Big Walter Horton & Paul Butterfield – An Offer You Can´t Refuse (1972)

FrontCover1“An Offer You Can’t Refuse” is one of the best blues harmonica compilations put together. Walter Horton’s material on this recording is some of the best music I have ever heard in my life. Horton’s control, note choice, and near endless well of ideas give a textbook example of what every harmonica player (and musician) needs to do in order to be a competent musician.
Horton’s treatment of “Easy” is a bit sparser than the one he did with Jimmy Deberry long ago; he takes a more restrained approach, but still lets it loose on certain parts of the song. Absolutely brilliant work.

“Have a Good Time” is a straight ahead exchange with Robert Nighthawk backing (as throughout the record), Horton lays it hard and down-home through his solos showing just how to treat the song. Horton’s virtue is that he leaves a good amount of space to let his notes breathe through his solos, so that they don’t bunch up and sound insignificant.
“Mean Mistreater” is a slow blues in 1st position that is soulful and pretty. This is how all you harp players need to solo over a slow blues, beautifully done; Nighthawk’s backing is simple and dead-on as well. All you SRV clone twits can learn a thing or two from Robert Nighthawk, it ain’t always about the soloing!

“In the Mood” is an upbeat frisky deal that has Horton throwing notes down with authority. Great singing and solid backing with Horton doing some very hard (yet musical) lines make this alone worth the price of the CD.
“West Side Blues” is a steady, high and lonesome blues feel with very tasteful soloing on Horton’s part. Horton plays the melody through much of this song, but makes it sound wonderful.
“Louise” is another steady feeling blues with Horton singing and dominating; beautiful lines, with acoustic harp make this a winner.

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“Tin Pan Alley” is a sweet lowdown song, Horton’s soloing is slow and well paced.
“Walter’s Boogie” rounds out the Horton section; uptempo, and seriously well done, Horton lays a lesson in tone and control that is near scary at times. Very well done.
The Butterfield section was taken from a 1963 night club gig with Smokey Smothers and Sam Lay. A nice recording, not Butterfield’s best, but a good sneak preview of what was to come from the illustrious Butterfield. A great recording that’s worth your money. If you are learning to play harmonica, this CD should be in your library; it will do more for you than most instructional books could ever do. (an amazon cutomer)

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Paul Butterfield’s 1960 high school yearbook photo

An album released on the Red Lightnin’ label in 1972 consisting of one side of Big Walter Horton and the other side with very early Paul Butterfield (1963) (See: Big Walter Horton). Contains six tracks with Butterfield, Smokey Smothers on guitar, Jerome Arnold on bass, and Sam Lay on drums. This was recorded at Big Johns, the North side Chicago club where the Butterfield Band first played in 1963 — some two years before the material on the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album, which was released in 1965. The six tracks include two instrumentals, “Got My Mojo Working” and the Butterfield-authored tune “Loaded.” Although this is very early Butterfield, the harp playing is excellent and already in his own unique style. The singing is a little rough and heavy sounding. Butterfield fans will want to find this rare vinyl for musical and historical reasons. (by Michael Erlewine)

Recorded live  at the “Big Johns” Club,Wells Street, Chicago, Summer 1963 

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Personnel:

Big Walter Horton:
Big Walter Horton (vocals, harmonica)
Robert Nighthawk (guitar)

Paul Butterfield:
Jerome Arnold (bass)
Paul Butterfield (vocals, harmonica)
Sam Lay (drums)
Smokey Smothers (guitar)

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Tracklist:

Big Walter Horton:
01. Easy (Horton) 3.16
02. Have A Good Time (Horton) 3.18
03. Mean Mistreater (Carr/Horton) 3.03
04. In The Mood (Horton) 3.07
05. West Side Blues (Horton) 3-08
06. Louise (Morganfield) 4.04
07. Tin Pan Alley (Geddins) 2.52
08. Walters Boogie, This Is It (Horton) 2.45

Paul Butterfield:
09. Everythings Gonna Be Alright (Jacobs) 3.40
10. Poor Boy (Horton) 3.53
11. Got My Mojo Working (Morganfield) 3.07
12. Last Night (Jacobs) 4.38
13. Loaded (Butterfield) 2.52
14. One Room Country Shack (Walton) 4.54

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Jeanne Moreau – Same (1963)

