The Five Corners Quintet (feat. Mark Murphy) – Hot Corner (2008)

FrontCover1Here’s a twist for you — a Finnish band playing newly composed soul-jazz and post-bop music. The Five Corners ensemble is clearly influenced by the Horace Silver/Lee Morgan/Art Blakey strain of ’60s jazz, and even uses recording techniques that are reminiscent of the reel-to-reel two-track era. Saxophonist Timo Lassy and trumpeter Jukka Eskola front this well-heeled jazz band that harkens back to better times for the music, and feels good doing it without resorting to funk or dance music. When you hear tracks like the handclap induced “Skinny Dipping,” the delightful soul traipse “Waltz Up,” or the echoed “Shake It,” it is clear where this music takes its information from. Lassy proves his versatility in stepping away from his John Coltrane influenced side going more for a Hank Mobley/Joe Henderson approach He’s especially good playing flute during the excellent “Habib’s Habit,” a hip modal piece that swings hard, and fully showcases the considerable gifts of pianist Mikael Jakobsson. “Hot Rod” is a spy swing jazz with a basic melody, while “Midnight in Trieste” also sounds like soundtrack music with Lassy’s tenor sax, the vibraphone work of guests Arttu Takalo, and Pekka Jaclin on tympani.

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Most of the material goes beyond the advertised five-piece combo, several cuts feature a string section — fairly unobtrusive — and the veteran vocalist Mark Murphy appears on two tracks. He sings “Kerouac Days in Montana,” bringing out the ’60s cruising California cool factor, while an Oliver Nelson derived “Come & Get Me” combines an orchestral approach blended in with rhythm & blues. Unfortunately, the balance between words and instruments tends to favor the music and not the singers, especially on Okou’s feature “Rich in Time,” where the strings and horns half-bury his thin vocals. Not only does the music have a retro feel, the production values overall reflect this, a bit muddled and murky, not sounding up to date or digital at all. Not a fault musically though, especially if you would enjoy a fresh take on mainstream jazz looking back in order to move forward. (by Michael G. Nastos)

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Personnel:
Jukka Eskola (flugelhorn, trumpet)
Pekka Jaclin (percussion, timpani)
Timo Kämäräinen (lap steel guitar)
Timo Lassy (flute, saxophone)
Antti Lötjönen (bass)
Matt Murphy (vocals)
Teppo Mäkynen (drums, percussion)
Ouko (vocals)
Jaakko Rajamäki (cello)
Arttu Takalo (vibraphone)

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Tracklist:
01. Hot Rod (Kallio) 5.41
02. Kerouac Days in Montana (Kallio/Murphy) 5.14
03. Skinny Dipping (Kallio/Lassy) 3.28
04. Rich in Time (Kallio/Okou) 3.11
05. Midnight in Trieste (Kallio) 4.39
06. Come and Get Me (Murphy) 5.09
07. Interlope II (Malm) 0.37
08. Waltz Up (Makynen) 4.14
09. Easy Diggin’ (Kallio) 4.55
10. Shake It (Makynen) 4.54
11. Habib’s Habit (Makynen) 4.38

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John Lennon – Rock ‘N’ Roll (1975)

FrontCover1Rock ‘n’ Roll is the sixth studio album by John Lennon. Released in 1975, it is an album of late 1950s and early 1960s songs as covered by Lennon. Recording the album was problematic and spanned an entire year: Phil Spector produced sessions in October 1973 at A&M Studios, and Lennon produced sessions in October 1974 at Record Plant Studios (East). Lennon was being sued by Morris Levy over copyright infringement of one line in his song “Come Together”. As part of an agreement, Lennon had to include three Levy-owned songs on Rock ‘n’ Roll. Spector disappeared with the session recordings and was subsequently involved in a motor accident, leaving the album’s tracks unrecoverable until the beginning of the Walls and Bridges sessions. With Walls and Bridges coming out first, featuring one Levy-owned song, Levy sued Lennon expecting to see Lennon’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album.

The album was released in February 1975, reaching number 6 in both the United Kingdom and the United States, later being certified gold in both countries. It was supported by the single “Stand by Me”, which peaked at number 20 in the US, and 30 in the UK. The cover was taken by Jürgen Vollmer during the Beatles’ stay in Hamburg. It was Lennon’s last album until 1980: With no recording contract obligation, he took a hiatus from the music business to raise his son Sean.

