Charlie Daniels Band – Fire On The Mountain (1974)

FrontCover1.jpgFire on the Mountain is the fifth studio album by Charlie Daniels, released in 1974, appearing on the record label Kama Sutra Records, then later in 1976 by Epic Records. Most of the tracks on the album are studio recordings, while the last two songs are live performances, recorded at the War Memorial Auditorium, Nashville, Tennessee on October 4, 1974. Early pressings contained a three song, seven inch, 45 RPM disc. Side one contains Volunteer Jam Part (1) and side two contains Volunteer Jam contd. Part (2) and Volunteer Jam contd. Part (3). The catalogue number of this disc is KSBS-EP-10. (by wikipedia)

Four albums in, Charlie Daniels — now fronting the Charlie Daniels Band — finally found a way to not just synthesize his various influences, he found a way to streamline them and polish them, turning them into something proudly Southern and redneck yet commercial with Fire on the Mountain. This means that he’s toned down the wild, messy eclecticism that he displayed on his ignored debut in favor of a bluesy, jam-oriented country-rock owing a great deal to the Allman Brothers. The change is brought into sharp relief because he revives two of the best songs from Charlie Daniels — the rampaging rocker “Trudy” and the sweet ballad “Georgia,” both given more direct arrangements here; the originals were ragged and right, but these have more of a rock feel, even if they’re not as loose as those on the debut.


And that pretty much sums up the difference with Fire on the Mountain — here, Charlie Daniels and his band have fused their Southern-fried country to a rollicking, jam-intensive blues-rock, where it plays like rock but feels like redneck country. It’s a rather brilliant move, because it’s every bit as jam-oriented as Capricorn bands like the Alllmans or the Marshall Tucker Band (the latter are thanked in the liner notes, while Dickey Betts of the former cameos on this record), but the CDB have yet to give themselves over to playing for the sake of playing (which they soon would with Saddle Tramp). Instead, they focus that energy into the songs, which are all top-notch, and the result is probably the best balance of songs and performances that the Charlie Daniels Band ever did. They would wander into longer jams and Daniels would become unapologetically redneck later, but here the mix is just right, which is why this is the quintessential Charlie Daniels Band album. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)


Gary Allen (drums, percussion)
Barry Barnes (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Daniels (guitar, vocals, slide-guitar, banjo, fiddle)
Joel “Taz” DiGregorio (keyboards, vocals)
Fred Edwards (drums)
Mark Fitzgerald (bass)
Richard Dickey  Betts (dobro on 02.)
Jaimie Nichol (congas on 05., 07. + 08.)


01. Caballo Diablo (Daniels) 4.29
02. Long Haired Country Boy (Daniels) 4.04
03. Trudy (Daniels) 4.52
04. Georgia (Daniels) 3.07
05. Feeling Free (Barnes) 4.11
06. The South’s Gonna Do It (Daniels) 4.00
07. New York City, King Size Rosewood Bed (Daniels) 3.26
08. No Place To Go (Daniels) 11.24
09. Orange Blossom Special (Rouse) 3.01





Gov’t Mule – Live With a Little Help From Our Friends (Collector´s Edition) (1999)

FrontCover1Live… With a Little Help from Our Friends is a live recording of Gov’t Mule’s 1998 New Year’s Eve concert at The Roxy in Atlanta, Georgia. It was released as a 4-CD set Collector’s Edition and as two separate albums.

