Vangelis – 1492 (Conquest of Paradise) (OST) (1992)

FrontCover1

Evángelos Odysséas Papathanassíou[a] (born 29 March 1943), known professionally as Vangelis, is a Greek musician and composer of electronic, progressive, ambient, jazz, and orchestral music. He is best known for his Academy Award-winning score to Chariots of Fire (1981), as well as for composing scores to the films Blade Runner (1982), Missing (1982), Antarctica (1983), The Bounty (1984), 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), and Alexander (2004), and for the use of his music in the PBS documentary Cosmos: A Personal Voyage by Carl Sagan.

Vangelis began his career working with several popular bands of the 1960s such as The Forminx and Aphrodite’s Child, with the latter’s album 666 going on to be recognized as a progressive-psychedelic rock classic. Throughout the 1970s, Vangelis composed music scores for several animal documentaries, including L’Apocalypse des Animaux, La Fête sauvage and Opéra sauvage; the success of these scores brought him into the film scoring mainstream. In the early 1980s, Vangelis formed a musical partnership with Jon Anderson, the lead singer of progressive rock band Yes, and the duo went on to release several albums together as Jon & Vangelis.

Vangelis01

In 1981, he composed the score for the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Original Score. The soundtrack’s single, the film’s “Titles” theme, also reached the top of the American Billboard Hot 100 chart and was used as the background music at the London 2012 Olympics winners’ medal presentation ceremonies.

Having had a career in music spanning over 50 years and having composed and performed more than 50 albums, Vangelis is considered to be one of the most important figures in the history of electronic music

Vangelis02

1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 music score to the film of the same name by Greek electronic composer and artist Vangelis. The film, a recount of the voyage to America in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, was directed by Ridley Scott, for whom Vangelis had previously composed the music score for Blade Runner, in 1982. The album and the single “Conquest of Paradise” enjoyed a revival in 1995 for various reasons and broke many sales records.

Due to the soundtrack’s success, Vangelis won an Echo Award as “International Artist Of The Year”, and RTL Golden Lion Award for the “Best Title Theme for a TV Film or a Series” in 1996. The album was nominated for “Best Original Score – Motion Picture” at the 50th Golden Globe Awards in 1993.

On this soundtrack, Vangelis plays together with a number of performers, including two Flamenco guitarists and vocalists, violin, mandolin and flutes. As on a number of previous albums by Vangelis, the English Chamber Choir, directed by Guy Protheroe, performs the choral parts.

1492 - cinema quad movie poster (1).jpg

The sound engineering was done by Philippe Colonna and coordination by French musician Frederick Rousseau (also known for his collaborations with Jean-Michel Jarre), who has been Vangelis’s studio partner since the 1980s till the recording of the Alexander soundtrack.

Vangelis plays all synthesizers, using mainly string patches but also several ethnic ones, to reflect the character of the film, and electric piano and harp patches. Some calmer, atmospheric pieces (tracks 3, 7, 11 and 12) are entirely performed by Vangelis, using pianos, strings and harp.

Booklet07+08

For the ethnic music, Vangelis consulted with French specialist Xavier Belanger, who has advised other artists on similar issues, including Jean-Michel Jarre.

A video clip was shot in Paris with Vangelis in his Epsilon Studios (since dismantled), with the choir performing.

Three tracks of this album contain lyrics. In “Monastery of La Rabida” and “Deliverance”, the choir sings Latin hymns (“De Profundis” and “Dies Irae, respectively”). In “Conquest of Paradise” Vangelis used a pseudo-Latin invented language.

Sticker

Both the album and the EP had poor sales upon their release in 1992, but success came three years later, in 1995, for disparate reasons: In Germany, local boxer Henry Maske used the album-track “Conquest of Paradise” as his introduction theme during boxing bouts. When he became the IBF world title holder in the light heavyweight category, the piece received wide coverage and a single was hastily released.

In Portugal, the local Socialist Party also used “Conquest of Paradise” as its theme for the general election campaign (it won). The song has also been used as a theme for the Crusaders, a Super Rugby team based in Christchurch, New Zealand, for English rugby league team the Wigan Warriors, for the 2011 Cricket World Cup, and for the 2010 and 2014 cricket World Twenty20 championships.

Wallpaper01

The soundtrack album charted very well, and went on to be certified gold and platinum in over 17 countries, including Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the U.K., culminating with over million copies in Germany.

