Los Soneros de Havanna – Cafe Havana (1999)

frontcover1The music of Cuba, including its instruments, performance and dance, comprises a large set of unique traditions influenced mostly by west African and European (especially Spanish) music. Due to the syncretic nature of most of its genres, Cuban music is often considered one of the richest and most influential regional musics of the world. For instance, the son cubano merges an adapted Spanish guitar (tres), melody, harmony, and lyrical traditions with Afro-Cuban percussion and rhythms. Almost nothing remains of the original native traditions, since the native population was exterminated in the 16th century.

Since the 19th century Cuban music has been hugely popular and influential throughout the world. It has been perhaps the most popular form of regional music since the introduction of recording technology. Cuban music has contributed to the development of a wide variety of genre and musical styles around the globe, most notably in Latin America, the Caribbean, West Africa and Europe. Examples include rhumba, Afro-Cuban jazz, salsa, soukous, many West African re-adaptations of Afro-Cuban music (Orchestra Baobab, Africando), Spanish fusion genres (notably with flamenco), and a wide variety of genres in Latin America. (by wikipedia)

Los Soneros de Havanna is a totally unknown group from Cuba and you can hear on this album “14 great Cuband classic songs”. I found no further informations about this group … but … even this is a very cheap production … it´s a great album, with fantastic melodies and rhythms …

Enjoy this trip to Cuba …

havannaPersonnel:
Los Soneros de Havanna

tray1Tracklist:
01. El Carretero (Portables) 3.16
02. Dos Gardenias (Carillo) 3.02
03. Chan Chan (Repilado) 4.17
04, Alto Songo (Martinez) 8.18
05. Amor Verdadero (Marquetti) 7.31
06. Son De La Loma (Matamoros) 4.13
07. No Llores Más (D.K.) 4.49
08. El Guato De Catalina (Rodriguez) 3.17
09. Mentiras Tuyas (Portas) 2.58
10. La Charanga (Farjado) 4.23
11. Rico Vacilón (Ruiz) 4.04
12. Toda Una Vida (DeLange/Farres) 2.32
13. Los Sitio Asere (Gonzalez) 6.17
14. A Toda Cuba Le Gusta (Becquer) 5.48

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Orchestre Sassoun – Folklore Armenien (70´s)

frontcover1Armenia, officially the Republic of Armenia , is a sovereign state in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia. Located in Western Asia,[20][21] on the Armenian Highland, it is bordered by Turkey to the west, Georgia to the north, the de facto independent Nagorno-Karabakh Republic and Azerbaijan to the east, and Iran and Azerbaijan’s exclave of Nakhchivan to the south. The Republic of Armenia constitutes only one-tenth of historical Armenia.

Armenia is a unitary, multi-party, democratic nation-state with an ancient cultural heritage. Urartu was established in 860 BC and by the 6th century BC it was replaced by the Satrapy of Armenia which was one of Satrapies of Persian Empire . In the 1st century BC the Kingdom of Armenia reached its height under Tigranes the Great. Armenia became the first state in the world to adopt Christianity as its official religion.[23] In between the late 3rd century to early years of the 4th century, the state became the first Christian nation.[24][25][26] The official date of state adoption of Christianity is 301 AD.[27] The ancient Armenian kingdom was split between the Byzantine and Sasanian Empires around the early 5th century. Under the Bagratuni dynasty, the Bagratid Kingdom of Armenia was restored in the 9th century. Declining due to the wars against the Byzantines, the kingdom fell in 1045 and Armenia was soon after invaded by the Seljuk Turks. An Armenian principality and later a kingdom Cilician Armenia was located on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea between the 11th and 14th centuries.

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Between the 16th century and 19th century, the traditional Armenian homeland composed of Eastern Armenia and Western Armenia came under the rule of the Ottoman and Iranian empires, repeatedly ruled by either of the two over the centuries. By the 19th century, Eastern Armenia had been conquered by the Russian Empire, while most of the western parts of the traditional Armenian homeland remained under Ottoman rule. During World War I, Armenians living in their ancestral lands in the Ottoman Empire were systematically exterminated in the Armenian Genocide. In 1918, following the Russian Revolution, all non-Russian countries declared their independence after the Russian Empire ceased to exist, leading to the establishment of the First Republic of Armenia. By 1920, the state was incorporated into the Transcaucasian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic, and in 1922 became a founding member of the Soviet Union. In 1936, the Transcaucasian state was dissolved, transforming its constituent states, including the Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic, into full Union republics. The modern Republic of Armenia became independent in 1991 during the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

