Mose Jones – Get Right (1973)

FrontCover1.JPGThe Band formed in 1972, with core members from the Florida band “Stonehenge”. The band name derived from jazz great “Mose Allison’ and a family dog named “Jones”. Initially the band was created with Clay Watkins on keys, then during the recording of their first album, replaced by long-time friend Steve McRay (keys and vocals), who had just returned from his stint with the US ARMY and serving in Vietnam.

In 1972 Mose Jones was the first band signed by Al Kooper for his startup Atlanta label “Sounds of the South” on MCA Records. Al’s “Blues Project” was chosen, and a band named “Elijah”. The last band signed was a little band from Jacksonville that had been playing in Atlanta – that band’s name was “Lynyrd Skynyrd”. (by java-monkey.com)

And here´s the first album of Mose Jones:

It’s a great quality rip, so thanks to whoever made this available. It’s quite a lovely record. First released on Al Kooper’s ‘Sounds Of The South’-label, this record was launched with the label, along with Skynyrd’s “Pronounced” album.

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An important part of Southern Rock history, cause this is when Southern Rock started to become the kind of music that we know and love so well. When it became a big thing. Unfortunately Mose Jones never made it big, but it is a nice album. I prefer it to the “Mose Knows” album. It’s hippy-ish rock at times, but there’s some passionate singing going on. I quite enjoyed myself, listening to this album.  The song “Old Man trouble” features slide guitar by Lowell George, and is one of the better songs. Nothing bad about this.(by skydog)

This a real pretty good album … a forotten jewel in the history of Southern Rock

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Personnel:
Bryan Cole (drums, vocals)
Randy Lewis (bass, vocals)
Steve McRay (keyboards, vocals)
Jimmy O’Neill (guitar, mellotron, vocals)
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Lowell George (slide guitar on 04.)
Al Kooper (synthesizer on 03., background vocals)
Clay Watkins (organ on 10.)

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Tracklist:
01, Get Right (Kooper) 1.45
02 Here We Go Again (Cole/O’Neill) 4.26
03. Kiwi Stumble Boogie (O’Neill) 3.16
04. Ole Man Trouble (Jones) 7.08
05. What Kind Of Woman Would Do That (Kooper/O’Neill) 4.20
06. Barroom Sweeper (Cole/O’Neill) 3.13
07. It’s A Whole Lot Of Fun (Cole/O’Neill/Lewis) 2.31
08. Ode To Drugan (Nuttycombe/Lambert/Drugan) 4.49
09. All That I’ve Got (Preston) 3.07
10. Julia’s Beautiful Friend (Cole/O’Neill) 6.22
11. Get Right: Reprise (Kooper) 0.16

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Sea Level – Cats On The Coast (1977)

FrontCover1.JPGCats on the Coast was the second album by American rock band Sea Level. It was released in 1977 on Capricorn Records.

The leadoff track, “That’s Your Secret”, reached #50 on the Billboard Hot 100, the band’s only charting single.

The cover photo of Sea Level’s sophomore album, 1977’s Cats on the Coast, depicts nearly twice the number of musicians as the cover photo of the band’s eponymous debut album released earlier that same year. There’s a lot of promise on display, and the music largely fulfills expectations. In addition to the quartet introduced on Sea Level — keyboardist/vocalist Chuck Leavell, drummer/percussionist Jaimoe, bassist Lamar Williams, and guitarist Jimmy Nalls — the band now includes singer/songwriter and saxophonist Randall Bramblett, guitarist Davis Causey, and drummer George Weaver (the latter featured prominently since Jaimoe only plays congas, and only on three tracks). This lineup bears remarkable similarity to the then-disbanded Allman Brothers, from whom Leavell, Jaimoe, and Williams had departed: two guitarists, two percussionists (well, sometimes), a bassist, a keyboardist — and, importantly, Bramblett, a proven session man, saxophonist, and singer/songwriter with two acclaimed but underappreciated solo albums (1975’s That Other Mile and 1976’s Light of the Night) under his belt. Cats on the Coast wastes no time introducing the new singer with the Bramblett/Causey co-written leadoff track “That’s Your Secret,” building from pure Southern R&B/soul/funk into dual-guitar fireworks (Causey in one channel; Nalls in the other) that any Southern rock fan could appreciate. Bramblett’s somewhat oblique lyrics may lack the emotional immediacy his writing often possesses, but Sea Level clearly weren’t about to introduce the singer with anything remotely approaching a downer (“This Could Be the Worst” could wait for the next album, On the Edge).

