Status Quo – Spare Parts (with bonus tracks) (1969/1998)

LPFrontCover1Spare Parts is the second album by the English rock band Status Quo, and the final one in the psychedelic vein. It is also the first in which the group’s roadie Bob Young began writing and co-writing songs for and with the band.

The album covers a song written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin, “You’re Just What I Was Looking for Today”. Only one song was slated for a single release. This was the Anthony King written song “Are You Growing Tired of My Love”, backed with the Alan Lancaster composition “So Ends Another Life”. Released in April 1969 it reached no. 46 in UK singles charts.

The album was released in September 1969 but wasn’t a commercial success.

Following the disappointment of the album, the band released a non-album single – the Everly Brothers’ “The Price of Love”, also released in September 1969, with the Francis Rossi and Rick Parfitt composition “Little Miss Nothing” as the B-side. (by wikipedia)

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Following the wake of Picturesque Machstickable Messages From the Status Quo, Spare Parts tries to imitate the psychedelic sound that was so fashionable at the time. The disc is known for being one of the less-fortunate made by the British band, and they have even despised it on some occasions. In fact, 1969 was going to be the most dismal year in the story of Status Quo. Urged by Pye’s request to reach the charts at any rate, the songs in the record reflect the band’s frustrated attempts to please the company. The result is an irregular album that does not reach the imaginative sound of their earlier songs nor the brightness of their subsequent records. Beyond that, a friendly and deep listening reveals that Spare Parts is an underrated effort in some aspects.

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Some songs of their own — like “Nothing at All,” “So Ends Another Life,” or even “Little Miss Nothing” — and some borrowed compositions — like “Are You Growing Tired of My Love?” (which scraped the Top 50 on the British charts) and “Mister Mind Detector” — sound really inventive and they work as an excellent reflection of how pop music was trying to develop itself during those years. Although it could sound a little bit dated later on, Spare Parts deserved more attention than people were willing to afford it when it was released. This one was also their last record in which keyboardist Roy Lynes performed as an active member. A few months after Spare Parts was released, Status Quo initiated their metamorphosis toward the boogie rock that would make them rich and famous later on. (by Robert Aniento)

And I add some bonus tracks from a re-issue from 1998 … Listen carefully … Status Quo begann to change their style ..

And the rest is history ! … Rockin´ all over the world … you know …

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Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Roy Lynes (organ, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Bob Young (harmonica on 13.)

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Tracklist:
01. Face Without A Soul (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.09
02. You’re Just What I Was Looking For Today (Goffin/King) 3.49
03. Are You Growing Tired Of My Love (King) 3.38
04. Antique Angelique (Lancaster/Young) 3.23
05. So Ends Another Life (Lancaster) 3.12
06. Poor Old Man (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.39
07. Mr. Mind Detector (King) 4.02
08. The Clown (Lancaster/Young/Nixon) 3.25
09. Velvet Curtains (King) 3.00
10. Little Miss Nothing (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.03
11. When I Awake (Lancaster/Young) 3.52
12. Nothing At All (Lancaster/Lynes/Young) 3.59
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13. The Price Of Love (D.Everly/P.Everly) 3.41
14. Josie (DiMucci/Fasce) 3.38
15. Do You Live In Fire (Lancaster) 2.16
16. Hey Little Woman (previously unreleased version) (Lancaster) 3.56
17. Are You Growing Tired Of My Love (King) 3.39

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Status Quo – Whatever You Want (1979)

FrontCover1.jpgWhatever You Want is the twelfth studio album by the British rock band Status Quo and features 10 tracks

This was the band’s third album to be produced by Pip Williams. Recording began in December 1978 at Wisseloord Studios in Hilversum, the Netherlands, with the final mixes being completed in London in March 1979. The album was released on 12 October 1979 and entered the chart on 20 October 1979, reaching as high as no. 4. The first single from the album — “Whatever You Want” — was released on 14 September, with “Hard Ride” as the B-side, and also reached a peak position of no. 4. The second single from the album was “Living on an Island”, with the B-side “Runaway”. This was released on 16 November 1979 and reached no. 16 in the chart.

