Gregg Allman Band & Cowboy – The Gregg Allman Tour (1974)

FrontCover1

Gregg Allman, the singer, musician and songwriter who played an essential role in the invention of Southern rock, has died at the age of 69 of complications from liver cancer. Allman’s rep confirmed to Rolling Stone that the artist died Saturday afternoon.

Allman “passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia,” a statement on the singer’s website read Saturday. “Gregg struggled with many health issues over the past several years. During that time, Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans, essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times.”

“It’s too soon to properly process this,” Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts said in a statement. “I’m so glad I was able to have a couple good talks with him before he passed. In fact I was about to call him to check and see how he was when I got the call. It’s a very sad day.”

Allman’s longtime manager and close friend Michael Lehman added, “I have lost a dear friend and the world has lost a brilliant pioneer in music. He was a kind and gentle soul with the best laugh I ever heard. His love for his family and bandmates was passionate as was the love he had for his extraordinary fans. Gregg was an incredible partner and an even better friend. We will all miss him.”

GreggAllman02

Although Allman claimed the term was redundant, the singer-keyboardist helped create the first great “Southern-rock” group as co-founder of the legendary Allman Brothers Band alongside his older brother, famed guitarist Duane Allman. The Allmans fused country blues with San Francisco-style extended improvisation, with their sound creating a template for countless subsequent jam bands. Gregg Allman was blessed with one of blues-rock’s great growling voices and, along with his Hammond B-3 organ playing (beholden to Booker T. Jones), had a deep emotional power.

Writing in Rolling Stone, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons said that Allman’s singing and keyboard playing displayed “a dark richness, a soulfulness that added one more color to the Allmans’ rainbow.”
“I’ve tried … Words are impossible. Gui Gui forever. Chooch,” Cher wrote on Twitter. “Rest in peace Greg [sic] Allman peace and love to all the family,” Ringo Starr wrote. The Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir added, “Bon Voyage, Brother Gregg, enjoy your next stop…” (by Rolling Stone)

Gregg Allman Playing the Guitar

The Gregg Allman Tour is the second album and first live album by Gregg Allman, released in 1974. It was recorded at Carnegie Hall and Capitol Theatre. It peaked at number 50 on the Billboard Pop Albums charts in 1974. It was originally released as a double LP.
For this concert, Allman was backed by the band Cowboy, who played two of their own songs. Cowboy was a Capricorn Records label-mate and was Duane Allman’s favorite band. Several of its members had already backed Gregg Allman on his debut album the previous year.

At the beginning of the album, Gregg Allman is introduced by Martin Mull. (by wikipedia)

BackCover1

Gregg Allman’s tour in support of his debut solo LP, Laid Back, led to the recording of this album (originally two LPs) at Carnegie Hall in New York and the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, NJ. It’s a match for Laid Back in musical value and then some, with a good, wide range of repertory and great performances throughout by all concerned, plunging head-first and deep into blues, R&B, honky tonk, and gospel. Strangely enough, the album contains only three of Laid Back’s songs — “Don’t Mess Up a Good Thing” opens the show in a properly spirited, earthy manner, but it’s the second song, “Queen of Hearts,” in a soaring rendition, with gorgeous backing by Annie Sutton, Erin Dickins, and Lynn Rubin, and superb sax work by Randall Bramblett and David Brown, that shows Allman in his glory as a singer and bandleader.

Allman gives a lively, raucous, honky tonk-style rendition of the Elvis Presley hit “I Feel So Bad,” complete with a killer guitar solo by Tommy Talton, and “Turn on Your Lovelight” gets an extended treatment worthy of the Allman Brothers Band. One would expect that, with Chuck Leavell and Jaimoe present in the band, there were be more similarity to the Allmans’ sound, and that they’d be prominently featured, but Tommy Talton and bassist Kenny Tibbetts get more of a spotlight. Several Allman Brothers songs are present here, in more laid-back and lyrical versions, and the Capricorn Records band Cowboy — essentially serving as the core of Allman’s touring band — gets a featured spot with two songs, “Time Will Take Us” and “Where Can You Go,” that leave one wanting to hear a lot more concert material from them, and from Talton as a singer. (by Bruce Eder)

GreggAllman04

Personnel:

 