FrontCover1Jeanne Moreau is an icon of the French cinema who also experienced a streak of success as a vocalist during the 1960s. Born on January 23, 1928, in Paris, she broke into the film industry during the 1950s, appearing most notably in a pair of 1958 films by Louis Malle, Ascenseur Pour l’Échafaud and Les Amants. Following her breakthrough success in these films, she appeared in a long line of others by prominent directors, most notably François Truffaut, who immortalized her in his classic Jules et Jim (1962), as well as Jean-Luc Godard (A Woman Is a Woman, 1961), Michelangelo Antonioni (La Notte, 1961), Orson Welles (The Trial, 1962), Luis Buñuel (Diary of a Chambermaid, 1964), Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Querelle, 1982), and Wim Wenders (Until the End of the World, 1991). Moreau’s recording career as a vocalist was sparked by her memorable performance of the song “Le Tourbillon” in Jules et Jim. Released as a 45-rpm single by Philips in 1962, “Le Tourbillon” was written by Cyrus Bassiak (born Serge Rezvani). The full-length album Jeanne Moreau (1963), comprised of a dozen songs by Rezvani, was released on the Disques Jacques Canetti label in the wake of “Le Tourbillon.” Subsequent silver-screen singing performances of note include the songs “Embrasse-Moi,” a Bassiak song from the film Peau de Banane (1963), and “Ah les P’tites Femmes de Femmes de Paris,” a duet with Brigitte Bardot from the film Viva Maria (1965). There was also another full-length album of Bassiak songs released on Disques Jacques Canetti, 12 Chansons (1966).

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Moreau’s two full-lengths were later compiled by the British label Él on The Immortal Jeanne Moreau (2008). Numerous other best-of collections were compiled over the years, most of them featuring soundtrack recordings such as “Le Tourbillon” alongside material from her full-lengths. (by Jason Birchmeier)

Throughout her life, Moreau maintained friendships with prominent writers such as Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet, Henry Miller and Marguerite Duras (an interview with Moreau is included in Duras’s book Outside: Selected Writings). She was formerly married to Jean-Louis Richard (1949–1964) and then to American film director William Friedkin (1977–1979). Director Tony Richardson left his wife, Vanessa Redgrave, for her in 1967 but they never married. She also had affairs with directors Louis Malle and François Truffaut, fashion designer Pierre Cardin, jazz trumpeter Miles Davis and Theodoros Roubanis, the Greek actor/playboy.

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Moreau was a close friend of Sharon Stone, who presented a 1998 American Academy of Motion Pictures life tribute to Moreau. Orson Welles called her “the greatest actress in the world”, and she remained one of France’s most accomplished actresses.

Moreau died on 31 July 2017, at the age of 89. (by wikipedia)

And here´s her first album … a tribute to a real great actress … and we hear very fine chansons from France … of course. Enjoy the magic of Jeanne Moreau !

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Personnel:
Jeanne Moreau (vocals)
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François Rauber Orchestra
Ward Swingle Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. J’Ai La Mémoire Qui Flanche (Bassiak/Rauber) 2.23
02. La Vie S’Envole (Bassiak/Delerue) 1.34
03. La Peau, Léon (Bassiak/Delerue) 2.24
04.  Rien N’Arrive Plus (Bassiak/Robert) 3.10
05. Moi Je Préfère (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.01
06. Le Blues Indolent (Bassiak/Swingle) 3.21
07. La Vie De Cocagne (Bassiak/Robert) 2.33
08. L’Homme D’Amour (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.37
09. L’Horloger (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.34
10. Ni Trop Tôt, Ni Trop Tard (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.41
11. Les Mensonges (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.17
12. L’Amour Flou (Bassiak/Delerue) 2.15

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Jeanne Moreau (23 January 1928 – 31 July 2017)

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

FrontCover1The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan is the second studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on May 27, 1963 by Columbia Records. Whereas his self-titled debut album Bob Dylan had contained only two original songs, Freewheelin’ represented the beginning of Dylan’s writing contemporary words to traditional melodies. Eleven of the thirteen songs on the album are Dylan’s original compositions. The album opens with “Blowin’ in the Wind”, which became an anthem of the 1960s, and an international hit for folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary soon after the release of Freewheelin’. The album featured several other songs which came to be regarded as among Dylan’s best compositions and classics of the 1960s folk scene: “Girl from the North Country”, “Masters of War”, “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”.

Dylan’s lyrics embraced news stories drawn from headlines about the Civil Rights Movement and he articulated anxieties about the fear of nuclear warfare. Balancing this political material were love songs, sometimes bitter and accusatory, and material that features surreal humor. Freewheelin’ showcased Dylan’s songwriting talent for the first time, propelling him to national and international fame. The success of the album and Dylan’s subsequent recognition led to his being named as “Spokesman of a Generation”, a label Dylan repudiated.

Dylan1963_02The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan reached number 22 in the US (eventually going platinum), and became a number-one album in the UK in 1964. In 2003, the album was ranked number 97 on Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In 2002, Freewheelin’ was one of the first 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. (by wikipedia)

It’s hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with “Corrina Corrina” and “Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance,” but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Masters of War,” and “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” weren’t just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic.

