The Rolling Stones – Hampton Coliseum Decmber 18, 1981

FrontCover1.jpgRecorded on the same tour that produced both the 1982 live album Still Life and Hal Ashby’s 1983 theatrical film Let’s Spend the Night Together, the archival project From the Vault: Hampton Coliseum (Live in 1981) — released digitally in 2012 with a video and physical release following in 2014 — captures a gig the Stones gave in Virginia on December 18, 1981. The tour was winding down — only one other show remained — and it was the day guitarist Keith Richards turned 38, so perhaps that’s the reason why the band seemed to be in a celebratory mood. No matter the reason, the Stones are on fire here, charging through their 1981 set, a set that was heavy on oldies (there’s a three-song sequence of “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me),” “Twenty Flight Rock,” and “Going to A Go Go”) and nasty rockers (it opens with “Under My Thumb” and “When the Whip Comes Down,” effectively setting up the slide into Undercover in the next year). Perhaps it was this palpable sense of sleaze that possessed a fan to bum rush the stage during “Satisfaction,” a move that required Keith to weaponize his Telecaster and attack the invader, providing an appropriate capper to a night when the old pros could still seem dangerous. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

And here´s an early bootleg version of this show, taken from my bootleg colletcion …

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals on 14.)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, vocals)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian McLagan (keyboards, vocals)
Ian “Stu” Stewart (keyboards)
Ernie Watts (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Under My Thumb 5.26
02 When The Whip Comes Down 5.16
03. Let’s Spend The Night Together 4.48
04. Shattered 4.39
05. Neighbours 4.20
06. Black Limousine 4.26
07. Just My Imagination 7.10
08. Let Me Go 4.02
09. Time Is On My Side 4.11
10. Beast Of Burden 8.00
11. Waiting On A Friend 5.59
12. Let It Bleed 6.53
13. You Can’t Always Get What You Want + Band introduction + Happy Birthday Keith 11.51
14. Little T & A 4.11
15. Tumbling Dice 4:49
16. She’s So Cold 4.30
17. Hang Fire 2.48
18. Miss You 7.42
19. Honky Tonk Women + Brown Sugar 7.27
20. Start Me Up 5.08
21. Jumpin’ Jack Flash 9.14
22. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction 7.19

All songs written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards

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Rolling Stones – Havana Moon (TV rip) (2016)

HavannaMoon52Havana Moon is a concert film by the Rolling Stones, directed by Paul Dugdale. Havana Moon was filmed on 25 March 2016 in Havana, Cuba. The film is a recording of a free outdoor concert put on by the band at the Ciudad Deportiva de la Habana sports complex, which was attended by an estimated 500,000 concert-goers. The concert marked the first time a rock band had performed in Cuba to such a large crowd. On 11 November 2016 the film was released in multiple formats.

When the news that sitting United States president, Barack Obama was to visit Cuba was released—marking the first time a sitting president had visited the island nation in 88 years—the concert was rescheduled from 20 March 2016 to 25 March 2016.

The concert was suggested by lawyer Gregory Elias to Rolling Stones manager Joyce Smyth during a phone call on 13 November 2015. Elias suggested that the Stones play a free concert in Cuba, which he would cover the costs of – to which Smyth responded “Well, that’s certainly a unique proposal”. The concert was bankrolled by Elias’ charitable organization, Fundashon Bon Intenshon. There was some speculation that the move on Elias’ part was politically motivated, to which he responded in a statement that he only wanted to do something good for the Cuban people and did not have any business relations in the country.

The concert was planned for several months prior to its public announcement while the band was on their 2016 tour of South America, titled América Latina Olé Tour 2016.[4] The bands’ manager, Joyce Smyth, and Concerts West worked extensively with the Cuban government in order for the show to be approved, due to the Cuban government still having control over what its citizens listen to. The embargo on Cuba proved to be a technical challenge for the band and stage crews since they had to ship all of their equipment from Belgium and could not rely on local infrastructure to assist to the degree that they are used to in more developed areas.

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The concert took place 5 days after President Barack Obama visited Cuba, marking the first time a sitting United States president has visited the island nation since the 30th President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge, visited the nation 88 years earlier, in 1928.