The Gregg Allman Band:
Gregg Allman (organ, vocals)
Scott Boyer (guitar)
Randall Bramblett (saxophone)
David Brown (saxophone)
Peter Eklund (trumpet)
Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums, percussion)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Todd Logan (trumpet)
Bill Stewart (drums)
Ken Tibbets (bass)
Tommy Talton (guitar, slide guitar)
Harold “Bullets” Williams (saxophone)
+
background vocals:
Annie Sutton – Erin Dickins – Lynn RubinCowboy:
Scott Boyer (guitar, Background vocals)
Randall Bramblett (organ, saxophone)
David Brown (bass)
Peter Eklund (trumpet)
Johnny Lee Johnson (drums, percussion)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Todd Logan (trumpet)
Bill Stewart (drums)
Tommy Talton (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Harold “Bullet” Williams (saxophone)
+
Gregg Allman (organ on 06.)

Booklet1

Tracklist:

The Gregg Allman Band:
01. Don’t Mess Up A Good Thing (Sain) 4.33
02. Queen of Hearts (G.Allman) 7.40
03. I Feel So Bad (Willis) 4.44
04. Stand Back (G.Allman/Oakley) 3.30

Cowboy:
05. Time Will Take Us (Talton) 5.30
06. Where Can You Go? (Talton) 8.11

The Gregg Allman Band:
07. Double Cross (G.Allman/Leavell) 4.39
08. Dreams (Gregg Allman) 7.19
09. Are You Lonely For Me Baby (Cousin/Livesey/Price/Regan) 4.21
10. Turn On Your Love Light (Malone/Scott) 10.32
11. Oncoming Traffic (G.Allman, J.B.Allman) 5.44
12. Will The Circle Be Unbroken (Traditional) 6.13

LabelB1*
**

GreggAlman01
Goodbye Gregg and thanks a lot !
(December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017)

Rest In Peace !

Advertisements

Dickey Betts Band – Let’s Get Together (2001)

FrontCover1After being fired from the Allman Brothers Band in 2001, a band he was a founding member of in the late ’60s, Dickey Betts dealt with his pain, anger, and loss by putting together a new band, hitting the road, and issuing a new album only a few months after the dirty deed. Let’s Get Together is a good-time, swinging, blues and New Orleans R&B-drenched romp through the roots of American music. From the Elmore James/Johnny Otis-inspired R&B of “Rave On” (not the Buddy Holly tune) that opens the album, Betts plays it loud and proud, blasting from the rafters with his own Les Paul and employing a second one via Mark May. Stinging his way through the raucous choruses, Betts reveals he’s lost none of his fire nor his impeccable taste as he slips jazz chords, rock pyrotechnics, and shimmering Chicago blues lines into the mix, driving a band whose Hammond B-3 and saxophone punch (courtesy of Matt Zeiner and Kris Jensen, respectively) is fierce. The title track is a throwaway lyrically, but musically it stomps the tar out of anything Brian Setzer tries to accomplish with raw American swing.

DickeyBettsBetts churns up the tempo and the volume and leaves the production out of the track, preferring an edgy, slippery groove. Betts also proves he can still write a gorgeous country song in “Tombstone Eyes,” with its shimmering acoustic guitars and B-3 crescendos. The balladry is simple but the emotion is complex. Betts’ voice may have lost its sheeny country whine, but he more than makes up for it with sheer guts. Given its tune, lyric, and instrumentation, there is no reason country program directors shouldn’t be playing the hell out of this one. On “One Stop Be-Bop,” Betts showcases his immense knowledge of American musical forms as this ten-minute instrumental courses through bop, gypsy swing, Brazilian samba, rock, blues, country, and jazz fusion, all of it done with taste and aplomb; Betts is too much of a musician to have to show off, and he has nothing whatsoever to prove – though it’s true no one could have guessed he was such a fine arranger. The only drawback tracks – and they wouldn’t be if they weren’t juxtaposed with Betts’ own wonderful songs – are those written by his sidemen.