Armenians have had a long tradition of folk music from the antiquity. Under Soviet domination, Armenian folk music was taught in state-sponsored conservatoires. Instruments played include qamancha (similar to violin), kanun (dulcimer), dhol (double-headed hand drum, see davul), oud (lute), duduk, zurna, blul (ney), shvi and to a lesser degree saz. Other instruments are often used such as violin and clarinet. The duduk is Armenia’s national instrument, and among its well-known performers are Margar Margarian, Levon Madoyan, Saro Danielian, Vatche Hovsepian, Gevorg Dabaghyan and Yeghish Manoukian, as well as Armenia’s most famous duduk player, Djivan Gasparyan.
Armenian folk musicians

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Earlier in Armenian history, instruments like the kamancha were played by popular, travelling musicians called ashoughs. Sayat Nova, an 18th-century Ashough, is revered in Armenia. Performers such as Armenak Shahmuradian, Vagharshak Sahakian, Norayr Mnatsakanyan, Hovhannes Badalyan, Hayrik Muradyan, Raffi Hovhannisyan, Papin Poghosian, and Hamlet Gevorgyan have been famous in Armenia and are still acclaimed. The most notable female vocalists in the Armenian folk genre have been Araksia Gyulzadyan, Ophelia Hambardzumyan, Varduhi Khachatrian, Valya Samvelyan, Rima Saribekyan, Susanna Safarian, Manik Grigoryan, and Flora Martirosian.

Armenian emigrants from other parts of the Middle East settled in various countries, especially in the California Central Valley, and the second- and third-generation have kept their folk traditions alive, such as Richard Hagopian, a famous oud-player. Another oud player, John Berberian, is noted in particular for his fusions of traditional music with jazz and rock in the 1960s. From Lebanon and Syria, George Tutunjian, Karnig Sarkissian and others performed Armenian Revolutionary Songs which quickly became popular among the Armenian Diaspora, notably ARF supporters. In Tehran Iran the folk music of the Armenian community is characterized by the work of Nikol Galanderian (1881–1946) and the Goghtan choir. (by wikipeda)

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And this is a very rare album with music from Armenia, recorded in France during the  70`s.

It´s maybe a music we never heard before, but it´s an unique piece of music … and you know I call my blog “many fantastic colors” (of music) … so enjoy this beautiful trip to Armenia … it´s a magic trip !

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Personnel:
Samvel Adiarian (guitar)
Michael Boyadjian (tenpouk)
Yervant Harounian (mandoline)
Levon Minassian (mandoline)
Gilbert Kulbastian (guitar)
Jean-Pierre Mazloumian (guitar)
Antranik Minassian (vocals)
Helene Ohanian (vocals)
Nelly Vemian (piano)
Hovcep Yeghiazariab (mandoline)

Orchestra conducted by Philippe Boyadjian

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Tracklist:
01. Tek Daneïn (Traditional) 2.42
02. Odar Amaï (Meserlian/Issahakian) 3.50
03. Ain Kicher (Manassarian)
04. Sirounik et danses des chevaliers (Traditional) 7.33
05. Haïastani Dzov Ginin (Haroutyounian) 3.19
06. Mama (Amirghanian/Ohanian) 3.01
07. Tou Im Hebard Haï Artchik (Porian/Arménian) 2.48
08. Im Anouch Davir (Avedissian/Haroutyounian) 4.26
09. Enzeli (Spendiarian) 2.13

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Sarband – Alla Turka – Oriental Obsession (1998)

frontcover1Musical director Dr. Vladimir Ivanoff, who founded
Sarband in 1986, connects cultures, people and
epochs, both as a scholar and a musician:
His programs unite musicians from widely different
cultures and musical backgrounds and mediate
between past and present, Early Music
and living traditions.

The cooperation in the ensemble is not a fashionable crossover, but conceived as a continuous dialogue
on equal terms. All the artists unrestrictedly contribute their native traditions, their personal histories and their own creativity to the programs, so that Sarband also ecomes a musical training ground for communication
and tolerance between different cultural identities.

«Sarband» means connection.
In Mid-Eastern music theory, this term signifies a link between two compositions within a musical suite.
Ensemble Sarband invites most diverse audiences as well as most diverse performers «to come together»;  it «binds» them to cultural experiences previously  perceived as alien. (by sarband.de)

vladimir-ivanoff

Vladimir Ivanoff

With Mozart’s “Rondo Alla Turca” at its core, this production encompasses early instances of a fascination with things exotic, an attitude based on the equation of the exotic with the promise of great happiness. European interest in Turkish music can be traced back to as early as the sixteenth century. It was in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, however, that “Turkish” music became really popular — in the “turqueries, ” exotic-sounding passages included in many operas. The album defines the historical point in time at which popular interest in non-European music was aroused for the first time: The perception of the world was no longer limited to Europe. “Alla Turca” presents unusual European translations of “Oriental” music. In Mozart’s famous “Rondo Alla Turca” motif, the lively confusion of exotica seems sort itself out, its pieces falling into place in a “rondo” of the strange and the familiar.