Gov’t Mule is almost single-handedly bringing back the spirit of the ’60s and ’70s power trios, the same kind of rock & roll magic that made Jimi Hendrix and Cream such musical icons. With this two-CD set, Gov’t Mule once again breaks the rules by recording both their second release and their fourth record live in concert. But hey, that’s OK for Warren Haynes, Matt Abts and Allen Woody because they are, after all, Gov’t Mule. This show was recorded on New Year’s Eve, 1998, at the Roxy in Atlanta, GA, and documents the band in peak form, from the power charged vocals and lead guitar of Warren Haynes, to Abts’ freight train drumming and Woody’s thunder driven bass. On any given night, Gov’t Mule alone can rock your socks off, but on this magical evening, the band was joined by some real brothers of the road — the Allman Brothers, the Rolling Stones, Eric ConcertPosterClapton; sideman Chuck Leavell was there, along with Parliament’s Bernie Worrell, former Black Crowes guitarist Marc Ford, Aquarium Rescue Unit’s Jimmy Herring, Randall Bramblett, newly appointed Allman Brothers’ bandmember, Derek Trucks and Yonrico Scott, the drummer from the Derek Trucks Band. Talk about a stage full of talent. The set kicks off with a pair of Gov’t Mule originals, “Thorazine Shuffle” and “Dolhineus,” before counting down the New Year clock and launching into an unexpected but amazing rendition of Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs.” Next comes a guitar rocking take on Steve Marriott’s “30 Days in the Hole” followed by Paul Rogers’ “Mr. Big,” featuring Marc Ford on guitar, followed by the blues laced “Look Over Yonder,” with some ultra fine piano work from Leavell. Haynes and the boys keep up the momentum by bringing out Worrell and Trucks, in addition to Leavell, to perform the Haynes-penned Allman Brothers favorite, “Soulshine.” Disc one closes with a hard rocking “Mule,” featuring Worrell again on organ, and incorporating a segment of Van Morrison’s “I’ve Been Working.” Dave Mason’s “Sad and Deep as You” is given the Gov’t Mule treatment to begin disc two, with Leavell’s and Bramblett’s sax enhancing the sound just that much more, and Herring and Worrell sit in on Haynes’ “Devil Likes It Slow.”

Gov´t Mule

Next comes yet another surprise for 1999, a dramatic reading of Neil Young’s “Cortez the Killer,” leading up to the closing all-star jam of “Afro Blue.” “Live” clocks in at about two-and-one-half hours, so there’s no doubt you are getting much more bang for your buck, but it’s not the quantity of the music that is important here, it’s the quality, and believe you me, you won’t find more quality rock & roll and blues anywhere. [Live…With a Little Help from Our Friends was also released as a limited-edition four-disc set] (by Michael B. Smith)

A hell of a show, a hell of a concert … Listen and enjoy … long live Southern Rock !

Gov´t Mule2

Matt Abts (drums, djembe)
Warren Haynes (vocals, guitar)
Allen Woody (bass, mandoline on 19.)
Randall Bramblett (saxophone on 18. – 20. + 23.)
Marc Ford (guitar, background vocals on 06., 07., 08., 20.)
Jimmy Herring (guitar on 20., 21. + 23.)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)
Yonrico Scott (percussion on 18.)
Derek Trucks ( slide-guitar on 14., 16. + 23. guitar on 15.)
Bernie Worrell (organ, clavinet on 17., 18., 20. – 24.)


01. Wandering Child (Abts/Haynes) 7.45
02. Thorazine Shuffle (Abts/Haynes) 8.55
03. No Need To Suffer (Haynes) 8.12
04. Dolphineus + Happy New Year (Woody/Abts/Haynes) 1.12
05. War Pigs (Ward/Butler/Osbourne/Iommi) 8.00
06.Happy New Year II 0.17
07. Announcement + 30 Days In The Hole (Marriott) 7.12
08. Some Blues Licks (Haynes) 0.43
09. Mr. Big (Fraser/Kossoff/Rodgers/Kirke) 8.08
10.  Introducing Chuck Leavell 0.15
11. The Hunter (Jackson Jr./Jones/Wells/Dunn/Cropper) 8.24
12. Gambler’s Roll (Neel/Haynes) 13.49
13. Look On Yonder Wall (James/Sehorn) 11.06
14. 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 10.08
15. Announcment + I Shall Return (Haynes) 9.30
16. Soulshine (Haynes) 10.20
17. Mule (Woody/Abts/Haynes) + I’ve Been Working (Morrison) 17.56
18. Spanish Moon (George) 20.10
19. Sad And Deep As You (Mason) 13.51
20.  Introducing Jimmy Herring 0.44
21. Third Stone From The Sun (Hendrix) 17.01
22. Devil Likes It Slow (Haynes) 10.42
23. Cortez The Killer (Young) 13.54
24. Afro-Blue (Santamaria) 29.17
25. Pygmy Twylyte (bonus track – studio recording) (Zappa) 5.17




Atlanta Rhythm Section – Dog Days (1975)

FrontCover1Dog Days is the forth album by the southern rock band Atlanta Rhythm Section, released in 1975.

