Chet Atkins – Down Home (1962)

FrontCover1Down Home is a recording by American guitarist Chet Atkins.Down Home is a recording by American guitarist Chet Atkins.
After releasing the smooth pop and easy listening albums Chet Atkins’ Workshop and The Most Popular Guitar, Chet returned to his roots with Down Home. The album peaked at No. 31 and returned Atkins to the Top 40. It includes two of Chet’s signature tunes, “Windy and Warm” and “Trambone”. (by wikipedia)

After the commercial success of Chet Atkins’ 12th 12″ LP, Chet Atkins’ Workshop, which peaked in the pop Top Ten in 1961, RCA Victor Records decided to turn the country guitarist into an easy listening bandleader à la Ray Conniff on his next release, The Most Popular Guitar. But that LP didn’t come close to the sales of its predecessor, and after a holiday collection (Christmas With Chet Atkins) at the end of the year, RCA opted to let Atkins do what he wanted again. Hence, his 15th long-player, Down Home. The contrast from his previous secular release couldn’t have been more dramatic. The scantily clad lass with the come-hither smile on the cover of The Most Popular Guitar was replaced by a front-porch-swing shot of Atkins himself, guitar in hand, a vintage car in the background, and a faithful dog at his feet.

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And the strings that dominated The Most Popular Guitar were replaced by Atkins’ free-picking studio regulars, supporting him on a varied collection that never strayed far in the arrangements from an old-time country feeling, even when a saxophone intruded here and there. “Salty Dog Rag,” the leadoff track, was not the kind of material you’d have heard on The Most Popular Guitar, but it was no doubt closer to Atkins’ taste. The rest of the album, while mixing in a current movie theme (“Never on Sunday”) and a swing era classic (“Tuxedo Junction”), kept doubling back to country styles. And — what do you know? — Down Home outpolled The Most Popular Guitar by 88 places in the Billboard LP charts, returning him to the Top 40, which seemed to indicate that when you let Atkins do what he liked, his fans probably would like it too. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Chet Atkins (guitar)
Floyd Cramer (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Morris Palmer (drums)
Boots Randolph (saxophone)
Velma Smith (guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Salty Dog Rag (Crows/Gordy) 2.11
02. I Am A Pilgrim (Travis) 3.07
03. Trambone (Atkins) 2.21
04. Steel Guitar Rag (McAuliffe) 2.04
05. Little Feet (Atkins) 2.32
06. Blue Steel Blues (Daffan) 2.21
07. Windy And Warm (Loudermilk) – 2:26
08. I Ain’t Gonna Work Tomorrow (Atkins/Louvin) 2.37
09. Never On Sunday” (Manos Hadjidakis, Billy Towne) – 3:01    “The Girl Friend of the Whirling Dervish” (Al Dubin, Johnny Mercer, Harry Warren) – 2:15    “Give the World a Smile” (Otis Deaton, Marshall Yandell) – 2:04    “Tuxedo Junction” (Buddy Feyne, Erskine Hawkins) – 2:07

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Etta Jones – Hollar! (1963)

FrontCover1Hollar! is an album by jazz vocalist Etta Jones which was recorded at three separate sessions between 1960 and 1962 and released on the Prestige label in 1963.

Etta Jones had the spark that made each of her vocals special, though she was never acknowledged properly during a long career. Following her hit “Don’t Go to Strangers,” she continued to record first-rate songs. Many of her albums were unjustly out of print for decades, though Hollar! was finally reissued by Fantasy as part of their Original Jazz Classics series in 2001. Jones is backed by three separate groups on this release. Guitarist Wally Richardson provides the driving rhythm to back her swinging take of “And the Angels Sing,” while vibraphonist Lem Winchester and pianist Richard Wyands support Jones in her emotional rendition of “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good).” Jones would eventually return to the brisk bop gem “Reverse the Charges” decades after this recording, but this early version is preferable, with a nice interlude by pianist Jimmy Neely. There’s a bit of friendly conversation in the studio as Jones gets underway with another swinger, “Our Love Is Here to Stay,” adding a boisterous tenor sax solo by Oliver Nelson. This is easily one of Etta Jones’ best recordings. (by Ken Dryden)

Recorded at Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, on September 16, 1960 (tracks 2, 4, 5 & 7), March 30, 1961 (tracks 1, 3, 6, 8 & 9) and November 28, 1962 (track 10).

