The Rolling Stones – Blue & Lonesome (2016)

FrontCover1Blue & Lonesome is a cover album by the Rolling Stones—their 23rd British and 25th American studio album—released on 2 December 2016. It is the band’s first album to feature only cover songs, and their first studio release since 2005’s A Bigger Bang, with its eleven-year gap being the longest between two albums from the band. Despite the short time length of just around 43 minutes, the album was released as a double LP. “Just Your Fool”, a Buddy Johnson cover (though the Rolling Stones version is based on Little Walter’s arrangement) was released as the first single from the album on 6 October. The name of the album is from a song which Little Walter wrote, “Blue and Lonesome”.

Though there had been an eleven-year gap between albums, the Rolling Stones kept the same basic production and musician team as A Bigger Bang. Joining vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards as producers was Don Was, who had been working with the group for most of the prior two decades. In the studio were band members Ronnie Wood (guitar) and Charlie Watts (drums), alongside contract players Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (multi-instrumentalist). Eric Clapton contributed guitar on two tracks and drummer Jim Keltner plays percussion on another.

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Recorded over a marathon three-day session in December, 2015 the album was released a year later to robust sales; reaching number one on the album charts in the UK and over a dozen other countries, and number four in the US. It was certified gold or platinum in several countries. The first Stones album of the streaming media age, many of the songs from the album charted on several top-40 digital music charts, and the lead single “Just Your Fool” was a top-40 hit on several airplay and genre-specific charts. The album received high critical praise, receiving four- and five-star ratings from many top music journalism outlets, and accolades from jazz and blues publications. The album was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album in 2018, the band’s first Grammy in 23 years.

Blue & Lonesome was recorded in just three days in December 2015. In April 2016, at the launch of the Rolling Stones career retrospective Exhibitionism, the band confirmed that their new album was due to be released “some time in the autumn”. Richards said the album would feature “a lot of Chicago blues”. Eric Clapton plays guitar on two tracks; he was recording his own album in the same studio as the Stones were and was asked to play on a few tracks. The album is entirely blues-based, consisting of covers of artists such as Howlin’ Wolf and Little Walter.

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This is the first album since Dirty Work (1986) to not feature any guitar playing from Jagger (who instead concentrates completely on vocals and harmonica), although he is pictured in the album’s booklet playing guitar during the album’s sessions. It is also the first album since It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (1974) to not feature a lead vocal from Richards. Likewise, it is also the first album since Dirty Work to release a lead single that was not a Jagger/Richards composition with “Just Your Fool”.

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On 6 October 2016, the Rolling Stones changed their “tongue and lips” logo, which first appeared on their Sticky Fingers album, from red to blue.

On 8 November 2016, the Rolling Stones released a video for “Hate to See You Go”.

On 25 November 2016, the Stones released a one-track limited edition electric blue 10″ vinyl record of “Ride ‘Em on Down” (on the UMC label) on the occasion of the Record Store Day Black Friday 2016. The track is a cover of Eddie Taylor’s “Ride ‘Em on Down” originally recorded by Taylor in Chicago on 5 December 1955 for the Vee-Jay Label (and released as VJ 185).

On 1 December 2016, they released a video for “Ride ‘Em on Down”. The video features actress Kristen Stewart driving through Los Angeles in a blue 1968 Ford Mustang Fastback.

Ron Wood

During its first week the album moved 106,000 sales to debut at No. 1 on the UK Albums Chart, the second-highest opening sales week for an album in the UK in 2016. On 3 February 2017 it was certified Platinum there, for sales over 300,000 copies. It also debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 with 123,000 album-equivalent units, of which 120,000 were pure album sales. It was also the No. 2 best selling album of the week in the US. Despite strong initial sales, the album remains to this day the only Stones’ studio album without a certification in the USA. By 17 February 2017 the album had reached global sales of 2,000,000.

Blue & Lonesome was met with positive reviews from critics noted at review aggregator Metacritic. This release received a weighted average score of 82 out of 100, based on 21 reviews. Kitty Empire from The Observer called it “a labour of love”, while Alexis Petridis of The Guardian said the Stones here are “more alive than they’ve sounded for years”. Robert Christgau was less impressed in Vice, saying the album is “a sodden thing – many old rockers have recorded sharper, spunkier, wiser music”.

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The album won Album of the Year at the 2017 Jazz FM Awards. The Rolling Stones also won the Blues Artist of the Year Award at the event, held in April 2017.

On January 28, 2018, Blue & Lonesome received a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album of the Year at the 60th Annual Grammy Awards. The award was the Stones’ third Grammy of their career and their first win since the 1995 show. (by wikipedia)

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As Keith Richards tells it, the Rolling Stones’ first-ever all-blues album is the result of the band learning how to play in the unfamiliar surroundings of Mark Knopfler’s British Grove Studios. To ease into the new place, the Stones decided to knock out a version of Little Walter’s “Blue and Lonesome” and it sounded good enough that the band decided to cut a few more covers, winding up with a full album of Chicago blues in a few days. The Stones haven’t worked at such swift speed in decades — not since the early ’60s, when they were churning out two albums a year — and much of the appeal of Blue & Lonesome lies in its casualness: by being tossed off, the album highlights how the Stones play together as a band, blending instinct and skill. Blue & Lonesome isn’t a showcase for virtuoso playing — even Eric Clapton’s two smoldering solos are part of the tapestry — but rather a groove record, emphasizing feel and interplay while never losing sight of the song.

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Such commitment to song is one of the reasons Blue & Lonesome winds up as an unexpected triumph from Mick Jagger. A blues album from the Stones always seemed like a dream project for Keith Richards, who always championed the band’s blues roots, but it’s Jagger who dominates the album, playing searing harp and singing with nuance and power. Always a guarded performer — back in 1974, he scoffed at the notion of letting his feelings flood on the page — Jagger seems freed, pouring heart into the slow burners and uptempo shuffles alike. The rest of the Stones match his commitment and that’s what makes Blue & Lonesome something remarkable. Conceptually, it’s clever — if this winds up being the last Rolling Stones album, it provides a nice bookend to their 1964 debut — but it’s artistically satisfying because it’s the Rolling Stones allowing themselves to simply lay back and play for sheer enjoyment. It’s a rare thing that will likely seem all the more valuable over the years. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar)
+
Eric Clapton (slide guitar on 06., guitar on 12.)
Matt Clifford (keyboards)
Darryl Jones (bass)
Jim Keltner (percussion on 09.)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Just Your Fool (Walter) 2.16
02. Commit A Crime (Burnett) 3.38
03. Blue And Lonesome (Walter) 3.07
04. All Of Your Love (Sam) 4.46
05. I Gotta Go (Walter) 3.26
06. Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson/Horton) 4.31
07. Ride ‘Em On Down (Taylor) 2.49
08. Hate To See You Go (Walter) 3.21
09. Hoo Doo Blues (Hicks/West) 2.37
10. Little Rain (Abner Jr./Reed) 3.32
11. Just Like I Treat You (Dixon) 3.24
12. I Can’t Quit You Baby (Dixon) 5.13

CD1

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The Rolling Stones – It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll (1974)

FrontCover1It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll is the 12th British and 14th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. It was the last Rolling Stones album for guitarist Mick Taylor and the songwriting and recording of the album’s title track had a connection to Taylor’s eventual replacement, Ronnie Wood. The album also marked the 10th anniversary since the release of the band’s debut album, The Rolling Stones. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll combines the core blues and rock ‘n’ roll-oriented sound with elements of funk and reggae. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll reached number one in the United States and number two in the UK.

Though it wasn’t as successful as their prior albums, It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was an important transitional album for the Rolling Stones. Long-time producer Jimmy Miller was out, and the album was self-produced by guitarist Keith Richards and singer Mick Jagger under the pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins”. Guitarist Mick Taylor missed the initial recording sessions with health problems, and ended up quitting the Rolling Stones a few months after the album’s release. The rest of the instrumentation included bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts, as well as frequent collaborators Ian Stewart, Nicky Hopkins, and Billy Preston, and featured the first appearance of percussionist Ray Cooper, who would continue to work with the Rolling Stones into the 1980s.