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In 1969, Lennon composed the song “Come Together” for the Beatles’ album Abbey Road. Inspired by the Chuck Berry tune “You Can’t Catch Me”, it bore too much of a melodic resemblance to the original—and Lennon took the third line of the second verse (“Here come old flat-top”) for the new lyric. Publisher Morris Levy brought a lawsuit for infringement, and the case was due to be heard in a New York court in December 1973. It was later settled out of court, with the agreement that, according to an announcement by Levy, Lennon had to “record three songs by Big Seven publishers on his next album”. The songs [he] intends to record at this time are “You Can’t Catch Me”, “Angel Baby” and “Ya Ya”.” Lennon had the right to change the last two songs to any other songs that were published by Big Seven. In the meanwhile,

Lennon had split with Yoko Ono and was living in Los Angeles with his personal assistant, May Pang. Nostalgia was a popular trend on film with American Graffiti, and television was readying the series Happy Days (Lennon and Pang had even visited the set). Lennon, rather than writing his own songs, and partly inspired by his arrangement to include at least three songs from Levy’s publishing company catalogue, Big Seven Music, decided to record an album of oldies as his next release, following on from Mind Games. (by wikipedia)

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Although the chaotic sessions that spawned this album have passed into rock & roll legend and the recording’s very genesis (as an out-of-court settlement between John Lennon and an aggrieved publisher) has often caused it to be slighted by many of the singer’s biographers, Rock ‘n’ Roll, in fact, stands as a peak in his post-Imagine catalog: an album that catches him with nothing to prove and no need to try. Lennon could, after all, sing old rock & roll numbers with his mouth closed; he spent his entire career relaxing with off-the-cuff blasts through the music with which he grew up, and Rock ‘n’ Roll emerges the sound of him doing precisely that. Four songs survive from the fractious sessions with producer Phil Spector in late 1973 that ignited the album, and listeners to any of the posthumous compilations that also draw from those archives will know that the best tracks were left on the shelf — “Be My Baby” and “Angel Baby” among them. But a gorgeous run through Lloyd Price’s “Just Because” wraps up the album in fine style, while a trip through “You Can’t Catch Me” contrarily captures a playful side that Lennon rarely revealed on vinyl.

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The remainder of the album was cut a year later with Lennon alone at the helm, and the mood remains buoyant. It might not, on first glance, seem essential to hear him running through nuggets like “Be Bop A Lula,” “Peggy Sue,” and “Bring It on Home to Me,” but, again, Lennon has seldom sounded so gleeful as he does on these numbers, while the absence of the Spector trademark Wall-of-Sound production is scarcely noticeable — as the object of one of Lennon’s own productions, David Peel once pointed out, “John had the Wall of Sound down perfectly himself.” Released in an age when both David Bowie and Bryan Ferry had already tracked back to musical times-gone-by (Pin-Ups and These Foolish Things, respectively), Rock ‘n’ Roll received short shrift from contemporary critics. As time passed, however, it has grown in stature, whereas those other albums have merely held their own. Today, Rock ‘n’ Roll sounds fresher than the rock & roll that inspired it in the first place. Imagine that. (by Dave Thompson)

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Personnel:
Ken Ascher (keyboards)
Jeff Barry (horn)
Hal Blaine (drums)
Jim Calvert (guitar)
Steve Cropper (guitar)
Jesse Ed Davis (guitar)
José Feliciano (guitar)
Michael Hazelwood (guitar)
Peter Jameson (horn)
Arthur Jenkins (percussion)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Bobby Keys (horn)
Michael Lang (keyboards)
John Lennon (vocals, guitar)
Gary Mallaber (drums)
Barry Mann (horn)
Dennis Morouse (horn)
Eddie Mottau (guitar)
Leon Russell (keyboards)
Joseph Temperley (horn)
Nino Tempo (saxophone)
Frank Vicari (horn)
Klaus Voormann (bass guitar, vocals on 10.)

