at #2. The other singles released from this album were “Loving You Again” (UK #47), “Joys of Christmas” (UK #67) and “Que Sera” (UK #73).(by wikipedia)

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Album no 3 in Chris’ ‘imperial’ phase, and the all-important one before The Road To Hell set the seal on the legend. A splendid album, with something for everyone. Of it’s time, yes, but none the worse for that. ‘Side One’ is just about faultless, with each song a sign of styles to come, combining pop, rock & blues just so (I Can’t Dance to that being a particular favourite).

‘Side Two’ kicks off with the always great Let’s Dance (the slightly superior original version to my mind), and while not quite as strong as the first half, still holds it’s own. The album may be a couple of tracks too long, but it shows an artist on top, confident form, with the best yet to come. (by Jason Brown)

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Personnel:
Robert Ahwai (guitar)
Martin Ditcham (percussion, drums)
Jerry Donahue (guitar)
Kevin Leach (keyboards)
Dave Mattacks (drums)
Max Middleton (keyboards)
Eoghan O’Neill (bass)
Adrian Rea (drums)
Chris Rea (vocals, guitar, keyboards, slide guitar, synthesizer, accordion)
Davy Spillane (guitar, uilleann pipes)

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Tracklist:
01. Joys Of Christmas 5.15
02. I Can’t Dance To That 4.19
03. Windy Town 4.25
04. Gonna Buy A Hat 4.25
05. Curse Of The Traveller 6.26
06. Let’s Dance 4.07
07. Que Sera 5.23
08. Josie’s Tune 2.19
09. Loving You Again 5.40
10. That Girl Of Mine 3.41
11. September Blue 3.09
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12. I Don’t Care Any More 2.10
13. Donahue’s Broken Wheel 3.02
14. Danielle’s Breakfast 4.33

All songs written by Chris Rea

Tracks 12, 13, 14 are bonus tracks not available on the initial LP release.

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Mott The Hoople – Live At HMV Hammersmith Apollo (2009)

frontcover1“Mott the Hoople storm back to London for a dazzling night at the Hammersmith Apollo.

The stakes in heritage rock reunions are getting so high that, soon, only the exhumation of some demised old stager will up the ante. This latest one, however, was pretty far-fetched.

Mott the Hoople were titans of mid-Seventies glam. In their early career, they struggled as unreconstructed rockers, until David Bowie, no less, remodelled them in satin suits and platform boots. He donated them a fabulously dissolute glam anthem, ‘All the Young Dudes’, and thus began their tenure in the Top Five.

This, however, was a band destined to fail. They didn’t handle whirlwind fame well at all, and quickly disintegrated, only to be championed retrospectively by fans such as Morrissey, for their raunchy, wry take on the rock ‘n’ roll life.

Forty years on from their inception, and thirty years since some of the members had concertposteractually spoken to each other, Mott stormed back into London for the first of five sold-out nights at the Apollo. Their singer, Ian Hunter, agelessly shrouded in corkscrew curls and face-blotting sunglasses, led straight into a ballad, ‘Hymn For the Dudes’, his gnarly, Dylan-esque voice roaring at the high notes. This was not to be a half-hearted canter through the hits.

The first hour was mostly devoted to the band’s pre-Bowie, high-voltage rock ‘n’ roll material. Hunter, a busy solo artist for more than three decades, and the silver-topped lead guitarist, Mick Ralphs, riffed vigorously, in active defiance of Time’s subsequent intervention. The partisan crowd — at least eighty percent of whom, gloriously, unrepentantly, were old enough to remember it all from the turn of the Seventies — responded with commensurate enthusiasm.

The electricity crackled to a new intensity, however, when Hunter moved to a piano stage-left, and finally unleashed a dazzling run of glam classics — songs about little more than rock itself. Glam, originally, existed purely to overturn prog-rock’s tedious virtuosity, to revive the raw, sexy thrill of Fifties rock’s simple, thumping beats and clanging riffs.

Perhaps it was daft, witnessing a seventy-year old man with a blond afro singing, “I get my kicks from guitar licks”, but also fabulously empowering, given his heedless dedication to the cause.

The sense of lifelong commitment was heightened during the encore, when the band’s original drummer, Dale Griffin, entered the fray.

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Martin Chambers with Ian Hunter and his daughter Tracy Hunter

Griffin has Alzheimer’s, and had to be led by the hand to a drum kit alongside his substitute for the evening, the Pretenders’ Martin Chambers. Soon, he was pounding away the rhythm to ‘Roll Away the Stone’, grinning from ear to ear. ‘All the Young Dudes’, then, was simply breath-taking, with Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott joining in for a verse.

And the rockin’ went on, unrestrainable, deafening, totally life-affirming.”(by Andrew Perry; The Telegraph, 02 October, 2009)

Okay, most of th time, Mott Te Hoople sounds like a “Mott The Hoople Revival Band” … but it´s still a very important document of one of the finest bands from the Seventies.

Note: This show was recorded and transferred to CD on the night. This means you hear a CD-R rather than factory-pressed CDs.

Recorded live at the first Mott The Hoople re-union show
at HMV Hammersmith Apollo 1st October 2009.

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Personnel:
Verden Allen (keyboards)
Martin Chambers (drums)
Ian Hunter (vocals, guitar, piano, bass on 11.)
Mick Ralphs (guitar, background vocals)
Overend Watts (bass, vocals on 11.)
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Joe Elliott (vocals on 20.)
Dale Griffin (drums on 21. + 22.)
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background vocals:
Maggie Ronson – Tracy Hunter

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Jupitor Intro  (Holst) 1.12
02. Hymm For The Dudes (Allen/Hunter) 5.34
03. Rock & Roll Queen (Ralphs) 4.44
04. Sweet Jane (Reed) 4.51
05. One Of The Boys (Hunter/Ralphs) 6.15
06. Sucker (Hunter/Ralphs/Watts) 5.15
07. Moon Upstairs (Hunter/Ralphs) 6.32
08. The Original Mixed Up Kid (Hunter) 4.41
09. I Wish I Was Your Mother (Hunter) 6.36
10. Ready For Love (Ralphs) 8.13
11. Born Late ’58 (Watts) 4.33
12. Ballad Of Mott The Hoople (GriffinHunter/Ralphs/Watts) 6.18

CD 2:
13. Walking With A Mountain (Hunter) / Jumpin Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 5.56
14. Like A Rolling Stone (Dylan) / Laugh At Me (Bono) /The Journey (Hunter) 9.02
15. Golden Age Of Rock & Roll (Hunter) 3.35
17. Honaloochie Boogie (Hunter) 3.43
18. All The Way From Memphis (Hunter) 9.46
19. Roll Away The Stone (Hunter) 4.41
20. All The Young Dudes (Bowie) 4.52
21. Keep A Knockin’  (Penniman) 3.53
22. Saturday Gigs (Hunter) 6.28

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