Kerrang – No. 99 (July 1985)

FrontCoverKerrang! is a UK-based magazine devoted to rock music, currently published by Hamburg based Bauer Media Group. It was first published on 6 June 1981 as a one-off supplement in the Sounds newspaper. Named after the onomatopoeic word that derives from the sound made when playing a power chord on a distorted electric guitar, Kerrang! was initially devoted to the new wave of British heavy metal and the rise of hard rock acts.[2] In the early 2000s it became the best-selling British music weekly.

Kerrang! was founded in 1981. The magazine commenced publication on 6 June 1981 and was edited by Geoff Barton, initially as a one-time supplement in the Sounds newspaper, which focused on the new wave of British heavy metal phenomenon and on the rise of other hard rock acts. Angus Young of AC/DC appeared on Kerrang!’s first cover. Launched as a monthly magazine, Kerrang! began to appear on a fortnightly basis later, and in 1987 it went weekly. The original owner was United Newspapers who then sold it to EMAP in 1991.

During the 1980s and early 1990s the magazine placed many thrash and glam metal acts on the cover (like Mötley Crüe, Slayer, Bon Jovi, Metallica, Poison, and Venom) but later discarded them when grunge acts such as Nirvana rose to fame. Readers often criticise the magazine for repeating this process every time a new musical trend becomes popular.

Kerrang!’s popularity rose again with the hiring of editor Paul Rees circa 2000 when the nu metal genre, featuring bands like Limp Bizkit and Slipknot were becoming more popular.[6] Rees went on to edit Q magazine and Ashley Bird took over as editor from 2003 to 2005. However the magazine’s sales went quickly into decline in 2003 and Paul Brannigan took over as editor in May 2005.

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The term “thrash metal” was first referred to in the music press by Kerrang journalist Malcolm Dome while making a reference to the Anthrax song “Metal Thrashing Mad” in issue number 62, page 8 published on 23 February 1984. Prior to this Metallica’s James Hetfield referred to their sound as power metal.

With the emergence of emo and metalcore, Kerrang! began to heavily feature this musical trend. However, the revamp was not welcomed by all readers and many complaints were received about Kerrang!’s sudden emphasis on emo and metalcore music. Brannigan took the magazine into its most commercially successful period with a record ever ABC for the title of 80,186 copies.

In 2008, EMAP sold its consumer magazine to current owner Bauer Media Group. Brannigan left Kerrang! in 2009 and Nichola Browne was appointed editor.[10] She later stepped down in April 2011. Former NME features editor and GamesMaster deputy editor James McMahon was appointed as editor on 6 June 2011.

In April 2017, Bauer sold Kerrang! magazine, its website, and the K! Awards to Mixmag Media, publisher of dance monthly Mixmag, along with assets related to defunct style magazine The Face, which Mixmag plans to relaunch as a digital-first title. It is suggested that the new owners will relaunch Kerrang! as a monthly title. Bauer will retain ownership of Kerrang! Radio and the Box Plus Network will continue to operate Kerrang! TV as before (by wikipedia)

Here´s a issue from July 1985:

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More Kerrang magazines will come ….

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Musician – August 1985 (No. 82)

MusicianAugust1985_01AMusician (1976–1999) was a monthly magazine that covered news and information about American popular music. Initially called Music America, it was founded in 1976 by Sam Holdsworth and Gordon Baird. The two friends borrowed $20,000 from relatives and started the publication in a barn in Colorado.

Subtitled “The Art, Business and Technology of Making Music”, it became known for its extended and thorough articles about the stars of rock music. Musician was not intended to be a fan magazine—the founders envisioned it as a publication about the musician’s craft, and as a result, it earned it the respect of people in the music business. As Holdsworth told an interviewer in 2003, the magazine “…created a level of trust that made the musicians feel they were talking with peers”. In that same article, he noted that Musician was also known for finding out the little things that the average magazine did not—such as why a musician chose a particular brand of instrument, or what was the inspiration for a certain song.

MusicianAugust1985_06ABut Musician never gained a wide following, although it had a devoted base of fans. The magazine was respected by the critics for the quality of the writers—among the best known writers for Musician were rock critic Lester Bangs and soon-to-be film director Cameron Crowe. Due to the expense of running it, Holdsworth and Baird sold it in 1982, to the company that owned Billboard magazine; but Holdsworth and another company executive bought it back in 1985 and they ran it until selling it again in 1987.