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Leavell takes over the mike on the soul shouter “It Hurts to Want It So Bad,” featuring the Muscle Shoals Horns, and Bramblett and Leavell trade off verses on the down-n-dirty Louisiana swamp blues-funk of “Had to Fall,” which collapses into utterly unhinged howling derangement at the end. The mood is far calmer in “Every Little Thing,” Bramblett’s “let’s-talk-it-over” display of sensitivity later in the track list. But Sea Level’s instrumental skill was the main attraction on the debut, and here they arguably up the ante. Leavell’s “Storm Warning” stands with his best jazz-rock fusion numbers, but with stinging dual lead guitars the likes of which hadn’t emerged from a Capricorn studio date since the Allmans left their blues at home on Idlewild South. Bramblett’s soprano sax here, and his soulful alto on Neil Larsen’s “Midnight Pass,” add even stronger jazziness to the band’s palette. Best of all is the two-part instrumental title track, with Nalls’ slide approaching Duane Allman territory and Bramblett’s soprano answering him in a stunning call and response; after a full-band climax, Jaimoe and Weaver take the track out under a flurry of simulated seagull cries. The album then concludes with the brief “Song for Amy,” a lovely and unexpected coda featuring Leavell on piano accompanied by a string quartet. Some great music from Sea Level was still to come, but the best moments of Cats on the Coast wouldn’t be topped. (by Dave Lynch)

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Personnel:
Randall Bramblett (organ, saxophone. vocals, percussion)
Davis Causey (guitar, background vocals)
Jai Johanny Johanson (percussion)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards, clavinet, percussion, vocals)
Jimmy Nalls (guitar, background vocals)
George Weaver (drums)
Lamar Williams (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. That’s Your Secret (Bramblett/Causey) 5.12
02. It Hurts To Want It So Bad (Feldman/T.Smith/S.Smith) 3.33
03. Storm Warning (Leavell) 5.23
04. Had To Fall (Bramblett/Nalls/Williams) 4.35
05. Midnight Pass (Larson) 6.32
06. Every Little Thing (Bramblett) 4.43
07. Cats On The Coast (Causey) 5.39
08. Song For Amy (Leavell) 1.42

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Drive-By Truckers – Southern Rock Opera (2001)

FrontCover1.jpgSouthern Rock Opera is the third studio album by the alt country band Drive-By Truckers, released in 2001. A double album covering an ambitious range of subject matter from the politics of race to 1970s stadium rock, Southern Rock Opera either imagines, or filters, every topic through the context of legendary Southern band, Lynyrd Skynyrd. The record was originally self-released on Soul Dump Records. The album was re-released on July 16, 2002 by Lost Highway Records. The album was financed by issuing promissory notes in exchange for loans from fans, family and friends of the band.[citation needed]Southern Rock Opera is the third studio album by the alt country band Drive-By Truckers, released in 2001. A double album covering an ambitious range of subject matter from the politics of race to 1970s stadium rock, Southern Rock Opera either imagines, or filters, every topic through the context of legendary Southern band, Lynyrd Skynyrd. The record was originally self-released on Soul Dump Records. The album was re-released on July 16, 2002 by Lost Highway Records. The album was financed by issuing promissory notes in exchange for loans from fans, family and friends of the band.

The idea for Southern Rock Opera pre-dates the band’s formation in 1996. Southern Rock Opera began in a long discussion between Drive-By Truckers’ frontman Patterson Hood and former Truckers bassist and producer Earl Hicks, during a road trip. The pair discussed writing a semi-autobiographical screenplay about growing up in the South and about the plane crash that almost ended the career of the rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd, taking singer Ronnie Van Zant, guitarist Steve Gaines, and Gaines’ back-up-singer sister Cassie Gaines.