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Tracklist:
01. Be-Bop-A-Lula (Davis/Vincent) 2.37
02. Stand By Me (Leiber/Stoller/King) 3.30
03. Medley: Rip It Up/Ready Teddy (Blackwell/Marascalco) 1.34
04. You Can’t Catch Me (Berry) 4.53
05. Ain’t That A Shame (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.33
06. Do You Wanna Dance? (Freeman) 2.54
07. Sweet Little Sixteen (Berry) 3.05
08. Slippin’ And Slidin’ (Bocage/Collins/Penniman/Smith) 2.18
09. Peggy Sue (Allison/Petty/Holly) 2.05
10. Medley: Bring It On Home To Me/Send Me Some Lovin’ (Cooke/Marascalco/Price) 3.42
11. Bony Moronie (Williams) 3.50
12. Ya Ya (Dorsey/Lewis/Robinson/Levy) 2.18
“13. ust Because (Price) 4.27

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Loreena McKennitt – The Mask And Mirror (1994)

FrontCover1The Mask and Mirror is an album by Loreena McKennitt. Released in 1994, the album has been certified Gold in the United States.

 

Like most of Loreena McKennitt’s albums, The Mask and Mirror is heavily influenced by her travels. Her experiences in Spain and Morocco, specifically, serve as the inspiration for this album.

As her introduction to the album, McKennitt wrote:

I looked back and forth through the window of 15th century Spain, through the hues of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, and was drawn into a fascinating world: history, religion, cross-cultural fertilization….For some medieval minds the mirror was the door through which the soul frees itself by passing…. for others the pursuit of personal refinement was likened to polishing the mirror of the soul. From the more familiar turf of the west coast of Ireland, through the troubadours of France, crossing over the Pyrenees, and then to the west through Galicia, down through Andalusia and past Gibraltar to Morocco….the Crusades, the pilgrimage to Santiago, Cathars, the Knights Templar, the Sufis from Egypt, One Thousand and One Nights in Arabia, the Celtic imagery of trees, the Gnostic Gospels…who was God? and what is religion, what spirituality? What was revealed and what was concealed…and what was the mask and what the mirror?

Accompanying all the selections, as the liner remarks, are some of the entries in a traveler’s log that McKennitt kept all throughout her journey.

The album’s cover uses a collage made from the medieval The Hunt of the Unicorn tapestries.

Loreena McKennitt
Photo by Donna Griffith

Press play and enter the world of Loreena McKennitt, where walls dissolve into thick, billowing mists as the ground beneath your feet turns to compacted earth and the sky above opens up to reveal a black cloak dotted with shimmering stars draped beneath silk-like clouds. Were McKennitt’s composing and songwriting abilities lacking of any luster (as they most certainly are not), her voice would still possess the strength to hold her fifth album, The Mask and Mirror, up on its own. But the combination of this talented woman’s vocal prowess and songwriting ability makes her all the more similar to her work — ethereal and almost unbelievable in its level of quality. A mythical menagerie, The Mask and Mirror contains songs that lift the veil to reveal the soul of McKennitt’s work in eight dreamlike, Celtic-inspired tracks.

The opening track, “The Mystic’s Dream” (featured on the TNT movie The Mists of Avalon, based on the novel by Marion Zimmer Bradley), is a haunting tune that features McKennitt at her most heavenly peak as a vocalist, evoking the spirits of the instruments and Gregorian chant-like background vocals that accompany her on the track. The album excels at conjuring up mythical visions in the listener’s imagination, as with the gypsy-like tune “Marrakesh Night Market,” which echos of the picturesque scene the title invokes. The soul-searching “Full Circle” best exhibits McKennitt’s ability to transpose the true meaning of the lyrics into her songs.

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Even after the song ends, the somber mood lingers softly in the air. The balalaika (a three-stringed triangular-shaped instrument), the bouzouki (an eight-stringed instrument), and the hurdy-gurdy (a stringed instrument that also has keyboard and percussion parts) are among the rare, strange instruments introduced on many of the songs, including the lighthearted, uplifting “Ce He Mise Le Ulaingt? (The Two Trees),” on which these instruments demonstrate their incredible quality and prowess. The lyrics of this track are none other than the words of the poem of the same name by William Butler Yeats. McKennitt’s unique use of the lyrical words of William Shakespeare, combined with her skillful adaptation of the words to the heavenly, undulating music, make the final track, “Prospero’s Speech,” an inspiration in itself. (by Kerry L. Smith