The single “Conquest of Paradise” also topped the charts in a number of countries, including 10 weeks at No. 1 in the Netherlands and Germany, where it sold 1.5 million copies, 8 weeks at No. 1 in Belgium and Switzerland. (by wikipedia)

MoviePic

Suitably grand in scale and far-reaching in its scope, this soundtrack is the first new music from Vangelis since 1990’s The City. 1492 stands up well next to Vangelis’s classic Chariots of Fire, due to his innate ability to get right inside the material and provide an integral part of the film itself. Vangelis succeeds in capturing the 15th-century mood, mixing rich choral portions with modern elements, and portraying the larger than life character of Columbus, complete with full-range, dynamic sound. (by All Music)

BackCover1

Personnel;
Francis Darizcuren (mandolin, violin)
Didier Malherbe (flute)
Pepe Martinez (guitar, vocals)
Guy Protheroe (vocals)
Vangelis (keyboards, synthesizer)

Booklet01+02

Tracklist:
01. Opening 1.22
02. Conquest Of Paradise 4.48
03. Monastery Of La Rábida 3.39
04. City Of Isabel 2.16
05. Light And Shadow 3.47
06. Deliverance 3.29
07. West Across The Ocean Sea 2.53
08. Eternity 2.00
09. Hispañola 4.56
10. Moxica And The Horse 7.06
11. Twenty Eighth Parallel 5.14
12. Pinta, Niña, Santa María (Into Eternity) 13.20

CD1

*
**

Booklet05+06

Jon And Vangelis – Private Collection (1983)

frontcover1Private Collection is the third album released by Jon and Vangelis, released in 1983 on Polydor Records. “He is Sailing” was released as a single shortly before the album. The song “Polonaise” was written under the influence of events that took place in Poland a little earlier (martial law). The song is dedicated to Poles.(by wikipedia)

Jon & Vangelis’ first two albums really seemed to be building up to this point. With Private Collection, the two artists (Jon Anderson of Yes fame and Vangelis) have created what feels just a bit like a classical work. Truly the nearly 23-minute “Horizon” really feels a lot like a modern symphony. It is definitely the culmination of their work together, their most ambitious effort. The shorter cuts on the album all have their moments and surely hold up to anything from the previous releases, but “Horizon” stands far above them all. It combines the best elements of Anderson’s work in Yes with the electronically classically tinged stylings of Vangelis to produce a work that is near masterpiece in its quality. It is a life-affirming, positive piece. Among the other highlights of the disc are “Deborah” and “He Is Sailing.” If you only buy one Jon & Vangelis album, choose the best-of collection. However, if you opt for a second disc, this is the one. (by Gary Hill)

jonvangelis

Personnel:
Jon Anderson (vocals)
Vangelis (keyboards, ynthesiser)
+
Dick Morrissey (saxophone on 02.)

booklet01a

Tracklist:
01. Italian Song 2.53
02. And When The Night Comes 4.35
03. Deborah 4.54
04. Polonaise 5.24
05. He Is Sailing 6.49
06. Horizon 22.53

Music composed by Vangelis
Lyrics written by Jon Anderson

labelb1
*
**

Vangelis – El Greco (A Tribute To El Greco) (1995 – 1998)

frontcover1El Greco is a 1998 classical album by Greek electronic composer and artist Vangelis (born March 29, 1943). The title is a reference to the man who inspired the composition, Dominikos Theotokópoulos (known as El Greco, “The Greek”; 1541–1614), the painter and sculptor of the Spanish Renaissance. It consists of ten long movements performed on electronic instruments.

This album is an expansion of an earlier album by Vangelis, Foros Timis Ston Greco. That album had been released in 1995, in a limited edition. For this general release, the track order was rearranged, three new tracks were added, and the album title was changed.

Vangelis composed and arranged the album, and performed all the instruments, accompanied by a choir conducted by Ivan Cassar. The music is in a Byzantine style yet sounding contemporary due to his use of synthesizers. Soprano Montserrat Caballé and tenor Konstantinos Paliatsaras make guest appearances on one movement each.

The album reached #66 in France and #74 in Germany. At the Billboard New Age Albums chart peaked at #9 position.

The image on the album is “The Knight with His Hand on His Breast” by El Greco.

(Not to be confused with El Greco Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, a 2007 album also by Vangelis)

This 1998 album expands the original ‘Tribute To El Greco’ (released semi-privately in Athens in 1995) to a full-length CD by adding three tracks (Movements III, V and VII) to the original ones, which have not been tampered with for this international release, only reordered slightly. The lavishly packaged 1995 release was limited to 3000 signed copies and officially obtainable only through the National Gallery museum in Athens which used the money thus generated to help acquire an El Greco painting (called ‘Saint Peter’) for its collection, although various copies have been bought by determined fans through different channels. I’ve always found the reasoning behind this restricted release a bit suspect – if you really want to generate a sizeable sum of money then why not create a great album and make it an international (or certainly internationally obtainable) release, perhaps upping the price a bit to account for its charity purpose. Anyway, a great album it was so this re-release has been much welcomed by fans unable to get hold of the original. The project shows Vangelis at his most inspired by the almost exclusively religious paintings from Domenikos Theotokopoulos (to give El Greco his full name) and his general artistic outlook. This becomes apparent from a rare personal note by Vangelis in the booklet, which is basically the mystic statement that, in order to be a truly creative artist, one must be true to one’s own nature and thus to Cosmic nature in general, as they are identical. The music’s flavour is very Byzantine, using Greek orthodox harmonies, church-bells, choir-sounds and more. It’s got a faint religious touch and is both austere and rich at the same time – austere because of the generally sparse orchestration, rich because of its deeply felt emotions. One of Vangelis’ main musical strengths, which is the use of rubato (the slight quickening up or slowing down of the tempo of the music to create those subtle effects), is very much in evidence throughout. Two singers from the classical world also make a contribution – a great aria by Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe accompanied on piano and on another track tenor Konstantinos Paliatsaras. The album’s promotion (what little there has been) occurred mainly through classical channels and although it’s hard to think of a classical composer creating music equivalent in nature to ‘El Greco’ still anyone who likes classical music (for instance Wagner – similar use of rubato, or perhaps Eastern European religious music) will in all probability like this music as well. (by .vangelismovements.com)

