Grateful Dead – Aoxomoxoa (1969)

Grateful Dead Aoxomoxoa 1Aoxomoxoa is a 1969 album by the Grateful Dead.[4] One of the first rock albums to be recorded using 16-track technology, fans and critics alike consider this era to be the band’s experimental apex. The title is a meaningless palindrome, usually pronounced “ox-oh-mox-oh-ah”.

Rolling Stone, upon reviewing the album, mentioned that “no other music sustains a lifestyle so delicate and loving and lifelike”. The album was certified gold by the RIAA on May 13, 1997. In 1991 Rolling Stone selected Aoxomoxoa as having the eighth best album cover of all time. (by wikipedia)

The Grateful Dead’s third studio effort was also the first that the band did without any Warner Bros. staff producers or engineers hampering their creative lifestyle and subsequent processes. As they had done with their previous release, Anthem of the Sun, the Dead were actively seeking new forays and pushing envelopes on several fronts simultaneously during Aoxomoxoa (1968) — which was created under the working title of “Earthquake Country.” This was no doubt bolstered by the serendipitous technological revolution which essentially allowed the Dead to re-record the entire contents when given free reign at the appropriately named Pacific High Recording facility. As fate would have it, they gained virtually unlimited access to the newly acquired Ampex MM-1000 — the very first 16-track tape machines ever produced — which was absolutely state of the art in late 1968. The band was also experiencing new directions artistically.

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This was primarily the net result of the budding relationship between primary (by default) melodic contributor Jerry Garcia (guitar/vocals) and Robert Hunter (lyrics), who began his nearly 30-year association with the Grateful Dead in earnest during these sessions. When the LP hit the racks in the early summer of 1969, Deadheads were greeted by some of the freshest and most innovative sounds to develop from the thriving Bay Area music scene. The disc includes seminal psychedelic rockers such as “St. Stephen,” “China Cat Sunflower,” and “Cosmic Charlie,” as well as hints of the acoustic direction their music would take on the Baroque-influenced “Mountains of the Moon” and “Rosemary.”

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The folky “Dupree’s Diamond Blues” — which itself was loosely based on the traditional “Betty & Dupree” — would likewise foreshadow the sound of their next two studio long-players, Workingman’s Dead (1969) and American Beauty (1970). The too-trippy-for-its-own-good “What’s Become of the Baby” is buried beneath layers of over-indulgence. This is unfortunate, as Hunter’s surreal lyrics and Garcia’s understated vocals languish beneath the soupy sonics. In 1972, Aoxomoxoa was overhauled, and the original mix — which includes several significant differences such as an a cappella vocal tag at the tail end of “Doin’ That Rag” — has yet to be reissued in any form. When the title was reworked for inclusion in the Golden Road (1965-1973) (2001) box set, three previously unreleased and incomplete studio instrumental jams — respectively titled “Clementine Jam,” “Nobody’s Spoonful Jam,” and “The Eleven Jam” — as well as a live rendering of “Cosmic Charlie” from a January 1969 performance were added as “bonus material(s).(by Lindsay Planer)

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Personnel:
Tom Constanten (keyboards
Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals)
Mickey Hart (drums, percussion)
Bill Kreutzmann (drums, percussion)
Phil Lesh (bass. vocals)
Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (keyboards, percussion)
Bob Weir (uitar, vocals)

Additional musicians:

John “Marmaduke” Dawson – Debbie – Peter Grant – Mouse – David Nelson – Wendy

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Tracklist:
01. St. Stephen (Garcia/Lesh/Hunter) 4.31
02. Dupree’s Diamond Blues (Garcia/Hunter) 3.36
03. Rosemary (Garcia/Hunter) 2.03
04. Doin’ That Rag (Garcia/Hunter) 4.46
05.  Mountains Of The Moon (Garcia/Hunter) 4.05
06. China Cat Sunflower (Garcia/Hunter) 3.44
07. What’s Become Of The Baby (Garcia/Hunter) 8.17
08. Cosmic Charlie (Garcia/Hunter) 5.33

