Status Quo – Live (1977)

FrontCover1Live! is the first live album by English Rock band Status Quo. It contains 2 discs. It is an amalgam of performances at Glasgow’s Apollo Theatre between 27 and 29 October 1976, recorded using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio.

Recorded, with perfect timing, just as Status Quo hit their live peak, 1977’s double Live! album is, contrarily, a timeless reminder of just how much power and excitement was bound up in the band through the mid-’70s — and on, in fact, into the early ’80s. It would be several years before Status Quo turned into the faintly embarrassing cabaret singalong that scarred the latter years of their career, a fact that Live! broadcasts via a picture-perfect snapshot of the last calm before that particular storm. Touring to support 1976’s Blue for You (U.S. title Status Quo) album, the band is still reaching back to the dawn of the decade for material. “Junior’s Wailing” and “In My Chair” both date back to the tentative days of 1970, as the band prepared to slide from psych to boogie without knowing whether there was even an audience for such a shock.

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The fact that there was, of course, would be celebrated with some of the most visceral singles of the decade. “Roll Over Lay Down,” “Rain,” “Don’t Waste My Time,” and, most impressively, “Caroline” all slough off well-loved 45s, to be transformed into veritable showstoppers, while the LP epics “Forty-Five Hundred Times” and “Roadhouse Blues” receive marathon workouts that all but defy gravity.

The mid-’70s were a golden age for double live albums, and from Frampton Comes Alive! to Thin Lizzy’s Live and Dangerous, the era is littered with what now rank as classics. Live! effortlessly takes its place alongside those most hallowed of halcyon howlers, and no matter what else Status Quo might have become in later years, this is what they sounded like before that happened. Priceless. (by Dave Thompson)

In other words. A classic live album including a brilliant version of “Roadhouse Blues” original recorded by The Doors !

And it´s fun and fun only !

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Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Andy Bown -(keyboards)
Bob Young (harmonica)

Booklet

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Junior’s Wailing (White/Pugh) 5.21
02. Backwater/Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 8.28
03. Is There A Better Way” (Rossi/Lancaster) 4.17
04. In My Chair (Rossi/Young) 3.36
05. Little Lady/Most of the Time (Parfitt/Rossi/Young) 7.19
06. Rain (Parfitt) 4.53
07. Forty-Five Hundred Times (Rossi/Parfitt) 16.42

CD 2:
08. Roll Over Lay Down (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 6.04
09. Big Fat Mama (Rossi/Parfitt) 5.22
10. Don’t Waste My Time (Rossi/Young) 4.05
11. Roadhouse Blues (Morrison/Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek) 14.21
12. Caroline (Rossi/Young) 6.43
13. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 6.22

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This entry is dedicated to one of the boys in the band:
Rick Parfitt (12 October 1948 – 24 December 2016)

Status Quo – On The Level (1975)

frontcover1On the Level is the eighth studio album of English rock band Status Quo. It features Francis Rossi, Richard Parfitt, Alan Lancaster and John Coghlan. The album’s cover art features band members in an Ames room, and on the original vinyl release, the inner gatefold sleeve consisted of informal photos members of the group had taken of each other.
In November 1974 the band released the only single from the album, an edited version of a Rossi/Young song entitled “Down Down”. The single gave the band their only #1 hit to date. Its b-side was the Parfitt/Young album track “Nightride”.
When the album was released in February 1975, the group were more or less at the peak of their career, record sales-wise. The album entered the chart at #1. All tracks were written or co-written by the group including unofficial fifth member, Robert Keith Young, apart from “Bye Bye Johnny”, which was a Chuck Berry composition.
If any single song sums up Status Quo in the hearts and the minds of the millions, it’s “Down Down.” Other songs may have been bigger, others may have more resonance, and some (“Rocking All Over the World ” comes to mind) may be so permanently ingrained that it’s hard to remember that Status Quo cut anything else. But, if you want to nail the very essence of Status Quo, only “Down Down” will do. It was their first British number one and their first all-time classic. And it was also their first grinning, winking acknowledgement that not only was there a formula to the records they made, but they were not afraid to list its ingredients. “Down Down” is the perfect Status Quo record, and the fact that it doesn’t arrive until six songs into the band’s eighth album just proves how much fun it had coming up with it.
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On the Level is Quo at its single-minded best. It doesn’t matter whether its driving the boogie through your skull with the relentless precision of “Little Lady” and “Over and Done,” lurching loosely around the ghosts of blues and ballads (“Most of the Time” and a positively maniacal finale of “Bye Bye Johnny”), or even glancing back to their days as one of British psych’s finest pop bands (“What to Do”). Still, all roads lead back to “Down Down,” a dynamic riff, a perplexing lyric, and a mood that’s so compulsive that you’ll still be shaking your head in time long after all your hair’s fallen out. And, just to make it even better, the album version’s almost two minutes longer than the familiar hit, littered with false starts, fake endings, and one of the cruelest fade-outs in recorded history. It comes just as you’re really getting into the groove. (by Dave Thompson)
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The rare live EP from 1975
Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, guitar, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
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Tracklist:.
01: Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.03
02. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.22
03. I Saw The Light (Rossi/Young) 3.40
04. Over And Done (Lancaster) 3.55
05. Nightride (Parfitt/Young) 3.54
06. Down Down (Rossi/Young) 5.25
07. Broken Man (Lancaster) 4.14
08. What To Do (Rossi/Young) 3.07
09. Where I Am (Parfitt) 2.45
19. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 5.21
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20. Down Down (Single Version) (Rossi/Young) 3.50
21. Roll Over Lay Down (Live Version from the Live EP) (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 5.41
22. Gerdundula (Live Version from the Live EP)  (Manston/James) 2.35
23. Junior’s Wailing (Live Version from the Live EP) (White/Pugh) 3.57
24. Roadhouse Blues [Live Version) (Morrison/Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek) 12.24
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Live in Mainz/Germany (22/02(1975)25.
25. Backwater (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.56
26. Just Take Me (Parfitt/Lancaster) 3.41
27. Claudie (Rossi/Young) 4.37
28. Little Lady (Parfitt) 3.27
29. Most Of The Time (Rossi/Young) 3.20
30. Bye Bye Johnny (Berry) 6.35