But here again, if Betts has erred – and this is personal taste reflected here after all – he has erred on the side of democracy in his band, and he can hardly be faulted for it. The album closes with the blazing rocker “Sing While I’m Walkin’.” Using a Wilbert Harrison riff (from “Let’s Get Together” no less!), Betts takes it out with a stomping rouser that uses the I-IV-V progression in inverted fashion and good-times it to death with a slippery backbeat and crunchy rhythm guitar as he slashes the very air with his solo. Though he hasn’t done any solo records in a while, this cannot be considered Dickey Betts’ comeback; he’s simply stepped out on his own again and, in sharp contrast to other acts that are usually more than the sum of their parts, as a result of his split with the Allmans, listeners now have two fine acts to take pleasure in instead of just one. (by Thom Jurek)

DickeyBettsBand01
Personnel:
Dickey Betts (guitar, vocals)
Mark Greenberg (drums)
Kris Jensen (saxophone)
Frankie Lombardi (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Mark May (guitar, slide-guitar vocals)
David Soltz (bass)
Matt Zeiner (keyboards, vocals)
+
Donna Bonelli (background vocals on 02.)
Shascle Yochim (background vocals on 02. + 03.)

Booklet01

Tracklist:
01. Rave On (Betts) 3.42
02. Let’s All Get Together (Betts) 4.39
03. Immortal (Zeiner) 4.26
04. Tombstone Eyes (Betts) 5.51
05. Here Come The Blues Again (Betts) 7.39
06. One Stop Be-Bop (Betts) 10.12
07. I Gotta Know (May) 8.08
08. Call Me Anytime (Zeiner) 4.40
09. Dona Maria (Betts) 12.16
10. All For You (May) 7.08
11. Sing While I’m Walkin’ (Betts) 6.41
CD1

*
**

 

Booklet04

Allman Brothers Band – Idlewild South (1970)

OriginalFrontCover1Idlewild South is the second album by American Southern rock band the Allman Brothers Band. Produced by Tom Dowd, the album was released on September 23, 1970, in the United States by Atco Records and Capricorn Records.
Following the release of their 1969 debut, the Allman Brothers Band toured the United States extensively to promote the album, which had little commercial success. Their performances, however, did create positive word of mouth exposure that extended to more famous musicians, such as Eric Clapton, who invited group leader Duane Allman to contribute to his 1970 album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

As a result of the band’s relentless touring schedule, Idlewild South was recorded gradually over a period of five months in various cities, including New York, Miami, and Macon, Georgia, the band’s home. Tom Dowd had previously been sought to record the group’s debut but had been unavailable. The material presented on Idlewild South was written during this period and tested out on the road at shows. The album’s title comes from the band’s nickname for a rustic cabin the band rented out and used for rehearsals, as well as parties. Idlewild South contains two of the band’s best-known songs, “Midnight Rider” (later a hit for various artists) and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed”, which became one of the band’s famous concert numbers.

The album was released in September 1970 but again failed to achieve significant success. Sales began to grow, however, due to over 300 shows the band put on in 1970, setting the stage for their artistic and commercial breakthrough with 1971’s live follow-up album, At Fillmore East.
AllmanBrothersBand01
The Allman Brothers Band formed in March 1969, and began writing music and touring together. By that August, the group had recorded their self-titled debut album, which was released that November on Capricorn Records, a division of Atlantic Records.[1] The record received a poor commercial response, selling less than 35,000 copies upon initial release.[2] Executives suggested to the band’s manager and Capricorn president, Phil Walden, that he relocate the band to New York or Los Angeles to increase their exposure. “They wanted us to act “like a rock band” and we just told them to “fuck themselves,” remembered Trucks.[3] For their part, the members of the band remained optimistic, electing to stay in the South. “Everyone told us we’d fall by the wayside down there,” said Gregg Allman,[3] but the collaboration between the band and Capricorn Records “transformed Macon from this sleepy little town into a very hip, wild, and crazy place filled with bikers and rockers.” In March 1970, Oakley’s wife rented a large Victorian home on 2321 Vineville Avenue in Macon, which they dubbed “the Big House”.

AllmanBrothersBand02
Idlewild South was the band’s first effort with Tom Dowd, known for his work with Cream and John Coltrane. Dowd first heard the band rehearsing while visiting Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon, asking their name and remarking to Walden, “Get them the hell out of there and give them to me in the studio. They don’t need to rehearse; they’re ready to record” Dowd was initially scheduled to work with the band on their debut album but was called away at the last minute. Initially, the band had asked friend and colleague Johnny Sandlin to produce their second album, but as recording inched closer, it became obvious they wanted him to co-produce with Dowd. In one of their first sessions, Sandlin was giving suggestions and acting as a co-producer, though no one had informed Dowd; Sandlin was embarrassed and did not return to the studio