The show was originally scheduled to take place 20 March 2016. However, after it was announced that President Barack Obama was scheduled to arrive on the same day, concerns were raised and the decision was made to reschedule the concert to 25 March 2016.[5][6] Shortly before the rescheduled concert date, Pope Francis attempted to delay it, asking that the band play on a later date as the concert was scheduled for 25 March 2016, which was Good Friday, a major and solemn Christian holiday. The Vatican also suggested that the band delay the start of their concert until midnight to avoid the holy day. However, the Stones opted to play the concert at the originally scheduled date and time.

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Prior to the show, the band were guests of honour at the British embassy in Cuba, which held a meet and greet on 24 March 2016 for approximately 200 people, many being Cuban musicians. The Rolling Stones also started a “musician-to-musician” charity initiative in which musical instruments were donated by major instrument suppliers to Cuban musicians of all genres.

The concert itself was attended by a crowd estimated to have consisted of over 500 thousand concert-goers and marked the first time a foreign rock band had performed an open-air concert in Cuba to a crowd of that size.

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The film received critical acclaim from multiple publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian, Rolling Stone, and The Daily Telegraph. The New York Times stated that “The Rolling Stones gave a stunning performance”. The Guardian remarked that the show was “spectacular and historic,”[24] with the Daily Express sharing a similar viewpoint, calling it a “historic” show.[25] Rolling Stone magazine praised the concert, stating that it was “no ordinary concert” and had a significant impact for music in Cuba.

“This was no ordinary concert. People hugged and shared looks of disbelief. Coming at the end of a run of shows in South America and Mexico, last night might have marked at least a temporary pause for the legendary group, but it had all the markings of a new chapter for music in Cuba.” (Richard L. Dewey, Rolling Stone, 26 March 2016)

“We have performed in many special places during our long career but this show in Havana is going to be a landmark event for us, and, we hope, for all our friends in Cuba too.” (The Rolling Stones official statement, 1 March 2016)

This video was ripped from the a German TV channel called 3sat with German subtitles.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica, guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ron Wood (guitar)
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Sasha Allen (background vocals)
Karl Denson (saxophone)
Bernard Fowler (background vocals)
Darryl Jones (bass, background vocals)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)
Tim Ries (saxophone, keyboards)
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Directed by Paul Dugdale

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Tracklist:
01. Jumpin’ Jack Flash
02. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)
03. Tumbling Dice
04. Out of Control
05. All Down The Line
06. Angie
07. Paint It Black
08. Honky Tonk Women
09. You Got the Silver
10. Before They Make Me Run
11. Midnight Rambler
12. Miss You
13. Gimme Shelter
14. Start Me Up
15. Sympathy For The Devil
16. Brown Sugar
17. You Can’t Always Get What You Want
18. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

All songs written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards

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The Rolling Stones – Chicago Chess Sessions (1998)

FrontCover1In the beginning, the Stones wanted nothing more than to be a blues band. And for a long time, they were — albeit one that realized it could never, ever be as good as the musicians who schooled them from overseas. Dixon once told the Tribune that he remembered playing Piccadilly Square in London during the early ’60s. The callow Jagger, Richards and Jones were in the audience. “(These kids would) tell us, ‘Look, man, we got a little group and we want to do some of your songs,'” Dixon said. “We put a lot of songs on tape for them … and then some years later, somebody played me a record of (Dixon’s classic) ‘Little Red Rooster’ and told me some fellows called the Rolling Stones had done that song out of England. … (But) back then they were just little kids, no hair on their faces or anything, so how would I remember them?”

The Stones early albums were stuffed with cover versions of American blues and soul music, and as soon as the quintet became popular enough to tour America in the late spring of 1964, they beelined to Chess studios in Chicago for a two-day recording session. There they were greeted by the mighty Waters himself, who, according to the oft-repeated story, was slapping a coat of paint on the studio walls. Waters had no idea who these long-haired kids were, but helped them unload their gear anyway. While there, the Stones recorded the master’s “I Can’t Be Satisfied,” which appeared on their second album, “Rolling Stones No. 2,” while Dixon’s “Little Red Rooster” wound up on its U.K. companion, “Rolling Stones Now!”