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Personnel:
Anne Bourne (cello, background vocals)
Al Cross (drums)
Nigel Eaton (hurdy gurdy)
Ofra Harnoy (cello)
Brian Hughes (guitar, oud, balalaika, sitar)
Patrick Hutchinson (Bagpipes, pipe)
George Koller (bass, tambura, cello, esraj, tambura)
Rick Lazar (drums, percussion, udu)
Donal Lunny  (bouzouki, bodhrán)
Hugh Marsh (fiddle)
Loreena McKennitt (vocals, keyboards, goblet drums, accordion, piano,pipe)
Ravi Naimpally (tabla)
Abraham Tawfik (oud)
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background vocals:
Victoria Scholars Choir conducted by Jerzy Cichocki
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strings (on 07.2.)
Adele Armin – Andy Benac – David Hetherington – David Miller –  Douglas Perry –  Fujico Imajishi – Heinz Boshart – Kent Teeple – Mark Sabat – Marie Berard – Morry Kernerman – Sharon Prater – Susan Lipchak – Sylvia Lange

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Tracklist:
01. The Mystic’s Dream (McKennitt) 7.43
02. The Bonny Swans (Traditional) 7.21
03. The Dark Night Of The Soul (Traditional/St. John Of The Cross) 6.44
04. Marrakesh Night Market (McKennitt) 5.30
05. Full Circle (McKennitt) 5.57
06. Santiago (Traditional) 5.59
07. 1. Cé Hé Mise Le Ulaingt? (“Who Am I To Bear It”) (Hutchinson) 1.31
07.2. The Two Trees (Traditional/Yeats) 7.35
08. Prospero’s Speech (Traditional/Shakespeare) 3.23

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Inlet02ACommunication … before we had the internet

The Blues Band – Songbook (early 80´s)

FrontCoverThe Blues Band is a British blues band formed in 1979 by Paul Jones, former lead vocalist and harmonica player with Manfred Mann, and vocalist/slide guitarist Dave Kelly, who had previously played with the John Dummer Blues Band, Howlin’ Wolf and John Lee Hooker. The band’s first line-up also included bassist Gary Fletcher, guitarist Tom McGuinness (also of Manfred Mann) and drummer Hughie Flint, (the two had previously formed McGuinness Flint). In 1982 Flint left and was replaced by former Family drummer Rob Townsend.
Their first album The Official Blues Band Bootleg Album, a mixture of blues standards and original songs featured the Jones and McGuinness composition “Come On In” and their long-standing stage favourite “Flatfoot Sam”. This album initially attracted no interest from major record companies, so the band pressed a limited run of 3,000, hand-stamped their logo on the cardboard sleeve and signed them all. After unqualified endorsement from BBC Radio 1 presenter Simon Bates and others, media interest resulted in a recording contract with Arista Records, who re-released the album under the same title. After that they released Ready, Itchy Feet and Brand Loyalty albums and regularly toured through Europe. (by wikipedia)

And this is their first and last (so I guess) songbook, including many popular tunes from their early days.

The songbook included Dylan´s “Maggies Farm”:

The Blues Band recorded a version as a commentary on Margaret Thatcher’s government . The line, “The National Guard stands around the door” being replaced with a line about the Special Patrol Group (SPG), the controversial unit of the London Metropolitan Police then being used to quell protests. (by wikipedia)

So, this songbook is a nice addition for every serious Blues Band collector.

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Angelo Badalamenti – Music From Twin Peaks (OST) (1990)

FrontCover1The music of the American television series Twin Peaks, and its 1992 sequel film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, was composed by Angelo Badalamenti. Twin Peaks’ co-creator David Lynch wrote lyrics for five songs used throughout the series—including “Falling”, “The Nightingale”, “Into the Night”, “Just You” and “Sycamore Trees”—and three songs featured in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, including “A Real Indication”, “Questions in a World of Blue” and “The Black Dog Runs at Night.” Julee Cruise, who made cameo appearances in both the series and film, provided vocals for four of Lynch’s and Badalamenti’s collaborations, and jazz vocalist Jimmy Scott performed on “Sycamore Trees.” Three of the series actors, James Marshall, Lara Flynn Boyle and Sheryl Lee, provided vocals for “Just You.”