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Soon after this discussion, Hood formed Drive-By Truckers. The Truckers recorded two studio albums and one live album during the four years between their formation and the actual recording of Southern Rock Opera. During these years, Drive-By’s principal songwriters Hood, Mike Cooley, and Rob Malone continued to contribute songs to “The Rock Opera”, as they had come to call it.
After the release of their live album Alabama Ass Whuppin’, Drive-By Truckers began recording what they hoped would be their magnum opus: Southern Rock Opera. According to Patterson Hood, “(the album) was recorded in Birmingham, upstairs in a uniform shop during an early September heat wave, with no air-conditioning. We had to turn the fans off when we were recording, and we worked from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. So Southern Rock Opera was fun to write, but we had a miserable time making it.”

After the album was finished, however, the troubles continued for The Truckers when they ran out of funding for the immense project. To resolve the problem, and to avoid “any fine print crap”, as Hood put it, the band took a non-traditional approach. The Truckers made a prospectus and solicited investors, with a promise of 15% interest, to pay for the manufacturing and distribution of Southern Rock Opera. The approach worked. Through their fan-based online news group and by sheer word of mouth, The Truckers were able to raise $23,000. This allowed them to print about 5,000 copies of the album, and buy a “new” used van for touring. Notably included in the group, dubbed “The DBT Investors”, was Widespread Panic bassist and fellow Athenian Dave Schools.

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Southern Rock Opera was finally released on September 12, 2001 on Soul Dump Records.
The critical praise for Southern Rock Opera created no shortage of buzz around the album and the band. The Truckers didn’t have the means to press the necessary amount of copies of the album on their own.
In order to meet demand, Drive-By Truckers signed a large-scale distribution deal with Lost Highway Records. Southern Rock Opera was re-released, this time worldwide, on July 16, 2002. (by wikipedia)

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Don’t be deterred by the rather misleading title. Not a rock opera in the sense of Tommy or Jesus Christ Superstar, this sprawling double disc is more akin to a song cycle about Southern rock, in particular Lynyrd Skynyrd. Almost six years in the making, the Drive-By Truckers have created a startlingly intelligent work that proudly stands with the best music of their obvious inspiration. Largely written and conceived by lead trucker Patterson Hood (son of famed Muscle Shoals bassist David Hood), who sings the majority of the songs in a torn, ragged, but emotionally charged twangy voice somewhere between Tom Petty and Rod Stewart, these 20 literate tracks encapsulate a remarkably objective look at what Hood calls “the duality of the South.” Rocking with a lean hardness, the story unfolds over 90 minutes, but the savvy lyrical observations never overburden the songs’ clenched grip.

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While bands like the similarly styled Bottle Rockets have worked this territory before, never has a group created an opus that’s thematically tied to this genre while objectively exploring its conceptual limitations. The two discs are divided into Acts I and II; the first sets the stage by exploring aspects of an unnamed Southern teen’s background growing up as a music fan in an environment where sports stars, not rock stars, were idolized. The second follows him as he joins his Skynyrd-styled dream band, tours the world, and eventually crashes to his death in the same sort of airplane accident that claimed his heroes. The Drive-By Truckers proudly charge through these songs with their three guitars, grinding and soloing with a swampy intensity recalling a grittier, less commercially viable early version of Skynyrd. A potentially dodgy concept that’s redeemed by magnificent songwriting, passionate singing, and ruggedly confident but far from over-the-top playing, Southern Rock Opera should be required listening not only for fans of the genre, but anyone interested in the history of ’70s rock, or even the history of the South in that decade. More the story of Hood than Skynyrd, this is thought-provoking music that also slashes, burns, and kicks out the jams. Its narrative comes to life through these songs of alienation, excess, and, ultimately, salvation, as seen through the eyes of someone who lived and understands it better than most. (by Hal Horowitz)

In other words: A masterpiece !

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Personnel:
Mike Cooley (guitar, vocals)
Earl Hicks (bass)
Patterson Hood (guitar, vocals)
Rob Malone (guitar, vocals)
Brad Morgan (drums)
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background voclas:
Kelly Hogan – Anne Richmond Boston – Jyl Freed – Amy Pike

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Days Of Graduation (Hood) 2.37
02. Ronnie And Neil (Hood) 4.53
03. 72 (This Highway’s Mean) (Cooley) 5.26
04. Dead, Drunk, and Naked (Hood) 4.51
05. Guitar Man Upstairs (Cooley) 3.17
06. Birmingham (Hood) 5.03
07. The Southern Thing (Hood) 5.00
08. The Three Great Alabama Icons (Hood) 6.51
09. Wallace (Hood) 3.27
10. Zip City (Cooley) 5.17
11. Moved (Malone) 4.17