What has become known as Southern rock is now one of my favorite genres of current rock & roll, but one of the most distinctive oddities I’ve discovered about it is that it seems to take most bands several albums before they arrive at a level of competence that I can stand to listen to. Two or three pedestrian LPs and then boom!, the rhythm section’s tight and funky, the lead guitar player has stopped imitating Dickey Betts, and they’re writing and singing memorable tunes.

With Dog Days, the Atlanta Rhythm Section joins my record collection after four records. They sing of their audience:

We like raggae [sic] and we dig country
Classical music’s a gas
We play the blues in three-quarter time
But they don’t wanna hear that jazz
They just want boogie…

But there is no denying that they do boogie well, as “Boogie Smoogie,” the tune those lyrics come from, amply demonstrates. Paul Goddard’s flatulent bass and some slashing guitar work from Barry Bailey and J.R. Cobb (as well as some excellent lyrics) make for an exciting eight minutes.

Not all of the album fares as well, since the band does have a tendency to meander, but the humorous “Cuban Crisis” and the ballad “All Night Rain” provide a good change of pace. All in all, enjoyable if not earthshaking, and that’s good enough for me. (by Ed Ward, Rolling Stone, 10/23/75.)


Barry Bailey (guitar)
Buddy Buie (vocals)
J.R. Cobb (guitar, background vocals)
Dean Daughtry (keyboards)
Paul Goddard (bass)
Ronnie Hammond -(vocals, background vocals)
Robert Nix (drums, percussion, background vocals)


01. Crazy (Buie/Nix/Daughtry) 3.09
02. Boogie Smoogie (Buie/Nix/Bailey) 8.04
03. Cuban Crisis (Buie/Nix/Cobb) 3.39
04. It Just Ain’t Your Moon (Buie/Nix/Daughtry) 4.51
05. Dog Days (Buie/Nix/Daughtry) 3.37
06. Bless My Soul (Cobb) 3.50
07. Silent Treatment (Buie/Nix/Bailey) 5.16
08. All Night Rain (Buie/Nix/Daughtry/McRee) 3.13





Blackfoot – Strikes In Denver (1979)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is the story of one of the greatest southern-rock bands ever:

Blackfoot is an American Southern rock musical ensemble from Jacksonville, Florida organized during 1970. Though they are primarily a Southern rock band, they are also known as a hard rock act. The band’s classic lineup consisted of guitarist and vocalist Rickey Medlocke, guitarist Charlie Hargrett, bassist Greg T. Walker, and drummer Jakson Spires.

They’ve had a number of successful albums during the 1970s and early 1980s, including Strikes (1979), Tomcattin’ (1980) and Marauder (1981).

More informations: here

And this is Blackfoot live: recorded from a show at the Rainbow Music Hall in Denver (Source: FM Broadcast). Most songs are from the Strikes album, one of their best works.

And this is high energy southern rock … what a brilliant concert !

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate frontcover

Charlie Hargrett (guitar)
Rickey Medlocke (vocals, guitar)
Greg T. Walker (bass, background vocals)
Jakson Spires (drums, background vocals)


01. Intro 0.32
02. I Want To Talk To You (R.Medlocke) 5.25
03. Pay My Dues  () 3.11
04. I Got A Line On You (California) 5.29
05. Wishing Well (Rodgers/Kossoff/Yamauchi/Bundrike/Kirke) 4.06
06. Left Turn On A Red Light (R.Medlocke) 4.05
07.  Baby Blue ( R. Medlocke/Hargrett/Spires) 3.54
08. Road Fever (R.Medlocke) 4.06
09. Trouble In Mind (Johnson) 10.44
10. Train Train (S.Medlocke) 7.48
11. Highway Song (R.Medlocke/Spires) 9.28





Gregg Allman Band & Cowboy – The Gregg Allman Tour (1974)


Gregg Allman, the singer, musician and songwriter who played an essential role in the invention of Southern rock, has died at the age of 69 of complications from liver cancer. Allman’s rep confirmed to Rolling Stone that the artist died Saturday afternoon.