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Personnel:
Etta Jones (vocalsunca
Rudy Lawless (drums)
Michael Mulia (bass)
Jimmy Neeley (piano)
Wally Richardson (guitar)
Richard Wyands (piano on 02., 04. 05. + 07.)
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Kenny Burrell (guitar on 10.)
Sam Bruno (guitar on 10.)
George Duvivier (bass on 02., 04., 05. + 07.)
Bobby Donaldson (drums on 10.)
Roy Haynes (drums on 02., 04., 05.+ 07.)
Oliver Nelson (saxophone on 05. + 05.)
Bucky Pizzarelli (guitar on 10.)
Jerome Richardson (saxophone on 10.)
Lem Winchester (vibraphone on 02., 04., 05. + 07,)

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Tracklist:
01. And The Angels Sing (Elman/Mercer) -2.37
02. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good) (Ellington/Webster) 4.11
03. Give Me the Simple Life (Bloom/Ruby) 2.54
04. The More I See You (Gordon/Warren) 4.13
05. Love Is Here To Stay (G.Gershwin(I.Gershwin) 3.49
06. Reverse The Charges (Webster/Williams) 2.59
07. They Can’t Take That Away From Me (G.Gershwin(I.Gershwin) 2.52
08. Answer Me, My Love (Rauch/Sigman/Winkler) 3.20
09. Looking Back (Benton/Otis) 3.44
10. Nature Boy (eden ahbez) – 2:55

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Beach Boys – Surfin´Safari (1962)

FrontCover1Surfin’ Safari is the debut album by American rock band the Beach Boys, released on October 1, 1962 on Capitol Records. The official production credit went to Nick Venet, though it was Brian Wilson with his father Murry who contributed substantially to the album’s production; Brian also wrote or co-wrote nine of its 12 tracks. The album peaked at No. 32 in its 37-week run on the US charts.

The album was preceded by two singles: “Surfin'” and “Surfin’ Safari”, which charted at Nos. 75 and 14, respectively. The success of “Surfin’ Safari” helped secure a full album for the group while an additional single, “Ten Little Indians”, was issued, charting at No. 49.

The group is mainly comprised of people from Hawthorne, California, named Wilson … there’s Brian, Dennis, Carl, and their Dad, Murry Wilson, a long-time songwriter who acts as manager for the outfit. Then there’s the boys’ talented cousin, Mike Love … who sings both the lead tenor and deep bass parts in their unusual vocal arrangements. … [and] young David Marks, a neighbor of the Wilsons who plays a driving rhythm guitar. Brian, the oldest of the Wilson boys, is the group’s leader and vocal arranger. Carl is the very accomplished lead guitarist, while brother Dennis sings and plays the drums. None of them, incidentally, had any formal training, but they all grew up in an atmosphere where music was a regular part of their lives. (excerpt taken from the album’s original liner notes)

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In the autumn of 1961, cousins Brian Wilson and Mike Love composed a song on surfing, titled “Surfin'” at the behest of Brian’s younger sibling, Dennis Wilson. They quickly formed a band, bringing in the youngest Wilson brother Carl on lead guitar and Brian’s high school friend Al Jardine on rhythm guitar. Brian took up bass, Dennis the drums and Mike would be the frontman, while they all would harmonize vocals arranged by Brian. Released that December, produced by Hite Morgan, and backed by “Luau”, “Surfin'” made No. 75 in the US Top 100 in early 1962.

Father Murry Wilson became the band’s manager. He submitted a professionally recorded demo tape to Capitol Records that spring. The Beach Boys were signed and “Surfin’ Safari” b/w “409” (from the April 1962 demo tape) was released as a single that June. Al Jardine left the band after the recording of the song “Surfin'” but before the demo session and album session, replaced by Wilson-family friend David Marks— Jardine would rejoin to form a six-member band in the fall of 1963, appearing on the third studio album. With both “Surfin’ Safari” and “409” becoming hits (the former reaching US No. 14), Capitol Records approved a full album. Brian Wilson, who regularly collaborated with Mike Love and Gary Usher, contributed the songs that made up the bulk of the LP.