They had to get on the road to support themselves. They were working 300 days a year. So they would just blow in and do some songs and blow out. That was it — in and out — just like that.
AllmanBrothersBand03
The first recording sessions for Idlewild South took place in mid-February 1970 at the newly built Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon. Subsequently, the band moved to Criteria Studios in Miami in mid-March, where Dowd felt more comfortable producing albums; he viewed the then-new Capricorn studio as still a work-in-progress and unfit to record in. The band was constantly on the road while Idlewild South was developed, leading to a fractured recording process completed in fits and stops. They reconvened with Dowd during short breaks from shows. In addition, group leader Duane Allman still received invitations to play as a session musician elsewhere; on the “rare instances when [the band] could return to Macon for a short break”, Allman would hit the road for New York, Miami, or Muscle Shoals to contribute to other artists’ sessions. On days that the band would be available, manager Walden phoned Dowd to inform him; he would often catch their show and spend the rest of the night in the studio. After nearly half a year and over three different recording studios, production wrapped up by July 1970.

AllmanBrothersBand04
Instead of using multitrack recording (which was quickly gaining popularity), the Allman Brothers Band opted to cut most of Idlewild South live, with all of the musicians performing together. On rare occasions, they would go back to overdub sections that weren’t up to standard. “The idea is that part of the thing of the Allman Brothers is the spontaneity — the elasticity. The parts and tempos vary in a way that only they are sensitive to”, said Dowd. Duane often left a song alone for more work and testing out on the road. “They would record maybe five songs. Then they might say, ‘I don’t think that song was good enough,’ or, ‘I don’t think that song was ready to record,”, remembered Dowd.[10] Joel Dorn, predominantly a jazz producer for Atlantic, stepped in to produce one song on the album, “Please Call Home”, which was recorded at Regency Sound Studios on July 14, 1970.[12] The band were in New York at the time and Dowd was unavailable.[13]
Following the recording process, Duane was invited to join Eric Clapton and his new group Derek & the Dominos on the recording of their debut album, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Clapton later formally invited Allman to join the group, but he reluctantly declined, expressing loyalty to the members of the Allman Brothers and musical concept that had birthed it.
Idlewild South was issued by Atco and Capricorn Records on September 23, 1970, less than a year after the band’s debut album. It sold only “marginally better, in spite of the band’s growing national reputation, and included songs that would become staples of its repertoire—and eventually of rock radio.”[27] Jim Hawkins, engineer of the album, remembered that Walden informed him that Idlewild South opened to 50,000 copies in its first week, before settling in at 1,000 per week.[28] While the album did help boost the band’s popularity, the Allman Brothers’ name really grew in fame due to their live performances. Walden doubted the band’s future, worrying whether they would ever catch on, but word of mouth spread due to the band’s relentless touring schedule, and crowds got larger.

AllmanBrothersBand05
Rolling Stone’s Ed Leimbacher wrote that Idlewild South “augurs well for the Allmans’ future,” calling it “a big step forward from the Allmans’ first” but considered the second side of the LP a disappointment. Robert Christgau at The Village Voice gave the album a “B+” and considered it a companion piece to Duane Allman’s work on Layla, noting that “a lot of people think that Duane Allman is already a ranking titan of the electric guitar.”[31] A retrospective five-star review from Bruce Eder at Allmusic deemed it “the best studio album in the group’s history, electric blues with an acoustic texture, virtuoso lead, slide, and organ playing, and a killer selection of songs.”

In 2014 Rolling Stone listed it among the most “groundbreaking” albums, covering its impact on Southern rock: “On their second album, the Allman Brothers transmogrified from mere blues-rockers to an assemblage creating an entirely new kind of Southern music.” (by wikipedia)
AllmanBrothersBand06
Personnel:
Duane Allman (slide guitar, guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion congas, timbales)
Berry Oakley (bass, vocals on 05., background vocals on 03.)
Butch Trucks (drums, Timpani)

+
Thom Doucette (harmonica, Percussion)
OriginalBackCover
Tracklist:
01. Revival (Betts) 4.06
02. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.30
03. Midnight Rider (Allman/Payne) 3.00
04. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 6.56
05. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 4.59
06. Please Call Home (G.Allman) 4.04
07. Leave My Blues At Home (G.Allman) 4.18
LabelA1
 *
**

 

Marshall Tucker Band – A New Life (1974)

frontcover1A New Life is the second album by The Marshall Tucker Band. It was recorded in Macon, Georgia at Capricorn Studios.

