Paul Simon – There Goes Rhymin’ Simon (1973)

FrontCover1AThere Goes Rhymin’ Simon is the third solo studio album by American musician Paul Simon rush-released on May 5, 1973. It contains songs covering several styles and genres, such as gospel (“Loves Me Like a Rock”) and Dixieland (“Take Me to the Mardi Gras”). It received two nominations at the Grammy Awards of 1974, including Best Male Pop Vocal performance and Album of the Year.

As foreshadowed by the feel-good lead single “Kodachrome” (which reached #2 on the Billboard charts, blocked by Billy Preston’s “Will It Go Round in Circles”), There Goes Rhymin’ Simon proved to be a bigger hit than its predecessor, reaching #2 on the Billboard 200 chart (kept off the top spot by George Harrison’s Living in the Material World), and #1 on Cashbox Magazine for one week on June 30, 1973.[4] In the United Kingdom, the album peaked at #4. Subsequent singles were also the #2 single “Loves Me Like a Rock” (knocked off by Cher’s “Half-Breed”, but reaching #1 on Cashbox on September 29, 1973), and the Top 40 hit “American Tune”. Also “Take Me to the Mardi Gras” was released in the UK reaching the Top 20.

The song “Kodachrome” is named after the Kodak film of the same name. Kodak required the album to note that Kodachrome is a trademark of Kodak. The song was not released as a single in Britain, where it could not be played on BBC radio due to its trademarked name. The song “Was a Sunny Day” has an interesting reference to early rock and roll in the line “She called him Speedo but his Christian name was Mr. Earl” which echoes the chorus from the 1955 song “Speedo” by The Cadillacs: “They often call me Speedo but my real name is Mr. Earl,” referring to lead singer, Earl “Speedo” Carroll.

CoverIllustration

Critical praise was practically universal for this album. The Denver Post’s Jared Johnson called it “a brilliantly executed masterpiece, and surely the finest album in three years,” citing such 1970 releases as Bridge Over Troubled Water and After the Gold Rush.

Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times said, “Combining a variety of musical textures (from a touch of gospel to an infectious trace of Jamaican rhythm to a hint of the old Simon and Garfunkel grandeur), Simon’s new album firmly establishes him as one of our most valuable and accessible artists.”

But Stereo Review’s Noel Coppage found much to complain about. Though he gave it an “excellent” rating, he added that it was “deficient in spontaneity, excitement, strain…I don’t know how it could sound so cut-and-dried, having been recorded in four different locations (New York, London, Muscle Shoals, and Jackson, Mississippi), but although the arrangements are clean and sensible, they are oddly predictable.” (by wikipedia)

In other words: Another classic album by Paul Simon,

PaulSimon1973

Personnel:
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
+
Barry Beckett (piano 01., 06. + 09.,  organ on 03., vibraphone on 09.)
Pete Carr (guitar on 01. 03., 06. + 09.)
Bob Cranshaw (bass on 05., 06. + 07.)
Richard Davis (bass on 04.)
Cornell Dupree (guitar on 02.)
Gordon Edwards (bass on 02.)
Don Elliott (vibraphone on 04.)
Alexander Gafa (guitar on 04.)
Paul Griffin (piano on 02.)
Roger Hawkins (drums on 01., 03., 06., + 10., percussion on 09. + 10.)
David Hood (bass on 01., 03., 06., 09. +10.)
Bob James (piano on 04., keyboards on 06.)
Rev. Claude Jeter (vocals on 03.)
Jimmy Johnson (guitar on 01. + 03.)
Rick Marotta (drums on 02.)
Airto Moreira (percussion on 07.)
Jerry Puckett (guitar on 08.)
Vernie Robbins (bass on 08,)
Bobby Scott (piano on 04.)
David Spinozza (guitar on 04.)
James Stroud (drums on 08,)
Grady Tate (drums on 04. + 06.)
Carson Witsett (organ on 08.)
+
The Onward Brass Band (horns on 03.)
The Dixie Hummingbirds (group vocals on 02. + 10.)
Maggie and Terre Roche (background vocals on 07.)
+
Quincy Jones – string arrangements on 04.)
Del Newman (string arrangements on 06.)
Allen Toussaint (horn arrangements on 02.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Kodachrome 3.32
02. Tenderness 2.53
03. Take Me To The Mardi Gras 3.27
04. Something So Right 4.33
06. One Man’s Ceiling Is Another Man’s Floor 3.44
06. American Tune 3.43
07. Was A Sunny Day 3.41
08. Learn How To Fall 2.44
09. St. Judy’s Comet 3.19
10. Loves Me Like A Rock 3.31