originaledition

Doménikos Theotokópoulos (Greek: Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος [ðoˈminikos θeotoˈkopulos]; 1541 – 7 April 1614), most widely known as El Greco (pronounced: [el ˈgɾeko]; Spanish for “The Greek”), was a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. The nickname “El Greco” refers both to his Greek origin and Spanish citizenship. The artist normally signed his paintings with his full birth name in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος (Doménikos Theotokópoulos), often adding the word Κρής (Krēs, “Cretan”).

view-of-toledoView of Toledo (c. 1596–1600, oil on canvas, 47.75 × 42.75 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) is one of the two surviving landscapes of Toledo painted by El Greco.

El Greco was born in Crete, which was at that time part of the Republic of Venice, and the center of Post-Byzantine art. He trained and became a master within that tradition before traveling at age 26 to Venice, as other Greek artists had done. In 1570 he moved to Rome, where he opened a workshop and executed a series of works. During his stay in Italy, El Greco enriched his style with elements of Mannerism and of the Venetian Renaissance. In 1577, he moved to Toledo, Spain, where he lived and worked until his death. In Toledo, El Greco received several major commissions and produced his best-known paintings.

El Greco’s dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century. El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis. El Greco has been characterized by modern scholars as an artist so individual that he belongs to no conventional school. He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often fantastic or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions with those of Western painting (by wikipedia)

vangelis

Personnel:
Vangelis (synthesizer)
+
Montserrat Caballé (soprano)
Konstantinos Paliatsaras (tenor)
+
Choir conducted by Ivan Cassar

booklet01a

Tracklist:
01. Movement I (Movement I) 10.04
02. Movement II (Movement II) 5.18
03. Movement III (new) 6.48
04. Movement IV (Movement III) 6.21
05. Movement V (new) 4.30
06. Movement VI (Movement V) 7. 52
07. Movement VII (new) – 3:18
08. Movement VIII (Movement IV) 9.43
09. Movement IX (Movement VI) 12.00
10. Movement X (Epilogue) (Movement VII) 6.21

In parenthesis, correspondence to the track listing of Foros Timis Ston Greco.

cd1

*
**

the-vision-of-saint-john

The Vision of Saint John
(El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos) (1541–1614)

Vangelis – Voices (1995)

FrontCover1Voices is a 1995 album by Greek electronic composer and artist Vangelis.

Its music was used in the soundtrack for the 1998 documentary Deep Seas, Deep Secrets co-produced by The Learning Channel and Discovery Channel, together with music from Vangelis next album, Oceanic.

The track “Ask the Mountains” was also used as the music for the TV commercial for the Hotpoint/Ariston Aqualtis washing machine. (by wikipedia)

Voices is a deep and engaging album from an e-music legend, Vangelis. This CD predates his regular use of symphony orchestras to augment his synths. His synths are, however, very symphonic. He creates broad atmospheres and dramatic soundscapes with synth hooks, chant vocals, and samples. Vangelis also adds some experimental textures and smooth melodies to cap his soundscapes. This is an exciting CD. Vangelis is in a league with few peers. In terms of stature and emotional response, this disc will appeal to fans of Enya and Yanni. (by Jim Brentholts)

VangelisPersonnel:
Vangelis (all instruments)
+
Caroline Lavelle (vocals, cello)
Stina Nordenstam (vocals)
Paul Young (vocals)
+
Athens Opera Company (vocals on 01.)

Inlay1Tracklist:
01. Voices (Vangelis) 7.01
02. Echoes (Vangelis) 8.23
03. Come To Me (Vangelis/Lavelle) 4.33
04. P.S. (Vangelis) 2.06
05. Ask The Mountains (Vangelis/Nordenstam) 7.53
06. Prelude (Vangelis) 4.25
07. Losing Sleep (Vangelis/Young) 6.41
08. Messages (Vangelis) 7.39
09. Dream In An Open Place (Vangelis) 5.56

CD1*
**