Perhaps the only reason that New Life isn’t quite as memorable as its self-titled predecessor is that the band’s debut was just so startling when it appeared. By the time New Life was issued in 1974, to the band’s credit, it seemed like the Marshall Tucker Band sound had always been a part of America’s rock & roll scene. New Life is earthier than the first album, and country music is less layered over by the trappings of jam-band rock. “Blue Ridge Mountain Sky” is only eclipsed by Dickey Betts’ “Ramblin’ Man” as the ultimate road song from the period. Likewise, the pedal steel blues of “Too Stubborn” echo an earlier era altogether, as the ghost of Bob Wills comes into Toy Caldwell’s songwriting. The whining guitars and lilting woodwinds of the title track bring the jazzier elements in the band’s sound to the fore and wind them seamlessly into a swirling, pastoral country music. The Muscle Shoals horns lend a hand on the Allman Brothers’ Brothers and Sisters-influenced “Another Cruel Love,” and guest Charlie Daniels’ fiddle cooks up a bluegrass stew on “24 Hours at a Time.” The sound is fantastically balanced and warm, and like its predecessor, this album has dated very well. (by Thom Jurek)

backcover1
Personnel:
Tommy Caldwell (bass, background vocals)
Toy Caldwell – guitar, steel guitar, slide guitar, vocals on 03. + 11.)
Doug Gray (vocals, guitar, percussion)
Jerry Eubanks (flute, saxophone, keyboards, background vocals)
George McCorkle (guitar, Banjo)
Paul Riddle (drums)
+
Charlie Daniels (fiddle)
Earl Ford (horn)
Paul Hornsby (keyboards)
Oscar Jackson (horn)
Jaimoe (percussion)
Todd Logan (horn)
Harold Williams (horn)

booklet1
Tracklist:
01. A New Life 6.44
02. Southern Woman 7.55
03. Blue Ridge Mountain Sky 3.37
04. Too Stubborn 3.58
05. Another Cruel Love 3.58
06. You Ain’t Foolin’ Me 7.03
07. 24 Hours At A Time 5.04
08. Fly Eagle Fly 4.25
+
09. Another Cruel Love” (Live at Uhlein Hall, Milwaukee, WI, July 11, 1974) 4.23
labela1

*
**

The Allman Brothers Band – Live From A&R Studios, New York, August 26, 1971 (1971)