All songs were written by Paul Simon. The melody of “American Tune” was almost note-for-note written by Johann Sebastian Bach (St Matthew Passion), who was not credited on the album. In turn, Bach had imitated the melody of Mein G’mueth ist mir verwirret by Hans Leo Hassler.

LabelB1

*
**

Front+BackCover

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Paul Simon – Paul Simon’s Concert In The Park (1991)

FrontCover1Paul Simon’s Concert in the Park is a live album released in 1991 by Paul Simon. It provided a survey of his two most recent albums, Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, and also drew liberally from his earlier songbook including a number of tunes from the Simon and Garfunkel era. 600,000 people were initially claimed to have attended the show, which was held in Central Park, New York City on August 15, 1991.[1] The concert was similar to The Concert in Central Park, a reunion concert for Simon and Garfunkel held ten years earlier. The album was released on the 50th birthday of Art Garfunkel. (by wikipedia)

Ten years after playing a free concert in New York’s Central Park with Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon returned, backed by the New York session musicians and the native musicians from South Africa and Brazil who had enlivened his solo work. The show was PaulSimon01filmed and recorded, and the audio release was a 23-track double-disc set running nearly two hours. Half the selections came from his Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints albums, but unlike the Graceland Tour of 1987, the Born at the Right Time Tour of 1991 made room for Simon’s earlier solo work as well as a few Simon & Garfunkel songs. Simon made such stylistically various material work together by front-loading the set with the newer stuff and rearranging some of the older solo stuff, so that “Kodachrome,” for example, was refitted with a guitar line courtesy of Graceland player Ray Phiri. (Wisely, except for a becalmed Africanization of “Cecilia,” Simon didn’t monkey with the S&G songs, most of which came at the end of the set.) But Simon also toned down the Brazilian percussion that had dominated the Saints material and sang it more convincingly, so that “Born at the Right Time,” for example, was far more effective than it had been in its studio version. On the whole, then, Concert in the Park managed to be an enjoyable and surprisingly cohesive career summary. (by William Ruhlmann)

CentralParl

Personnel:
Mingo Araujo (percussion)
Cyro Baptista (percussion)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Tony Cedras (piano, keyboards, accordion)
Dom Chacal (Percussion)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Sidinho Moreira (percussion)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Ray Phiri (guitar)
Barney Rachabane (saxophone, pennywhistle)
Armand Sabal-Lecco (bass)
John Selolwane (guitar)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
Richard Tee (piano)
+
background vocals:
The Waters:
Oren Waters – Maxime Waters – Julia Waters

Special guests: Briz, Grupo Cultural OLODUM and Chevy Chase join Paul, dancing to “You Can Call Me Al”.

Booklet03A

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Obvious Child 4.39
02. The Boy in the Bubble 4.49
03. She Moves On 6.26
04. Kodachrome 4.13
05. Born At The Right Time 5.12
06. Train In The Distance 4.45
07. Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard 3.14
08- I Know What I Know 3.14
09. The Cool, Cool River 5.41
10. Bridge over Troubled Water 5.16
11. Proof 5.39

CD 2:
01. The Coast 7.06
02. Graceland 5.31
03. You Can Call Me Al 5.10
04. Still Crazy After All These Years 3.42
05. Loves Me Like A Rock 2.54
06. Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes 9.30
07. Hearts And Bones 6.17
08. Late In The Evening 4.45
09. America 3.23
10. The Boxer 4.18
11. Cecilia 3.24
12. The Sound Of Silence 5.45