CD 2:
12. Let There Be Rock (Hood) 4.18
13. Road Cases (Hood) 2.43
14. Women Without Whiskey (Cooley) 4.20
15. Plastic Flowers On The Highway (Hood) 5.05
16. Cassie’s Brother (Malone) 4.58
17. Life In The Factory (Hood) 5.28
18. Shut Up And Get On The Plane (Cooley) 3.38
19. Greenville To Baton Rouge (Hood) 4.12
20. Angels And Fuselage (Hood) 8.00

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Gov’t Mule – Same (1995)

Muro do Classic RockGov’t Mule (pronounced Government Mule) is an American southern rock jam band, formed in 1994 as a side project of The Allman Brothers Band by guitarist Warren Haynes and bassist Allen Woody. Fans often refer to Gov’t Mule simply as Mule.

The band released their debut album, Gov’t Mule, in 1995, and have since released an additional nine studio albums, plus numerous EPs and live releases. Gov’t Mule has become a staple act at music festivals across North America, with both its members and frequent guests boasting members from other notable bands, adding various funk and blues rock elements to the band’s sound.

When The Allman Brothers Band reformed in 1989, partially in response to the popularity of their Dreams box set, Warren Haynes was added as a permanent lead guitarist and vocalist, and Allen Woody was recruited as bass guitarist. The two shared a love for 1960s power trios like Cream, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, the James Gang, and Mountain. Haynes, Woody, and drummer Matt Abts, who played with Haynes in Dickey Betts’ band, came together as Gov’t Mule during Allman Brothers breaks. They released Muro do Classic Rocktheir debut album Gov’t Mule, produced by Michael Barbiero, in 1995

Gov’t Mule is the self-titled debut studio album by southern rock jam band Gov’t Mule. The album was produced and mostly recorded live by Michael Barbiero in Bearsville Recording Studios with many tracks running into each other. “Mule” is still a concert favorite, and “Rockin’ Horse” was later recorded by The Allman Brothers Band when Warren Haynes rejoined the group for the album Hittin’ the Note.Gov’t Mule is the self-titled debut studio album by southern rock jam band Gov’t Mule. The album was produced and mostly recorded live by Michael Barbiero in Bearsville Recording Studios with many tracks running into each other. “Mule” is still a concert favorite, and “Rockin’ Horse” was later recorded by The Allman Brothers Band when Warren Haynes rejoined the group for the album Hittin’ the Note. (by wikipedia)

Gov’t Mule’s self-titled debut is a scorching set of heavy blues-rockers. Although they have some difficulty coming up with memorable original material, the band is loose, funky, gritty, and real. They have enough burning licks to make the record a worthwhile listen for guitar fanatics. (by Daevid Jehnzen)

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Gov’t Mule live in New York, October 1995

Personnel:
Matt Abts (drums)
Warren Haynes (vocals, guitar)
Allen Woody (bass)
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Hook Herrera (harmonica)
John Popper (harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Grinnin’ In Your Face Eddie (House) 1.36
02. Mother Earth (Chatman)Simpkins) 8.13
03. Rockin’ Horse (Allman/Haynes/Woody/Pearson) 4.07
04. Monkey Hill (Haynes/Woody) 4.39
05. Temporary Saint (Haynes) 5.45
06. Trane (Haynes/Woody/Abts) 7.28
07. Mule (Haynes/Woody/Abts) 5.40
08. Dolphineus (Haynes/Woody/Abts) 2.03
09. Painted Silver Light (Haynes) 7.07
10. Mr. Big (Rodgers/Fraser/Kirke/Kossoff) 6.08
11. Left Coast Groovies (for FZ) (Haynes/Woody/Abts) 6.53
12. World Of Difference (Haynes) 10.16

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Blackfoot – Strikes In Denver (1979)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is the story of one of the greatest southern-rock bands ever:

Blackfoot is an American Southern rock musical ensemble from Jacksonville, Florida organized during 1970. Though they are primarily a Southern rock band, they are also known as a hard rock act. The band’s classic lineup consisted of guitarist and vocalist Rickey Medlocke, guitarist Charlie Hargrett, bassist Greg T. Walker, and drummer Jakson Spires.