Holdsworth did more than just sell his magazine to Billboard : he went to work there, eventually rising to the position of Executive Vice President and Publishing Director of parent company Billboard Publications Inc. (BPI), then located in New York City. He ran their publishing group until 1991. His sale of the company made him millions. In 2000, he became CEO of Rykodisc, a Massachusetts-based independent record company. He retired from that position in 2008, and has remained in Massachusetts, where he had moved in 1981. He currently lives in Gloucester with his wife and three children. He has become a well-known local artist, and some of his paintings have been displayed in museums. (by wikipedia)

This is the August 1985 issue with articles about:

  • The Beach Boys
  • Jerry Garcia
  • Sting + Police
  • Bob Geldof
  • Cajun Music
  • and a special about “Computers & Music”

+ much more informations about the musician scene during the mid-80´s (reviews an so on).

Enjoy the trip to the year 1985 (30 years ago … )

And I will present much more issues of this magazin during the next months.

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John Klumper- Forbidden Fruit – UK Singles 1963 – 1969 No 3 (1985)

ForbiddenFruitNo3_01AI have a large collection of fanzines and I will open my archive with a very special one: John Klumper´s “Forbidden Fruit” magazine from the 80´s of the last century.

Forbidden Fruit was an A5 size fanzine/booklett by a Dutch guy called John Klumper, and it came as 11 separate little A5 volumes. (the last one was Vols 11 & 12 Combined) It was subtitled “Uk Singles 1963-1969″

It was bought by a 4 issue per year subscription, and ran from 1985 to 1988.

It was a real work of love, as each band got it’s line up and some history if known, and all UK releases by them and type of music etc.. considering this was pre internet, the work involved was staggering.. (by woodbutcher)

And someone wrote in an internet forum called “verygoodplus.co.uk”: “Probably very hard to find but now at least I now know what I’m looking for.”

And here is the No. 3 … (published in October 1985) … “In this  issue I cover artists/groups from Dek & Jerry to Fortunes.Again some well kept secrets will be revealed” (John Klumper)

Hard to believe: all informations was written with a simple typewriter ,,, long time ago …

And I will publish in the next weeks all edition of this fantastic fanzine !

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More FORBIDDEN FRUITS:

MoreForbiddenFruitsclick !

John Klumper- Forbidden Fruit – UK Singles 1963 – 1969 No 2 (1985)

FrontCoverI have a large collection of fanzines and I will open my archive with a very special one: John Klumper´s “Forbidden Fruit” magazine from the 80´s of the last century.

Forbidden Fruit was an A5 size fanzine/booklett by a Dutch guy called John Klumper, and it came as 11 separate little A5 volumes. (the last one was Vols 11 & 12 Combined) It was subtitled “Uk Singles 1963-1969″

It was bought by a 4 issue per year subscription, and ran from 1985 to 1988.

It was a real work of love, as each band got it’s line up and some history if known, and all UK releases by them and type of music etc.. considering this was pre internet, the work involved was staggering.. (by woodbutcher)

And someone wrote in an internet forum called “verygoodplus.co.uk”: “Probably very hard to find but now at least I now know what I’m looking for.”

And here is the No. 2 … (published in July 1985) … Hard to believe: all informations was written with a simple typewriter ,,, long time ago …

And I will publish in the next weeks all edition of this fantastic fanzine !

Example01Example02Example03Example04And: hey Mr. Klumper: wherever you are: You did a real fantastic job … and I guess many collectors have to say thank you (me, too)

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And here you´ll find No. 1 of Forbidden Fruit (click on the cover):

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John Klumper – Forbidden Fruit – UK Singles 1963 – 1969 (1985)

FrontCoverI have a large collection of fanzine and I will open my archive with a very special one: John Klumper´s “Forbidden Fruit” magazine from the 80´s of the last century.

Forbidden Fruit was an A5 size fanzine/booklett by a Dutch guy called John Klumper, and it came as 11 separate little A5 volumes. (the last one was Vols 11 & 12 Combined) It was subtitled “Uk Singles 1963-1969”

It was bought by a 4 issue per year subscription, and ran from 1985 to 1988.

It was a real work of love, as each band got it’s line up and some history if known, and all UK releases by them and type of music etc.. considering this was pre internet, the work involved was staggering.. (by woodbutcher)

And someone wrote in an internet forum called “verygoodplus.co.uk”: “Probably very hard to find but now at least I now know what I’m looking for.”

And here is the No. 1 … (published in early 1985) … Hard to believe: all informations was written with a simple typewriter ,,, long time ago …

And I will publish in the next weeks all edition of this fantastic fanzine !

Example01Example03Example04Example05And: hey Mr. Klumper: wherever you are: You did a real fantastic job … and I guess many collectors have to say thank you (me, too)

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