All Songs written by Paul Simon

CD2A
*
**

The Waters

 

Joan Baez & Friends – Beacon Theatre, New York (2016)

FrontCover1Joan Baez is still the mother of us all. At the Beacon Theater, where she celebrated her 75th birthday on Wednesday evening with an all-star concert of duets, she was a quietly magnetic woman in charge. Radiating her characteristic maternal strength and easygoing humor, she projected the welcoming empathy of someone you can turn to in times of trouble. She looked terrific: trim and fit, with short silver hair and a wonderfully goofy smile.

That strength is embedded in a voice that has shrunk in range and power but conveys an embracing reassurance and solidity. Her upper register is all but gone, but her middle range, where she remained comfortably settled for most of the evening, was as warmly expressive as ever.

It wasn’t actually the birthday of this great folk-pop singer, who was born on Jan. 9, 1941. But why quibble? The concert, in which she sang with guests including Paul Simon, Judy Collins, Mavis Staples and Jackson Browne, was taped for the PBS series “Great Performances” to be broadcast in June.

wDavidCrosby
with David Crosby

For the live audience, the concert presented technical difficulties. Except for Ms. Baez, the singers were under-rehearsed and had trouble reading lyrics on a teleprompter at the back of the orchestra. The sound in this unusually quiet concert was passable at best. Too many of the duets were so glaringly out of tune that they will have to be redone or adjusted before the broadcast. A particularly embarrassing casualty was David Crosby, who was so confused he seemed barely present during his chaotic duet with Ms. Baez on the Beatles’ “Blackbird.”

The technical lapses suggested a depressing possibility: that as much as they’d like to continue, many folk singers (not Ms. Baez) can’t go on forever without losing vocal power, stamina or spirit. The younger guests — the Irish folk singer Damien Rice, the Chilean singer Nano Stern — gave the show a shot of adrenaline and passion it desperately needed.

wDamienRice
with Damien Rice

The all-acoustic concert began with strong, steady performances by Ms. Baez, accompanying herself on guitar, of Steve Earle’s “God Is God” and the great Phil Ochs song “There but for Fortune.” The parade of guests began with David Bromberg and continued with Mr. Crosby, Mr. Rice, Mary Chapin Carpenter and Emmylou Harris, who recalled that while growing up she wanted to be Ms. Baez.

Mr. Browne, playing the piano, sang his prophetic ’70s anthem “Before the Deluge” with Ms. Baez, who glumly observed that “as we head into the abyss” this expression of apocalyptic foreboding is even more relevant today than when it was written. A weary sense of impending doom was a persistent undercurrent throughout a concert that tried and mostly failed to conjure a ’60s-style inspirational fervor. Ms. Staples, 76, came close in her duets with Ms. Baez of “Oh, Freedom” and “Turn Me Around.”

wPaulSimon
with Paul Simon

Ms. Baez’s duets with Richard Thompson on “House of the Rising Sun,” arranged as a waltz, and his original song “She Never Could Resist a Winding Road,” were stronger. Late in the evening, Mr. Simon sang a low-keyed rendition of “The Boxer” with Ms. Baez. The concert’s final number was her solo rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young,” a trite song that mocks baby-boomer narcissism.

The appearance of Mr. Stern lent the concert its only moment of genuine excitement. That 30-year-old Chilean singer and guitarist infused the theme song of the Argentine diva Mercedes Sosa, “Gracias a la Vida,” written by Violeta Parra, with an incandescent verve and spirit. It is the title song of Ms. Baez’s mostly Spanish 1974 album. As he and Ms. Baez sang it, their performance generated the kind of lightning you might have experienced at a joyful ’60s hootenanny when everything seemed possible and hope was in the air.