Badalamenti’s compositions have been released on three soundtrack albums: Soundtrack from Twin Peaks (1990), Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) and Twin Peaks Music: Season Two Music and More (2007). Starting in March 2011, David Lynch began distributing The Twin Peaks Archive, a collection of previously unreleased and unused songs on his official web site for digital download. In total, 215 songs were made available for download.

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Twin Peaks’ music has received widespread critical acclaim. The Guardian has said that the original soundtrack “still marks the summit of TV Soundtracks” and Allmusic reviewer Stephen Eddins has referred to it as “a model of film music ideally matched to the images and actions it underscores.” The main theme song to Twin Peaks, composed by Badalamenti, also received a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance at the 1991 Grammy Awards.

All the songs from the album were written by Angelo Badalamenti, who received the 1991 Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “Twin Peaks Theme”. Most of the songs are instrumental pieces, but three songs that contain lyrics were written by David Lynch. These three songs are available on the singer Julee Cruise’s album Floating into the Night. Cruise’s album also contains songs that were used in the series, but are not included in any soundtrack release. (by wikipedia)

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Composer Angelo Badalamenti (Cousins) set the tone for David Lynch’s bizarre television soap with a haunting theme created from electric piano, synthetic strings, and the twangiest guitar this side of Duane Eddy. The love theme, appropriately enough, sounds like a funeral march. (The series’ central character was found dead at the beginning of the first episode.) The rest of the music, instantly recognizable to anyone who saw even one episode of the series, borders on fever-dream jazz. Lynch favorite Julee Cruise sings the only three vocal songs. The music from Twin Peaks is dark, cloying, and obsessive — and one of the best scores ever written for television. (by Brian Mansfield)

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And yes … I´m a real fan of “Twin Peaks” … till today and this soundtrack is one of the finest soundtracks ever !

Listen to the Magic “Twin Peaks Theme 2 or to “Dance Of The Dream Man” and you´ll know, what I mean !

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Personnel:
Angelo Badalamenti (piano, synthesizer)
Vinnie Bell (guitar)
Julee Cruise (vocals on 04, 07. + 11.)
Eddie Daniels (flute, clarinet)
Eddie Dixon (guitar)
Kinny Landrum (Synthesizer)
Al Regni (saxophone, clarinet, flute)
Grady Tate (drums)

Booklet01A

Tracklist:
01. Twin Peaks Theme (Instrumental) 5.10
02. Laura Palmer’s Theme (Instrumental) 4.52
03. Audrey’s Dance (Instrumental) 5.17
04. The Nightingale (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.56
05. Freshly Squeezed (Instrumental) 3.48
06. The Bookhouse Boys (Instrumental) 3.29
07. Into The Night (vocal by Julee Cruise) 4.44
08. Night Life In Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 3.27
09. Dance Of The Dream Man (Instrumental) 3.41
10. Love Theme From Twin Peaks (Instrumental) 5.04
11. Falling (vocal by Julee Cruise) 5.21

All music composed by Angelo Badalamenti
All lyrics by David Lynch

 

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AngeloAngelo Badalamenti

 

Big Will & The Bluesmen feat. Peter Struijk – Hard Times (2011)

FrontCover1Big Will & The Bluesmen was a traditional blues band from the Netherlands inspired by great musicians as Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson and John Lee Hooker.
On this album you’ll find eleven original compositions from Big Will & the Bluesmen. Among those are four acoustic tracks. All songs are based on the Delta / Chicago tradition with true, authentic bluessounds

The band has chosen to give a prominent place on the harmonica (blues harp) and there is also – slide guitar to hear. All this for an authentic blues atmosphere. Close your eyes and imagine yourself in the Mississippi Delta, the “swamp” on a sultry evening, a bottle of Jack Daniels under your belt, life is hard and unforgiving.

They let themselves be inspired by among others: Son House, Robert Johnson, Junior Wells, Muddy Waters and John Lee Hooker.

Will has over 10 years experience playing in blues / rock bands, but would rather be back to basics, the Delta and Chicago blues.

Alex also has extensive stage experience, playing primarily in rock bands. He too has fallen in love with the authentic blues.

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Jos the drummer lets you feel the heartbeat of the blues, just goose bumps!

Traditional blues riffs on electric and upright-bass by Henk Wessels, you’ll be hearing a lot from this promising new band.