“Powerful sounds from Ivanoff: Shades of baroque, Turkish dervish music and the Orient, never mind the occasional Mozart, make this a disc worth a listen. This is a car accident (of Oriental and Occidental history thrown together), and we all stare at those as we drive by.” (JAM, February 1999)

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Personnel:
Mustafa Dógan Dikmen (flute, vocals, percussion)
Vladimir Ivanoff (percussion)
Ihsan Özer (zither, percussion)
Ahmed Kadri Rizeli (fiddle)
Silke Strauf (violoncello)
Belinda Sykes (oboe, vocals)
Axel Weidenfeld (lute, guitar)
Mehmet Cemal Yesilcay (lute)

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Tracklist
01. Rondo Alla Turca (1) (Mozart) 2.17
02. Elci Pesrev (Cantemir) 3.31
03. Izanum (Dona) 1.11
04. Chanson Turque (Nlainville) 4.42
05. Acem Ilahi (Bobowsky/Ufki) 6.12
06. Concerto Turco/Nominato Izia Semaisi (Toderini/Traditional) 7.41
07. Rondo Alla Turca (2) (Mozart) 1.05
08. Busis Derdim (Dona)
09. Rondo Alla Turca (3) (Mozart) 1.04
10. Hüseyni Ilahi (Bobowsky/Ufki) 7.24
11. Allahoy (Isaac) 3.14
12. Perdeh (Chardin) 1.31
13. Der Deste (Traditional) 4.58
14. Psalm 6 (Bobowsky/Ufki) 5.26
15. Hasta Ghiringium (Dona) 3.05
16. Hüseyni Pesrev (Murad) 6.31
17. Rondo Alla Turca (4) (Mozart) 1.10
18. Psalm 2 (Bobowsky/Ufki) 13.30

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Harry Belafonte – Ballads, Blues And Boasters (1964)

frontcover1Ballads, Blues and Boasters is an album by Harry Belafonte, released in 1964.

In the liner notes to this album, Harry Belafonte is credited with selecting songs “that are an integral part of life…songs with a beat and mood and feeling that speak of people.” Even though his records were now conveniently dumped into the “Male Vocalists” section of record stores, Belafonte continued to explore the human condition through roots musical forms. Although the album contains work songs (“Black Betty”) and even a protest number (“Back of the Bus”), the mood of this album is generally upbeat, unlike the somber depiction of pain and misery of Swing Dat Hammer. Highlights range from the rousing gospel numbers “Ananias” and “John the Revelator” to a uniquely catchy interpretation of Woody Guthrie’s “Pastures of Plenty.” Belafonte acknowledges contemporary folk singer-songwriters with his versions of Ian Tyson’s “Four Strong Winds” and Mark Spoelstra’s “My Love is a Dewdrop.” (by Cary Ginell)

This is another fine album by Harry Belafonte … a very unique musician … he gave us so mucg … listen to this album and you´ll know what I mean.

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Harry Belafonte with Martin Luther King

Personnel:
Harry Belafonte (vocals)
Jay Berliner (guitar)
Percy Brice (drums)
Ernie Calabria (guitar)
John Cartwright (bass)
Paul Griffin (organ)
Ralph MacDonald (percussion)
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Tracklist:
01. Tone The Bell Easy (Eaton) 3.20
02. Blue Willow Moan (Eaton) 3.34
03. Ananias (Eaton) 2.50
04. Boy (Tipton/Lewis) 3.49
05. My Love Is A Dewdrop (Spoelstra) 3.25
06. Back Of The Bus (Traditional/Neblett) 3.25
07. Pastures Of Plenty (Guthrie) 3.38
08. John The Revelator (Traditional/Neblett) 3.40
09. Four Strong Winds (Tyson) 2.53
10. Black Betty (Traditional/Dunham) 4.13
11. Big Boat Up The River (Traditional) 4.06