For a moment, the hush of depression lifted, the generational sense of defeat abated, and the concert came thrillingly alive.

wNanoSternwith Nano Stern

To celebrate her 75th birthday, Joan Baez held a concert at the Beacon Theatre in New York; the guests included Jackson Browne, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Judy Collins, Emmylou Harris, Indigo Girls, Damien Rice, Paul Simon, Mavis Staples, Nano Stern and Richard Thompson.

Joan Baez remains an icon of the Sixties folk revival, one of the movement’s foremost architects and a lifelong champion of vernacular musical tradition. So despite the grand setting and fancy roster of artists, Wednesday’s show was, true to spirit, a folk concert through and through, full of spontaneous sing-alongs and impromptu lyrical ad-libs, and with nary a single electric guitar to be found onstage. (by Rolling Stone)

Recorded live at the Beacon Theatre, New York, NY; January 27, 2016
Very good audio (ripped from HDTV – Arte HD – broadcast).

wJudyCollins

with Judy Collins

Tracklist:
01. God Is God (Earle) 3.35
02. There But For Fortune (Ochs) 4.34
03. Blackbird (with David Crosby) (Lennon/McCartney)) 3.20
04. Catch the Wind (with Mary Chapin Carpenter) (Leitch) 4.01
05. Hard Times Come Again No More (with Emmylou Harris) (Foster) 5.30
06. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (Traditional) 3.50
07. Oh, Freedom (with Mavis Staples) (Traditional) 2.46
08. Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around (with Mavis Staples) (Traditional) 3.39
09. The Water Is Wide (with The Indigo Girls and Mary Chapin Carpenter) (Traditional) 4.54
10. She Moved Through The Fair (with Damien Rice) (Traditional) 5.41
11. She Never Could Resist A Winding Road (with Richard Thompson) (Thompson) 3.39
12. Before The Deluge (with Jackson Browne) (Browne) 6.38
13. Diamonds And Rust (with Judy Collins) (Baez) 5.44
14. Gracias a la vida (with Nano Stern) (Parra) 6.21
15. The Boxer (with Paul Simon and Richard Thompson) 7:26 (Simon) 7.26
16. Forever Young (Dylan) 4.31

wBrowneHarris

with Jackson Brown + Emmylou Harris

 

*
**

Paul Simon – Paul Simon’s Concert In The Park (1991)

FrontCover1Paul Simon’s Concert in the Park is a live album released in 1991 by Paul Simon. It provided a survey of his two most recent albums, Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, and also drew liberally from his earlier songbook including a number of tunes from the Simon and Garfunkel era. 600,000 people were initially claimed to have attended the show, which was held in Central Park, New York City on August 15, 1991, though later estimates downgraded the number to less than 100,000. The concert was similar to The Concert in Central Park, a reunion concert for Simon and Garfunkel held ten years earlier. The album was released on the 50th birthday of Art Garfunkel. (by wikipedia)

Ten years after playing a free concert in New York’s Central Park with Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon returned, backed by the New York session musicians and the native musicians from South Africa and Brazil who had enlivened his solo work. The show was PaulSimonfilmed and recorded, and the audio release was a 23-track double-disc set running nearly two hours. Half the selections came from his Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints albums, but unlike the Graceland Tour of 1987, the Born at the Right Time Tour of 1991 made room for Simon’s earlier solo work as well as a few Simon & Garfunkel songs. Simon made such stylistically various material work together by front-loading the set with the newer stuff and rearranging some of the older solo stuff, so that “Kodachrome,” for example, was refitted with a guitar line courtesy of Graceland player Ray Phiri. (Wisely, except for a becalmed Africanization of “Cecilia,” Simon didn’t monkey with the S&G songs, most of which came at the end of the set.) But Simon also toned down the Brazilian percussion that had dominated the Saints material and sang it more convincingly, so that “Born at the Right Time,” for example, was far more effective than it had been in its studio version. On the whole, then, Concert in the Park managed to be an enjoyable and surprisingly cohesive career summary. (by William Ruhlmann)