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The Stones early recordings — newly reissued on the boxed set “The Rolling Stones in Mono” (ABKCO) — affirm how much the Stones borrowed from the Chicago blues: the songs, the mix of jazzy swing and backstreet menace, even the recording engineer, Ron Malo. All told the Stones recorded more than two dozen songs in three visits to Chess studios in 1964-65, which they sprinkled across several albums. (chicagotribune.com)

And here´s  very fine bootleg from this period … excellent soundoard recording … the early days of the British Blues … what a great period, what an unforgetable period !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Brian Jones (guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian Stewart (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. 2120 South Michigan Avenue (long version) (Nanker/Phelge) 3.57
02. Confessin’ The Blues (stereo version) (McShann/Brown) 3.16
03. High Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham ) 3.16
04. Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Berry) 3.57
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.49
06. If You Need Me (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.30
07. Empty Heart (Nanker/Phelge) 2.59
08. Around And Around (Berry) 3.24
09. Good Times, Bad Times (Jagger/Richards) 2.59
10. Down The Road Apiece (stereo version) (Raye) 3.20
11. I Can’t Be Satisfied (stereo version) (Morganfield) 3.57
12. Look What You’ve Done (stereo version) (Morganfield) 2.51
13. Stewed And Keefed (Brian´s Blues) (Nanker/Phelge) 4.34
14. Tell Me Baby (How Many Times) (Broonzy) 2.18
15. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.07
16. Confessin’ The Blues (McShann/Brown) 3.07
17. I Can’t Be Satisfied (Morganfield) 3.49
18. Look What You’ve Done (Morganfield) 2.51
19.  2120 South Michigan Avenue (stereo version) (Nanker/Phelge) 2.30
20.  It’s All Over Now (stereo version) (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.53

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Various Artists – The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones (2015)

FrontCover1This is a great sampler from Mexico !

The Rolling Stones have become the reincarnation of rock itself, being the representation, both musically and in terms of image and behavior, what rock & roll represents. In The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones, we will highlight their side-projects, their roots, their favorite songs and even a brand new song, which becomes and event in itself, for all the Stones’ fans around the world. The idea sounds wonderful right?. Well, The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones will meet the expectations of even the most demanding Stones fan. We have a lost recording by Leslie West (Mountain’s guitarist) with Mick Jagger playing guitar, a duet by Keith Richards with Ian McLagan (Faces’ keyboardist), and also the hard-to-find single versions of Bill Wyman’s solo hits.

Also we have Mick Jagger and Keith Richards all time favorite songs (handpicked by themselves), and an extremely rare track titled Catch As Catch Can, that was released only in a limited edition in France as a 7″ and never previously available on CD single, by musician and producer Robin Millar (Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel, Sade) recorded in 1973 along with Mick Taylor, Bobby Keys and Mick Jagger!!!.

Finally, we have the originals versions of the best songs the Stones covered during his long and illustrious career. This is a marvelous project that with remastered sound, beautiful cover art extended liner notes is an essential addition to your collection. (promo text)

Yes, yes, yes … a real great and intersting Project … Listen and discover the many faces of The Rolling Stones !
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Tracklist:

CD 1:
The Adventures Of The Stones:
01. Leslie West feat. Mick Jagger:High Roller (Jagger/Richards/Laing/Palmer) 4.13
02. Ron Wood & Ian McLagan: She Stole It (McLagan) 3.45
03. Bill Wyman: Monkey Grip (single edition) (Wyman) 3.17
04. Ian McLagan & Keith Richards: Truly (McLagan) 5.58
05. Toots & The Maytals feat. Keith Richards:- Careless Ethiopians (Hibbert) 3.22
06. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Had Me A Real Good Time (Lane/Wood) 4.45
07. Ian McLagan feat. Bobby Keys: Somebody (McLagan) 3.00
08 .British Invasion All-Stars feat. Dick Taylor: Gimme Some Loving (Winwood) 4.15
09. Bill  Wyman: (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star (single edit) (Wyman) 3.23
10. Robin Millar feat. Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins & Bobby Keys: Catch As Catch Can (Millar)  3.33
11. John Phillips feat. Mick Jagger, Mick Taylor & Keith Richards:- Zulu Warrior (Phillips/Jagger) 3.30
12. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 5.09
13. Chris Farlowe produced by Mick Jagger: Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
14. Johnny Winter: Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 4.42
CD 2:
Mick & Keith’s Favourite Tracks:
01. Little Walter: I Go To Go (Walter)  2.41
02. Muddy Waters: Forty Days And Forty Nights (Roth) 2.50
03. Robert Johnson: Stones In My Passway (Johnson) 2.28
04. Ray Charles: Lonely Avenue (Pomus) 2.34
05. Z.Z. Hill: Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson /Horton) 4.57
06. Blind Willie Johnson: Dark Was The Night (Cold Was The Ground) (Johnson) 3.20
07. Howlin’ Wolf: Forty Four (Burnett) 2.48
08. Jesse Fuller: Stagolee (Traditional) 3.44
09. Bill Broonzy: When Did You Leave Heaven (Bullock/Whiting) 3.29
10. Elmore James:- It Hurts Me Too (Red/James/London)  3.19
11. Little Walter: Key To The Highway (Segar) 2.45
12. Erna Franklin: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 2.38
13. Chuck Berry: Memphis (Berry) 2.14
14. Robert Johnson: 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 2.52
CD 3:
The  Originals:
01. Chuck Berry: Around And Around (Berry) 2.40
02. Larry Williams: She Said Yeah (Jackson/Williams) 1.50
03. Nat King Cole Trio: Route  66 (Troup) 3.01
04. Muddy Waters:  Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 2.51
05. Howlin’ Wolf: Little Red Rooster (Burnett/Dixon) 2.26
06. Buddy Holly: Not Fade Away (Holly/Petty) 2.23
07. Jimmy  Reed: Honest I Do (Reed/Abner) 2.42
08. Dale Hawkins: Suzie Q (Hawkins/Lewis/Broadwater)  2.19
09. The Coasters: Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.42
10. Jim Harpo: I’m A King Bee (Harpo) 3.04
11. Robertt Johnson: Love In Vain (Johnson) 3.20
12. Bo Diddley: Mona (McDaniel) 3.39
13. Gene Allison: You Can Make It If You Try (Jarrett) 2.09
14. Eric Donaldson: Cherry Oh, Baby (Donaldson) 3.07
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The Rolling Stones – It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll (1974)

frontcover1It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll is the 12th British and 14th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. It was the last Rolling Stones album for guitarist Mick Taylor and the songwriting and recording of the album’s title track had a connection to Taylor’s eventual replacement, Ronnie Wood. It also marked the 10th anniversary since the band’s debut album. The album has a firmer rock sound than the band’s previous album, the more funk- and soul-inspired Goats Head Soup. The album reached #1 in the US and #2 in the UK.

Work began on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll following the Rolling Stones’ fall 1973 European tour. Production began in November at Munich, Germany’s Musicland Studios. According to guitarist Keith Richards, “We were really hot (off the road) and ready just to play some new material.”[1] The recording sessions were attended by Belgian painter Guy Peellaert, who Mick Jagger invited to do the album cover after seeing his work in the book Rock Dreams, which featured illustrations of various rock musicians such as the Stones. Peellaert eventually painted the band as “rock deities”, descending a temple staircase, surrounded by young girls and women worshipping them in Grecian clothing. The artist refused to sign a deal of exclusivity, and in 1974 provided another album art, David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs.