Allman “passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia,” a statement on the singer’s website read Saturday. “Gregg struggled with many health issues over the past several years. During that time, Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans, essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times.”

“It’s too soon to properly process this,” Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts said in a statement. “I’m so glad I was able to have a couple good talks with him before he passed. In fact I was about to call him to check and see how he was when I got the call. It’s a very sad day.”

Allman’s longtime manager and close friend Michael Lehman added, “I have lost a dear friend and the world has lost a brilliant pioneer in music. He was a kind and gentle soul with the best laugh I ever heard. His love for his family and bandmates was passionate as was the love he had for his extraordinary fans. Gregg was an incredible partner and an even better friend. We will all miss him.”


Although Allman claimed the term was redundant, the singer-keyboardist helped create the first great “Southern-rock” group as co-founder of the legendary Allman Brothers Band alongside his older brother, famed guitarist Duane Allman. The Allmans fused country blues with San Francisco-style extended improvisation, with their sound creating a template for countless subsequent jam bands. Gregg Allman was blessed with one of blues-rock’s great growling voices and, along with his Hammond B-3 organ playing (beholden to Booker T. Jones), had a deep emotional power.

Writing in Rolling Stone, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons said that Allman’s singing and keyboard playing displayed “a dark richness, a soulfulness that added one more color to the Allmans’ rainbow.”
“I’ve tried … Words are impossible. Gui Gui forever. Chooch,” Cher wrote on Twitter. “Rest in peace Greg [sic] Allman peace and love to all the family,” Ringo Starr wrote. The Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir added, “Bon Voyage, Brother Gregg, enjoy your next stop…” (by Rolling Stone)

Gregg Allman Playing the Guitar

The Gregg Allman Tour is the second album and first live album by Gregg Allman, released in 1974. It was recorded at Carnegie Hall and Capitol Theatre. It peaked at number 50 on the Billboard Pop Albums charts in 1974. It was originally released as a double LP.
For this concert, Allman was backed by the band Cowboy, who played two of their own songs. Cowboy was a Capricorn Records label-mate and was Duane Allman’s favorite band. Several of its members had already backed Gregg Allman on his debut album the previous year.

At the beginning of the album, Gregg Allman is introduced by Martin Mull. (by wikipedia)


Gregg Allman’s tour in support of his debut solo LP, Laid Back, led to the recording of this album (originally two LPs) at Carnegie Hall in New York and the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, NJ. It’s a match for Laid Back in musical value and then some, with a good, wide range of repertory and great performances throughout by all concerned, plunging head-first and deep into blues, R&B, honky tonk, and gospel. Strangely enough, the album contains only three of Laid Back’s songs — “Don’t Mess Up a Good Thing” opens the show in a properly spirited, earthy manner, but it’s the second song, “Queen of Hearts,” in a soaring rendition, with gorgeous backing by Annie Sutton, Erin Dickins, and Lynn Rubin, and superb sax work by Randall Bramblett and David Brown, that shows Allman in his glory as a singer and bandleader.

Allman gives a lively, raucous, honky tonk-style rendition of the Elvis Presley hit “I Feel So Bad,” complete with a killer guitar solo by Tommy Talton, and “Turn on Your Lovelight” gets an extended treatment worthy of the Allman Brothers Band. One would expect that, with Chuck Leavell and Jaimoe present in the band, there were be more similarity to the Allmans’ sound, and that they’d be prominently featured, but Tommy Talton and bassist Kenny Tibbetts get more of a spotlight. Several Allman Brothers songs are present here, in more laid-back and lyrical versions, and the Capricorn Records band Cowboy — essentially serving as the core of Allman’s touring band — gets a featured spot with two songs, “Time Will Take Us” and “Where Can You Go,” that leave one wanting to hear a lot more concert material from them, and from Talton as a singer. (by Bruce Eder)