Booklet02APersonnel:
Mingo Araujo (percussion)
Cyro Baptista (percussion)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Tony Cedras (keyboards, accordion)
Dom Chacal (percussion)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Sidinho Moreira (percussion)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Ray Phiri (guitar)
Barney Rachabane (saxophone, pennywhistle)
Armand Sabal-Lecco (bass)
John Selolwane (guitar)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
Richard Tee (piano)
+
The Waters (background vocals)
Oren Waters – Maxime Waters – Julia Waters

Booklet03ATracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Obvious Child (Simon)
02. The Boy in the Bubble (Simon/Motloheloa)
03. She Moves On (Simon)
04. Kodachrome (Simon)
05. Born At The Right Time (Simon)
06. Train In The Distance (Simon)
07. Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard (Simon)
08. I Know What I Know (Simon/Shirinada)
09. The Cool, Cool River (Simon)
10. Bridge Over Troubled Water (Simon)
11. Proof (Simon)

CD 2:
12. The Coast (Simon/Nguini) 7.06
13. Graceland (Simon) 5.31
14. You Can Call Me Al (Simon) 5.10
15. Still Crazy After All These Years (Simon) 3.43
16. Loves Me Like A Rock (Simon) 2.54
17. Diamon And Bones (Simon) 9.31
18. Late In The Evening (Simon) 4.45
19. America (Simon) 3.23
20. The Boxer (Simon) 4.19
21. Cecilia (Simon) 3.24
22. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 5.45

CDs* (CD 1)
** (CD 1)

* (CD 2 + artwork)
** (CD 2 + artwork)

PaulSimon2

Paul Simon – Songs From The Capeman (1997)

FrontCover1There is a tendency among rock and pop performers, as they progress through their career, to move into more — as they used to day — “legit” music forms. Among the rockers who have written for classical orchestra are Paul McCartney, Joe Jackson and Billy Joel, who recently announced his intent to move entirely into the classical realm. This week we have an example of one of pop music’s most respected songwriters venturing into a theatrical production, but unlike many others who have attempted to jump genres, he does it without really changing his style — at least on this recording.

Paul Simon has just released Songs from the Capeman, music from a Broadway production scheduled to debut in January. Giving it even more of a prestigious imprimatur is his collaboration with prize-winning poet Derek Walcott on the lyrics.

After his success in the 1960s with Simon and Garfunkel, a duo which helped to define the folk-rock sound of the era, Simon has been releasing infrequent but much-anticipated records, almost all being innovative in some way, especially in choice of musicians with whom he has collaborated. His 1986 album Graceland introduced American audiences to contemporary African sounds, and he did more or less the same thing with Brazilian styles on The Rhythm of the Saints.

LiveLive performance of “Songs From The Capeman” at the Broadway, New York, 1997

It was around the time of that record, six years ago, that Simon said he got the idea for this production. The music is based on what he calls a “sensational 1959 news story in New York,” during Simon’s teen years. It was a gang-related killing that has racial and ethnic tensions as a backdrop, in a reminder of who little things seem to have changed. It involves one Salvador Agron who was a member of a Puerto Rican gang called The Vampires, who were on their way to a confrontation with an Irish gang called the Norsemen, when a rumble broke out and two teenaged innocent bystanders were stabbed to death. Witnesses described Agron as a “tall Puerto Rican wearing a cape.” Thus he was called the Capeman. He was convicted and sentenced to death at age 16, but his sentence was commuted after pleas for mercy from prominent citizens including Eleanor Roosevelt. He was later released from prison after serving twenty years, apparently as a model prisoner, getting an education and becoming a political activist, before dying of natural causes in 1986 at the age of 43.

Simon was drawn to the story, which suggested a musical setting of 1950s styles and Latin rhythms, which were a part of his own formative years. He began collaborating with Walcott in 1993 to write a musical which became The Capeman.