The album was at first developed as a half-live, half-studio production with one side of the album featuring live performances from the Stones’ European tour while the other side was to be composed of newly recorded cover versions of the band’s favourite R&B songs. Covers recorded included a take of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, Shirley & Company’s “Shame, Shame, Shame”, and The Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”. Soon the band began working off riffs by Richards and new ideas by Mick Jagger and the original concept was scrapped in favour of an album with all-new material. The cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” was the only recording to make the cut, while the “Drift Away” cover is a popular bootleg.

rollingstones1974_01It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll marked the Stones’ first effort in the producer’s chair since Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the first for Jagger and Richards under their pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins”. On the choice to produce, Richards said at the time:

“I think we’d come to a point with Jimmy (Miller) where the contribution level had dropped because it’d got to be a habit, a way of life, for Jimmy to do one Stones album a year. He’d got over the initial sort of excitement which you can feel on Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Also, Mick and I felt that we wanted to try and do it ourselves because we really felt we knew much more about techniques and recording and had our own ideas of how we wanted things to go. Goats Head Soup hadn’t turned out as we wanted to – not blaming Jimmy or anything like that… But it was obvious that it was time for a change in that particular part of the process of making records.”

Starting with this release, all future Rolling Stones albums would either be produced by them or in collaboration with an outside producer.

Most of the album’s backing tracks were recorded first at Musicland; solo vocals were recorded later by Jagger, about whom Richards would say, “he often comes up with his best stuff alone in the studio with just an engineer.”

The song “Luxury” showed the band’s growing interest in reggae music, while “Till the Next Goodbye” and “If You Really Want to Be My Friend” continued their immersion in ballads. Seven of the album’s ten songs crack the four-minute mark, a feature that would come to be disparaged during the rising punk rock scene of the late 1970s.

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Ronnie Wood, a longtime acquaintance of the band, began to get closer to the Rolling Stones during these sessions after he invited Mick Taylor to play on his debut album, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do. Taylor spent some time recording and hanging out at Wood’s house The Wick. By chance, Richards was asked one night by Wood’s wife at the time, Krissy, to join them at the guitarist’s home. While there, Richards recorded some tracks with Wood and quickly developed a close friendship, with Richards going as far as moving into Wood’s guest room. Jagger soon entered the mix and it was here that the album’s lead single and title track, “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”, was first recorded. Wood worked closely on the track with Jagger, who subsequently took the song and title for their album. The released version of this song features Wood on twelve-string acoustic guitar.

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was Mick Taylor’s last album with the Rolling Stones, and he played on just seven of the ten tracks (he did not play on tracks 2, 3, and 6). Due to Taylor’s absence, Richards is responsible for the brief lead guitar break on “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, the distorted electric guitar on the title track which includes the solo, and played both rhythm and lead guitar tracks on the “Luxury” studio recording. However, on the occasional live performances of “Luxury” during the Tour of the Americas ’75, lead guitar was provided by Ron Wood. Even though Mick Taylor is present on “Short and Curlies”, his slide guitar playing panned onto the right channel/speaker is mostly buried underneath Richards’ own lead guitar throughout most of the track which is panned to the left channel/speaker.

Similar to receiving no writing credits on the Stones’ previous album, Goats Head Soup, Taylor reportedly had made songwriting contributions to “Till the Next Goodbye” and “Time Waits for No One”, but on the album jacket, all original songs were credited to Jagger/Richards. Taylor said in 1997:

“I did have a falling out with Mick Jagger over some songs I felt I should have been credited with co-writing on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. We were quite close friends and co-operated quite closely on getting that album made. By that time Mick and Keith weren’t really working together as a team so I’d spend a lot of time in the studio.”

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Taylor’s statement contradicts Jagger’s earlier comment concerning the album. Jagger stated in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview about “Time Waits for No One” that Taylor “maybe threw in a couple of chords”.

Alongside the usual outside contributors, namely Billy Preston, Nicky Hopkins and unofficial member Ian Stewart, Elton John sideman Ray Cooper acted as percussionist for the album. Several songs were finished songs and overdubs and mixing were performed at Jagger’s home, Stargroves, in the early summer of 1974.

In July, the lead single, “It’s Only Rock ’n Roll (But I Like It)”, was released, and despite the familiar sound, it surprised many by failing to reach the top 10 in the US (although it did reach the top 10 in the UK). With its sing-along chorus, it has become a staple at Rolling Stones concerts. The B-side “Through the Lonely Nights” dates back to the previous year’s Goats Head Soup sessions. A cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, originally a 1966 hit by The Temptations, was released as the second single in the US only, where it also became a top 20 hit. Its parent album appeared in October with brisk initial sales, reaching number two in the UK (breaking a string of number-one albums that stretched back to 1969’s Let It Bleed) and number one in the US, where it eventually went platinum.