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The Sons Of Champlin – Live At The Record Plant – Sausalito (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Sons of Champlin are an American rock band, from Marin County in the San Francisco-Bay area, formed in the late 1960s. They are fronted by vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Bill Champlin, who later joined rock band Chicago, from 1981–2009, placing Sons of Champlin on haitus from 1981–1996. They brought to the late 60’s music scene in the Bay Area a soulful sound built around a horn section, sophisticated arrangements, philosophical themes, Bill Champlin’s songwriting and blue-eyed soul singing, and Terry Haggerty’s jazz-based guitar. They are one of the 1960s San Francisco bands, along with Jefferson Airplane, The Grateful Dead and Moby Grape.

Champlin started his musical career in high school (Tamalpais in Mill Valley) as a member of a local band, The Opposite Six. One of his teachers encouraged Champlin to drop out of school and pursue music full-time. In 1965 the draft claimed the drummer and bass player of the Opposite Six, and Champlin joined forces with guitarist Terry Haggerty, sax player Tim Cain, bassist John Prosser and drummer Jim Meyers in the band that became the Sons of Champlin. By late 1967 the lineup had changed to include keyboardist/saxman Geoff Palmer, trumpeter Jim Beem, bassist Al Strong, and drummer Bill Bowen, creating a Hammond B3-and-horns sound that was distinctive from the rest of the Bay Area’s psychedelic guitar bands.

SonsOfChamplin03.jpgThe Sons recorded their first album, Fat City in 1967 for Trident Records, owned by Kingston Trio manager Frank Werber. They released a single, “Sing Me a Rainbow,” (B-side “Fat City”) which got airplay in the Bay Area but did not crack the national charts. The plan was to follow this release with another song from the album, a Barry Mann/Cynthia Weil composition called “Shades of Grey”, but the Monkees released their version before this could happen. The album was not released and the Sons left Trident Records. In February 1999, this collection was released on a British CD under the title Fat City.

During the late 1960s, The Sons of Champlin performed regularly at the San Francisco venues, the Avalon Ballroom and the Fillmore West and the (former) Chateau Liberté venue in the mountains above San Jose. They shared billing with, among many others, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Country Joe and the Fish, and The Youngbloods. They were also the opening act at The Band’s first concert at which they used the name “The Band,” along with The Ace of Cups.

In 1968, the Sons of Champlin signed with Capitol Records, releasing Loosen Up Naturally in January 1969. Two more Capitol albums followed, The Sons and Follow Your Heart. In 1970, the band broke up and Bill Champlin moved to Santa Cruz, where he joined Moby Grape guitarist Jerry Miller in a short-lived project called The Rhythm Dukes.

The Sons reformed in 1971 as a five-piece band with Bill Vitt on drums and David Schallock from Big Brother and the Holding Company on bass. Briefly, the group went by the name Yogi Phlegm,  as which they played one of the last concerts at Bill Graham’s Fillmore West on June 30, 1971. In 1972 James Preston replaced Bill Vitt on drums, and the band once again went by the name Sons of Champlin.

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After recording their 1972 Columbia album, Welcome to the Dance, as a five piece, The Sons once again added a horn section, which included Mark Isham, now a film scorer and composer, on trumpet and synthesizer.

In 1975, The Sons recorded The Sons of Champlin in their own studio, and released it on their own label, Goldmine Records. This was purchased and re-released by Ariola America. The next two albums, Circle Filled With Love and Loving is Why, were also released on Ariola.

In 1977, the Sons of Champlin played what many assumed to be their last gig at the Kirkwood Meadows ski resort.

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The Sons released seven albums between 1969 and 1977, including Loosen Up Naturally, Welcome to the Dance, and Circle Filled With Love. The albums were generally well-reviewed, but were low sellers. In 1977, Champlin went solo, recording Single (1978) and Runaway (1981), before joining Chicago in 1981.

The Sons did continue briefly, through 1978, with former Pablo Cruise singer Bud Cockrell in place of Champlin.