The album was remixed for the US market and this version was released in the US with the title Now Hear This in 1980. It was finally released on CD as part of the 2016 deluxe remaster.[3] However this omitted two songs, “Shady Lady” and “Your Smiling Face”. These are therefore only available on the original vinyl/cassette/8-track releases. The tracks “Whatever You Want” and “Living On an Island” were also swapped in the running order of the US remixed version. (by wikipedia)

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After seven years at the top of the British charts, even Status Quo fans were beginning to wonder whether the band wasn’t simply rewriting the same riff over and over again, then putting it out with a new catch phrase for a title. From “Down Down” to “Rocking All Over the World,” Status Quo had enacted some of the most excitingly primal rock behemoths of the decade. But they’d also composed some of the most enduring clichés as well. However, nothing — repeat nothing — could have prepared the world for Whatever You Want, a record which, almost three decades later, still sounds like the most ruthless piss-take you’ve ever heard. And, of course, it became one of their biggest hits ever. Mercifully, the remainder of the album titled by this unfortunate monstrosity shows that there was more than one idea rattling around the band’s heads at this point: “Living on an Island,” with its acoustic wash and mournful melody, was one of the most unexpected songs they’d made in years, while the likes of “Shady Lady,” “High Flyer,” and the wonderful “Who Asked You” all had a bellicose punch that defied anyone to accuse the band of stagnation. The fact was, however, that “Whatever You Want” itself so scarred the record that it was hard not to hear the entire thing from beneath that baleful shadow. And, when the 1980s proved that Quo really had given up trying (at least for a few years) — well, now you know why a lot of fans gave up around then. (by Dave Thompson)

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Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Andy Bown (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Whatever You Want (Parfitt/Bown) 4.04
02. Shady Lady (Rossi/Young) 3.01
03. Who Asked You (Lancaster) 4.00
04. Your Smiling Face (Parfitt/Bown) 4.23
05. Living On An Island (Parfitt/Young) 4.49
06. Come Rock With Me (Rossi/Frost) 3.16
07. Rockin’ On (Rossi/Frost) 3.26
08. Runaway (Rossi/Frost) 4.40
09. High Flyer (Lancaster/Young) 3.47
10. Breaking Away (Rossi/Parfitt/Bown) 6.45

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Status Quo on a centre-spread poster in Bravo (a German music magazine) of 13 June 1979. The photo was taken during their performance of “Accident Prone” on 27 November 1978 on the monthly Saturday evening Disco music show.

 

Status Quo – Quo (1974)

LPFrontCover1Quo is the seventh studio album by Status Quo from 1974. Featuring Francis Rossi, Richard Parfitt, Alan Lancaster and John Coghlan. Like the previous album Hello!, it consisted entirely of songs written or co-written by the group. The only guest musicians featured were Bob Young and Tom Parker, who played harmonica and piano respectively on “Break the Rules”.

Despite the band believing the album’s opening track, “Backwater”, was the most suitable candidate for release as a single, the only track to actually be released as a single was “Break the Rules”, in April 1974, and it peaked in the UK at #8.

The album itself was released in May the same year. Its highest position was #2. In retrospect this album is regarded as one of their heaviest, possibly due to the influence of bassist Alan Lancaster, who is credited with co-writing six of the eight tracks.

The UK LP contained a gatefold insert with a picture of the band playing live on one side, backed with the lyrics on the other. (by wikipedia)

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By spring 1974 and the release of Status Quo’s seventh album, the band was already regarded as among the most reliable institutions in British rock, denim-clad purveyors of a rocking, rolling boogie beat that never knew when to quit. And, when “Break the Rules” peeled off the still unreleased LP to give the group its fourth Top 20 hit in little more than a year, it was clear that Quo would be business as usual. Eight tracks followed the now standard format for a new Quo album, a neat division between the two sets of songwriters (Rossi/Young, Parfitt/Lancaster), a final track that went on forever, and — best of all — a couple of intros that sounded nothing at all like Status Quo. Only the intros, though, and it quickly become one of the best games of the age, trying to predict how long it would last before the bandmembers ripped off their disguises and unleashed the boogie.