Booklet01AThis CD is interesting in that it is not an original cast recording in the traditional sense. There are some members of the Broadway cast, but Simon performs most of the songs himself, taking on various roles. But there are also other voices who appear doing lead vocals, most notably Marc Anthony, and there is a notable cameo appearance by Ruben Blades. Most of the musicians are Latin jazz players based in New York, such as pianist Oscar Harnandez and drummer Robbie Ameen. The styles on the CD range from doo-wop acapella to rockabilly to salsa to jazzy. The 55-minute CD features thirteen songs from the more than thirty that are to appear in the stage production, hence the title Songs from The Capeman. Interspersed in the CD are snippets of old news interviews with Agron.

Though Simon tried a set of related songs on his largely unsuccessful One Trick Pony, Songs from the Capeman has a very good “book” as they say in the musical theater. The story develops well, and is nicely done on the CD, though Simon includes uncharacteristically coarse language in the lyrics. There’s also some racial epithets in what is at its core, a rather gritty story.

The songs explore both the young gang-banger Salvador and an older, more “rehumanized” version of the same character, in some instances speaking to each other. The gangsters’ mother, whom Simon met and interviewed in his research for the CD, along with the mothers of the victims are also portrayed in the lyrics, as are other gang members, girlfriends and even a jailer who thought it unfair that Agron should receive in education in prison. The result makes for satisfying listening, — music that tells a several sides of a story well, and does it in a manner unlike the what one would expect to hear on Broadway.

The CD begins with a piece called Adios Hermanos, sung as an acapella doo-wop song. It incorporates a dialogue between the older Salvador recalling his trial, and the younger version, the gang member. It effectively sets up the storyline.

That leads into one of the album’s best pieces from a musical standpoint. Born in Puerto Rice is classic Paul Simon, the world-musician, tastefully incorporating Latin influences, while providing a kind of early musical biography of Salvador Agron.

It’s doo-wop acapella for the following track Satin Summer Nights sung by Marc Anthony, taking the part of the young Salvador recalling pleasant romantic memories.

Bernadette is another love song, sung by Simon, in a style recalling Fifties rock and with a hint of jazziness.

Salvador’s initiation into his gang is the basis for the track called The Vampires, done as a tasty slow salsa.

One of the most lyrically powerful compositions on the CD is Can I Forgive Him. Interestingly, it’s a solo acoustic demo Simon recorded in his home. The lyrics are a dialogue among Agron’s mother and his those of his victims.

Once Agron is imprisoned, he pursues an education there, and that causes some ambivalence among the inmates and one of the guards. A short piece called Killer Wants to Go to College, tells the story in a Fifties rock setting.

A prison guard named Virgil in the song of the same name is resentful of Agron’s studies in prison, especially when Virgil cannot afford to send his own kids to college.

Time Is an Ocean is a dialogue between the younger Salvador and his older counterpart, with Marc Anthony and Ruben Blades singing the respective parts, in another nice Salsa arrangement.

Booklet11AThe album ends with Trailways Bus, with the main character having been released and on his way to freedom in Texas, but finding discrimination from the border patrol.

Paul Simon’s new CD Songs from The Capeman is an outstanding effort from one of our best songwriters. His first full-blown venture into musical theater, the CD is an interesting cross between a new solo album by Simon and a cast recording of the Broadway production. As usual, the musicianship is first-rate, and Simon’s own performance is very understated, sometimes almost dispassionately telling the story of crime, violence and ethnic divisions, unbroadcastable language and all. Simon and his literary collaborator Derek Walcott have created a nice new twist on an old plot line that goes back to West Side Story, in this case based on real people and events. Drawing on the sounds of the late 1950s, including doo-wop and the Latin American sounds that were part of the Puerto Rican characters background, and with lyrics that skillfully tell the story without the need for a lot of explanation, the CD is one of Simon’s most artistically successful works yet, and destined to be another classic in his career — though there’s nothing like a pop hit song to be found on the record.

In our weekly sound-quality grade, we’ll give the CD an “A.” The mix is excellent and captures everything well, but dynamic range is restricted a bit by the usual compression in mastering that is typical of major-label CD releases.