On November 25, 1985, the Sons reunited for the first time in a surprise appearance at the Fillmore in San Francisco on a bill with Huey Lewis and the News, KBC Band and a reunited Country Joe and the Fish. The reunion comprised Champlin, Terry Haggerty, Geoffrey Palmer, Tim Cain, David Schallock and James Preston with Huey Lewis and the News drummer Bill Gibson sitting in as well as the Freaky Executives Horn Section, who provided the brass.

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The 1985 show proved to be a one-off as Champlin returned to his regular gig with Chicago. But in 1997, the Sons got together again for a series of reunion gigs, then recorded and released their first live CD in 1998. Beginning in 2002, The Sons put out several CDs, Hip L’il Dreams and Secret (both produced by Gary Platt , Bill Champlin  & Tom Saviano ), among them, and have also remastered much of their back catalog.

The Sons of Champlin appeared with original members Champlin, Palmer, Schallock, Preston and Cain. Haggerty was replaced by Tal Morris then Carmen Grillo . Tom Saviano  and Marc Russo of the Doobie Brothers were saxophone players during Cain’s absence from the band. Tower of Power alumnus Mic Gillette handled trumpet, trombone, and tuba parts until his death in January 2016.  After James Preston’s death in 2014. Alan Hertz joined the band as its drummer with Jeff Lewis on trumpet. Bobby Vega was part of the band on bass upon the departure of Schallock, followed by Richard Mithun. Tamara Champlin was also added as a vocalist, and solo artist, finalist on the Voice (TV series), Will Champlin, has guested with the Sons as a player and vocalist. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s a pretty good radio show, recorded live at the legendary Record Plant Studios, Sausalito for The KSAN, the band was in the studio to promote their album “Welcome To The Dance” … And if you like these legandary Westcoast sound … listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Bill Champlin (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Terry Haggerty (guitar, vocals)
Geoffrey Palmer (keyboards, voacls)
James Preston (drums, percussion)
David Schallock (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. KSAN Tom Donahue Intro 0:52
02. Day Tripper (Lennon/McCartney) 4.35
03. No Mo (Haggerty) 3:24
04. For Joy (Champlin) 4:52
05. Without Love (Champlin) 6:05
06. Fat City (Moitoza) 5.57
07. Welcome To The Dance (Champlin) 5.08
08. All And Everything (Champlin/Palmer) 3.57
09. Learn How To Swim (Champlin) 5.09
10. Right On (Champlin)  5:26
11. Linda Lou (Traditional) 5.24
12. Lightning (Champlin) 5:21
13. Outro Tom Donahue 1.37

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Jerry Garcia – Garcia (1972)

LPFrontCover1Garcia is Grateful Dead guitarist Jerry Garcia’s first solo album, released in 1972.

Warner Bros. Records offered the Grateful Dead the opportunity to cut their own solo records, and Garcia was released around the same time as Bob Weir’s Ace and Mickey Hart’s Rolling Thunder. Unlike Ace, which was practically a Grateful Dead album, Garcia was more of a solo effort, as Garcia played almost all the instrumental parts. Six tracks (specifically those coauthored by lyricist Robert Hunter) eventually became standards in the Grateful Dead concert repertoire.

Some reprints of the album are self-released. “Loser” was covered by Cracker on their 1993 album Kerosene Hat. (by wikipedia)

This disc was a happy byproduct of the Grateful Dead re-signing with Warner Bros. It was mutually beneficial for Bob Weir (guitar/vocals) as well as Mickey Hart (percussion) and his criminally overlooked debut long-player, Rolling Thunder (1972). Jerry Garcia’s (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, pedal steel guitar, bass, piano, organ, samples, vocals) simply titled Garcia (1972) is arguably the most solo of all these projects, as only he and the Grateful Dead’s Billy Kreutzmann (percussion) contribute instrumentally. That said, Robert Hunter’s lyrics should not be underestimated as all six of his co-compositions became staples in the Dead’s live songbook for the remainder of their concert career.