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“Backwater” keeps the mask on for one minute and eight seconds, but it’s a hallmark of Status Quo’s genius that, all these years later, it can still keep you guessing. “Just Take Me,” too, packs more than its fair share of surprises, rolling in on a drum solo that itself grows out of “Backwater”‘s back end. And if “Break the Rules” contrarily doesn’t break a single one, that’s probably just as well; there have been enough shocks already. Elsewhere, Quo indeed settles down to the status quo, with even the ballad “Lonely Man” holding onto the spirit of the band’s earliest boogie excursions (“In My Chair” and “Gerdundula” spring to mind). The pièce de résistance, however, is the closing “Slow Train,” an eight-minute epic that confusingly drives like an express, then collides with a Gaelic jig. The Chieftains would do such things a lot better — but Status Quo did it louder. (by Dave Thompson)

Singles

Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Tom Parker (keyboards)
Bob Young (harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Backwater (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.23
02. Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 3.32
03. Break The Rules (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 3,38
04. Drifting Away (Parfitt/Lancaster) 5.00
05. Don’t Think It Matters (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.49
06. Fine Fine Fine (Rossi/Young) 2.32
07. Lonely Man (Parfitt/Lancaster) 5.05
08. Slow Train (Rossi/Young) 7.56

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Status Quo – Live (1977)

FrontCover1Live! is the first live album by English Rock band Status Quo. It contains 2 discs. It is an amalgam of performances at Glasgow’s Apollo Theatre between 27 and 29 October 1976, recorded using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio.

Recorded, with perfect timing, just as Status Quo hit their live peak, 1977’s double Live! album is, contrarily, a timeless reminder of just how much power and excitement was bound up in the band through the mid-’70s — and on, in fact, into the early ’80s. It would be several years before Status Quo turned into the faintly embarrassing cabaret singalong that scarred the latter years of their career, a fact that Live! broadcasts via a picture-perfect snapshot of the last calm before that particular storm. Touring to support 1976’s Blue for You (U.S. title Status Quo) album, the band is still reaching back to the dawn of the decade for material. “Junior’s Wailing” and “In My Chair” both date back to the tentative days of 1970, as the band prepared to slide from psych to boogie without knowing whether there was even an audience for such a shock.

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The fact that there was, of course, would be celebrated with some of the most visceral singles of the decade. “Roll Over Lay Down,” “Rain,” “Don’t Waste My Time,” and, most impressively, “Caroline” all slough off well-loved 45s, to be transformed into veritable showstoppers, while the LP epics “Forty-Five Hundred Times” and “Roadhouse Blues” receive marathon workouts that all but defy gravity.

The mid-’70s were a golden age for double live albums, and from Frampton Comes Alive! to Thin Lizzy’s Live and Dangerous, the era is littered with what now rank as classics. Live! effortlessly takes its place alongside those most hallowed of halcyon howlers, and no matter what else Status Quo might have become in later years, this is what they sounded like before that happened. Priceless. (by Dave Thompson)

In other words. A classic live album including a brilliant version of “Roadhouse Blues” original recorded by The Doors !

And it´s fun and fun only !

Muro do Classic Rock

Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Andy Bown -(keyboards)
Bob Young (harmonica)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Junior’s Wailing (White/Pugh) 5.21
02. Backwater/Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 8.28
03. Is There A Better Way” (Rossi/Lancaster) 4.17
04. In My Chair (Rossi/Young) 3.36
05. Little Lady/Most of the Time (Parfitt/Rossi/Young) 7.19
06. Rain (Parfitt) 4.53
07. Forty-Five Hundred Times (Rossi/Parfitt) 16.42

CD 2:
08. Roll Over Lay Down (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 6.04
09. Big Fat Mama (Rossi/Parfitt) 5.22
10. Don’t Waste My Time (Rossi/Young) 4.05
11. Roadhouse Blues (Morrison/Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek) 14.21
12. Caroline (Rossi/Young) 6.43
13. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 6.22