31. Down Down (Demo Version) (Rossi/Young) 5.29

Status Quo – Ma Kelly’s Greasy Spoon (1970)

frontcover1Status Quo rocker Rick Parfitt OBE has died suddenly on holiday, aged 68 – after suffering a severe infection ‘he caught in hospital’.

The musician passed away at the hospital he was admitted to in Spain on Thursday, his manager confirmed in a statement this afternoon.

It’s claimed the veteran musician was taken in after suffering complications from a previous shoulder injury – but picked up a severe infection while he was there.

He died at lunchtime today, his family added in the statement.

Parfitt joins a long list of celebrated musicians to have died in 2016 – including David Bowie, Prince, Pete Burns, Keith Emerson, Glenn Frey, Greg Lake, Sir George Martin and Leonard Cohen.

Ironically in what would become his final interview, Parfitt spoke of dying to Classic Rock magazine last month, saying: “It’ll take more than death to kill me”.

As well as starring in Status Quo, he is one of the few musicians to have performed on the Band Aid hit Do They Know It’s Christmas?

His heartbroken son, Rick Parfitt Jnr, has led tributes to the legendary rocker, writing on Twitter moments after the news broke: “I am too numb.

“I cannot describe the sadness I feel right now. To many he was a rockstar, to me he was simply ‘Dad’, and I loved him hugely. RIP Pappa.”

Queen guitarist Brian May tweeted – in reference to the band’s song Rockin’ All Over The World – he was “shocked and so sad to hear of the passing of Rick Parfitt. Hard to find words. You joyfully rocked our world. RIP dear buddy. (by mirror.co.uk)

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As a tribute here a great album by the early Quo:

Woe betide the psychedelic groover who picked up the third album by Status Quo, dreaming of further picturesque matchstick messages! A mere three hits in a long three years had completely exhausted the bandmembers’ patience with the whimsy of yore, and their ears had long since turned in other directions. It was the age, after all, of Canned Heat’s relentless boogie and Black Sabbath’s blistered blues, and when the Quo’s first new single of 1970, the lazy throb of “Down the Dustpipe,” proved that the record-buying public wasn’t averse to a bit more down-home rocking, their future course was set. Ma Kelly’s Greasy Spoon allies one of the most evocative titles in rock album history to one of the most familiar sights in a rock band’s iconography, the cheap roadside café — crusty ketchup, leafy tea, an overflowing ashtray, and Ma Kelly herself, cigarette clenched between unsmiling lips and a face that has seen it all and didn’t like any of it. Neither do the album’s contents disturb her glowering visage. From the opening trundle of “Spinning Wheel Blues” and onto the closing, lurching medley of “Is It Really Me”/”Gotta Go Home,” the most underrated disc in Status Quo’s entire early catalog eschewed the slightest nod in the direction of the band’s past — even “Dustpipe” didn’t make the cut. (It has since been quo1970_2incorporated among the four bonus tracks appending the album’s 1998 remastering as have “In My Chair”, “Gerdundula” and an alternate version of “Junior’s Wailing”) But six years on, when recording their live album, the Quo were still dipping back to “Junior’s Wailing,” the midpoint in the greasy spoon experience, and an expressively rocking archetype for all they would later accomplish. The dark shuffle of “Lazy Poker Blues,” too, unleashed specters that the band would be referencing in future days, including the boogie piano that made 1974’s “Break the Rules” seem such a blast from the past. Compared to the albums that would follow, Ma Kelly is revealed as little more than a tentative blueprint for the Quo’s new direction. At the time, however, it was a spellbinding shock, perhaps the last one that the Quo ever delivered. You should remember that when you play it.(by Dave Thompson)

Personal note: Quo´s song “Is It Really Me” was one of the first song I played in my  first band, called “Dying Sun” …. many decades ago …  *smile*

quo1970

Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums)
Alan Lancaster (bass, guitar, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, vocals)
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Roy Lynes (organ)
Bob Young (harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Spinning Wheel Blues (Young/Rossi) 3.21
02. Daughter (Lancaster) 3.01
03. Everything (Rossi/Parfitt) 2.39
04. Shy Fly (Young/Rossi) 3.50
05. (April) Spring, Summer And Wednesdays (Young/Rossi) 4.13
06. Junior’s Wailing (White/Pugh) 3.35
07. Lakky Lady (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.16
08. Need Your Love (Young/Rossi) 4.47
09.Lazy Poker Blues (Adams/Green) 3.35
10. Is It Really Me/Gotta Go Home (Lancaster) 9.32

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Richard John Parfitt
(12 October 1948 – 24 December 2016)
Thanks for the music !