Reviews were largely positive, with Jon Landau calling It’s Only Rock ’n Roll “one of the most intriguing and mysterious, as well as the darkest, of all Rolling Stones records.”[12] However rock critic Lester Bangs disparaged the album in The Village Voice, much like Goats Head Soup, saying, “The Stones have become oblique in their old age, which is just another word for perverse except that perverse is the corniest concept extant as they realized at inception… Soup was friendly and safe. I want the edge and this album doesn’t reassure me that I’ll get it, what a curious situation to be stuck in, but maybe that’s the beauty of the Stones, hah, hah, kid? This album is false. Numb. But it cuts like a dull blade. Are they doing the cutting, or are we?”

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Author James Hector added that It’s Only Rock ’n Roll was a definitive turning point for the band. “The album marked the band’s decisive entry into a comfortable living as rock’s elder statesmen. From this point on, their youth culture importance vanished, and there would be few musical surprises in the future.” Hector concluded with “On It’s Only Rock ’n Roll, the band had become what they imagined their mass audience desired them to be. They were wrong.”

Instead of immediately touring to promote the album, the band decided to head back into the Munich studios to record the next album, to Mick Taylor’s disappointment and subsequent resignation from the band. A tour didn’t happen until the following summer in the US, the ‘Tour of the Americas ’75’, with future member Ronnie Wood taking Taylor’s place on guitar.

The title track became a permanent staple of the band’s live setlist, but apart from some performances of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “If You Can’t Rock Me” on the Licks Tour, none of the other tracks have been performed since 1977. “Till The Next Goodbye”, “Time Waits For No-One”, “If You Really Want To Be My Friend” and “Short and Curlies” have never been played live.

In order to promote the album, music videos were filmed for several of the songs. The most commonly seen video from the album was the video for “It’s Only Rock’n’Roll (But I Like It)”, featuring the band (in sailor suits) playing in a tent, which gradually fills with soap bubbles (Taylor is featured in the video but did not actually play on the recorded cut). Videos were also filmed for “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “Till The Next Goodbye”.

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals; guitar on 04. + 10.)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals; bass on 01.)
Mick Taylor (guitar, slide-guitar, synthesizer on 05., congas on 07.,  bass on 10.)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer on 10.)
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Ray Cooper (percussion)
Nicky Hopkins (piano on 04. – 06., 08. + 10.)
Charlie Jolly (tabla on 10.)
Ed Leach (cowbell on 02.)
Blue Magic (background vocals on 08.)
Billy Preston (piano on 01., 02., 10., clavinet on 02., organ on 08.)
Ian Stewart (piano on 03., 07. + 09.)

Basic track on “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”:
David Bowie (background vocals)
Kenney Jones (drums)
Willie Weeks (bass)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. If You Can’t Rock Me (Jagger/Richards) 3.48
02. Ain’t Too Proud To Beg (Whitfield/Holland) 3.30
03. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) (Inspiration by Ronnie Wood) (Jagger/Richards)     5.07
04. Till The Next Goodbye (Jagger/Richards) 4.39
05. Time Waits For No One (Jagger/Richards) 6.48
06. Luxury (Jagger/Richards) 5,03
07. Dance Little Sister (Jagger/Richards) 4.12
08. If You Really Want To Be My Friend (Jagger/Richards)  6.19
09. Short And Curlies (Jagger/Richards) 2.45
10. Fingerprint File (Jagger/Richards) 7.01

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The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – The Greatest Hits Of The Rolling Stones (2003)

FrontCover1In 2016, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) celebrates 70 years at the forefront of music-making in the UK. Its home base since 2004 at London’s Cadogan Hall serves as a springboard for fourteen residencies across the country, often in areas where access to live orchestral music is very limited. With a wider reach than any other UK large ensemble, the RPO has truly become Britain’s national orchestra.