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The second single, “Ten Little Indians”, was less successful, reaching only No. 49, with Brian feeling that “Chug-A-Lug” would have made a better follow-up. Though Mike and Brian are the most prominent singers, Dennis makes his first vocal appearance on “Little Girl (You’re My Miss America)” (shown as “Little Miss America” on the album cover). (by wikipedia

The Beach Boys’ debut album, recorded in an era in which little was expected of rock groups in the way of strong LP-length statements, is mostly thin and awkward in both the songwriting and production departments. The title track, their first true smash, is great, as is its flip side (“409”), which was not only a hit in its own right, but was the first vocal hot rod classic. “Surfin’,” their debut single (and small national hit), is also good, and one of the few Beach Boys tracks that could be said to have a garage-like quality. Unfortunately, most of the other cuts (most of which are group originals) are substandard ditties, as Brian Wilson had a way to go before honing his compositional genius. It does, however, afford a glimpse of the group as they sounded when they were a true band in the studio, before most of their parts were played by session musicians. Two of the better cuts, “The Shift” and the instrumental “Moon Dawg,” have a grittier-than-usual surf rock base that would flower on 1963 hits like “Surfin’ U.S.A.”  (by Richie Unterberger )

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Personnel:
Mike Love (vocals)
David Marks (guitar, vocals)
Brian Wilson (bass vocals, organ; snare drum on 07.)
Carl Wilson (guitar, vocals, drums on 11.)
Dennis Wilson (drums, background vocals)
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Al Jardine (bass, background vocals on 07.) 
Nick Venet (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Surfin’ Safari (B.Wilson/Love) 2.08
02. County Fair (B.Wilson/Usher) 2.17
03. Ten Little Indians (Wilson/Usher) 1.29
04. Chug-A-Lug (Wilson/Usher/Love) 2.02
05. Little Girl (You’re My Miss America) (Alpert/Catalano) 2.07
06. 409 (Wilson/Usher) 2.02
07. Surfin’ (Wilson/Love) 2.13
08. Heads You Win–Tails I Lose (Wilson/Usher/Love) 2:17
09. Summertime Blues (Cochran/Capehart) 2.11
10. Cuckoo Clock (Wilson/Usher) 2.12
11. Moon Dawg (Weaver) 2.03
12. The Shift (Wilson/Love) 1.55LabelB1*
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Various Artists – Beat, Beat, Beat! Volume One – The Mersey Sound & Other Mop Top Rarities 1962 – 1963 (2001)

FrontCover1Castle Music deserves some kind of an award for their Beat, Beat, Beat series — and even more honor because it’s unique; no other label, including EMI and English Decca, would have the courage or ambition to go up through three years of the British beat and British Invasion booms, single by single, and B-sides, focused on a single label. There are about 150 minutes of eminently enjoyable, delightfully danceable British Invasion-style music on this two-CD set, filling it to overflowing, and don’t let the fact that most listeners have only heard of maybe three of the three dozen acts featured put you off. Usually, with a compilation like this, covering the complete generic output of a particular label — in this case, England’s Pye Records — for a specific period, there are lots of apologies to be made and explanations to be given about why various tracks should be tolerated. Not so here — every track on this set has value precisely as what it was in 1962-1963: eminently listenable, usually exciting and diverting rock & roll. For starters, any Dave Clark Five fans worthy of the name are probably going to have to own this set because of the two early tracks by the group, “That’s What I Said” and “I Knew It All the Time,” which open these two CDs — they’re about as good as anything else the band ever recorded, and very catchy.