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The title track bears special note as it was recorded separately from the rest of the album. The basic rhythm track had been laid down by members of the Faces, including rhythm guitarist Ronnie Wood and drummer Kenney Jones during a jam session with Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and bassist Willie Weeks. Jagger liked the song so much, he brought the basic track to Richards, who added some guitar overdubs, and after some polishing, was put on the album as-is. After Taylor left the Rolling Stones at the end of 1974, the band would approach Wood to become a full-time member.

Work began on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll following the Rolling Stones’ autumn 1973 European tour. Production began in November at Munich, Germany’s Musicland Studios. According to guitarist Keith Richards, “We were really hot (off the road) and ready just to play some new material.” The recording sessions were attended by Belgian painter Guy Peellaert, who Mick Jagger invited to do the album cover after seeing his work in the book Rock Dreams, which featured illustrations of various rock musicians such as the Stones. Peellaert eventually painted the band as “rock deities,” descending a temple staircase, surrounded by young girls and women worshiping them in Grecian clothing. The artist refused to sign a deal of exclusivity, and in 1974 provided the album art for David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs.

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The album was at first developed as a half-live, half-studio production with one side of the album featuring live performances from the Stones’ European tour while the other side was to be composed of newly recorded cover versions of the band’s favourite R&B songs. Covers recorded included a take of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, Jimmy Reed’s “Shame Shame Shame,” and The Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.” Soon the band began working off riffs by Richards and new ideas by Mick Jagger and the original concept was scrapped in favour of an album with all-new material. The cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” was the only recording to make the cut, while the “Drift Away” cover is a popular bootleg.

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It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll marked the Stones’ first effort in the producer’s chair since Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the first for Jagger and Richards under their pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins.” On the choice to produce, Richards said at the time:

“I think we’d come to a point with Jimmy (Miller) where the contribution level had dropped because it’d got to be a habit, a way of life, for Jimmy to do one Stones album a year. He’d got over the initial sort of excitement which you can feel on Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Also, Mick and I felt that we wanted to try and do it ourselves because we really felt we knew much more about techniques and recording and had our own ideas of how we wanted things to go. Goats Head Soup hadn’t turned out as we wanted to – not blaming Jimmy or anything like that… But it was obvious that it was time for a change in that particular part of the process of making records.”[2]

Starting with this release, all future Rolling Stones albums would either be produced by themselves or in collaboration with an outside producer.

Most of the album’s backing tracks were recorded first at Musicland; solo vocals were recorded later by Jagger, about whom Richards would say, “he often comes up with his best stuff alone in the studio with just an engineer.”

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The song “Luxury” showed the band’s growing interest in reggae music, while “Till the Next Goodbye” and “If You Really Want to Be My Friend” continued their immersion in ballads. Seven of the album’s 10 songs crack the four-minute mark, a feature that would come to be disparaged during the rising punk rock scene of the late 1970s.

Ronnie Wood, a long-time acquaintance of the band, began to get closer to the Rolling Stones during these sessions after he invited Mick Taylor to play on his debut album, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do. Taylor spent some time recording and hanging out at Wood’s house The Wick. By chance, Richards was asked one night by Wood’s wife at the time, Krissy, to join them at the guitarist’s home.[citation needed] While there, Richards recorded some tracks with Wood and quickly developed a close friendship, with Richards going as far as moving into Wood’s guest room.[citation needed] Jagger soon entered the mix and it was here that the album’s lead single and title track, “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”, was first recorded. Wood worked closely on the track with Jagger, who subsequently took the song and title for their album. The released version of this song features Wood on 12-string acoustic guitar.

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was Mick Taylor’s last album with the Rolling Stones, and he played on just seven of the 10 tracks (he did not play on tracks 2, 3 or 6).

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Similar to receiving no writing credits on the Stones’ previous album, Goats Head Soup, Taylor reportedly had made songwriting contributions to “Till the Next Goodbye” and “Time Waits for No One,” but on the album jacket, all original songs were credited to Jagger/Richards. Taylor said in 1997:

“I did have a falling out with Mick Jagger over some songs I felt I should have been credited with co-writing on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. We were quite close friends and co-operated quite closely on getting that album made. By that time Mick and Keith weren’t really working together as a team so I’d spend a lot of time in the studio.”[6]

Taylor’s statement contradicts Jagger’s earlier comment concerning the album. Jagger stated in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview about “Time Waits for No One” that Taylor “maybe threw in a couple of chords.”

Alongside the usual outside contributors, namely Billy Preston, Nicky Hopkins and unofficial member Ian Stewart, Elton John sideman Ray Cooper acted as percussionist for the album. Several songs were finished songs and overdubs and mixing were performed at Jagger’s home, Stargroves, in the early summer of 1974. (by wikipedia)

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It’s uneven, but at times It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll catches fire. The songs and performances are stronger than those on Goats Head Soup; the tossed-off numbers sound effortless, not careless. Throughout, the Stones wear their title as the “World’s Greatest Rock & Roll Band” with a defiant smirk, which makes the bitter cynicism of “If You Can’t Rock Me” and the title track all the more striking, and the reggae experimentation of “Luxury,” the aching beauty of “Time Waits for No One,” and the agreeable filler of “Dance Little Sister” and “Short and Curlies” all the more enjoyable. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

“It’s Only Rock n Roll”, like it’s predecessor “Goats Head Soup” and follow up, ( a couple of years later), “Black and Blue ” are underrated albums. The title track “It’s Only Rock n Roll” and “If You Can’t Rock Me” are the Stones at their swaggering best. “Dance Little Sister” is in the same vein. “Time Waits For No One” is a beautiful song. “Fingerprint File”, a great number. “Luxury” another favorite. “Beggars Banquet”, “Let It Bleed”, Sticky Fingers” and “Exile on Main Street” are masterpieces. But the other two mentioned and this one are great albums.”Till the next goodbye” is a lovely song. (by Graham Paterson)

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, guitar on 04 – 10.) (4)
Keith Richards (guitar, bass on 01., background vocals)
Mick Taylor (guitar, bass on 10.)
Charlie Watts (drums, percussion)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer on 05. + 10.)
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Ray Cooper (percussion on 01., 02., 05. + 06.)
Nicky Hopkins (piano on 04. – 06., 08. + 10.)
Charlie Jolly (tabla on 10.)
Ed Leach (cowbell on 02.)
Blue Magic (background vocals on 08.)
Billy Preston (piano on 01., 02. + 10, clavinet on 02. + 10., organ on 08.)
Ian Stewart – piano (3, 7, 9)
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Basic track on “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”:
David Bowie (background vocals)
Kenney Jones (drums)
Willie Weeks (bass)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, background vocals)

Muro do Classic Rock

Tracklist:
01. If You Can’t Rock Me 3.48
02. Ain’t Too Proud To Beg 3.32
03. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) 5.06
04. Till The Next Goodbye 4.39
05. Time Waits For No One 6.48
06. Luxury 5.03
07. Dance Little Sister 4.12
08. If You Really Want To Be My Friend 6.19
09. Short And Curlies 2.45
10. Fingerprint File 7.01

All tracks written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards,
except “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” which was written by Norman Whitfield and Eddie Holland

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Mick Jagger & Uschi Obermaier in the “La Cave” club, Munich/Germany, 1974

The Rolling Stones – Philadelphia Special II (1990)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Rolling Stones American Tour 1972 was a much-publicized and much-written-about concert tour of the United States and Canada in June and July 1972 by The Rolling Stones. Constituting the band’s first performances in the United States following the Altamont Free Concert in December 1969, critic Dave Marsh would later write that the tour was “part of rock and roll legend” and one of the “benchmarks of an era.”

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards share a microphone during the June 1972 Winterland shows

The tour in part supported the group’s Exile on Main St. album, which was released a few weeks earlier on 12 May. It was also part of a tour-America-every-three-years rotation that the group established in 1969 and maintained through 1981.

On the first show of the tour, 3 June in Vancouver, British Columbia, 31 policemen were treated for injuries when more than 2,000 fans attempted to crash the Pacific Coliseum.