The regional programme, plus regular performances at Cadogan Hall, Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall and a hugely popular series at the Royal Albert Hall, are conducted by a distinguished roster of musicians: Charles Dutoit, appointed Artistic Director and Principal Conductor in 2009 after a decades-long association with the RPO; Pinchas Zukerman, the inspirational Principal Guest Conductor; Alexander Shelley, the dynamic young Principal Associate Conductor since January 2015, and the esteemed Permanent Associate Conductor Grzegorz Nowak.

International touring is vital to the Orchestra’s work, taking it to many prestigious destinations worldwide. The 70th Anniversary Season plans include concerts at the festivals of Montreux and Granada, an extensive tour of the USA, and visits to central Europe and the Far East, including South Korea and China.

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For more than twenty years RPO Resound, the Orchestra’s community and education programme, has taken music into the heart of the regions that the Orchestra serves. From Azerbaijan to Jamaica and from Shanghai to Scunthorpe, the team – comprising the majority of the Orchestra – has worked with young people, the homeless, recovering stroke patients (in the STROKEstra project in Hull) and in settings ranging from the Sea Life London Aquarium to hospitals, orphanages and children’s hospices.

In 1986, the RPO became the first UK orchestra to launch its own record label. Continuing its tradition of entrepreneurial innovation, in 2015 the RPO started an online radio station, The Sound of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, which broadcasts via its website, and RPO TV, an online video channel streaming fly-on-the-wall shorts written, directed and filmed by the musicians.

The Orchestra has become increasingly active on social media platforms, inviting audiences to engage informally on Facebook and Twitter and to enjoy behind-the-scenes insights on the RPO blog, YouTube and Instagram. It also offers a digital booking service on its app, RPO Rewards, offering audiences loyalty points.

Although the RPO embraces twenty-first-century opportunities, including appearances with pop stars and on video game, film and television soundtracks, its artistic priority remains paramount: the making of great music at the highest level for the widest possible audience. This would have been lauded by its Founder and first conductor, Sir Thomas Beecham, who set up the RPO in 1946, leading a vital revival in the UK’s orchestral life after World War II.

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Since then, the Orchestra’s principal conductors have included Rudolf Kempe, Antal Doráti, Walter Weller, André Previn, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Yuri Temirkanov and Daniele Gatti; and its repertoire has encompassed every strand of music from the core classical repertoire to music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, such as the three Stravinsky ballets with which it tours during 2016 and works by leading composers of recent years, including Sir Peter Maxwell Davies and Sir John Tavener.

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As the 70th Anniversary Season unfolds, the RPO’s versatility and high standards mark it out as one of today’s most open-minded, forward-thinking symphony orchestras. Now it proudly looks forward to the next 70 years.

And this is their way to play Rolling Stones classic tracks … a real nice way, indeed.

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Personnel:
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 7.30
02. The Last Time (Jagger/Richards) 4.44
03. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 5.31
04. Emotional Rescue (Jagger/Richards) 5.55
05. As Tears Go By (Jagger/Richards/Oldham) 6.33
06. Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 6.22
07. Angie (Jagger/Richards) 5.48
08. 19th Nervous Breakdown (Jagger/Richards) 5.16
09. Lady Jane (Jagger/Richards) 5.42
10. Fool To Cry (Jagger/Richards) 6.32

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Rolling Stones – No Security (1998)

FrontCoverWithSticker1No Security is a live album by The Rolling Stones released by Virgin Records in 1998. Recorded over the course of the lengthy 1997–1998 worldwide Bridges to Babylon Tour, it is the band’s sixth official full-length live release. It was not reissued by UMe when Universal reissued the 1971–2005 back catalogue.

Because of the risk of repeating songs recently covered on “Still Life” (American Concert 1981) and Flashpoint, The Stones carefully chose songs that had either never been on one of their live releases or had not appeared on a live album for a long time. Of the major hits, “The Last Time”, “Respectable”, and “Waiting on a Friend” are here, as well as standout album cuts such as “Gimme Shelter”, “Sister Morphine”, and “Memory Motel”. In addition to four tracks from the recent Bridges To Babylon, special guests Taj Mahal and Dave Matthews are featured on No Security.