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José Feliciano – Ché Sara´ (1971)

frontcover1One of the most prominent Latin-born performers of the pop era, singer/guitarist Jose Feliciano was born September 10, 1945, in Lares, Puerto Rico; the victim of congenital glaucoma, he was left permanently blind at birth. Five years later, he and his family moved to New York City’s Spanish Harlem area; there Feliciano began learning the accordion, later taking up the guitar and making his first public appearance at the Bronx’s El Teatro Puerto Rico at the age of nine. While in high school he became a fixture of the Greenwich Village coffeehouse circuit, eventually quitting school in 1962 in order to accept a permanent gig in Detroit; a contract with RCA followed a performance at New York’s Gerde’s Folk City, and within two years he appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival. After bowing with the 1964 novelty single “Everybody Do the Click,” he issued his flamenco-flavored debut LP The Voice and Guitar of Jose Feliciano, trailed early the next year by The Fantastic Feliciano.

Unhappy with the direction of his music following the release of 1966’s A Bag Full of Soul, Feliciano returned to his roots, releasing three consecutive Spanish-language LPs — Sombras…Una Voz, Una Guitarra, Mas Exitos de Jose Feliciano and El Sentimiento, La Voz y La Guitarra de Jose Feliciano — on RCA International, scoring on the Latin pop charts with the singles “La Copa Rota” and “Amor Gitana.” With 1968’s Feliciano!, he scored a breakthrough hit with a soulful reading of the Doors’ “Light My Fire” that launched him into the mainstream pop stratosphere; a smash cover of Tommy Tucker’s R&B chestnut “Hi Heel Sneakers” solidified his success, and soon Feliciano found himself performing the national anthem during the 1968 World Series. His idiosyncratic Latin-jazz performance of the song proved highly controversial, and despite the outcry of traditionalists and nationalists, his status as an emerging counterculture hero was secured, with a single of his rendition also becoming a hit.

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In 1969 Feliciano recorded three LPs — Souled, Alive Alive-O, and Feliciano 10 to 23 — and won a Grammy for Best New Artist; however, he never again equalled the success of “Light My Fire,” and only the theme song to the sitcom Chico and the Man subsequently achieved hit status, edging into the Top 100 singles chart in 1974. Throughout the 1970s Feliciano remained an active performer, however, touring annually and issuing a number of LPs in both English and Spanish, including 1973’s Steve Cropper-produced Compartments; he also appeared on the Joni Mitchell hit “Free Man in Paris,” and guested on a number of television series including Kung Fu and McMillan and Wife. In 1980 Feliciano was the first performer signed to the new Latin division of Motown, making his label debut with an eponymous effort the following year; his recorded output tapered off during the course of the decade, although he occasionally resurfaced with LPs including 1987’s Tu Immenso Amor and 1989’s I’m Never Gonna Change. A school in East Harlem was renamed the Jose Feliciano Performing Arts School in his honor; in 1996, he also appeared briefly in the hit film Fargo. (by Jason Ankeny)

This is a rare German sampler (all songs were recorded between 1968 and 1971) including his bit hit “Ché Sara’, a fine version of “Hitchcock Railway” (most of us will know this song from Joe Cocker) … and a wonderful version of “Let It Bet”.

“California Dreamin'” was recorded live is another pretty good socer version of José Feliciano.

This is the chance to discover the magic musical world of José Feliciano …  try and enjoy !

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Tracklist:
01. Ché Sara’ (Migliacci/Fontana) 3.34
02. Hitchcock Railway (Dunn/McCashen) 3.18
03. There’s No One About (Feliciano) 1.43
04. Sunny (Hebb) 3.25
05. Destiny (Feliciano) 2.50
06. I Only Want To Say (Gethsemane) (Webber/Rice) 4.36
07. Rain (H.Feliciano/J.Feliciano) 2.24
08. (There’s) Always Something There To Remind Me (Bacharach/David) 3.01
09. El Voh (Caymmi) 2.17
10. Let It Be (Lennon/McCartney) 3.55
11.  California Dreamin’ (Phillips) 4.23
12. Shake A Hand (Fontana/Burnett) 3.31

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Fela Ransome Kuti & Ginger Baker – The Afrika `70 (1971)

frontcover1Live! is an album recorded in 1971 by Fela Kuti’s band Africa 70, with the addition of former Cream drummer Ginger Baker on two songs. It was released in 1971 by EMI in Africa and Europe and by Capitol/EMI in the United States and Canada. It was reissued on CD  in remastered form by Barclay with a bonus track from 1978.