TourPosterIn San Diego on 13 June, there were 60 arrests and 15 injured during disturbances. In Tucson, Arizona on 14 June, an attempt by 300 youths to storm the gates led to police using tear gas.[3] While in Chicago for three appearances on 19 and 20 June, the group stayed at Hugh Hefner’s original Playboy Mansion in the Gold Coast district.[4] Eighty-one people were arrested at the two sellout Houston shows on 25 June, mostly for marijuana possession and other minor drug offences.[5] There were 61 arrests in the large crowd at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. on the Fourth of July.[6]

On 13 July police had to block 2,000 ticket-less fans from trying to gain access to the show in Detroit.[7] On 17 July at the Montreal Forum a bomb blew up in the Stones’ equipment van, and replacement gear had to be flown in; then it was discovered that 3,000 forged tickets had been sold, causing a fan riot and a late start to the concert.[2] The next day, 18 July, the Stones’ entourage got into a fight with photographer Andy Dickerman in Rhode Island, and Jagger and Richards landed in jail, imperilling that night’s show at the Boston Garden. Boston Mayor Kevin White, fearful of a riot if the show were cancelled, intervened to bail them out; the show went on, albeit with another late start. Dickerman would later file a £22,230 lawsuit against the band.

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The tour ended with four shows over three consecutive nights at New York City’s Madison Square Garden, the first night of which saw 10 arrests and two policemen injured,[9] and the last leading to confrontations between the crowd outside Madison Square Garden and the police.[10] The last show on 26 July, Jagger’s birthday, had balloons and confetti falling from Madison Square Garden’s ceiling and Jagger blowing the candles off a huge cake. Pies were also wheeled in, leading to a pie fight between the Rolling Stones and the audience.

Following the final performance, a party was held in Jagger’s honor by Ahmet Ertegun at the St. Regis New York. Guests included Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Andy Warhol, the Capote entourage, and Zsa Zsa Gabor, while the Count Basie Orchestra provided musical entertainment. At the event, Dylan characterized the tour as “encompassing” and “the beginning of cosmic consciousness.”

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Rock critic Robert Christgau reported that the mood of the shows was friendly, with Jagger “undercut[ting] his fabled demonism by playing the clown, the village idiot, the marionette.”

The official name of the tour was ‘American Tour 1972’. However, among the press and fans the tour is widely known as the ‘Stones Touring Party 1972’, derived from the laminates handed out by the management to crew, family, friends and press, granting access to the various area’s at the concert venues and hotels. ‘Stones Touring Party’ was then shortened to ‘STP’, the street name of the drug 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine, where STP stands for “Serenity, Tranquility and Peace”. In 2015 Jose Cuervo in association with the Rolling Stones launched a brand of tequila with a marketing campaign stating that the STP Tour was known as the ‘tequila sunrise tour’. This statement does not hold any historical truth.

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Several writers were assigned to cover the tour. Truman Capote was commissioned to write a travelogue for Rolling Stone. Accompanied by prominent New York socialites Lee Radziwill and Peter Beard, Capote did not mesh well with the group; he and his entourage abandoned the tour in New Orleans before resurfacing for the final shows at Madison Square Garden.[13] Having struggled with writer’s block since the publication of In Cold Blood in 1966, he failed to complete his feature, tentatively titled “It Will Soon Be Here.” Rolling Stone ultimately recouped its stake by assigning Andy Warhol to interview Capote about the tour in 1973. In the interview, Capote alleged that tour doctor Laurence Badgley (a 1968 graduate of the Yale School of Medicine who was later retained by Led Zeppelin for their 1977 North American tour) had a “super-Lolita complex” and initiated the statutory rape of a high school student (also filmed by Robert Frank) on the band’s business jet during a flight to Washington, D.C.

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Terry Southern, a close friend of Keith Richards since the late 1960s, wrote about the tour for Saturday Review in what proved to be one of his last major journalistic assignments. Southern and Beard developed a friendship on the tour and collaborated intermittently on The End of the Game (an unfilmed screenplay) for over two decades.

Robert Greenfield’s S.T.P.: A Journey Through America With The Rolling Stones (derived from his tour reportage for Rolling Stone) was published in 1974. Greenfield had already covered the band’s 1971 British Tour for Rolling Stone and was granted unlimited access to the band’s affairs. Although Greenfield was initially assigned as the magazine’s sole correspondent for the tour before a last-minute deal was reached with Capote, he was permitted to continue in his assignment, paralleling Hunter S. Thompson and Timothy Crouse’s two-pronged coverage of the contemporaneous 1972 United States presidential election for the magazine.

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Dick Cavett hosted a one-hour special shot before the concluding New York engagement of performances. Capote appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and several other talk shows, talking about his experiences on the tour. New York radio host Alex Bennett reported on the first Madison Square Garden show as soon as he got back from it.

No official live album was released from the tour at the time, although one was planned as far as having a front and back cover designed and studio touch-ups being made on several recorded tracks. Eventually, the album was shelved due to contractual disputes with Allen Klein.

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Two films of the tour were produced. The concert film Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones! only saw a limited theatrical release in 1974. Aside from an Australian VHS release in the early 1980s, it wasn’t officially available on home video until 2010. The film’s complete soundtrack was released as an album by Eagle Records/Universal in 2017.

Robert Frank’s Cocksucker Blues is a documentary shot in cinéma vérité style; several cameras were available for anyone in the entourage to pick up and start shooting backstage parties, drug use, and roadie and groupie antics, including a groupie in a hotel room injecting heroin. The film came under a court order which forbade it from being shown other than in very restricted circumstances. The film has since surfaced online in various bootlegged versions of varying quality. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s a superb bootleg from this tour.

This is an excellent soundboard recording from one of the best Stones’ tours ever, featuring the great Mick Taylor on leadguitar.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals)
Mick Taylor (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Nicky Hopkins (piano)
Bobby Keys (saxophone)
Jim Price (trumpet, trombone)

Booklet1

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Brown Sugar 3.42
02. Bitch 4.24
03. Rocks Off 3.46
04. Gimme Shelter 4:41
05. Dead Flowers 4.15
06. Happy 3.08
07. Tumbling Dice 4.49
08. Love In Vain 6.18
09. Sweet Virginia 4.05

CD 2:
2-1 You Can’t Always Get What You Want 7.57
2-2 All Down The Line 4.02
2-3 Midnight Rambler 10.08
2-4 Rip This Joint 2.10
2-5 Jumping Jack Flash 3.34
2-6 Street Fighting Man 4.17
2-7 Tumbling Dice II 4.29
2-8 Bitch II 4.29

All songs written bei Keith Richards & Mick Jagger,
except “Love In Vain” which was written by Robert Johnson

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The Rolling Stones – Got Live If You Want It! (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgGot LIVE If You Want It! is the first live album by British rock band The Rolling Stones. It was released in the US in late 1966. It was also released as Have You Seen Your Mother LIVE! on Decca in England but for export only; it was not released in the UK under this alternate title.

At the time, it was not released officially in the UK; instead, the British market had the 1965 EP release Got Live If You Want It!, from which the album’s name derived (a different recording of “I’m Alright” appeared on this EP.) The album had been compiled as a result of a contractual obligation with US distributor London Records, and the band themselves were not happy with it. Two songs (“I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” and “Fortune Teller”) were not even live recordings, but studio takes, overdubbed with audience background noises. They consequently disowned it, arguing that Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert (1970) was their true live album debut.

The performances captured for Got Live If You Want It reportedly occurred on 1 and 7 October 1966, in Newcastle upon Tyne and Bristol while on their last UK tour for three years, despite the album’s assertion that the recording hailed from the Royal Albert Hall.

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The album was issued in December, as the group were nearing the end of Between the Buttons’ sessions. It reached No. 6 in the US in early 1967 and went gold. Decca Records UK released the LP as Have You Seen Your Mother Live! for export purposes, while King Records Japan released the same LP under the title Hits LIVE. (by wikipedia)

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A live document of the Brian Jones-era Rolling Stones sounds enticing, but the actual product is a letdown, owing to a mixture of factors, some beyond the producers’ control and other very much their doing. The sound on the original LP was lousy, and for that matter not all of it’s live; a couple of old studio R&B covers were augmented by screaming fans that had obviously been overdubbed. Still, the album has its virtues as a historical document, with some extremely important caveats for anyone not old enough to recognize the inherent limitations in a live album of this vintage. The first concerns the history of this release — the Got Live if You Want It! album (not to be confused with the superior sounding but much shorter, U.K.-only extended-play single, issued in England in mid-1965) was a U.S.-only release in late 1966, intended to feed a seemingly insatiable American market.