The Gregg Allman Band:
Gregg Allman (organ, vocals)
Scott Boyer (guitar)
Randall Bramblett (saxophone)
David Brown (saxophone)
Peter Eklund (trumpet)
Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums, percussion)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Todd Logan (trumpet)
Bill Stewart (drums)
Ken Tibbets (bass)
Tommy Talton (guitar, slide guitar)
Harold “Bullets” Williams (saxophone)
background vocals:
Annie Sutton – Erin Dickins – Lynn RubinCowboy:
Scott Boyer (guitar, Background vocals)
Randall Bramblett (organ, saxophone)
David Brown (bass)
Peter Eklund (trumpet)
Johnny Lee Johnson (drums, percussion)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Todd Logan (trumpet)
Bill Stewart (drums)
Tommy Talton (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Harold “Bullet” Williams (saxophone)
Gregg Allman (organ on 06.)



The Gregg Allman Band:
01. Don’t Mess Up A Good Thing (Sain) 4.33
02. Queen of Hearts (G.Allman) 7.40
03. I Feel So Bad (Willis) 4.44
04. Stand Back (G.Allman/Oakley) 3.30

05. Time Will Take Us (Talton) 5.30
06. Where Can You Go? (Talton) 8.11

The Gregg Allman Band:
07. Double Cross (G.Allman/Leavell) 4.39
08. Dreams (Gregg Allman) 7.19
09. Are You Lonely For Me Baby (Cousin/Livesey/Price/Regan) 4.21
10. Turn On Your Love Light (Malone/Scott) 10.32
11. Oncoming Traffic (G.Allman, J.B.Allman) 5.44
12. Will The Circle Be Unbroken (Traditional) 6.13


Goodbye Gregg and thanks a lot !
(December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017)

Rest In Peace !


Dickey Betts Band – Let’s Get Together (2001)

FrontCover1After being fired from the Allman Brothers Band in 2001, a band he was a founding member of in the late ’60s, Dickey Betts dealt with his pain, anger, and loss by putting together a new band, hitting the road, and issuing a new album only a few months after the dirty deed. Let’s Get Together is a good-time, swinging, blues and New Orleans R&B-drenched romp through the roots of American music. From the Elmore James/Johnny Otis-inspired R&B of “Rave On” (not the Buddy Holly tune) that opens the album, Betts plays it loud and proud, blasting from the rafters with his own Les Paul and employing a second one via Mark May. Stinging his way through the raucous choruses, Betts reveals he’s lost none of his fire nor his impeccable taste as he slips jazz chords, rock pyrotechnics, and shimmering Chicago blues lines into the mix, driving a band whose Hammond B-3 and saxophone punch (courtesy of Matt Zeiner and Kris Jensen, respectively) is fierce. The title track is a throwaway lyrically, but musically it stomps the tar out of anything Brian Setzer tries to accomplish with raw American swing.

DickeyBettsBetts churns up the tempo and the volume and leaves the production out of the track, preferring an edgy, slippery groove. Betts also proves he can still write a gorgeous country song in “Tombstone Eyes,” with its shimmering acoustic guitars and B-3 crescendos. The balladry is simple but the emotion is complex. Betts’ voice may have lost its sheeny country whine, but he more than makes up for it with sheer guts. Given its tune, lyric, and instrumentation, there is no reason country program directors shouldn’t be playing the hell out of this one. On “One Stop Be-Bop,” Betts showcases his immense knowledge of American musical forms as this ten-minute instrumental courses through bop, gypsy swing, Brazilian samba, rock, blues, country, and jazz fusion, all of it done with taste and aplomb; Betts is too much of a musician to have to show off, and he has nothing whatsoever to prove – though it’s true no one could have guessed he was such a fine arranger. The only drawback tracks – and they wouldn’t be if they weren’t juxtaposed with Betts’ own wonderful songs – are those written by his sidemen.