Baker travelled with Kuti into Africa in a Land Rover to learn about the continent’s rhythms. The bonus track on the Barclay CD reissue features a 16-minute drum duet between Baker and Africa 70s drummer Tony Allen recorded at the 1978 Berlin Jazz Festival.(by wikipedia)

Originally released in 1971, this LP had Fela Kuti solidifying the format that would take him into international visibility in the years to come: extended tracks with grooves that mixed African and funk rhythms, punctuated by rudimentary lyrics. There are just four songs on the album, none shorter than seven minutes, and all but one going over the ten-minute mark. More than a dozen strong, his band, the Africa ’70, cooks pretty well on tracks that fuse jazz, soul, and African music in a trancelike fashion that avoids becoming stale, despite the length of the arrangements. Ex-Cream/Blind Faith drummer Ginger Baker’s name was given prominence in the billing, probably to attract rock- and pop-oriented listeners who might not ordinarily take a chance on music from the African continent. However, it’s Fela and Africa ’70, not Baker, who are the dominant presence on a record that sounds much like a mixture of James Brown, fusion, and Nigerian forms. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Tony Abayomi (percussion
Tony Allen (drums, percussion)
Lekan Animashaun (saxophone)
Peter Animashaun (guitar)
Ginger Baker (drums, percussion)
Igo Chiko (saxophone)
Maurice Ekpo (bass)
Eddie Faychum (trumpet)
Friday Jumbo (percussion)
Henry Koffi (percussion)
Akwesi Korranting (percussion)
Fela Kuti (organ, percussion, vocals)
Isaac Olaleye (percussion)
Tunde Williams (trumpet)

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Tracklist:
01. Let’s Start (Kuti) 8.06
02. Black Man’s Cry (Kuti)12.12
03. Ye Ye De Smell (Kuti) 13.55
04. Egbe Mi O (Carry Me I Want To Die) (Kuti) 12.37
+
05. Ginger Baker and Tony Allen Drum Solo (live 1978) (Kuti/Baker/Tony Allen) 16.21

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Giora Feidman – Viva El Klezmer (1991)

frontcover1Giora Feidman (Hebrew: גיורא פיידמן; born March 26, 1936) is an Argentine-born Israeli clarinetist who specializes in klezmer music.

Giora Feidman was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where his Bessarabian Jewish parents immigrated to escape persecution. Feidman comes from a family of klezmer musicians. His father, grandfather and great-grandfather made music for weddings, bar mitzvahs, and holiday celebrations in the shtetls of Eastern Europe. Feidman married Ora Bat-Chaim, his personal manager, in 1975.

Feidman began his career in Buenos Aires as a member of the Teatro Colón Symphony Orchestra. Two years later he immigrated to Israel to become the youngest clarinetist ever to play with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. He was a member of the orchestra for over 20 years.[2] In the early 1970s he began his solo career. He has performed with the Berliner Symphoniker, the Kronos Quartet, the Polish Chamber Philarmonic, the Munich Chamber Philarmonic Orchestra, and the Munich Radio Orchestra. In 1974 the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra commissioned composer Misha Segal to write a concerto for clarinet and orchestra for Giora Feidman. The one movement piece, which was based on an original Nigun, premiered that same year.

giorafeidman01Giora Feidman in 2006

Movie director Steven Spielberg invited him to play the clarinet solos for the soundtrack of Schindler’s List, which won seven Academy Awards.

Feidman founded the “Clarinet and Klezmer in the Galilee” seminar and master class program, which takes place every year in Safed, Israel.(by wikipedia)

And this is another album in the long career of Giora Feidman … listen, discover and enjoy the magic of Klezmer music … a real treasure !

This is the German edition … so, the booklet is written in German.

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Alternate frontcovers

Personnel:
Giora Feidman (clarinet)
Ami Frenkel (bass)
Shmuel Hershko (tuba)
Ofer Shalhin (drums, percussion)
Oscar Sher (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. To My Friend Michale (Liberman) 2.59
02. Let’s Dance: Ancient Melody / Sherele (Ne’eman/Traditional) 2.53
03. The Sounds Of Safed (O. Sher) 2.58
04. Silk Night Gown (Traditional) 2.06
05. Rozhinkes mit Mandeln (Goldfaden) 2.49
06. Bublitschki (Traditional) 2.36
07. Vehaeir Eineinu (Karlibach) 3.36
08. The Old Klezmer Band (Traditional) 2.49
09. Let’s Sing (Traditional) 2:39
10. To Giora – The Klezmer (O. Sher) 2.31
11. Desert Dawn (Katz) 4.21
12. Come In Peace (Katz) 2.44
13. Bouncing (Niturim) (O. Sher) 1.55
14. The New Freilach (Alstein) 2.30

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