They’ve had a number of successful albums during the 1970s and early 1980s, including Strikes (1979), Tomcattin’ (1980) and Marauder (1981).

More informations: here

And this is Blackfoot live: recorded from a show at the Rainbow Music Hall in Denver (Source: FM Broadcast). Most songs are from the Strikes album, one of their best works.

And this is high energy southern rock … what a brilliant concert !

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Personnel:
Charlie Hargrett (guitar)
Rickey Medlocke (vocals, guitar)
Greg T. Walker (bass, background vocals)
Jakson Spires (drums, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro 0.32
02. I Want To Talk To You (R.Medlocke) 5.25
03. Pay My Dues  () 3.11
04. I Got A Line On You (California) 5.29
05. Wishing Well (Rodgers/Kossoff/Yamauchi/Bundrike/Kirke) 4.06
06. Left Turn On A Red Light (R.Medlocke) 4.05
07.  Baby Blue ( R. Medlocke/Hargrett/Spires) 3.54
08. Road Fever (R.Medlocke) 4.06
09. Trouble In Mind (Johnson) 10.44
10. Train Train (S.Medlocke) 7.48
11. Highway Song (R.Medlocke/Spires) 9.28

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Marshall Tucker Band – A New Life (1974)

frontcover1A New Life is the second album by The Marshall Tucker Band. It was recorded in Macon, Georgia at Capricorn Studios.

Perhaps the only reason that New Life isn’t quite as memorable as its self-titled predecessor is that the band’s debut was just so startling when it appeared. By the time New Life was issued in 1974, to the band’s credit, it seemed like the Marshall Tucker Band sound had always been a part of America’s rock & roll scene. New Life is earthier than the first album, and country music is less layered over by the trappings of jam-band rock. “Blue Ridge Mountain Sky” is only eclipsed by Dickey Betts’ “Ramblin’ Man” as the ultimate road song from the period. Likewise, the pedal steel blues of “Too Stubborn” echo an earlier era altogether, as the ghost of Bob Wills comes into Toy Caldwell’s songwriting. The whining guitars and lilting woodwinds of the title track bring the jazzier elements in the band’s sound to the fore and wind them seamlessly into a swirling, pastoral country music. The Muscle Shoals horns lend a hand on the Allman Brothers’ Brothers and Sisters-influenced “Another Cruel Love,” and guest Charlie Daniels’ fiddle cooks up a bluegrass stew on “24 Hours at a Time.” The sound is fantastically balanced and warm, and like its predecessor, this album has dated very well. (by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
Tommy Caldwell (bass, background vocals)
Toy Caldwell – guitar, steel guitar, slide guitar, vocals on 03. + 11.)
Doug Gray (vocals, guitar, percussion)
Jerry Eubanks (flute, saxophone, keyboards, background vocals)
George McCorkle (guitar, Banjo)
Paul Riddle (drums)
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Charlie Daniels (fiddle)
Earl Ford (horn)
Paul Hornsby (keyboards)
Oscar Jackson (horn)
Jaimoe (percussion)
Todd Logan (horn)
Harold Williams (horn)

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Tracklist:
01. A New Life 6.44
02. Southern Woman 7.55
03. Blue Ridge Mountain Sky 3.37
04. Too Stubborn 3.58
05. Another Cruel Love 3.58
06. You Ain’t Foolin’ Me 7.03
07. 24 Hours At A Time 5.04
08. Fly Eagle Fly 4.25
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09. Another Cruel Love” (Live at Uhlein Hall, Milwaukee, WI, July 11, 1974) 4.23
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The Allman Brothers Band – Live From A&R Studios, New York, August 26, 1971 (1971)