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The infusion of new material can be attributed to the lack of any Dead-related releases since Workingman’s Dead (1970) over 14 months earlier. Although Garcia is the primary musician on the ten tracks, he has given each arrangement a wholly unique persona. These range from straight-ahead blues-based rock & roll (“Sugaree”) to the avant-garde (“Late for Supper”). Within those extremes are discerning renditions and solid performances of stone gems such as the noir folkie “Loser” as well as the lilting balladry of “Bird Song” and the cyclical psychedelia of “The Wheel,” the latter of which features some of the finest pedal steel guitar work to have come from Garcia’s brief infatuation with the twangy instrument. He brings an intimacy to the affective love song “To Lay Me Down” that was rarely equalled by the Grateful Dead. His prowess as an emotive pianist can be heard throughout not only that cut, but also on the trippy medley consisting of the previously mentioned “Late for Supper,” “Spidergawd,” and “Eep Hour.” Ever the self-effacing artist, at the time of release the guitarist overtly downplayed the album as “overindulgent.” Time has rendered that assessment utterly false, as Garcia is nothing short of a full-bodied artistic expression from one of rock & roll’s most multi-faceted musicians. Both initiated Deadheads as well as enthusiasts of the burgeoning early-’70s singer/songwriter movement will find much to cherish on this recording as Garcia redefines his immense talents and seemingly undiluted musical potential. (by Lindsay Planer)

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Personnel:
Jerry Garcia (guitar, pedal steel guitar, bass, keyboards, samples, vocals)
Bill Kreutzmann (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Deal 3.14
02. Bird Song 4.27
03. Sugaree 5.55
04. Loser 4.10
05. Late For Supper 1.38
06. Spidergawd 3.26
07. Eep Hour 5.08
08. To Lay Me Down 6.18
09. An Odd Little Place 1.39
10. The Wheel 4.12

Music Jerry Garcia + Billy Kreutzman
Lyrics: Robert Hunter

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Jerry Garcia

Jerry Garcia (August 1, 1942 – August 9, 1995)

Jerry Garcia & Merl Saunders – Live from The Record Plant, Sausalito (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgJerry Garcia was once asked what he liked to do when he wasn’t playing music. “Play music!” was his response. For about five years, the Grateful Dead guitarist spent many nights collaborating with organist Merl Saunders both in concert and in the studio. The five-year association of Saunders, who’d worked primarily as a jazz organist, and Garcia took root in early1970 with a weekly jam session featuring Saunders, Garcia, bassist John Kahn, and drummer Bill Vitt, at San Francisco’s Matrix.

From February 1971 to July 1975, Merl Saunders and Jerry Garcia often played live shows together when the Grateful Dead were not on tour. For many of those concerts, their band had the lineup featured on this album — Saunders on keyboards, Garcia on guitar and vocals, John Kahn on bass, and Bill Vitt on drums.

And here´s a pretty jam album from that period … here the relaxed sound of the Westcoat !

Live at The Record Plant, Sausalito, CA; July 8, 1973.
Very good KSAN FM broadcast.

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Personnel:
Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals)
John Kahn (bass)
Merl Saunders (organ)
Bill Vitt (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction (Tom Donahue) 0.38
02. Someday Baby (Estes) 6.34
03. My Funny Valentine (Hart/Rodgers) 1108
04. That’s Alright Mama (Crudup) 8.24
05. It’s Too Late (She´s Gone) (Willis)12.14
06. Finders Keepers (Saunders/Kahn) 6.34
07. Announcements (Tom Donahue) 1.20
08. Second That Emotion (Robinson) 11.44
09. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 12.02
10. Positively 4th Street (Dylan) 8.38
11. How Sweet It Is( Holland/Dozier/Holland) 8.05

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Jefferson Airplane – Takes Off (1966)

LPFrontCover1.jpgJefferson Airplane Takes Off is the debut album of American rock band Jefferson Airplane, released in August 1966 as RCA Victor LSP-3584 (stereo) and LPM-3584 (mono). The personnel differs from the later “classic” lineup: Signe Toly Anderson was the female vocalist and Skip Spence played drums. Both left the group shortly after the album’s release and were replaced by Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, respectively