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Although they’ve proven resilient throughout the years, if that’s all Freewheelin’ had to offer, it wouldn’t have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy (“Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”), gorgeous love songs (“Girl From the North Country”), and cheerfully absurdist humor (“Bob Dylan’s Blues,” “Bob Dylan’s Dream”) with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Bob Dylan On The Ed Sullivan Show

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
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on 11:
Howie Collins (guitar)
Leonard Gaskin (bass)
Bruce Langhorne (guitar)
Herb Lovelle (drums)
Dick Wellstood (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Blowin’ In The Wind (Dylan) 2.47
02. Girl From The North Country (Dylan) 3.22
03. Masters Of War (Dylan) 4.33
04. Down The Highway (Dylan) 3.25
05. Bob Dylan’s Blues (Dylan) 2.24
06. A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (Dylan) 6.53
07. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.40
08. Bob Dylan’s Dream (Dylan) 5.03
09. Oxford Town (Dylan) 1.50
10. Talking World War III Blues (Dylan) 6.26
11. Corrina, Corrina (Thomas) 2.42
12. Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance (Dylan) 2.00
13. I Shall Be Free (Dylan) 4.48

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More Bob Dylan:

 

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Come, you masters of war
You that build the big guns
You that build the death planes
You that build all the bombs

You that hide behind walls
You that hide behind desks
I just want you to know
I can see through your masks

You that never done nothin’
But build to destroy
You play with my world
Like it’s your little toy

You put a gun in my hand
And you hide from my eyes
And you turn and run farther
When the fast bullets fly

Like Judas of old
You lie and deceive
A world war can be won
You want me to believe

But I see through your eyes
And I see through your brain
Like I see through the water
That runs down my drain

You fasten all the triggers
For the others to fire
Then you sit back and watch
While the death count gets higher

You hide in your mansion
While the young peoples’ blood
Flows out of their bodies
And is buried in the mud

You’ve thrown the worst fear
That can ever be hurled
Fear to bring children
Into the world

For threatenin’ my baby
Unborn and unnamed
You ain’t worth the blood
That runs in your veins

How much do I know
To talk out of turn?
You might say that I’m young
You might say I’m unlearned

But there’s one thing I know
Though I’m younger than you
That even Jesus would never
Forgive what you do

Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good?
Will it buy you forgiveness?
Do you think that it could?

I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul

And I hope that you die
And your death will come soon
I’ll follow your casket
On a pale afternoon

I’ll watch while you’re lowered
Down to your deathbed
And I’ll stand over your grave
‘Til I’m sure that you’re dead

Herbie Mann – Latin Fever (1964)

frontcover1Latin Fever is an album by American jazz flautist Herbie Mann recorded for the Atlantic label and released in 1964. The album features tracks from the 1962 sessions that produced Do the Bossa Nova with Herbie Mann with more recent recordings. (by wikipedia)
Yes, other jazz musicians played Bossa Nova in the early sixties however, they jumped on the bandwagon after Herbie Mann began the craze. From the liner notes of Latin Fever originally recorded in 1964, “In recent years jazzman Herbie Mann has been recognized as the leading exponent and interpreter of the music emanating from Latin America. He traveled throughout Brazil before the music, which came to be known as the bossa nova, had yet to be exported, and on his return to the States, Mann introduced this musical goldmine to audiences in night clubs from New York to California.”
Herbie Mann was also one of the few who recorded with musicians from the particular region that piqued his musical interest. Latin Fever features such Brazilian luminaries as Sergio Mendes Antonio Carlos Jobim and guitarist Baden Powell.(piperglenn)

Recorded in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on October 15, 1962 (track 8), October 16, 1962 (tracks 7 & 10), October 17, 1962 (track 5) & October 19, 1962 (track 9) and in New York City on October 8, 1963 (tracks 1-3 & 6) and January 29, 1964 (track 4)

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Personnel:
Otavio Bailly Jr. (bass on 07. + 10.)
George Devens (vibraphone, percussion on 01. – 03, + 06.)
Durval Ferreira (guitar on 07. + 10.)
Gabriel (bass on 08.)
Paul Griffin (piano, organ on 01. -03., + 06.)
Antônio Carlos Jobim (piano, vocals on 05. + 09.)
Juquinha (drums on 08.)
Herbie Mann (flute)
Sérgio Mendes (piano on 07. + 10.)
Paulo Moura (saxophone on 07. + 10.)
Pedro Paulo (trumpet on 07. + 10.)
Baden Powell (guitar on 08.)
Dom Um Romão (drums on 07. + 10.)
Ernie Royal (trumpet on 01. – 03. + 06.)
Bill Suyker (guitar on 01 – 03. + 06.)
Clark Terry (trumpet on on 01. – 03. + 06.)
Bobby Thomas (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Harlem Nocturne” (Earle Hagen, Dick Rogers) – 2:15
02. Fever (Cooley/Davenport) 1.52
03. Not Now – Later On (Sherman/Meade) 1.51
04. The Golden Striker (Lewis) 2.14
05. How Insensitive (Jobim) 3.04
06. You Came A Long Way from St. Louis (Brooks/Russell) 2.28
07. Batida Differente (Einhorn/Lelys) 5.12
08. Nana (Powell) 3.59
09. Groovy Samba (Mendes) 5.06
10. Influenza de Jazz (Lyra) 5.38
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Various Artists – An Easy Christmas (2001)