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As a best-of album had been issued in March 1966 and Aftermath in June of the same year, and the Stones had just come off of a major U.S. tour (which proved to be their last for over three years), another album was needed to bridge the gap in America between the those earlier LPs, the two most recent singles — “Paint It, Black” and “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?” — and the Between the Buttons album, which was not going to make it out in time for the Christmas season.

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The result was Got Live If You Want It!, which was intended to be recorded at a concert at Royal Albert Hall on September 23, 1966, the Stones’ first live appearance in England in over a year. The problem was, as was memorably stated by a writer in Rolling Stone magazine a few years later, the Stones in those days didn’t play concerts — they played riots, and that was precisely what happened at Royal Albert Hall, as several hundred fans charged the stage, overwhelming the band before they’d gotten through the opening number “Paint It, Black.” The scene was captured in the footage later used in the promotional film for “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?” What was left of the show, once order was restored, was taped, along with at least two other shows on that tour over the next week or so; and it should also be remembered that in those days the group seldom played for more than 30 to 40 minutes, and sometimes less than that, much like the Beatles in concert. And the audience noise, much as it was with the Beatles, was overwhelming in the days before stacks of Marshall amps became routine in a band’s equipment; indeed, at some shows, at certain moments, only the tempo of Charlie Watts’ drumming could tell you which song the group was playing, and the bandmembers couldn’t hear much more than the crowd — matters such as tuning instruments and precise playing, even down to the most routine changes, became exercises in futility.

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Add to that the limitations of live recording, and the inevitable sound leakages and other problems, and one can see how this album was easier to conceive than to actually bring off successfully. When all of the tapes were assembled, the producers were left with about 28 minutes of material that was usable to varying degrees, and even that was somewhat wishful thinking by the standards of the day. (Apart from the Kinks’ Live at Kelvin Hall [aka The Live Kinks], few groups or record labels in 1967 had the courage to release a concert album that sounded like the real article.) And here, someone — the Stones’ producer, London Records, whoever — started fiddling around, twirling knobs, changing balances, and making the stuff supposedly sound “better,” and bringing in a couple of studio tracks, “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” and “Fortune Teller,” and laying on some crowd noise to bring the show up to an acceptable length for an LP. ( by Richie Unterberger)

But: We can hear the early Stones … loud and proud, hot and dirty !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, percussion)
Brian Jones (guitar, background vocals, harmonica, appalachian dulcimer)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums, percussion)
Bill Wyman (bass, background vocals)
+
Ian ‘Stu’ Stewart (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Under My Thumb (Jagger/Richards) 2.54
02. Get Off Of My Cloud (Jagger/Richards) 2.54
03. Lady Jane (Jagger/Richards) 3.08
04. Not Fade Away (Petty/Hardin) 2.04
05. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (Redding/Butler) 2.55
06. Fortune Teller (Neville) 1.57
07. The Last Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.08
08. 19th Nervous Breakdown (Jagger/Richards) 3.31
09. Time Is On My Side (Jagger/Richards) 2.49
10. I’m Alright (McDaniel) 2.27
11. Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow? (Jagger/Richards) 2.19
12. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 3.05

Introduction by Long John Baldry

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The Rolling Stones – Sydney (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgI was given this cassette of the 2UW 1966 Stones Sydney broadcast in 1972 (I was 16) by a chap only 4 years older than me who went on to be one of Australia’s leading music historians. Hadn’t seen him for years except on the telly /radio or on the rare occasion on the opposite side of a music venue. After The Monkees Sydney Opera House June 2019 concert I bumped into him in the foyer, re-introduced myself, we chatted, then shared a train ride home to my suburb where he had parked his car.

I took the opportunity to quiz him about the 2UW Broadcast cassette he had given me decades before. Such as, did he record it himself from the radio at the time? If not did someone else tape it, was my copy a dub from a cassette or reel to reel, did he have any idea when 2UW broadcast the show? I was dead set gobsmacked when he replied he couldn’t remember having this cassette & most likely it was his copy that he gave me.

So what do I have? Methinks i have either a 1st or 2nd generation. I’m sure this would have been aired on radio like the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast with advertisements / radio station ID, probably too hard to edit them out at the time of taping so possibly this cassette could be a dub from that but with the ads removed. What is present In track 12 Satisfaction at the 3.41 mark are 5 loud pips. I’ve been told that these could represent that it’s 5.00 PM at the time of this broadcast or the 5.00 PM news was coming up next.

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The cassette also included two radio reports. The first of these is about the Stones arrival at Kingsford Smith Sydney Airport on the 16th February 1966. The second a short interview with the Stones in Sydney most likely before the 18th February shows. Unfortunately both are incomplete. Both conducted by Ward “Pally” Austin, a Sydney Radio 2UW DJ. In the 60’s he was probably Sydney’s most famous albeit notorious disc jockey. Ward also introduces the band at the concert.

The 2UW Feb 1966 interview with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones (I think Keith Richards is in there as well) cuts in after a discussion has already started regarding As Tears Go By. Jagger states he recorded it first before Marianne Faithful but his voice was deemed to be a bit camp so they decided to re record it again in a deeper voice.

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Mick & Brian talk about engagements prior to marriage. Ward asks the boys what they’re going to do while in Sydney.
Jagger in an exaggerated Aussie accent talks about going down the beach, doing a bit of water skiing, watch the old sheila’s, sheilas being Australian slang for females, young or old. (The equivalent of the terms birds in the UK & broads in the USA.)

During the interview a voice comes on to tell us that at the time 2UW was one of Sydney’s lowest rated radio stations but they’d been building a new image of 24 hour nonstop teenage music. The voice continues that this has paid off because 2UW is now Sydney’s 3rd highest rated radio station & Ward is the top DJ.

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In the 80’s I had a fling with a 2UW employee who when I asked if they had access to the station’s radio library, replied they did as it was part of the job. I asked if it they would be agreeable to conduct a search of the 2UW library for me looking for the broadcast, “no worries” was the reply. And if located could they one way or the other obtain a copy of it for me. They searched high & low but nowhere could they find the 1966 Broadcast nor could any documentation regarding the broadcast be found. Probably long ago wiped or discarded.

The broadcast does not feature the 1st song of the concert The Last Time, it starts with the 2nd song of the night Mercy Mercy. audiowhore & myself have tried to find the actual date of the broadcast but have been unsuccessful. But he did find a newspaper ad for the Brisbane 4BH Stones 1966 live broadcast aired on the 22nd February 1966, so perhaps the Sydney broadcast was aired the day after the show as well. Hopefully one day the Brisbane broadcast might magically surface just as the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast did decades later.

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We couldn’t find any reviews of the Sydney 1966 concerts apart from a very brief show report in Go-Set magazine but I have the next best thing. Someone who not only attended this very show but took photographs as well. My friend Big Knob (Big from here on in) attended this concert as a 20 year old, not as a professional photographer but as a fan whose hobby / passion was photography.

Not even a year after attending this show he would be drafted into the Australian army & fighting in Vietnam. I asked him if in his days of being an audience member taking photographs at concerts (starting with The Beatles in 1964) was he hassled in any way for doing so. He replied no, it was the opposite, people would come up to him asking why was he was bothering to take photographs. He told me that if any newspaper photographer did bother to turn up to shoot a show, they would grab a few photos & then bugger off asap.

When audiowhore & myself searched newspaper articles regarding the Stones Australian 1966 tour we located a few pro-shot B/W Sydney photos but they hadn’t been reproduced in very good quality & in all honesty Big’s photos piss all over them & in colour too! It’s his photographs that he has so kindly allowed me to use for the artwork. The inside front cover photograph with Brian playing harmonica was taken during Not Fade Away. The back cover photograph with Brian sitting down playing the organ is That’s How Strong My Love Is.

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The show was held in the Commemorative Auditorium which is one of the halls inside the Sydney Showgrounds complex, it’s only a hop, skip & jump from the Hordern Pavilion where I would see many groups in the early 70’s to late 80’s. In some of the photographs you can see in the background a stained glass window of a reversed map of Australia on which NSW is the only state coloured in & because this was the early show the sunlight is streaming through it. Of course outside the building the map was the correct way round.

The concert was advertised (as can be seen in the newspaper add on the Back Inside Cover artwork) with the band being on the Centre Revolving Stage, which Big informed me was transported over from the Sydney Stadium at Rushcutters Bay. This would have been a bit of a task to do so. This stage was not electric but hand cranked around by stage hands, with a few songs performed to the front, then cranked around to the right for the next couple of numbers & so on.