RCA executives found some of the lyrics too sexually suggestive. They had the band change the lyrics in “Let Me In” from “I gotta get in, you know where” to “You shut your door, now it ain’t fair”, and “Don’t tell me you want money” to “Don’t tell me it’s so funny”. In “Run Around” they had the line “Blinded by colors come flashing from flowers that sway as you lay under me” altered to “that sway as you stay here by me”. With “Runnin’ ‘Round This World” the executives insisted that “trips” in the line “The nights I’ve spent with you have been fantastic trips” referred to taking LSD, though the band insisted it was merely common slang. Even replacing the word “trips” with a guitar apreggio did not placate RCA’s concerns with the line’s sexual connotations and refused its inclusion on the album, and the recording remained unreleased for the next eight years.

The album’s release drew little press attention at a time when mainstream newspapers did not normally cover rock releases and the rock press was yet in its infancy. Crawdaddy! highlighted the album on the cover of its January 1967 issue, which included a three-page review by the magazine’s assistant editor Tim Jurgens, who called the album “faulted” yet “the most important album of American rock” of 1966. (by wikipedia)

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The debut Jefferson Airplane album was dominated by singer Marty Balin, who wrote or co-wrote all the original material and sang most of the lead vocals in his heartbreaking tenor with Paul Kantner and Signe Anderson providing harmonies and backup. (Anderson’s lead vocal on “Chauffeur Blues” indicated she was at least the equal of her successor, Grace Slick, as a belter.) The music consisted mostly of folk-rock love songs, the most memorable of which were “It’s No Secret” and “Come up the Years.” (There was also a striking version of Dino Valente’s “Get Together” recorded years before the Youngbloods’ hit version.) Jorma Kaukonen already displayed a talent for mixing country, folk, and blues riffs in a rock context, and Jack Casady already had a distinctive bass sound. But the Airplane of Balin-Kantner-Kaukonen-Anderson-Casady-Spence is to be distinguished from the Balin-Kantner-Kaukonen-Casady-Slick-Dryden version of the band that would emerge on record five months later chiefly by Balin’s dominance. Later, Grace Slick would become the group’s vocal and visual focal point. On Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, the Airplane was still Balin’s group. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Signe Toly Anderson (vocals, percussion)
Marty Balin (vocals, guitar)
Jack Casady (bass)
Paul Kantner (guitar, vocals)

Jorma Kaukonen (guitar)
Skip Spence – drums)
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Spencer Dryden (drums on 15., 18. + 19.)

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Tracklist:
01. Blues From An Airplane (Balin/Spence) 2.13
02. Let Me In (Balin/Kantner) 2.59
03. Bringing Me Down (Balin/Kantner) 2.24
04. It’s No Secret (Balin) 2.39
05. Tobacco Road (Warnick[n) (*) 3.30
06. Come Up The Years (Balin/Kantner) 2.32
07. Run Around (Balin/Kantner) 2.40
08. Let’s Get Together (Kantner/Anderson/Balin/Powers) 3.35
09. Don’t Slip Away (Balin/Spence) 2.34
10. Chauffeur Blues (Melrose) 2.28
11. And I Like It (Balin/Kaukonen) 3.20
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12. Runnin’ Round This World (from Early Flight) (Balin/Kantner) 2.25
13. High Flying Bird (from Early Flight) (Wheeler) 2.17
14. It’s Alright (from Early Flight) (Balin/Spence) 2:17
15. Go To Her” (from Jefferson Airplane Loves You) Kantner, Irving Estes 4:09
16. “Let Me In (from Jefferson Airplane Loves You) (Balin/Kantner) 3.31
17. Run Around (uncensored version) (Balin/Kantner) 2.35
18. Chauffeur Blues (alternate version) (Melrose) 2.49
19.1. And I Like It (alternate version) (Balin/Kaukonen) 8.16
19.2.. Blues From An Airplane (instrumental; hidden track) (Balin/Spence) 2.10

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Grateful Dead – Anthem Of The Sun (1968)

FrontCover1Anthem of the Sun is the second album by the rock band the Grateful Dead. Released in 1968, it is the first album to feature second drummer Mickey Hart, who joined the band in September 1967. In 2003, the album was ranked number 287 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The mix of the album combines multiple studio and live recordings of each song. The result is an experimental amalgam that is neither a studio album nor a live album, but both at the same time (though it is usually classified as a studio album).