But here again, if Betts has erred – and this is personal taste reflected here after all – he has erred on the side of democracy in his band, and he can hardly be faulted for it. The album closes with the blazing rocker “Sing While I’m Walkin’.” Using a Wilbert Harrison riff (from “Let’s Get Together” no less!), Betts takes it out with a stomping rouser that uses the I-IV-V progression in inverted fashion and good-times it to death with a slippery backbeat and crunchy rhythm guitar as he slashes the very air with his solo. Though he hasn’t done any solo records in a while, this cannot be considered Dickey Betts’ comeback; he’s simply stepped out on his own again and, in sharp contrast to other acts that are usually more than the sum of their parts, as a result of his split with the Allmans, listeners now have two fine acts to take pleasure in instead of just one. (by Thom Jurek)

Dickey Betts (guitar, vocals)
Mark Greenberg (drums)
Kris Jensen (saxophone)
Frankie Lombardi (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Mark May (guitar, slide-guitar vocals)
David Soltz (bass)
Matt Zeiner (keyboards, vocals)
Donna Bonelli (background vocals on 02.)
Shascle Yochim (background vocals on 02. + 03.)


01. Rave On (Betts) 3.42
02. Let’s All Get Together (Betts) 4.39
03. Immortal (Zeiner) 4.26
04. Tombstone Eyes (Betts) 5.51
05. Here Come The Blues Again (Betts) 7.39
06. One Stop Be-Bop (Betts) 10.12
07. I Gotta Know (May) 8.08
08. Call Me Anytime (Zeiner) 4.40
09. Dona Maria (Betts) 12.16
10. All For You (May) 7.08
11. Sing While I’m Walkin’ (Betts) 6.41





Allman Brothers Band – Idlewild South (1970)

OriginalFrontCover1Idlewild South is the second album by American Southern rock band the Allman Brothers Band. Produced by Tom Dowd, the album was released on September 23, 1970, in the United States by Atco Records and Capricorn Records.
Following the release of their 1969 debut, the Allman Brothers Band toured the United States extensively to promote the album, which had little commercial success. Their performances, however, did create positive word of mouth exposure that extended to more famous musicians, such as Eric Clapton, who invited group leader Duane Allman to contribute to his 1970 album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

As a result of the band’s relentless touring schedule, Idlewild South was recorded gradually over a period of five months in various cities, including New York, Miami, and Macon, Georgia, the band’s home. Tom Dowd had previously been sought to record the group’s debut but had been unavailable. The material presented on Idlewild South was written during this period and tested out on the road at shows. The album’s title comes from the band’s nickname for a rustic cabin the band rented out and used for rehearsals, as well as parties. Idlewild South contains two of the band’s best-known songs, “Midnight Rider” (later a hit for various artists) and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed”, which became one of the band’s famous concert numbers.

The album was released in September 1970 but again failed to achieve significant success. Sales began to grow, however, due to over 300 shows the band put on in 1970, setting the stage for their artistic and commercial breakthrough with 1971’s live follow-up album, At Fillmore East.
The Allman Brothers Band formed in March 1969, and began writing music and touring together. By that August, the group had recorded their self-titled debut album, which was released that November on Capricorn Records, a division of Atlantic Records.[1] The record received a poor commercial response, selling less than 35,000 copies upon initial release.[2] Executives suggested to the band’s manager and Capricorn president, Phil Walden, that he relocate the band to New York or Los Angeles to increase their exposure. “They wanted us to act “like a rock band” and we just told them to “fuck themselves,” remembered Trucks.[3] For their part, the members of the band remained optimistic, electing to stay in the South. “Everyone told us we’d fall by the wayside down there,” said Gregg Allman,[3] but the collaboration between the band and Capricorn Records “transformed Macon from this sleepy little town into a very hip, wild, and crazy place filled with bikers and rockers.” In March 1970, Oakley’s wife rented a large Victorian home on 2321 Vineville Avenue in Macon, which they dubbed “the Big House”.

Idlewild South was the band’s first effort with Tom Dowd, known for his work with Cream and John Coltrane. Dowd first heard the band rehearsing while visiting Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon, asking their name and remarking to Walden, “Get them the hell out of there and give them to me in the studio. They don’t need to rehearse; they’re ready to record” Dowd was initially scheduled to work with the band on their debut album but was called away at the last minute. Initially, the band had asked friend and colleague Johnny Sandlin to produce their second album, but as recording inched closer, it became obvious they wanted him to co-produce with Dowd. In one of their first sessions, Sandlin was giving suggestions and acting as a co-producer, though no one had informed Dowd; Sandlin was embarrassed and did not return to the studio