RollingStones1966_07In the artwork photographs you can notice that the reversed map of Australia appears in slightly different positions. The photograph of the Stones taken from the back that features on the back inner artwork was taken when the stage had revolved around. I asked Big if he had moved around to take that particular photograph, he replied that he’d taken all his photos basically staying in the same position.

Before Not Fade Away Jagger can be heard asking “Will you stop this thing this going round” referring to the stage. Apparently it was annoying him in some way. Big can’t remember if Jagger’s plea was granted but he does remember that the American singer P.J. Proby’s scarf was caught up in this stage the year before. Jagger says “Where are we?” followed by “Wait right there” & then something undecipherable in Satisfaction that could also be a another reference to the revolving stage.

Big definitely remembers the endless screaming of the sheilas, says it was just as loud as it was for the Beatles Sydney shows two years previously. He added that some brave girls would dash out of their seats, run past the cops to throw streamers at the stage, in the photographs some of these can be seen wrapped around various Stones & their instruments. I was aware that on this tour the Stones where supported by another UK band The Searchers plus New Zealand band Max Merritt & The Meteors but I was unaware until Big informed me that two Australian acts were also on the bill. They being Tony Barber and Steve & The Board.

Although this recording is certainly not Hi-Fi by any stretch I love hearing Brian’s contributions in this Sydney show. This live version of Satisfaction being my mid-60’s favourite version. Revisiting this show finds me wishing that one day soon hopefully the Stones From The Vaults series will release a Brian Jones era live concert instead of endless latter day releases that feature Ron Wood – the king of bum notes & out of tune solos.

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Australian Women’s Weekly Magazine (February 23rd 1966)

I first traded this recording with Stones collectors in the late 70’s, but when I told people I had this recording I was asked a number of times how could I be sure this radio show was Sydney. Easy I wrote back – Ward Austin who can be heard introducing the show was a Sydney DJ plus Jagger himself can be heard shortly before Satisfaction starts saying “Thank you very much Sydney”. Although the word Sydney is not as loud as the preceding words because of background tuning, Jagger definitely says Sydney.

I’m sure it was one of my trades that became the source for it’s appearance on the Japanese Silver Bootleg VGP Label entitled He Is Not Dead because it has the same tape wobble in Get Off Of My Cloud plus the radio pips in Satisfaction. But Ward Austin’s concert introduction is missing and the two 2UW radio segments didn’t make it either. IMHO my original cassette version has slightly more definition & is somewhat superior than the VGP title & other CD-R versions I’ve heard.

Thanks to my old friend for the original cassette, Big Knob for his photographs & audiowhore for the 2019 transfer and mixing and last but not least Bobel. (by wazza50)

Recorded live at the Commemorative Auditorium, Sydney Showgrounds, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; February 18, 1966 (1st show). Passable Sydney 2UW Radio broadcast (unknown airdate)

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, tambourine)
Brian Jones (guitar, organ, harmonica, background vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #1 1:21
(Soundtrack From UK TV Report)
02. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #2 1:57
(Ward Austin 2UW Report – Cuts out / then 2UW Ward Austin Stones Interview – Start of interview missing)

03. Intro 0.29
04. Mercy, Mercy (Covay/Miller) 2.19
05. She Said Yeah (Christy/Jackson) 2.01
06. Play With Fire (Jagger/Richards) 2.20
07. Not Fade Away (Hardin/Petty)  2.16
08. Spider And The Fly (Jagger/Richards)  2:57
09. That’s How Strong My Love Is (Jamison) 2.09
10. Get Off Of My Cloud (Jagger/Richards) 3.06
11. 19th Nervous Breakdown (Jagger/Richards) 3.52
12. Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 5.03

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Thanks to wazza50 for sharing the show at Dime

Rolling Stones – Seattle Supersonic (1981)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Rolling Stones’ American Tour 1981 was a concert tour of stadiums and arenas in the United States to promote the album Tattoo You. It was the largest grossing tour of 1981 with $50 million in ticket sales. Roughly three million concert goers attended the concerts, setting various ticket sales records.[2] The 5 December show in New Orleans set an indoor concert attendance record which stood for 33 years.

Initially, singer Mick Jagger was not interested in another tour, but guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood were, as were elements of the press and public. Jagger eventually relented. As with previous tours, the American Tour 1981 was promoted by Bill Graham.

The band rehearsed at Long View Farm, North Brookfield, Massachusetts, from August 14 to September 25, 1981. and played a warm-up show at the Sir Morgan’s Cove club in Worcester, Massachusetts on 14 September. Although they were billed as Little Boy Blue & The Cockroaches, word got out and some 11,000 fans pushed and shoved outside the 300-capacity venue. The Mayor of Boston Kevin H. White stopped the notion of further public rehearsals, saying, “The appearance here of Mr. Jagger is not necessarily in the public interest.”

Tourmap

The tour’s elaborate and colorful stage was the work of Japanese designer Kazuhide Yamazaki. “Most concerts that took place outdoors at the time were played during the day,” recalled Jagger, “probably because it was cheaper, I don’t know. So we had the bright, bright primary colors… and we had these enormous images of a guitar, a car and a record—an Americana idea—which worked very well for afternoon shows.”

Most shows later in the tour featured a cherry picker and the release of hundreds of balloons at the show’s end. During the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum stops on the tour, the band played a Friday and Sunday show and USC had a football game in between on Saturday. As a televised football game, viewers could see the full stage set-up and often field goals would land on stage at the East end zone. Two of the three opening bands, George Thorogood, and The J Geils Band were received well, but the third – a still somewhat unknown Prince – barely got through three songs before being booed off.

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The tour was the largest-grossing tour of 1981, but for several years to come. It grossed $50 million in ticket sales when the average ticket price was $16. Roughly three million attended the concerts. The Stones set many records that remain unbroken. The JFK Stadium shows in Philadelphia prompted nearly 4 million requests via post cards for tickets (a method used at the time to prevent scalping); requests for the five arena shows in the New York metropolitan area were in the millions. The New York Times stated, “The tour is expected to be the most profitable in the history of rock & roll; its sheer size has been staggering…ticket requests for these shows ran into the millions…” The tour indeed did turn out to be profitable: the Stones were estimated to have reaped about $22 million after expenses.

The tour also was an early milestone for the rock industry by selling advertising rights to Jōvan Musk. Jōvan paid $1 million to put their name on Stones tickets. This attracted considerable attention in the business media, as Jōvan’s image of a pleasant fragrance was at odds with the Stones’ bad boys image. But the Stones behaved well on tour, and rock tour corporate sponsorships soon became the norm.

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In another marketing first, the 18 December performance at Virginia’s Hampton Coliseum was broadcast as “The World’s Greatest Rock’n’Roll Party”, on pay-per-view and in closed circuit cinemas. It was the first such use of pay-per-view for a music event. Keith Richards hit a fan who ran onstage with his guitar.

Also of note was the 14 December performance at Kansas City’s Kemper Arena. Former Stones guitarist Mick Taylor joined the band for a large part of the performance. Ronnie Wood was not happy with Taylor, however: “[He was] bulldozing through parts of songs that should have been subtle, ignoring breaks and taking uninvited solos.” Other guests during the tour were Tina Turner (who would sing “Honky Tonk Women”), Chuck Leavell, Tower of Power and Sugar Blue. Turner, People reported, had toured with the Stones in 1966, and Jagger admitted he had “learned a lot of things” from her.

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In general, there was less backstage madness on the tour than on many previous outings. This was largely due to Richards having largely overcome his well-known drugs and alcohol problems; The New York Times wrote of Richards, “He looks healthy, he is playing brilliantly and his backup vocals are often so lusty that they drown out Mr. Jagger, who is working harder to hold up his end of things as result.” However, this and the 1982 tour were the last tours on which Richards contributed the majority of backup vocals; for future tours, additional singers were enlisted.

Several of the concerts were recorded and selected songs were released on 1982’s live Still Life. The Hal Ashby-directed concert film Let’s Spend the Night Together grossed $50 million. Possibly due to the film, most of the shows on this tour were professionally recorded. Bootleg evidence suggests that for 35 of the regular 50 shows from this tour, more than half of each concert is directly from the soundboard.