frontcover1Live from A&R Studios is an album by the Allman Brothers Band. It was recorded on August 26, 1971, at A&R Studios in New York City for a live radio broadcast.
A bootleg recording of this concert had been circulated for years, and coveted by many fans. Originally, “You Don’t Love Me” / “Soul Serenade” was released on the box set Dreams.
On Jambands.com, Larson Sutton said, “The nine-song program was inspired work, showcasing the conflagration of six musicians focused as one… The A&R show, presumably taped in droves by home stereos, was widely bootlegged, and in the following decades considered quite a treasure of both performance and historical context. To have it officially released, cleaned up and remastered to a high polish from the original broadcast tapes, is to put it finally in the proper place for all to hear; the magnificence of the Allman Brothers Band in one of its finest hours of its finest year of 1971.”
In American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz wrote, “As those who already own this heavily bootlegged concert, recorded in front of a small audience at the titular studio can attest, the sextet was on fire this evening. And even though there were few surprises in the songs played (they had stayed pretty similar for about a year), the group charged through the material like they had everything to prove…. Moderate Brothers admirers can stick with the already released versions, but for those digging deeper into Duane’s sadly limited well of professionally recorded work with the band, this is absolutely essential listening.” (by wikipedia)
labels
We were reminded of this great show from the old European bootleg label, Gold Standard, when a fan shared his on the net earlier this month. It’s a killer show from the Allmans, at the peak of their career.
They had recorded their seminal live album, At Fillmore East, in March 1971, and continued to tour relentlessly. In July, At Fillmore East was released to critical acclaim. It was back on the road again to promote that album. One important stop was at New York’s A&R Studios. The show was broadcast live on FM.
This show was broadcast two weeks after the death of King Curtis. This article from Hittin’ The Note by Tim Hoover details Curtis’ influence on Duane Allman.
During the broadcast, Duane pauses to reflect on his fallen friend: “About King Curtis – that was one of the finest cats there ever was. He was just right on top of getting next to young people, you know? It’s a shame. If y’all get the chance, listen to that album he made out at Fillmore West… Boy, it’s incredible, it’s unbelievable, the power and the emotional stature the man had. He’s an incredible human being.
“At the funeral, boy, Aretha sang and Stevie Wonder played… they played ‘Soul Serenade.’ Duane breaks off into the melody of Curtis’ signature song, and a few in the audience respond with polite applause of recognition.
“Y’all probably a little bit young. It’s fantastic. We’ll do some of that… yeah, I know where we’ll do it…”
lpbooklet01a
“Duane and the band jump into the intro for ‘You Don’t Love Me.’ A little over eight minutes into the song, Duane slows the band, reaching an achingly slow transitional phase, gradually leading everyone into his own version of ‘Soul Serenade’. When Duane plays the melody of the song again, the audience immediately begins clapping along to the sweet melodic tune. Suddenly, Duane jumps in and absolutely cuts the melody to shreds with one of the most moving, heart-felt solos you will ever hear, taking it right up into the stratosphere. Mirroring his words for Curtis, the ‘power and emotional stature’ of Duane’s own very personal and passionate eulogy for his lost friend is delivered as only he can do it – powerfully, lovingly, and gracefully.
Tragically, the Allman Brothers Band lost their founder and leader when Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle crash in Macon on October 29, just two months after this show.
Allman’s influences were varied as they were all-encompassing. You can hear it in his playing, spacious, inventive, intense and always entertaining. Although he was a virtuoso musician, he was also a team player and his interplay with Dickey Betts was complex and masterful. At this point, the Allmans had a superb rhythm section of Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks and Jaimoe Johanson.
Back then, a broad outlook was important. Nobody liked being typecast or placed in boxes. The music had to be interesting. It’s almost four decades since Duane passed on, so this one’s in his Memory.
alternatefrontcovers
Personnel:
Duane Allman (guitar, slide guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Berry Oakley (bass)
Butch Trucks (drums)
Jai Johanny Johanson (Jaimoe) (drums, percussion)
backcover
Tracklist:
01. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.30
02. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 4.04
03. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.39
04. Done Somebody Wrong (Lewis/James/Levy) 3.43
05. One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 4.48
06. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 11.23
07. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.48
08. Medley:
08.1. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs)
08.2. Soul Serenade (Ousley/Dixon) 19.32
09. Hot ‘Lanta (G.Allman/D.Allman/Betts/Trucks/Oakley,Jai Johanny Johanson) 6.46
cd
This is just so shocking and sad. Butch Trucks, a founding member of the legendary Allman Brothers Band, allegedly shot himself in the head on Jan. 24, 2017 as his wife watched, according to a Jan. 26 report. Here’s what we know.
Butch Trucks has died at the age of 69 after suffering from a gun shot to the head, according to police reports obtained by Daily Mail. He was in his condo in West Palm Beach, FL, and his wife Melinda allegedly witnessed Butch pull the trigger. So awful.
What a tragedy …

butchtrucks

Goodbye Butch … RIP !

Gregg Allman – One Way Out (1989) (VHS rip)

frontcoverAnd here´s another VHS rip from my collection:

“I had this originally many years ago on VHS video. I have been a fan for a long time, and this was a little productive spurt by Gregg Allman, Two albums and a Video in 3 or four years.
The show covers the I’m No Angel album and the line up includes the Toler brothers on Dums and Guitar, Chaz Trippy on percussion Bruce Waibel ion Bass and Tim Heading on Keyboards, as well as Gregg on Hammond Organ and Vocals.
The set is short at just under an hour and is pretty good covering a mix of Allman Brothers songs ‘It’s Not My Cross To Bear’ , ‘Statesboro’ Blues’ and ‘One way out ‘and Gregg Allman solo song from the period ‘I’m No Angel’, ‘Demons’ and ‘Just Before the Bullets Fly’. The show is short at just under 1 hour.
The picture quality is not ‘hi-def’ by any means and may be a very good dub from the original Video. Sound is slightly better though only Dolby and not LPCM.
Overall an ‘honest presentation’ of a Gregg Allman Band show of the time. Recommended for fans and those nostalgic for eighties production.” (by Fletch-a-sketch)

Enjoy this rare concert … And without any doubts … Gregg Allmann was one of the most impotant musicians of Southern Rock !