Drummer Bill Kreutzmann’s description of the production process describes the listening experience of the album as well: “…Jerry [Garcia] and Phil [Lesh] went into the studio with [Dan] Healy and, like mad scientists, they started splicing all the versions together, creating hybrids that contained the studio tracks and various live parts, stitched together from different shows, all in the same song — one rendition would dissolve into another and sometimes they were even stacked on top of each other… It was easily our most experimental record, it was groundbreaking in its time, and it remains a psychedelic listening experience to this day.” (by wikipedia)

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As the second long-player by the Grateful Dead, Anthem of the Sun (1968) pushed the limits of both the music as well as the medium. General dissatisfaction with their self-titled debut necessitated the search for a methodology to seamlessly juxtapose the more inspired segments of their live performances with the necessary conventions of a single LP. Since issuing their first album, the Dead welcomed lyricist Robert Hunter into the fold — freeing the performing members to focus on the execution and taking the music to the next level. Another addition was second percussionist Mickey Hart, whose methodical timekeeping would become a staple in the Dead’s ability to stop on the proverbial rhythmic dime. Likewise, Tom Constanten (keyboards) added an avant-garde twist to the proceedings with various sonic enhancements that were more akin to John Cage and Karlheinz Stockhausen than anything else coming from the burgeoning Bay Area music scene.

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Their extended family also began to incorporate folks like Dan Healy — whose non-musical contributions and innovations ranged from concert PA amplification to meeting the technical challenges that the band presented off the road as well. On this record Healy’s involvement cannot be overstated, as the band were essentially given carte blanche and simultaneous on-the-job training with regards to the ins and outs of the still unfamiliar recording process. The idea to create an aural pastiche from numerous sources — often running simultaneously — was a radical concept that allowed consumers worldwide to experience a simulated Dead performance firsthand. One significant pattern which began developing saw the band continuing to re

fine the same material that they were concurrently playing live night after night prior to entering the studio.

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The extended “That’s It for the Other One” suite is nothing short of a psychedelic roller coaster. The wild ride weaves what begins as a typical song into several divergent performances — taken from tapes of live shows — ultimately returning to the home base upon occasion, presumably as a built-in reality check. Lyrically, Bob Weir (guitar/vocals) includes references to their 1967 pot bust (“…the heat came ’round and busted me for smiling on a cloudy day”) as well as the band’s spiritual figurehead Neal Cassidy (“…there was Cowboy Neal at the wheel on a bus to never ever land”). Although this version smokes from tip to smouldering tail, the piece truly developed a persona all its own and became a rip-roaring monster in concert. The tracks “New Potato Caboose” and Weir’s admittedly autobiographically titled “Born Cross-Eyed” are fascinatingly intricate side trips that had developed organically during the extended work’s on-stage performance life. “Alligator” is a no-nonsense Ron “Pigpen” McKernan workout that motors the second extended sonic collage on Anthem of the Sun. His straight-ahead driving blues ethos careens headlong into the Dead’s innate improvisational psychedelia. The results are uniformly brilliant as the band thrash and churn behind his rock-solid lead vocals. Musically, the Dead’s instrumental excursions wind in and out of the primary theme, ultimately ending up in the equally frenetic “Caution (Do Not Stop on Tracks).” Although the uninitiated might find the album unnervingly difficult to follow, it obliterated the pretension of the post-Sgt. Pepper’s “concept album” while reinventing the musical parameters of the 12″ LP medium. (by Lindsay Planer)