This was the Stones’ last tour of the United States until 1989. (by wikipedia)

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1981 is an embarassment of riches for any Stones fan due to the large number of great-sounding soundboards available from the US tour. This is a typical performance and setlist from the tour; I’ve always found Mick’s vocals to be fairly sloppy during this era, but overall the performance is good and the sound quality is great. (by ax179 at Dime, 2013)

Recorded live at the Kingdome, Seattle, WA; October 15, 1981
Very good soundboard.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals)
Ron Wood (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
+
Ian McLagan (keyboards, background vocals)
Ian Stewart (piano)
Ernie Watts (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. (Intro) Take The A-Train 1.51
02. Under My Thumb 3.49
03. When The Whip Comes Down 4.53
04. Let’s Spend The Night Together 4.09
05. Shattered 4.51
06. Neighbors 4.30
07. Black Limousine 3.48
08. Just My Imagination 6.37
09. Twenty Flight Rock 2.22
10. Let Me Go 4.07
11. Time is on My Side 3.47
12. Beast Of Burden 6.07
13. Waiting On aA Friend 5.22
14. Let It Bleed 7.20
15. You Can’t Always Get What You Want 8.04
16. Little T&A 3:34
17. Tumbling Dice 4.04
18. Band intros 0.52
19. She’s So Cold 3.52
20. All Down The Line 4.09
21. Hang Fire 2.55
22. Star Star 4.16
23. Miss You 6.16
24. Start Me Up 4.15
25. Honkey Tonk Women 3.21
26. Brown Sugar 3:37
27. Jumping Jack Flash 9.15
28. Satisfaction 6.47
29. (Outro) Star Spangled Banner (Jimi Hendrix Woodstock version, 1969) 4.04

All songs written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards
except:
“Take The A-Train” written by Billy Strahorn
“Star Spangled Banner” written by John Stafford Smith
“Twenty Flight Rock” written by   Eddie Cochran + Ned Fairchild

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Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet (1968)

OriginalFrontCover1It´s time to celebrate one of the most important albums of the Sixites:

Beggars Banquet is the seventh British and ninth American studio album by English rock band The Rolling Stones. It was released in December 1968 by Decca Records in the United Kingdom and London Records in the United States. The album marked a change in direction for the band following the psychedelic pop of their previous two albums, Between the Buttons and Their Satanic Majesties Request. Styles such as roots rock and a return to the blues rock sound that had marked early Stones recordings dominate the record, and the album is among the most instrumentally experimental of the band’s career, as they infuse Latin beats and instruments like the claves along side South Asian sounds from the sitar, tabla and shehnai and African-influnced conga rhythms. The album has frequently been ranked highly on many retrospective “great albums” lists, and forms the beginning of the most critically acclaimed time period of the Rolling Stones career.

Brian Jones, the band’s founder and early leader, had become increasingly unreliable in the studio due to his drug use, and it was the last Rolling Stones album to be released during his lifetime, though he also contributed to two songs on their next album Let It Bleed, which was released after his death.

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Glyn Johns, the album’s recording engineer and longtime collaborator of the band, said that Beggars Banquet signaled “the Rolling Stones’ coming of age … I think that the material was far better than anything they’d ever done before. The whole mood of the record was far stronger to me musically.” Producer Jimmy Miller described guitarist Keith Richards as “a real workhorse” while recording the album, mostly due to the infrequent presence of Brian Jones. When he did show up at the sessions, Jones behaved erratically due to his drug use and emotional problems. Miller said that Jones would “show up occasionally when he was in the mood to play, and he could never really be relied on:

When he would show up at a session—let’s say he had just bought a sitar that day, he’d feel like playing it, so he’d look in his calendar to see if the Stones were in. Now he may have missed the previous four sessions. We’d be doing let’s say, a blues thing. He’d walk in with a sitar, which was totally irrelevant to what we were doing, and want to play it. I used to try to accommodate him. I would isolate him, put him in a booth and not record him onto any track that we really needed. And the others, particularly Mick and Keith, would often say to me, ‘Just tell him to piss off and get the hell out of here’.

Brian Jones

Jones played sitar and tanpura on “Street Fighting Man”, acoustic guitar on “Parachute Woman”, slide guitar on “No Expectations”, harmonica on “Dear Doctor” and “Prodigal Son”, and Mellotron on “Jigsaw Puzzle” and “Stray Cat Blues”. In a television interview Jagger recalled that Brian’s slide guitar performance on “No Expectations” was the last time he contributed something with care. Other than Jones, the principle band members appeared extensively, with Keith Richards providing nearly all of the lead and rhythm guitar work, as well as playing bass on two others, in the place of Bill Wyman, who appears on the rest. Drummer Charlie Watts plays the drum kit on all but two tracks, as well as other percussion on the tracks that do not feature a full drum kit. Additional parts were played by keyboardist and frequent Stones collaborator Nicky Hopkins and percussionist Rocky Dijon, among others.

Ev’rywhere I hear the sound of marching, charging feet, boy
‘Cause summer’s here and the time is right
for fighting in the street, boy
But what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock ‘n’ roll band
‘Cause in sleepy London town
There’s just no place for a street fighting man
No

Hey! Think the time is right for a palace revolution
‘Cause where I live the game to play is compromise solution
Well, then what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock ‘n’ roll band
‘Cause in sleepy London town
There’s just no place for a street fighting man
No

Hey! Said my name is called disturbance
I’ll shout and scream, I’ll kill the king,
I’ll rail at all his servants
Well, what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock ‘n’ roll band
‘Cause in sleepy London town
There’s just no place for a street fighting man
No

Hey! Said my name is called disturbance
I’ll shout and scream, I’ll kill the king,
I’ll rail at all his servants
Well, what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock ‘n’ roll band
‘Cause in sleepy London town
There’s just no place for a street fighting man
No

The basic track of “Street Fighting Man” was recorded on an early Philips cassette deck at London’s Olympic Sound Studios, where Richards played a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic guitar, and Charlie Watts played on an antique, portable practice drum kit. Richards and Mick Jagger were mistakenly credited as writers on “Prodigal Son”, a cover of Robert Wilkins’s Biblical blues song.

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According to Keith Richards, the album’s title was thought up by British art dealer Christopher Gibbs. On 7 June 1968, a photoshoot for the album’s gatefold, with photographer Michael Joseph, was held at Sarum Chase, a mansion in Hampstead, London. Previously unseen images from the shoot were exhibited at the Blink Gallery in London in November and December 2008. The album’s original cover art, depicting a bathroom wall covered with graffiti, was rejected by the band’s record company, and their unsuccessful dispute delayed the album’s release for months. The “toilet” cover was later featured on most compact disc reissues.

RollingStones05

Beggars Banquet was first released in the United Kingdom by Decca Records on 6 December 1968, and in the United States by London Records the following day.[15] Like the band’s previous album, it reached number three on the British albums chart, but remained on the chart for less weeks. The album peaked at number five on the American chart.

InTheStudio01

On 11–12 December 1968 the band filmed a television extravaganza titled The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus featuring John Lennon, Eric Clapton, The Who, Jethro Tull and Marianne Faithfull among the musical guests. One of the original aims of the project was to promote Beggars Banquet, but the film was shelved by the Rolling Stones until 1996, when their former manager, Allen Klein, gave it an official release.

Beggars Banquet received a highly favourable response from music critics, who considered it a return to form for the Stones. Author Stephen Davis writes of its impact: “[The album was] a sharp reflection of the convulsive psychic currents coursing through the Western world. Nothing else captured the youthful spirit of Europe in 1968 like Beggar’s Banquet.”