Personnel:
Gregg Allman (keyboards, vocals)
Tim Heading (keyboards)
Dan Toler (guitar)
David Toler (drums)
Chaz Trippy (percussion)
Bruce Waibel (bass)

vhstape1

Tracklist:
01. Don’t Want You No More (Davis/Hardin)
02. It’s My Cross To Bear (
03. Sweet Feeling
04. Just Before The Bullets Fly
05. Fear Of Falling
06. Demons
07. I’m No Angel
08. Statesboro’ Blues
09. Slip Away
10. One Way Out

example01

example02

example03

example04

example05

example06

example07

example08

example09

example10

example11

*
**

frontbackcover1

JoJa Band – Cold Winds (1977)

frontcover1The JoJa Band’s roots stem from two earlier groups:  The Easywalkers and JoJo.  The Easywalkers grew out of informal jam sessions held during 1972 in the basement of Savannah’s downtown YWCA.  John Clark (bass), Steffens Clark (guitar), Bobby Hanson (harp and vocals), Jesse Jordan (drums and vocals), Jimmy Maddox (keyboards, sax, and vocals), and Gene Weatherford (guitar and vocals) participated in these sessions.  After Steffens had moved to Atlanta for a brief period, the others moved to a farmhouse in Register, Georgia to rehearse and write original material.  With the addition of Michael Amburgey on guitar, the Easywalkers moved back to Savannah and became the house band at the Hershey Bar on Congress Street, where they played a combination of R & B covers mixed with original songs.  Many of the songs written by Bobby and Jimmy during the Easywalkers days would become material for future JoJa Band recordings.

The first incarnation of JoJo was formed in 1973 by Steffens, Danny Branson (bass and vocals), Danny Williby (drums), and Chuck Womble (keyboard). Under various band names, Steffens and the two Dannys performed together for some time, both on their own and as a backup group for other artists, most notably for Sam “The Sham” Samudio.  When singer Howard Jobe joined in 1974, the band re-named itself JoJo, at the insistence of legendary booking agent Don James.  (JoJo was Howard’s nickname, and Don correctly believed that club owners already familiar with Howard’s work would be interested in booking the group immediately.)  In various forms, this band toured the eastern U. S. for several years, playing mostly their own arrangements of rock, R & B, roots and pop music covers.  After Chuck left to return to college, several other keyboard players filled in with the group until Jimmy Maddox joined in 1975.

After nearly two years of touring, the band returned to Savannah for a break. By the time they hit the road again a few months later, Danny Branson was unavailable, and Phil Alaimo took over on bass.  Varying versions exist of exactly how and when the band name morphed into JoJa from JoJo, but by 1976 the band was working under the new name.  Phil retired from the road a few months after joining, and Danny Branson became the group’s bassist again.

In 1977, the band returned to Savannah, and, with the addition of Bobby Hanson, recorded their first album, Cold Winds.  The recording lineup included Danny Branson, Steffens Clark, Bobby Hanson, Howard Jobe, Jimmy Maddox, and Danny Williby; many people consider this to be the “original JoJa Band.”  Recorded at Rocky Evans’ Ragdoll Studios on a shoestring budget, the album solidified the group’s regional following but got little distribution or airplay.  Talks with Capricorn Records proved useless when the label faltered shortly after the Cold Winds recording sessions. (by http://www.jojaband.com )

“We were the thinking man’s southern rock band,” Jimmy Massix recalls. Mixing lush ballads and jazz rhythms with lowdown blues and country harmonies, this effort culminated in two critically acclaimed albums” (by http://jimmymaddox.com)

Listen to this very rare piece of a more or less unknown southern rock band !

jojabandPersonnel:
Danny Branson (bass)
Steffens Clark (guitar)
Bobby Hanson (harmonica, backbround vocals, vocals on 07.)
Howard Jobe (vocals)
Jimi Maddox (keyboards, saxophone, strings, background vocals)
Danny Williby (drums, percussion)

backcover1

Tracklist:
01. Savannah Mama (Maddox) 4.52
02. I Don’t Know (Maddox)  5.47
03. Better Days (Jobe/Branson) 3.54
04. Keep On Movin’  3.46 (Maddox/Branson)
05. Sooner Or Later (Maddox) 3.32
06. My Whiskey & My Blues (Maddox/Branson)  5.29
07. Georgia Rag (Maddox) 2.38
08. Cold Winds (Maddox) 9.44

labelb1

*
**