Leonard Cohen – Songbook (1971)

LeonardCohenSongbook_01ALeonard Norman Cohen, CC GOQ (born 21 September 1934) is a Canadian singer, songwriter, musician, painter, poet, and novelist. His work has explored religion, politics, isolation, sexuality, and personal relationships. Cohen has been inducted into both the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame as well as the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He is also a Companion of the Order of Canada, the nation’s highest civilian honor. In 2011, Cohen received a Princess of Asturias Awards for literature.

The critic Bruce Eder assessed Cohen’s overall career in popular music by asserting that “[he is] one of the most fascinating and enigmatic … singer/songwriters of the late ’60s … [and] has retained an audience across four decades of music-making…. Second only to Bob Dylan (and perhaps Paul Simon) [in terms of influence], he commands the attention of critics and younger musicians more firmly than any other musical figure from the 1960s who is still working at the outset of the 21st century.”

LeonardCohenHis second novel, Beautiful Losers (1966), received attention from the Canadian press and was considered controversial because of a number of sexually graphic passages. The Academy of American Poets has commented more broadly on Cohen’s overall career in the arts, including his work as a poet, novelist, and songwriter, stating that “Cohen’s successful blending of poetry, fiction, and music is made most clear in Stranger Music: Selected Poems and Songs, published in 1993, which gathered more than 200 of Cohen’s poems … several novel excerpts, and almost 60 song lyrics… While it may seem to some that Leonard Cohen departed from the literary in pursuit of the musical, his fans continue to embrace him as a Renaissance man who straddles the elusive artistic borderlines.”

Cohen’s first album was Songs of Leonard Cohen (1967) followed by Songs from a Room (1969) (featuring the often-recorded “Bird on the Wire”) and Songs of Love and Hate (1971) (by wikipedia)

ThreeLongplayersOfLCAnd this is a songbook, which contains the lyrics from hsis first 3 albums. This is a very rare songbook, because it´s pirate edition form Germany (but printed in Denmark).

Maybe we should listen his old albums from that period.

LCSongbook01LCSongbook02LCSongbook03LCSongbook04

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Creem (Magazine) – September 1971

CreemSeptember1971_01ACreem (which is always capitalized in print as CREEM despite the magazine’s nameplate appearing in lower case letters), “America’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll Magazine”, was a monthly rock ‘n’ roll publication first published in March 1969 by Barry Kramer and founding editor Tony Reay. It suspended production in 1989 but received a short-lived renaissance in the early 1990s as a glossy tabloid. Lester Bangs, often cited as “America’s Greatest Rock Critic”, became editor in 1971. The term “punk rock” was coined by the magazine in May 1971, in Dave Marsh’s Looney Tunes column about Question Mark & the Mysterians. The same issue introduced “heavy metal” as the name of a genre in a review of Sir Lord Baltimore by “Metal” Mike Saunders.

In the winter of 1969, Barry Kramer owned the Detroit record store Full Circle as well as Mixed Media, a head shop/bookstore and was an unsuccessful concert promoter and band manager. In a fit of pique at the local alternative paper rejecting his concert review, he decided to publish his own paper. Tony Reay, a clerk at the record store, became the first editor, naming the publication after his favorite band, Cream. Charlie Auringer became the photo editor and designer, and Dave Marsh joined soon after at age 19. CreemThe first issue was distributed only in Detroit as a tabloid-sized newspaper. A deal was struck with a distributor, but many copies were ordered by porn shops who were confused by the faintly suggestive title, who displayed it next to the similarly sized Screw magazine. Richard Siegel became circulation director and within two years CREEM had become a glossy color magazine, sized for newsstand distribution, and secured a national distribution deal.

The original offices were at 3729 Cass Avenue in Detroit for the first two years. An armed robbery of the offices convinced Kramer to move the operation to a 120 acre farm in Walled Lake, Michigan at 13 Mile and Haggerty Road. Just before the move, Lester Bangs was hired, originally to write a feature on Alice Cooper. He had been fired from rival music magazine Rolling Stone by publisher Jann Wenner for “disrespecting musicians” after a particularly harsh review of the group Canned Heat. Bangs fell in love with Detroit, calling it “rock’s only hope”, and remained there for five years.

LesterBangs1981Lester Bangs, 1981

Many of the staff members lived in the Walled Lake farmhouse, with occasional physical altercations between writers. Marsh had objected to Bangs’ poorly housebroken dog, and placed the dog’s dung on Bangs’ typewriter. This resulted in a fistfight that gave Marsh a gash on his head. Eventually, the magazine was successful enough to move to professional editorial offices in downtown Birmingham, MI. After becoming editor in 1971, Bangs left the magazine in 1976 and never wrote for it again. On January 29, 1981, Kramer died of an overdose of nitrous oxide, and Bangs died a year later on April 30, 1982 in New York City of an accidental Darvon overdose.

This geographical separation from the majority of the entertainment industry in the United States, then focused primarily in Hollywood and New York City, along with the British upbringing of original editor Reay, resulted in a certain irreverence, a deprecatory and humorous tone that permeated the magazine throughout its existence. The magazine became famous for its comical photo captions, which poked fun at rock stars, the industry, and even the magazine itself. Every year, the tall Plexiglas pyramid presented as the American Music Award was dubbed “The Object From Space”, and was attributed with the power to force celebrities to look ridiculous while holding it. The location also meant CREEM was among the first national publications with in-depth coverage of many popular Detroit-area artists, such as Bob Seger, Mitch Ryder, Alice Cooper, The MC5, The Stooges, Iggy Pop, and Parliament-Funkadelic, as well as other Midwestern acts such as Raspberries and Cheap Trick.(by wikipedia)

This is one Creem magazin from my archive, including one of the first appearences from Patti Smith as a rock n roll poet.

Fasten your seatl-belts and enjoy the journey with the time machine into the year 1971. A time when music was for many people one of he most important things of life.

CreemSeptember1971_03ACreemSeptember1971_19ACreemSeptember1971_21ACreemSeptember1971_23jA
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And here some record ads from this magazine:

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