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Personnel:
Tom Constanten (piano, electronic tape)
Jerry Garcia (guitar, kazoo, vibraslap, vocals)
Mickey Hart – drums, orchestra bells, gong, chimes, crotales, piano)
Bill Kreutzmann (drums, glockenspiel, percussion)
Phil Lesh (bass, trumpet, harpsichord, kazoo, piano, timpani, vocals)
Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (organs, celesta, claves, vocals)
Bob Weir (guitar, kazoo, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. That’s It For The Other  7.57:
01.1. Cryptical Envelopment (Garcia)
01.2. Quadlibet for Tenderfeet (Garcia/Kreutzmann/Lesh/McKernan/Weir)
01.3. The Faster We Go, the Rounder We Get (Kreutzmann/Weir)
01.4. We Leave the Castle (Constanten)
02. New Potato Caboose (Lesh/Petersen) 8.26
03. Born Cross-Eyed (Weir) 2.04
04. Alligator (Lesh/McKernan/Hunter) 11.20
05. Caution (Do Not Stop On Tracks) (Garcia/Kreutzmann/Lesh/McKernan/Weir) 9.37
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06. Alligator (live) (Lesh/McKernan/Hunter) 18.43
07. Caution (Do Not Stop On Tracks) (live) (Garcia/Kreutzmann/Lesh/McKernan/Weir)  11.38
08. Feedback (live) (Constanten/Garcia/Hart/Kreutzmann/Lesh/McKernan/Weir) 6.58
09. Born Cross-Eyed (single version) (Weir) 2.55

06 – 08.: recorded August 23, 1968

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Jefferson Airplane – Live At The Monterey Festival 1967 (1990)

frontcover1Live at the Monterey Festival is a live album by the San Francisco rock band Jefferson Airplane, which was released in the United Kingdom and Europe by Thunderbolt Records in 1990. The album was authorized by the band and features the entire set from the group’s June 17, 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. The album marked the first time that Jefferson Airplane’s entire Monterey Pop Festival performance had been given a release by a legitimate record company. (by wikipedia)

Jefferson Airplane was unique among San Francisco psychedelic groups for actually charting a pair of hit singles (“White Rabbit” and “Somebody to Love”), but apart from those two radio staples, it was their albums and their live performances that made their reputations. Yet it wasn’t until 1969 that they issued an official live album, by which time their repertory and sound had become much heavier than the way it started out. Live at the Monterey Festival captures them earlier in their history, on June 17, 1967, dead-center in the middle of the Summer of Love that their two hit singles helped usher in. They were still a somewhat folk-based group with an interest in blues as well, riding the initial tide of their success four months after the release of Surrealistic Pillow (whose songs make up the bulk of the eight-song set that they played) and with the two hits still fresh; it was also less than a year after Grace Slick joined, when Marty Balin was still playing a prominent (if not dominant) role in shaping the group’s sound.

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The group’s sound is very lean and muscular, especially Jorma Kaukonen’s razor-sharp lead playing and Spencer Dryden’s pounding beat, over Jack Casady’s surprisingly melodic bass work — Slick and Balin’s voices meld perfectly on “High Flying Bird” and soar on the individual featured numbers. “Today” gets almost a definitive performance, and “Somebody to Love” isn’t far behind. “The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil” as performed here is possibly the best single live track ever issued by the band. Additionally, the audio version of this set works better than elements of the film of it do — for much of “Today,” director D.A. Pennebaker ended up focusing on Grace Slick, who was only playing the keyboard, rather than Marty Balin, who was singing. (by Bruce Eder )

And I guess, Patti Smith was very impressed by, very influenced by Grace Slick !

Enjoy the early magic of Jefferson Airplane !!!

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Personnel:
Marty Balin (vocals)
Jack Casady (bass)
Spencer Dryden (drums, percussion)
Paul Kantner (guitar, vocals)
Jorma Kaukonen (guitar)
Grace Slick (vocals, piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Somebody to Love” (D.Slick/G.Slick) 3.16
02. The Other Side Of This Life (Neil) 6.53
03. White Rabbit (G,Slick) 2.41
04. High Flying Bird (Wheeler) 4.02
05. Today (Balin/Kantner) 3.07
06. She Has Funny Cars (Kaukonen/Balin) 3.20
07. Young Girl Sunday Blues (Balin) 3.26
08. The Ballad Of You & Me & Pooneil (Kantner) 11.13

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