Forty years after the release of his first hit record, Hey Schoolgirl with Art Garfunkel as “Tom & Jerry,” Paul Simon has created a fascinating new work in Songs from the Capeman, turning his attention to writing for Broadway, but in the process creating a worthy new recording that reflects his own distinctive style. (by George Graham)

DerekDerek Walcott

Personnel:
Bobby Allende (percussion)
Robby Ameen (drums, guitar)
Johnny Andrews (timbales)
Marc Anthony (vocals)
Angelo Aponte (background vocals)
John Beal (bass)
Errol Crusher Bennett (shaker)
Karen Bernod (background vocals)
Rubén Blades (vocals)
Laura Bontrager (cello)
Bobby Bright (background vocals)
Briz (background vocals)
Marcia Butler (oboe)
Pablo Calogero (clarinet, saxophone)
Milton Cardona (background vocals, percussion)
Renee Connell-Adams (background vocals)
Richard Crooks (drums)
Steve Cropper (guitar)
Barry Danielian (flugelhorn)
David Davila (background vocals)
Ray de la Paz (background vocals)
Chris Eminizer (saxophone)
Krista Bennion Feeney (violin)
Shannon Ford (drums)
Bob Franceschini (saxophone)
Mitch Frohman (saxophone)
Tony Garnier (bass)
Hans Giraldo (background vocals)
Myrna Lynn Gomila (background vocals)
Nelson Gonzalez     Plenaro, Tres
Paul Griffin (piano)
Juliet Haffner (viola)
Kevin Harrison (background vocals)
Oscar Hernandez  (celeste, glockenspiel, piano, synthesizer, vibraphone)
Bill Holloman (saxophone, trumpet)
Derrick James (background vocals)
Kia Jeffries (background vocals)
Bakithi Kumalo (bass)
Saturnino Laboy (guitar)
Jay Leonhart (bass)
Paul Livant (guitar)
Oriente Lopez (keyboards, flute)
David Mann (saxophone)
Luis Marrero (background vocals)
Diomedes Matos (guitar)
Ozzie Melendez (trombone)
Bernie Minoso (guitar, bass)
Edgardo Miranda (cuatro)
Edwin Montalve (congas)
Ednita Nazario (vocals)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Pablo Nunez (percussion)
Horace Ott (piano)
Paul Peabody (violin)
Sean Pulley (background vocals)
Marc Quiñones (congas, timbales)
Angel Ramirez, Jr. (background vocals)
Sara Ramírez (vocals)
Michael Ramos (accordion)
Wallace Richardson (guitar)
Danny Rivera (vocals)
David “Piro” Rodríguez (trumpet)
Rubén Rodríguez (bass)
Teana Rodriguez (background vocals)
Stewart Rose (french horn)
Arlen Roth (guitar)
Jimmy Sabater (congas, cowbell)
Nestor Sanchez (background vocals)
Harper Simon (guitar, harmonica)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
DeWayne Snype (background vocals)
Edgar Stewart (background vocals)
Dionte Sutton (background vocals)
Trent Sutton (background vocals)
Robby Turner (pedal steel-guitar)
Hechter Ubarry (background vocals)
Robert Vargas (background vocals)
Ed Vasquez (background vocals)
Ray Vega (trumpet)
John Walsh (trumpet)

WalcottSimon

Tracklist:
01. Adios Hermanos 4.42
02. Born In Puerto Rico 4.54
03. Satin Summer Nights 5.46
04. Bernadette 3.28
05. The Vampires 5.06
06. Quality 4.10
07. Can I Forgive Him 6.02
08. Sunday Afternoon 3,25
09. Killer Wants To Go To College 1.51
10. Time Is An Ocean 5.24
11. Virgil 2.50
12. Killer Wants To Go To College, No. 2 2.10
13. Trailways Bus 5.15
Paul Simon / Derek Walcott

All songs written by Paul Simon + Derek Walcott

CD1*
**