Please allow me to introduce myself
I’m a man of wealth and taste
I’ve been around for a long, long year
Stole many a man’s soul and faith

And I was ’round when Jesus Christ
Had his moment of doubt and pain
Made damn sure that Pilate
Washed his hands and sealed his fate

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name
But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game

I stuck around St. Petersburg
When I saw it was a time for a change
Killed the Tsar and his ministers
Anastasia screamed in vain

I rode a tank
Held a general’s rank
When the blitzkrieg raged
And the bodies stank

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name, oh yeah
Ah, what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah

I watched with glee
While your kings and queens
Fought for ten decades
For the gods they made

I shouted out,
“Who killed the Kennedys?”
When after all
It was you and me

Let me please introduce myself
I’m a man of wealth and taste
And I laid traps for troubadours
Who get killed before they reached Bombay

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah, get down, baby

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
But what’s confusing you
Is just the nature of my game

Just as every cop is a criminal
And all the sinners saints
As heads is tails
Just call me Lucifer

Cause I’m in need of some restraint
So if you meet me
Have some courtesy
Have some sympathy, and some taste

Use all your well-learned politesse
Or I’ll lay your soul to waste, um yeah
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, um yeah

But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, um mean it, get down
Woo, who
Oh yeah, get on down

Oh yeah
Oh yeah!
Tell me baby, what’s my name
Tell me honey, can ya guess my name

Tell me baby, what’s my name
I tell you one time, you’re to blame
Ooo, who

Oh, yeah
What’s my name
Tell me, baby, what’s my name

Tell me, sweetie, what’s my name
Ooo, who, who

According to music journalist Anthony DeCurtis, the “political correctness” of “Street Fighting Man”, particularly the lyrics “What can a poor boy do/’Cept sing in a rock and roll band”, sparked intense debate in the underground media In the description of author and critic Ian MacDonald, French director Jean-Luc Godard’s filming of the sessions for “Sympathy for the Devil” contributed to the band’s image as “Left Bank heroes of the European Maoist underground”, with the song’s “Luciferian iconoclasm” interpreted as a political message.

Bill Wyman

Time magazine described the Stones as “England’s most subversive roisterers since Fagin’s gang in Oliver Twist” and added: “In keeping with a widespread mood in the pop world, Beggars Banquet turns back to the raw vitality of Negro R&B and the authentic simplicity of country music.”[26] Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone considered that the band’s regeneration marked the return of rock’n’roll, while the Chicago Sun-Times declared: “The Stones have unleashed their rawest, rudest, most arrogant, most savage record yet. And it’s beautiful.”

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Less impressed, the writer of Melody Maker’s initial review dismissed Beggars Banquet as “mediocre” and said that, since “The Stones are Mick Jagger”, it was only the singer’s “remarkable recording presence that makes this LP”. Geoffrey Cannon of The Guardian found that the album “demonstrates [the group’s] primal power at its greatest strength” and wrote admiringly of Jagger’s ability to fully engage the listener on “Sympathy for the Devil”, saying: “We feel horror because, at full volume, he makes us ride his carrier wave with him, experience his sensations, and awaken us to ours.” In his ballot for Jazz & Pop magazine’s annual critics poll, Robert Christgau ranked it as the third best album of the year, and “Salt of the Earth” the best pop song of the year.

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In a retrospective review for Wondering Sound, Ben Fong-Torres called Beggars Banquet “an album flush with masterful and growling instant classics”, and said that it “responds more to the chaos of ’68 and to themselves than to any fellow artists … the mood is one of dissolution and resignation, in the guise of a voice of an ambivalent authority.” Colin Larkin, in his Encyclopedia of Popular Music (2006), viewed the album as “a return to strength” which included “the socio-political ‘Street Fighting Man’ and the brilliantly macabre ‘Sympathy for the Devil’, in which Jagger’s seductive vocal was backed by hypnotic Afro-rhythms and dervish yelps”. Writing for MusicHound in 1999, Greg Kot opined that the same two songs were the “weakest cuts”, adding: “Otherwise, the disc is a tour de force of acoustic-tinged savagery and slumming sexuality, particularly the gleefully flippant ‘Stray Cat Blues.'” Larry Katz from the Boston Herald called Beggars Banquet “both a return to basics and leap forward”.

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In his 1997 review for Rolling Stone, DeCurtis said the album was “filled with distinctive and original touches”, and remarked on its legacy: “For the album, the Stones had gone to great lengths to toughen their sound and banish the haze of psychedelia, and in doing so, they launched a five-year period in which they would produce their very greatest records.” Author Martin C. Strong similarly considers Beggars Banquet to be the first album in the band’s “staggering burst of creativity” over 1968–72 that ultimately comprised four of the best rock albums of all time. Writing in 2007, Daryl Easlea of BBC Music said that, although in places it fails to maintain the quality of its opening song, Beggars Banquet was the album where the Rolling Stones gained their enduring status as “the Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band in the World”.

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The legendary censored front + back cover

In 2003, the album was ranked at number 58 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In the same year, the TV network VH1 named Beggars Banquet the 67th greatest album of all time. The album is also featured in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. (by wikipedia)

In other words: One of the most important albums by The Rolling Stones !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Brian Jones (guitar, slide guitar, harmonica, mellotron, sitar, tambura, background vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, bass on 01. + 06., vocals on 10., background vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums, percussion claves,  background vocals, tabla)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer, background vocals, maracas)
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Rocky Dijon (percussion on 01. 08. + 09.)
Ric Grech (fiddle on 09.)
Nicky Hopkins –(piano, mellotron on 09.)
Dave Mason (shehnai on 06.)
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Anita Pallenberg – Marianne Faithfull – Himmy Miller
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background vocals on 10.:
Watts Street Gospel Choir

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Tracklist:
01. Sympathy For The Devil (Jagger/Richards) 6.26
02. No Expectations (Jagger/Richards) 4.01
03. Dear Doctor (Jagger/Richards) 3.25
04. Parachute Woman (Jagger/Richards) 2.19
05. Jigsaw Puzzle (Jagger/Richards) 6.16
06. Street Fighting Man (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
07. Prodigal Son (Wilkins) 2.54
08. Stray Cat Blues (Jagger/Richards) 4.40
09. Factory Girl (Jagger/Richards) 2.09
10. Salt Of The Earth (Jagger/Richards) 4.50

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Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the lowly of birth
Raise your glass to the good and the evil
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth

Say a prayer for the common foot soldier
Spare a thought for his back breaking work
Say a prayer for his wife and his children
Who burn the fires and who still till the earth

And when I search a faceless crowd
A swirling mass of gray and
Black and white
They don’t look real to me
In fact, they look so strange

Raise your glass to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the uncounted heads
Let’s think of the wavering millions
Who need leaders but get gamblers instead

Spare a thought for the stay-at-home voter
His empty eyes gaze at strange beauty shows
And a parade of the gray suited grafters
A choice of cancer or polio

And when I look in the faceless crowd
A swirling mass of grays and
Black and white
They don’t look real to me
Or don’t they look so strange

Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s think of the lowly of birth
Spare a thought for the rag taggy people
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth

Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth
Let’s drink to the two thousand million
Let’s think of the humble of birth

The Rolling Stones – Hampton Coliseum Decmber 18, 1981

FrontCover1.jpgRecorded on the same tour that produced both the 1982 live album Still Life and Hal Ashby’s 1983 theatrical film Let’s Spend the Night Together, the archival project From the Vault: Hampton Coliseum (Live in 1981) — released digitally in 2012 with a video and physical release following in 2014 — captures a gig the Stones gave in Virginia on December 18, 1981. The tour was winding down — only one other show remained — and it was the day guitarist Keith Richards turned 38, so perhaps that’s the reason why the band seemed to be in a celebratory mood. No matter the reason, the Stones are on fire here, charging through their 1981 set, a set that was heavy on oldies (there’s a three-song sequence of “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me),” “Twenty Flight Rock,” and “Going to A Go Go”) and nasty rockers (it opens with “Under My Thumb” and “When the Whip Comes Down,” effectively setting up the slide into Undercover in the next year). Perhaps it was this palpable sense of sleaze that possessed a fan to bum rush the stage during “Satisfaction,” a move that required Keith to weaponize his Telecaster and attack the invader, providing an appropriate capper to a night when the old pros could still seem dangerous. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

And here´s an early bootleg version of this show, taken from my bootleg colletcion …

Alternate frontcovers:

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals on 14.)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, vocals)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian McLagan (keyboards, vocals)
Ian “Stu” Stewart (keyboards)
Ernie Watts (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Under My Thumb 5.26
02 When The Whip Comes Down 5.16
03. Let’s Spend The Night Together 4.48
04. Shattered 4.39
05. Neighbours 4.20
06. Black Limousine 4.26
07. Just My Imagination 7.10
08. Let Me Go 4.02
09. Time Is On My Side 4.11
10. Beast Of Burden 8.00
11. Waiting On A Friend 5.59
12. Let It Bleed 6.53
13. You Can’t Always Get What You Want + Band introduction + Happy Birthday Keith 11.51
14. Little T & A 4.11
15. Tumbling Dice 4:49
16. She’s So Cold 4.30
17. Hang Fire 2.48
18. Miss You 7.42
19. Honky Tonk Women + Brown Sugar 7.27
20. Start Me Up 5.08
21. Jumpin’ Jack Flash 9.14
22. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction 7.19

All songs written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards

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Rolling Stones – Havana Moon (TV rip) (2016)

HavannaMoon52Havana Moon is a concert film by the Rolling Stones, directed by Paul Dugdale. Havana Moon was filmed on 25 March 2016 in Havana, Cuba. The film is a recording of a free outdoor concert put on by the band at the Ciudad Deportiva de la Habana sports complex, which was attended by an estimated 500,000 concert-goers. The concert marked the first time a rock band had performed in Cuba to such a large crowd. On 11 November 2016 the film was released in multiple formats.