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A pair of early dance cuts by the Roulettes at the outset of their career are no less compelling. Erky Grant & the Earwigs may have been a less-compelling talent, but even they had a rhythm section that could pound out a solid dance beat, and generated one solidly memorable song in “I’m a Hog for You Baby.” Nelson Keene, Bobby Shafto, and Dickie Pride, all late-’50s popsters, didn’t do a bad beat-style single in “The Kissing Had to Stop,” masquerading as the Guv’ners. Much more interesting is the harmony-based trio the Kestrels and their cover of “There’s a Place,” which attempts (successfully) to lay a more ornate and soulful vocal take on the early Lennon/McCartney original. In this company, the Searchers sound like world-class talents, but they’re not that far above, say, Danny Stormthe Viscounts (featuring future songwriter/manager Gordon Mills), who tried for a Merseybeat/harmony approach on “It’s You” and “I’ll Never Get Over You.” Johnny Sandon & the Remo Four show why both singer and band were able to endure as potential breakout talents for years on the enjoyably frantic “Lies” and the ballad “On the Horizon.” Those who are curious about the Undertakers, a top soul outfit from Liverpool who somehow never made it despite enjoying the publicly stated fandom of the Beatles, can start here, and folkish, harmony-based the Overlanders are similarly well represented. Future Graham Nash collaborator and Threshold Records artist Gregory Phillips is also here, doing the Billy J. Kramer-style “Angie,” and the disc ends with the Brian Epstein client Tommy Quickly and reliable Pye mainstays Joe Brown & the Bruvvers. Enjoyable as the first disc is, disc two is even better, showing off the label’s slightly more sophisticated later-1963 vintage efforts at emulating the Mersey sound as it became established, with serious and more compelling talents, including the Puppets (produced by Joe Meek), the Chants (superb singers who not only were based in Liverpool, but were black as well), and the Migil 4 (soon to become the Migil 5, a top bluebeat outfit).

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There are several examples of good early versions of songs that would later manifest themselves as hits in the hands of other bands, including Johnny Sandon & the Remo Four’s recording of “Magic Potion,” the Sundowners’ interpretation (complete with electric guitar) of “House of the Rising Sun,” and Pat Harris & the Blackjacks’ “Hippy Hippy Shake,” done in a high-energy Brenda Lee style. The sound is excellent throughout, giving good, solid, even pumped-up play to the bass and rhythm sections that will tell you why many of these groups came off so well when they played live. (by Bruce Eder)

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Oh boys and girls … what a great, sentimental trip in the very earlydays of British Beat …

And I will dedicate this entry to all these unknown heroes of teh times of Merseybeat:

The Roulettes – Buddy Britten & The Regents – Carter-Lewis – Joe Brown – Erkey Grant & The Eerwigs – The Guv’ners – The Kestrels – The Viscounts – Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four – The Hi-Fi’s – The Undertakers – The Overlanders – Gregory Phillips – The Bruvvers – The Puppets – The Chants – Nicky James – The Sundowners – Danny Storm & The Strollers – Pat Harris & The Blackjacks – The Migil 4 – Jeannie & The Big Guys – Dickie Rock & Miami Showband

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Tracklist:

CD 1:

Dave Clark Five feat. Mike Smith:
01. That’s What I Said (Clark/Ryan) 2.19
02. I Knew It All The Time (Murray) 2.25

The Roulettes:
03. Hully Gully Slip ‘N’ Slide (Vandyke) 2.09
04. La Bamba (Traditional) 2.31

Buddy Britten & The Regents:
05. My Pride, My Joy (Britten) 1.54

Carter-Lewis:
06. Here’s Hopin’ (Reed/Stephens) 1.59

Joe Brown:
07. What’s The Name Of The Game (Westlake/Subotsky) 2.34

Erkey Grant & The Eerwigs:
08. I Can’t Get Enough Of You (Mills)  2:22
09. I’m A Hog For You Baby (Leiber/Stoller) 2.08

The Guv’ners:
10. Lat’s Make A Habit Of This (Reed/Murray) 2.02
11. The Kissing Had To Stop (Howard/John) 2.00

The Kestrels:
12. There’s A Place (Lennon/McCartney) 2.16

The Searchers:
13. Sweets For My Sweet (Pomus/Shuman) 2.28
14. It’s All Been A Dream (Crummy) 1.50

The Viscounts:
15. It’s You (Mills/Paul/Wells) 2.11
16. I’ll Never Get Over You (Mills) 1.55

Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four:
17. Lies (Manley) 2.08
18. On The Horizon (Leiber/Stoller) 2:23

The Hi-Fi’s:
19, Take Me Or Leave Me (Bennett/Higgins) 2.01
20. I’m Struck (Bennett/Higgins) 2:51

The Undertakers:
21. (Do The) Mashed Potatoes (Rozier) 2.14
22. Everybody Loves A Lover (AdlerAllen) 2.17

The Overlanders:
23. Summer Skies & Golden Sands (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.32
24. Call Of The Wild (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 3.07

Gregory Phillips:
25. Angie (Springfield/Slater) 2.00
26. Please Believe Me (Beveridge/Oakman) 1.52