They had to get on the road to support themselves. They were working 300 days a year. So they would just blow in and do some songs and blow out. That was it — in and out — just like that.
The first recording sessions for Idlewild South took place in mid-February 1970 at the newly built Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon. Subsequently, the band moved to Criteria Studios in Miami in mid-March, where Dowd felt more comfortable producing albums; he viewed the then-new Capricorn studio as still a work-in-progress and unfit to record in. The band was constantly on the road while Idlewild South was developed, leading to a fractured recording process completed in fits and stops. They reconvened with Dowd during short breaks from shows. In addition, group leader Duane Allman still received invitations to play as a session musician elsewhere; on the “rare instances when [the band] could return to Macon for a short break”, Allman would hit the road for New York, Miami, or Muscle Shoals to contribute to other artists’ sessions. On days that the band would be available, manager Walden phoned Dowd to inform him; he would often catch their show and spend the rest of the night in the studio. After nearly half a year and over three different recording studios, production wrapped up by July 1970.

Instead of using multitrack recording (which was quickly gaining popularity), the Allman Brothers Band opted to cut most of Idlewild South live, with all of the musicians performing together. On rare occasions, they would go back to overdub sections that weren’t up to standard. “The idea is that part of the thing of the Allman Brothers is the spontaneity — the elasticity. The parts and tempos vary in a way that only they are sensitive to”, said Dowd. Duane often left a song alone for more work and testing out on the road. “They would record maybe five songs. Then they might say, ‘I don’t think that song was good enough,’ or, ‘I don’t think that song was ready to record,”, remembered Dowd.[10] Joel Dorn, predominantly a jazz producer for Atlantic, stepped in to produce one song on the album, “Please Call Home”, which was recorded at Regency Sound Studios on July 14, 1970.[12] The band were in New York at the time and Dowd was unavailable.[13]
Following the recording process, Duane was invited to join Eric Clapton and his new group Derek & the Dominos on the recording of their debut album, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Clapton later formally invited Allman to join the group, but he reluctantly declined, expressing loyalty to the members of the Allman Brothers and musical concept that had birthed it.
Idlewild South was issued by Atco and Capricorn Records on September 23, 1970, less than a year after the band’s debut album. It sold only “marginally better, in spite of the band’s growing national reputation, and included songs that would become staples of its repertoire—and eventually of rock radio.”[27] Jim Hawkins, engineer of the album, remembered that Walden informed him that Idlewild South opened to 50,000 copies in its first week, before settling in at 1,000 per week.[28] While the album did help boost the band’s popularity, the Allman Brothers’ name really grew in fame due to their live performances. Walden doubted the band’s future, worrying whether they would ever catch on, but word of mouth spread due to the band’s relentless touring schedule, and crowds got larger.

Rolling Stone’s Ed Leimbacher wrote that Idlewild South “augurs well for the Allmans’ future,” calling it “a big step forward from the Allmans’ first” but considered the second side of the LP a disappointment. Robert Christgau at The Village Voice gave the album a “B+” and considered it a companion piece to Duane Allman’s work on Layla, noting that “a lot of people think that Duane Allman is already a ranking titan of the electric guitar.”[31] A retrospective five-star review from Bruce Eder at Allmusic deemed it “the best studio album in the group’s history, electric blues with an acoustic texture, virtuoso lead, slide, and organ playing, and a killer selection of songs.”

In 2014 Rolling Stone listed it among the most “groundbreaking” albums, covering its impact on Southern rock: “On their second album, the Allman Brothers transmogrified from mere blues-rockers to an assemblage creating an entirely new kind of Southern music.” (by wikipedia)
Duane Allman (slide guitar, guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion congas, timbales)
Berry Oakley (bass, vocals on 05., background vocals on 03.)
Butch Trucks (drums, Timpani)

Thom Doucette (harmonica, Percussion)
01. Revival (Betts) 4.06
02. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.30
03. Midnight Rider (Allman/Payne) 3.00
04. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 6.56
05. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 4.59
06. Please Call Home (G.Allman) 4.04
07. Leave My Blues At Home (G.Allman) 4.18