When the news that sitting United States president, Barack Obama was to visit Cuba was released—marking the first time a sitting president had visited the island nation in 88 years—the concert was rescheduled from 20 March 2016 to 25 March 2016.

The concert was suggested by lawyer Gregory Elias to Rolling Stones manager Joyce Smyth during a phone call on 13 November 2015. Elias suggested that the Stones play a free concert in Cuba, which he would cover the costs of – to which Smyth responded “Well, that’s certainly a unique proposal”. The concert was bankrolled by Elias’ charitable organization, Fundashon Bon Intenshon. There was some speculation that the move on Elias’ part was politically motivated, to which he responded in a statement that he only wanted to do something good for the Cuban people and did not have any business relations in the country.

The concert was planned for several months prior to its public announcement while the band was on their 2016 tour of South America, titled América Latina Olé Tour 2016.[4] The bands’ manager, Joyce Smyth, and Concerts West worked extensively with the Cuban government in order for the show to be approved, due to the Cuban government still having control over what its citizens listen to. The embargo on Cuba proved to be a technical challenge for the band and stage crews since they had to ship all of their equipment from Belgium and could not rely on local infrastructure to assist to the degree that they are used to in more developed areas.

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The concert took place 5 days after President Barack Obama visited Cuba, marking the first time a sitting United States president has visited the island nation since the 30th President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge, visited the nation 88 years earlier, in 1928.

The show was originally scheduled to take place 20 March 2016. However, after it was announced that President Barack Obama was scheduled to arrive on the same day, concerns were raised and the decision was made to reschedule the concert to 25 March 2016.[5][6] Shortly before the rescheduled concert date, Pope Francis attempted to delay it, asking that the band play on a later date as the concert was scheduled for 25 March 2016, which was Good Friday, a major and solemn Christian holiday. The Vatican also suggested that the band delay the start of their concert until midnight to avoid the holy day. However, the Stones opted to play the concert at the originally scheduled date and time.

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Prior to the show, the band were guests of honour at the British embassy in Cuba, which held a meet and greet on 24 March 2016 for approximately 200 people, many being Cuban musicians. The Rolling Stones also started a “musician-to-musician” charity initiative in which musical instruments were donated by major instrument suppliers to Cuban musicians of all genres.

The concert itself was attended by a crowd estimated to have consisted of over 500 thousand concert-goers and marked the first time a foreign rock band had performed an open-air concert in Cuba to a crowd of that size.

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The film received critical acclaim from multiple publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian, Rolling Stone, and The Daily Telegraph. The New York Times stated that “The Rolling Stones gave a stunning performance”. The Guardian remarked that the show was “spectacular and historic,”[24] with the Daily Express sharing a similar viewpoint, calling it a “historic” show.[25] Rolling Stone magazine praised the concert, stating that it was “no ordinary concert” and had a significant impact for music in Cuba.

“This was no ordinary concert. People hugged and shared looks of disbelief. Coming at the end of a run of shows in South America and Mexico, last night might have marked at least a temporary pause for the legendary group, but it had all the markings of a new chapter for music in Cuba.” (Richard L. Dewey, Rolling Stone, 26 March 2016)

“We have performed in many special places during our long career but this show in Havana is going to be a landmark event for us, and, we hope, for all our friends in Cuba too.” (The Rolling Stones official statement, 1 March 2016)

This video was ripped from the a German TV channel called 3sat with German subtitles.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica, guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ron Wood (guitar)
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Sasha Allen (background vocals)
Karl Denson (saxophone)
Bernard Fowler (background vocals)
Darryl Jones (bass, background vocals)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)
Tim Ries (saxophone, keyboards)
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Havanna Chor: Coro Entrevoces

Directed by Paul Dugdale

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Tracklist:
01. Jumpin’ Jack Flash
02. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)
03. Tumbling Dice
04. Out of Control
05. All Down The Line
06. Angie
07. Paint It Black
08. Honky Tonk Women
09. You Got the Silver
10. Before They Make Me Run
11. Midnight Rambler
12. Miss You
13. Gimme Shelter
14. Start Me Up
15. Sympathy For The Devil
16. Brown Sugar
17. You Can’t Always Get What You Want
18. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

All songs written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards

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The Rolling Stones – Chicago Chess Sessions (1998)

FrontCover1In the beginning, the Stones wanted nothing more than to be a blues band. And for a long time, they were — albeit one that realized it could never, ever be as good as the musicians who schooled them from overseas. Dixon once told the Tribune that he remembered playing Piccadilly Square in London during the early ’60s. The callow Jagger, Richards and Jones were in the audience. “(These kids would) tell us, ‘Look, man, we got a little group and we want to do some of your songs,'” Dixon said. “We put a lot of songs on tape for them … and then some years later, somebody played me a record of (Dixon’s classic) ‘Little Red Rooster’ and told me some fellows called the Rolling Stones had done that song out of England. … (But) back then they were just little kids, no hair on their faces or anything, so how would I remember them?”

The Stones early albums were stuffed with cover versions of American blues and soul music, and as soon as the quintet became popular enough to tour America in the late spring of 1964, they beelined to Chess studios in Chicago for a two-day recording session. There they were greeted by the mighty Waters himself, who, according to the oft-repeated story, was slapping a coat of paint on the studio walls. Waters had no idea who these long-haired kids were, but helped them unload their gear anyway. While there, the Stones recorded the master’s “I Can’t Be Satisfied,” which appeared on their second album, “Rolling Stones No. 2,” while Dixon’s “Little Red Rooster” wound up on its U.K. companion, “Rolling Stones Now!”

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The Stones early recordings — newly reissued on the boxed set “The Rolling Stones in Mono” (ABKCO) — affirm how much the Stones borrowed from the Chicago blues: the songs, the mix of jazzy swing and backstreet menace, even the recording engineer, Ron Malo. All told the Stones recorded more than two dozen songs in three visits to Chess studios in 1964-65, which they sprinkled across several albums. (chicagotribune.com)

And here´s  very fine bootleg from this period … excellent soundoard recording … the early days of the British Blues … what a great period, what an unforgetable period !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Brian Jones (guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian Stewart (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. 2120 South Michigan Avenue (long version) (Nanker/Phelge) 3.57
02. Confessin’ The Blues (stereo version) (McShann/Brown) 3.16
03. High Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham ) 3.16
04. Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Berry) 3.57
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.49
06. If You Need Me (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.30
07. Empty Heart (Nanker/Phelge) 2.59
08. Around And Around (Berry) 3.24
09. Good Times, Bad Times (Jagger/Richards) 2.59
10. Down The Road Apiece (stereo version) (Raye) 3.20
11. I Can’t Be Satisfied (stereo version) (Morganfield) 3.57
12. Look What You’ve Done (stereo version) (Morganfield) 2.51
13. Stewed And Keefed (Brian´s Blues) (Nanker/Phelge) 4.34
14. Tell Me Baby (How Many Times) (Broonzy) 2.18
15. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.07
16. Confessin’ The Blues (McShann/Brown) 3.07
17. I Can’t Be Satisfied (Morganfield) 3.49
18. Look What You’ve Done (Morganfield) 2.51
19.  2120 South Michigan Avenue (stereo version) (Nanker/Phelge) 2.30
20.  It’s All Over Now (stereo version) (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.53

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