Tommy Quickly:
27. Tip Of My Tongue (Lennon/McCartney) 2.09
28. Heaven Only Knows (Rapaport/Murray) 2.21

Joe Brown & The Bruvvers;
29. Sally Ann (Klein) 1.57
30. There’s Only One Of You (Klein/Brown) 2:35

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CD 2:

The Puppets:
01. Everybody’s Talking (Cap) 2.01
02. Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.09

The Chants:
03. I Don’t Care (Amoo) 1.57
04. Come Go With Me (Quick) 2.32

Johnny Sandon & Remo Four:
05. Yes (Leiber/Stoller) 2.35
06. Magic Potion (Bacharach/David) 2.19

Nicky James:
07. My Colour Is Blue (James) 2.18

The Undertakers:
08. What About Us (Leiber/Stoller) 2.40
09. Money (That’s What I Want) (Bradfod/Gordy) 2.53

The Sundowners:
10. Baby, Baby (Takes) 2.12
11. House Of The Rising Sun (Traditional) 2:54

Danny Storm & The Strollers:
12. Say You Do (Storm/Pritchard) 2.10
13. Let The Sun Shine In (Barberis/Weinstein/Randazzo) 2.27

Pat Harris & The Blackjacks:
14. Hippy, Hippy Shake (Romero) 2.25
15. You Gotta See Your Mama Ev’ry Night (Rose/Conrad) 2.10

The Overlanders:
16. Movin’  (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.31
17. Rainbow (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.30

The Migil 4;
18. Maybe (Flynn/Madden) 2.24
19. Can’t I ? (Lovett) 2.29

The Searchers:
20. Sugar & Spice (Nightingale) 2.16
21. Saints & Searchers (Traditional) 3.18

Jeannie & The Big Guys:
22. Don’t Lie To Me (Dawson/Ford/Hiller) 2.19
23. Boys (Farrell) 2.06

Tommy Quickly & Remo Four:
24. Kiss Me Now (Martin) 1.55
25. No Other Love (Could Ever Be The Same) (Leonard) 2.00

The Chants:
26. I Could Write A Book (Rodgers/Hart) 2.02
27. A Thousand Stars (Pearson) 1.56

Dickie Rock & Miami Showband:
28. Boys (Farrell) 2.40

The Searchers:
29. Needles & Pins (Nitzsche/Bone) 2.14
30. Saturday Night Out (Anthony/Richards) 1.47

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Ca. 1963 excerpt from Mersey documentary on the music scene, featuring The Undertakers (Jackie Lomax, Chris Huston, Geoff Nugent, Brian Jones, Bugs Pemberton) at the Iron Door Club in Liverpool.

Peggy Lee – Blues Cross Country (1962)

FrontCover1Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.
Blues Cross Country was the second of Lee’s two albums featuring arrangements by Jones. He had also arranged her previous studio album, If You Go (1961). (by wikipedia)

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Peggy Lee and Quincy Jones

One of Peggy Lee’s most intriguing concept LPs of the ’50s and ’60s, Blues Cross Country teams her with the Quincy Jones Orchestra on a set of swinging blues set all over America, almost like a continental version of Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me.” She balances standards like “Basin Street Blues,” “St. Louis Blues,” “I Left My Sugar (In Salt Lake City),” and “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” alongside collaborations with Jones on “Los Angeles Blues,” “New York City Blues,” and “The Train Blues.” (She is also the lyricist of four other songs PeggyLee02on the album.) Though Jones’ arrangements are often a touch brassier than the blues standards can handle, Lee contributes just the right blend of vigor and feeling to the songs. Blues Cross Country also includes her first waxing of the Leiber & Stoller song “Kansas City,” which looks forward to her successful performances of their “I’m a Woman,” “Is That All There Is?,” and the Mirrors album. At a little over half-an-hour, it is a brief LP, and the 1999 CD reissue has two additional tracks. From the same spring 1961 sessions that produced the album came Lee’s single recording of Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh’s “Hey! Look Me Over,” the most popular song to emerge from the 1960 Broadway musical Wildcat, also arranged by Quincy Jones. Skipping ahead five years, there was another Lee single, “The Shining Sea,” which she wrote with Johnny Mandel, who also arranged it. Neither song fits in with the album’s concept, but they at least add more than four minutes to its running time. (by William Ruhlmann)

This not only a hot easy listening album, but a great album with Big Band music with a real hot voice … Peggy Lee at her best !