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RickParfitt

This entry is dedicated to one of the boys in the band:
Rick Parfitt (12 October 1948 – 24 December 2016)

Status Quo – On The Level (1975)

frontcover1On the Level is the eighth studio album of English rock band Status Quo. It features Francis Rossi, Richard Parfitt, Alan Lancaster and John Coghlan. The album’s cover art features band members in an Ames room, and on the original vinyl release, the inner gatefold sleeve consisted of informal photos members of the group had taken of each other.
In November 1974 the band released the only single from the album, an edited version of a Rossi/Young song entitled “Down Down”. The single gave the band their only #1 hit to date. Its b-side was the Parfitt/Young album track “Nightride”.
When the album was released in February 1975, the group were more or less at the peak of their career, record sales-wise. The album entered the chart at #1. All tracks were written or co-written by the group including unofficial fifth member, Robert Keith Young, apart from “Bye Bye Johnny”, which was a Chuck Berry composition.
If any single song sums up Status Quo in the hearts and the minds of the millions, it’s “Down Down.” Other songs may have been bigger, others may have more resonance, and some (“Rocking All Over the World ” comes to mind) may be so permanently ingrained that it’s hard to remember that Status Quo cut anything else. But, if you want to nail the very essence of Status Quo, only “Down Down” will do. It was their first British number one and their first all-time classic. And it was also their first grinning, winking acknowledgement that not only was there a formula to the records they made, but they were not afraid to list its ingredients. “Down Down” is the perfect Status Quo record, and the fact that it doesn’t arrive until six songs into the band’s eighth album just proves how much fun it had coming up with it.
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On the Level is Quo at its single-minded best. It doesn’t matter whether its driving the boogie through your skull with the relentless precision of “Little Lady” and “Over and Done,” lurching loosely around the ghosts of blues and ballads (“Most of the Time” and a positively maniacal finale of “Bye Bye Johnny”), or even glancing back to their days as one of British psych’s finest pop bands (“What to Do”). Still, all roads lead back to “Down Down,” a dynamic riff, a perplexing lyric, and a mood that’s so compulsive that you’ll still be shaking your head in time long after all your hair’s fallen out. And, just to make it even better, the album version’s almost two minutes longer than the familiar hit, littered with false starts, fake endings, and one of the cruelest fade-outs in recorded history. It comes just as you’re really getting into the groove. (by Dave Thompson)
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The rare live EP from 1975
Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, guitar, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Tracklist:.
01: Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.03
02. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.22
03. I Saw The Light (Rossi/Young) 3.40
04. Over And Done (Lancaster) 3.55
05. Nightride (Parfitt/Young) 3.54
06. Down Down (Rossi/Young) 5.25
07. Broken Man (Lancaster) 4.14
08. What To Do (Rossi/Young) 3.07
09. Where I Am (Parfitt) 2.45
19. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 5.21
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20. Down Down (Single Version) (Rossi/Young) 3.50
21. Roll Over Lay Down (Live Version from the Live EP) (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 5.41
22. Gerdundula (Live Version from the Live EP)  (Manston/James) 2.35
23. Junior’s Wailing (Live Version from the Live EP) (White/Pugh) 3.57
24. Roadhouse Blues [Live Version) (Morrison/Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek) 12.24
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Live in Mainz/Germany (22/02(1975)25.
25. Backwater (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.56
26. Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 3.41
27. Claudie (Rossi/Young) 4.37
28. Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.27
29. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.20
30. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 6.35

31. Down Down (Demo Version) (Rossi/Young) 5.29

Status Quo – Ma Kelly’s Greasy Spoon (1970)

frontcover1Status Quo rocker Rick Parfitt OBE has died suddenly on holiday, aged 68 – after suffering a severe infection ‘he caught in hospital’.

The musician passed away at the hospital he was admitted to in Spain on Thursday, his manager confirmed in a statement this afternoon.

It’s claimed the veteran musician was taken in after suffering complications from a previous shoulder injury – but picked up a severe infection while he was there.