Booklet03AAll tracks from live performances at the Arena Amsterdam, River Plate Buenos Aires, Zeppelinfeld Nuremberg, TWA Dome in St. Louis and MTV’s Live from the 10 Spot.

The album was released in November 1998 and in support of it the band embarked on another tour. The No Security Tour was an arenas-only tour, crossing North America for 34 shows in hockey and basketball arenas.

No Security peaked at number 67 on the UK Albums Chart, and at number 34 on the U.S. Billboard 200. It failed to achieve US gold record status, but sold over 300,000 copies.

The line “no security” appears in the song, “One Hit to the Body” on the Dirty Work album. “It’s one shot when you love me, one shot when you leave me, I don’t need no security, I just need me some peace.” (by wikipedia)

Booklet02AAnother record, another tour, another live album chronicling the whole shebang. The Rolling Stones have followed this basic pattern since the early ’80s — if Keith had been able to get Mick out on the road to support Dirty Work, there damn well would have been a live record in 1987 — stepping up the production rate in the ’90s, eventually winding their way to No Security, a document of the Bridges to Babylon tour of 1997-1998. Since the Stones (or at least Jagger) are sharp businessmen, they have given all three of their ’90s live albums a hook, an angle for journalists and fans alike — Flashpoint was their return to form, Stripped was culled from unplugged and club dates, and No Security contains 11 songs that have never before appeared on a live Stones album.

Booklet06AOf course, several of these date from Voodoo Lounge and Bridges to Babylon (five, to be exact), but they also dig out such great songs as “Gimme Shelter,” “Respectable,” “Sister Morphine,” and “Memory Motel,” as well as reviving “The Last Time” and “Live With Me,” which haven’t been on a live record since Got Live if You Want It! and Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!, respectively. There are also guest spots from Taj Mahal and Dave Matthews. All of these things give some measure of distinction to No Security, but they don’t erase the feeling that this is more of a soundtrack to a spectacle than a musical event. Sure, the Stones are as accomplished as ever, the album is certainly enjoyable, but it just doesn’t feel necessary. Which, again, doesn’t make it any different than most Stones live records since Love You Live. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Booklet04APersonnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica, guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, slide-guitar)
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Blondie Chaplin (background vocals, percussion)
Michael Davis (trombone)
Lisa Fischer (background vocals)
Bernard Fowler (background vocals, percussion)
Darryl Jones (bass)
Bobby Keys (saxophone)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)
Kent Smith (trumpet)
Andy Snitzer (saxophone, keyboards)
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Pierre de Beauport (piano on 11.)
Johnny Starbuck (shaker on 13.)
Leah Wood (background vocals on 11.)
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Taj Mahal (vocals on 05.)
Dave Matthews (vocals on 04.)
Joshua Redman (saxophone on 07.)

Booklet07ATracklist:
01. Intro 0.50
02. You Got Me Rocking (Amsterdam Arena, 6 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 3.36
02. Gimme Shelter (MTV 10 Spot 25 October 1997) (Jagger/Richards) 6.22
03. Flip The Switch (Amsterdam Arena, 1 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 4.12
04. Memory Motel (Amsterdam Arena, 5 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 6.05
05. Corinna (TWA Dome, St-Louis, MO, 12  December 1997) (Mahal/Davis) 4.17
06. Saint Of Me (River Plate Stadium Buenos Aires, 4 April 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 5.25
07. Waiting On A Friend (TWA Dome, St-Louis, MO, 12 December 1997) (Jagger/Richards) 5.02
08. Sister Morphine (Amsterdam Arena, 6 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards/Faithfull) 6.16
09. Live With Me (Amsterdam Arena, 1 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 3.54
10. Respectable (Amsterdam Arena, 5 July 1998) (Jagger/Richards) 3.35
11. Thief In The Night (Zeppelinfeld Nuremberg 13 June 1998) (Jagger/Richards/de Beauport) 5.37
12. The Last Time(TWA Dome, St-Louis, MO, 12 December 1997) (Jagger/Richards) 4.47
13. Out Of Control (River Plate Stadium Buenos Aires, 4 April 1998) (Jagger/Richards)  7.59

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