frontcover1Live from A&R Studios is an album by the Allman Brothers Band. It was recorded on August 26, 1971, at A&R Studios in New York City for a live radio broadcast.
A bootleg recording of this concert had been circulated for years, and coveted by many fans. Originally, “You Don’t Love Me” / “Soul Serenade” was released on the box set Dreams.
On Jambands.com, Larson Sutton said, “The nine-song program was inspired work, showcasing the conflagration of six musicians focused as one… The A&R show, presumably taped in droves by home stereos, was widely bootlegged, and in the following decades considered quite a treasure of both performance and historical context. To have it officially released, cleaned up and remastered to a high polish from the original broadcast tapes, is to put it finally in the proper place for all to hear; the magnificence of the Allman Brothers Band in one of its finest hours of its finest year of 1971.”
In American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz wrote, “As those who already own this heavily bootlegged concert, recorded in front of a small audience at the titular studio can attest, the sextet was on fire this evening. And even though there were few surprises in the songs played (they had stayed pretty similar for about a year), the group charged through the material like they had everything to prove…. Moderate Brothers admirers can stick with the already released versions, but for those digging deeper into Duane’s sadly limited well of professionally recorded work with the band, this is absolutely essential listening.” (by wikipedia)
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We were reminded of this great show from the old European bootleg label, Gold Standard, when a fan shared his on the net earlier this month. It’s a killer show from the Allmans, at the peak of their career.
They had recorded their seminal live album, At Fillmore East, in March 1971, and continued to tour relentlessly. In July, At Fillmore East was released to critical acclaim. It was back on the road again to promote that album. One important stop was at New York’s A&R Studios. The show was broadcast live on FM.
This show was broadcast two weeks after the death of King Curtis. This article from Hittin’ The Note by Tim Hoover details Curtis’ influence on Duane Allman.
During the broadcast, Duane pauses to reflect on his fallen friend: “About King Curtis – that was one of the finest cats there ever was. He was just right on top of getting next to young people, you know? It’s a shame. If y’all get the chance, listen to that album he made out at Fillmore West… Boy, it’s incredible, it’s unbelievable, the power and the emotional stature the man had. He’s an incredible human being.
“At the funeral, boy, Aretha sang and Stevie Wonder played… they played ‘Soul Serenade.’ Duane breaks off into the melody of Curtis’ signature song, and a few in the audience respond with polite applause of recognition.
“Y’all probably a little bit young. It’s fantastic. We’ll do some of that… yeah, I know where we’ll do it…”
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“Duane and the band jump into the intro for ‘You Don’t Love Me.’ A little over eight minutes into the song, Duane slows the band, reaching an achingly slow transitional phase, gradually leading everyone into his own version of ‘Soul Serenade’. When Duane plays the melody of the song again, the audience immediately begins clapping along to the sweet melodic tune. Suddenly, Duane jumps in and absolutely cuts the melody to shreds with one of the most moving, heart-felt solos you will ever hear, taking it right up into the stratosphere. Mirroring his words for Curtis, the ‘power and emotional stature’ of Duane’s own very personal and passionate eulogy for his lost friend is delivered as only he can do it – powerfully, lovingly, and gracefully.
Tragically, the Allman Brothers Band lost their founder and leader when Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle crash in Macon on October 29, just two months after this show.
Allman’s influences were varied as they were all-encompassing. You can hear it in his playing, spacious, inventive, intense and always entertaining. Although he was a virtuoso musician, he was also a team player and his interplay with Dickey Betts was complex and masterful. At this point, the Allmans had a superb rhythm section of Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks and Jaimoe Johanson.
Back then, a broad outlook was important. Nobody liked being typecast or placed in boxes. The music had to be interesting. It’s almost four decades since Duane passed on, so this one’s in his Memory.
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Personnel:
Duane Allman (guitar, slide guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Berry Oakley (bass)
Butch Trucks (drums)
Jai Johanny Johanson (Jaimoe) (drums, percussion)
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Tracklist:
01. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.30
02. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 4.04
03. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.39
04. Done Somebody Wrong (Lewis/James/Levy) 3.43
05. One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 4.48
06. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 11.23
07. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.48
08. Medley:
08.1. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs)
08.2. Soul Serenade (Ousley/Dixon) 19.32
09. Hot ‘Lanta (G.Allman/D.Allman/Betts/Trucks/Oakley,Jai Johanny Johanson) 6.46
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This is just so shocking and sad. Butch Trucks, a founding member of the legendary Allman Brothers Band, allegedly shot himself in the head on Jan. 24, 2017 as his wife watched, according to a Jan. 26 report. Here’s what we know.
Butch Trucks has died at the age of 69 after suffering from a gun shot to the head, according to police reports obtained by Daily Mail. He was in his condo in West Palm Beach, FL, and his wife Melinda allegedly witnessed Butch pull the trigger. So awful.
What a tragedy …

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Goodbye Butch … RIP !