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Personnel:
Bob Bain (guitar)
Max Bennett (bass)
Hoyt Bohannon (trombone)
Aubrey Bouck (french horn)
Dennis Budimir (guitar)
Larry Bunker (percussion)
Pete Candolli (trumpet)
Benny Carter (saxophone, tuba)
Buddy Collette (saxophone)
Bob Cooper (woodwind)
Bob Fowler (trumpet)
Vern Friley (trombone)
Justin Gordon (saxophone)
Conrad Gozzo (trumpet)
Joe Graves (trumpet)
Bill Green (saxophone)
Chico Guerrero (percussion)
Bill Henshaw (rench horn)
Plas Johnson (saxophone)
Artie Kane (organ)
Harry Klee (woodwind)
Bobby Knight (trombone)
Peggy Lee (vocals)
Lou Levy (piano)
Stan Levey (drums)
Sinclair Lott (french horn)
Lew McCreary (trombone)
Dick Nash (trombone)
Jack Nimitz (saxophone)
Earl Palmer (drums)
Bill Perkins (saxophone)
John Pisano (guitar)
Al Porcino (trumpet)
Emil Richards (percussion)
George Roberts (trombone)
Howard Roberts (guitar)
Frank Rosolino (trombone)
Jimmy Rowles (piano)
Bud Shank (woodwind)
Jack Sheldon (trumpet)
Tommy Shepard (trombone)
Henry Sigismonti (french horn)
Frank Strazzeri (piano)
Toots Thielemans (guitar)
Ray Triscari (trumpet)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. Kansas City (Leiber/Stoller) – 2:29
02. Basin Street Blues (Williams) – 3:04
03. Los Angeles Blues (Lee/Jones) – 2:38
04. I Left My Sugar in Salt Lake City (Lange/ Rene) – 2:53
05. The Grain Belt Blues (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) – 1:52
06. York City Blues (Jones/Lee) 3:21
07. Goin’ to Chicago Blues (Basie/Rushing) – 2:37
08. San Francisco Blues (Lee/Raskin) – 2:37
09. Fisherman’s Wharf (Lee/Raskin) – 3:11
10. Boston Beans (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) 2:05
11. The Train Blues (Jones/Lee) 2:42
12. Saint Louis Blues (Handy) – 2:15
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13. Hey, Look Me Over! (Cy Coleman/Leigh) – 1:55
14. The Shining Sea (Lee/Mandel) – 2:45

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Jerry Murad’s Fabulous Harmonicats – Sentimental Serenade (1962)

FrontCover1Jerry Murad’s Harmonicats were an American harmonica-based group. The band was founded in 1947; by 2009, it was no longer performing. Originally they were named The Harmonica Madcaps and the group consisted of Jerry Murad (chromatic lead harmonica), Bob Hadamik (bass harmonica), Pete Pedersen (chromatic harmonica), and Al Fiore, (chord harmonica). They reformed later as a trio with Murad, Fiore, and bass harmonica player Don Les.

Pedersen and Gail Wallace remained contributors to the group throughout its existence, working on arrangements and occasionally recording.
Jerry Murad
Jerry Murad (chromatic harmonica), was an Armenian born in Istanbul, Turkey who moved to America at the age of 2. He played diatonic harmonicas at first, and took up chromatic soon after. Murad played Hohner 270s and 64s, as well as the Musette, a harmonica made especially for him that replicates the sound qualities of a French accordion. It is featured on their 1960s recording of “Parisienne Fantasy”. Murad also played the Hohner Polyphonia (a type of orchestral melodic harmonica).

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Don Les
Don Les (bass harmonica) was born in Chicago, and was blind at birth. He was able to see again at the age of twelve after a successful surgery. At one point, he formed his own version of the Harmonicats. The Don Les Harmonicats, which featured Mildred Mulcay (of the harmonica duo the Mulcays) and Lenny Leavitt. They released a Christmas album entitled Christmas with the Don Les Harmonicats.

Al Fiore
Al Fiore (chord harmonica), was born in Chicago and started experimenting with chord harmonicas at the age of 13. Fiore played the rare pre-war Hohner Chord harmonica. He recorded the band’s No. 1 hit, Peg o’ My Heart on this harmonica. (by wikipedia)

Or, in their own words:

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Ok, this is Easy Listening music but witha real unique sound.