He died at lunchtime today, his family added in the statement.

Parfitt joins a long list of celebrated musicians to have died in 2016 – including David Bowie, Prince, Pete Burns, Keith Emerson, Glenn Frey, Greg Lake, Sir George Martin and Leonard Cohen.

Ironically in what would become his final interview, Parfitt spoke of dying to Classic Rock magazine last month, saying: “It’ll take more than death to kill me”.

As well as starring in Status Quo, he is one of the few musicians to have performed on the Band Aid hit Do They Know It’s Christmas?

His heartbroken son, Rick Parfitt Jnr, has led tributes to the legendary rocker, writing on Twitter moments after the news broke: “I am too numb.

“I cannot describe the sadness I feel right now. To many he was a rockstar, to me he was simply ‘Dad’, and I loved him hugely. RIP Pappa.”

Queen guitarist Brian May tweeted – in reference to the band’s song Rockin’ All Over The World – he was “shocked and so sad to hear of the passing of Rick Parfitt. Hard to find words. You joyfully rocked our world. RIP dear buddy. (by mirror.co.uk)

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As a tribute here a great album by the early Quo:

Woe betide the psychedelic groover who picked up the third album by Status Quo, dreaming of further picturesque matchstick messages! A mere three hits in a long three years had completely exhausted the bandmembers’ patience with the whimsy of yore, and their ears had long since turned in other directions. It was the age, after all, of Canned Heat’s relentless boogie and Black Sabbath’s blistered blues, and when the Quo’s first new single of 1970, the lazy throb of “Down the Dustpipe,” proved that the record-buying public wasn’t averse to a bit more down-home rocking, their future course was set. Ma Kelly’s Greasy Spoon allies one of the most evocative titles in rock album history to one of the most familiar sights in a rock band’s iconography, the cheap roadside café — crusty ketchup, leafy tea, an overflowing ashtray, and Ma Kelly herself, cigarette clenched between unsmiling lips and a face that has seen it all and didn’t like any of it. Neither do the album’s contents disturb her glowering visage. From the opening trundle of “Spinning Wheel Blues” and onto the closing, lurching medley of “Is It Really Me”/”Gotta Go Home,” the most underrated disc in Status Quo’s entire early catalog eschewed the slightest nod in the direction of the band’s past — even “Dustpipe” didn’t make the cut. (It has since been quo1970_2incorporated among the four bonus tracks appending the album’s 1998 remastering as have “In My Chair”, “Gerdundula” and an alternate version of “Junior’s Wailing”) But six years on, when recording their live album, the Quo were still dipping back to “Junior’s Wailing,” the midpoint in the greasy spoon experience, and an expressively rocking archetype for all they would later accomplish. The dark shuffle of “Lazy Poker Blues,” too, unleashed specters that the band would be referencing in future days, including the boogie piano that made 1974’s “Break the Rules” seem such a blast from the past. Compared to the albums that would follow, Ma Kelly is revealed as little more than a tentative blueprint for the Quo’s new direction. At the time, however, it was a spellbinding shock, perhaps the last one that the Quo ever delivered. You should remember that when you play it.(by Dave Thompson)

Personal note: Quo´s song “Is It Really Me” was one of the first song I played in my  first band, called “Dying Sun” …. many decades ago …  *smile*

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Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
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Roy Lynes (organ)
Bob Young (harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Spinning Wheel Blues (Young/Rossi) 3.21
02. Daughter (Lancaster) 3.01
03. Everything (Rossi/Parfitt) 2.39
04. Shy Fly (Young/Rossi) 3.50
05. (April) Spring, Summer And Wednesdays (Young/Rossi) 4.13
06. Junior’s Wailing (White/Pugh) 3.35
07. Lakky Lady (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.16
08. Need Your Love (Young/Rossi) 4.47
09.Lazy Poker Blues (Adams/Green) 3.35
10. Is It Really Me/Gotta Go Home (Lancaster) 9.32

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Richard John Parfitt
(12 October 1948 – 24 December 2016)
Thanks for the music !