“Unplugged” The band plays not only on festivals and pubs, they also perform unplugged for receptions, restaurants and backroom shows in a (semi) acoustic setting.

Inspiration:

The band Big Will & the Bluesmen ismainly inspired by two currents of blues music: the Delta and Chicago style. Originally starting in the early twenties.

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Although slavery is abolished, the black rural population is poor and work on the land. In the evenings they usually spent time in so called juke joints, where they drink the cheap self distilled whiskey and sing simple but powerfull songs about failed love and the misery of their existence. Often the singers were accompanied by guitar and harp.

That’s how the blues was born. -(by last.fm)

Or: That´s why I love the Blues !

“Guitarist Peter Struijk delivers lowdown blues that look back to a time of rough edges and raw emotions.” (Blues Revue, USA)

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Personnel:
Wil van der Ende (harmonica)
Alex “Riverside Jr.” Konijnenburg (guitar, vocals)
Henk Wessels (bass)
Jos Waal (drums)
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Henk Heijlema (lapsteel on 09., mandolin on 06.)
Gerbrand Schoenmaker (piano on 08.)
Peter Struijk (guitar on 01., 04. – 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. Hard Times 6.58
02. Same Old Blues 5.51
03. Waiting On A Train 3.34
04. Leave It All Behind 5.39
05. Seven days -3.25
06. Laura Song 1.26
07. On My Way 3.39
08. Big Will Theme 2.08
09. Drifting And Driving 4.15
10. Sweet Lovin Woman 4.13
11. Release My Soul 4.06

All songs written by Alex “Riverside Jr.” Konijnenburg

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Giora Feidman – Feidman Plays Piazzolla (2002)

FrontCover1Argentinian born Feidman comes from a family of Klezmer musicians and is one himself; it shows in his treatment of these Piazzolla pieces. His clarinet soars and dives in a magical way that makes each track a real experience. I am not clear whether these particular pieces were written to be played this way. Was that what drew him to performing them or is it just his particular treatment of them? Whatever the answers this approach makes these pieces infinitely listenable.

Piazzolla was born near Buenos Aires, in 1921. He is the man responsible for dragging the tango out of the bordellos, having it accepted in the world’s concert halls and purging it of the watered down bastardised state it had fallen into in the years following the second world war. It was his father who set the young Piazzolla on his musical course by having him take piano lessons at ten and buying him his first instrument – a bandoneon. The bandoneon is a quintessentially Argentinian relative of the concertina – the ‘voice’ that makes the music of the tango so irresistible.

Seeing the great populariser of the tango Carlos Gardel in New York, where he was living, changed Piazzolla’s life. Gardel, who had already heard of the young and talented ex-pat, invited him to join his orchestra. Returning to Buenos Aires Piazzolla played with many tango bands and brought innovation to them all. He started his own orchestra in 1946 but was so frustrated by its reception that he left for Paris where, encouraged by such people as Nadia Boulanger, he set about introducing aspects of modern jazz, classical music and the music of Latin American folklore into his tango compositions.

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Piazzolla finally won the recognition he and his music deserved in Paris but it didn’t win acceptance in his homeland until the 1960s. It is hoped that someone else will take on his mantle so that this wonderfully evocative music does not slip back into stagnation and pastiche. Certainly such people as Feidman are making a major contribution towards ensuring that this does not happen.

This disc is a perfect example of all the influences Piazzolla brought to bear on tango; every track is a delight. Feidman is accompanied by Raul Jaurena on bandoneon and the South West German Chamber Orchestra of Pforzheim conducted with verve and commitment by Vladislav Czarnecki.

Thoroughly recommended! (by Steve Arloff)

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Personnel:
Giora Feidman (clarinet)
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Raul Jaurena (bandoneon on 03., 07. + 09.)
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Chamber Orchestra of Pforzheim  counducted by Vladislav Czarnecki

Booklet01A

Tracklist:
01. Moderato Tangabile 3.45
02. Chant Et Fugue 7.08
03. Preparense 5.05
04. Tristango 8.15
05. Lo Que Vendra 4:01
06. Milonga Del Angel 5.45
07. Fracanapa 3.58
08. Hommage 6.43
09. Marron Y Azul 4.39
10. Kicho 6.30
11. Tanti Anni Prima 5.51

Music composed by Astor Piazolla

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