Just listen to the legendary magic of Jerry Murad and his fabulous Harmonicats – you won’t have heard anything like it!

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Personnel:
Al Fiore (harmonica 24″ chord)
Don Les (bass harmonica)
Jerry Murad (harmonica)
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unknown bass player and drummer

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Tracklist:
01. Who’s Sorry Now? (Kalmar/Ruby/Snyder) 2.09
02. Moonlight Cocktail (Roberts/Gannon) 2.33
03. Sentimental Journey (Homer/Green/Brown) 2.15
04. Blue Champagne  (Ryerson/Watts) 2,36
05. My One And Only Love (Wood/Mellin) 2.29
06. Ebb Tide (Sigman/Maxwell) 2.21
07. September Song (Weill/Anderson) 2.18
08. On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper/Washington) 2.00
09. Nora’s Theme (Lynn) 2.12
10. There Goes My Heart (Silver/Davis) 2.39
11. Shangri-La (Malneck/Maxwell) 2.11
12. Sunrise Serenade (Carle/Lawrence) 2.45

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Les Brown And His Band Of Renown – Revolution In Sound (1962)

FrontCover1 This is one of the “gimmick” records from the early days of stereo, when “ping-pong” percussion and other effects were exaggerated to show off the new technology of 2 channels. This one is perhaps the only one of its kind, though, featuring the entire big band recorded while on a huge revolving bandstand. (bilrux)

This was an interesting (if not wholly successful) concept album in its time — utilizing stereo and some studio trickery, Les Brown and his band essentially emulate the kind of dance band showcase that one would have experienced in the 1930s, with a revolving bandstand. The result is that a piece fades as the platform “revolves” and the next outfit comes up, with its selection. It’s hokey and silly, but it was something different in the use of stereo circa 1962, when such details mattered to a lot of potential record buyers. And the juxtaposing of pieces such as “The Man with the Golden Arm,” “Unchained Melody,” “Stompin’ at the Savoy,” and “One O’Clock Jump” allows Brown and company to show off their range (and that of the arrangers) to great effect, and the hi-fi sound is still mighty impressive. (by Bruce Eder)

LesBrownOrchestra

Personnel:
Abe Aaron (saxophone)
Leobardo O. Acosta (timbales)
John Audino (trumpet)
Don Bagley (bass)
Stumpy Brown (tuba, trombone)
Bobby Clark (trumpet)
Dick Collins (trumpet)
Herb Ellis (guitar)
Gene Estes (percussion)
Fred Haller (saxophone, flute)
J. Hill (trombone)
Roy Main (trombone)
Bill Mattison (trumpet)
Mickey McMahon (trumpet)
Ollie Mitchell (trumpet)
Bob Neel (drums)
Johnny Newsome (saxophone)
Frank Perry (saxophone)
Uan Rasey (trumpet)
Tony Rizzi (guitar)
Butch Stone (saxophone)
Terry Trotter (piano, celesta)
John Wanner (trombone)
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cello:
Eleanor Slatkin – Jesse Ehrlich
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viola:
Alexander Neiman – Stan Harris
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violin:
Amerigo R. Marino – Darrel Terwilliger – Felix Slatkin – Gerald Vinci – Jacques Gasselin – James Getzoff – John P. De Voogdt – Lou Klass – Mischa Russell

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Tracklist:
01 This Could Be The Start Of Something (Allen) 1.23
02. Patricia (Prado) 2.27
03. The Man With The Golden Arm (Cahn/v.Heusen) 1.59
04. Unchained Melody (North/Zaret) 2.40
05. Stompin’ At The Savoy (Razaf/Goodman/Webb/Sampson) 2.32
06. Lisbon Antigua (Vale/Galhardo/Portela) 2.32
07. Peter Gunn (Mancini) 2.35
08. One O’Clock Jump (Basie) 2.27
09. Man With A Horn (Lake/Delange/Jenney) 2.58
10. Calcutta (Gaze) 2.25
11. Music Makers (Raye/James) 2.48
12. The Song From Moulin Rouge (Auric/Engvick) 2.11
13. Tea For Two Cha Cha (Caesar/Youmans) 2.15
14. Little Brown Jug (Miller) 2.28

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