frontcover1This is just a sampler, full with 20 old and classic christmas songs, performed by many stars in the easy listening style.
You can hear singers like Don McLean, David Bowie, Andy Williams, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Perry Como and Al Green.

“This is my most favourite christmas album ever-I had to order a second copy as the first had a scratch on. I listen to it all the time. Not your average Christmas album!”(by miss r aughton)

“Great to listen to while wrapping presents” (by Zoe Bell)

And I guess, I will play this album (amongst others) on December 24, 2016 … Enjoy this romantic and sentimental sampler.

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Tracklist:
01. Andy Williams: Most Wonderful Time Of Year (2001) (Pola/Wyle) 2.34
02. Nat King Cole: Christmas Song (1963) (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire) (Tormé/Wells) 3.14
03. Eartha Kitt: Santa Baby (1953) (Javits/Springer) 3.26
04. Dean Martin: Let It Snow Let It Snow Let It Snow (1965) (Cahn/Styne) 1.58
05. Judy Garland: Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (1944) (Martin/Blane) 2.45
06. Harry Belafonte: Mary’s Boy Child (1957) (Hairston) 2.59
07. Bing Crosby: White Christmas (1954) (Berlin) 3.04
08. Al Green: Silent Night (1963) (Gruber/Mohr) 3.19
09. Crystal Gayle: Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer (1996) (Marks) 2.57
10. Anne Murray: Snowbird (1978) (MacLellan) 2.11
11. Don McLean: Winter Wonderland (1991) (Bernard/Smith) 2.54
12. Charles Brown: Please Come Home For Christmas (Christmas Finds Me Oh So Sad) (1961) (Brown/Redd) 3.18
13. Doris Day: I’ll Be Home For Christmas (1964) (Gannon/Kent/Ram) 2.27
14. Andy Williams: Sleigh Ride (live) (2001) (Anderson) 2.22
15. Crystal Gayle: Silver Bells (1996) (Livingston/Evans) 4.09
16. Don McLean: Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town (1991) (Coots/Gillespie) 3.06
17. Perry Como: God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen (1959)(Traditional) 2.56
18. Al Green: What Christmas Means To Me (1963) (Story/Gaye/ Gordy) 3.44
19. Bing Crosby + David Bowie: Peace On Earth/Little Drummer Boy (1977) (Fraser/Grossman/Alan Kohan/Simeone/Davis/Onorati) 2.38
20. Michael Ball: Happy New Year (1999) (Andersson/Ulvaeus) 4.18

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Beach Boys – Surfer Girl (1963)

FrontCover1Surfer Girl is the third studio album by American rock band the Beach Boys and their second longplayer in 1963. Surfer Girl reached number 7 in the US during a chart stay of 56 weeks. In the UK, the album was released in spring 1967 and reached number 13. This was the first album by the Beach Boys for which Brian Wilson was given full production credit, a position Wilson would maintain for the next few years.

For the first time producing an album himself, Brian Wilson co-wrote with Mike Love, Gary Usher and Roger Christian some of his most cherished songs. The title track, a number 7 US hit, was the first song Brian had ever composed, written at the age of 19 using “When You Wish Upon a Star” as his inspiration. As a ballad, it was a risky move for a single, but its obvious quality overcame any potential commercial risks. Its flip-side, “Little Deuce Coupe”, proved to be The Beach Boys’ most successful B-side, reaching US number 15 and becoming a hot rod staple. It also continued the band’s current trend of putting a surf-related song on the A-side of singles, and car songs on the B-side. “Catch a Wave” featured Mike Love’s sister, Maureen, on harp, while “The Surfer Moon” was the first Beach Boys song to have a string arrangement. “In My Room” was perhaps Brian Wilson’s first personal song, a reflection on having a place to go to feel a sense of security and safety from the stress of one’s life. Despite some slight material (“South Bay Surfer”, “Boogie Woodie”), it was clear that Surfer Girl was a significant step forward for The Beach Boys – and the first of many.

“South Bay Surfer” is co-credited to Al Jardine, who had rejoined The Beach Boys in the summer of 1963 in a limited capacity and does not appear on the album cover.

The instrumental track for “The Surfer Moon” (Brian’s first known use of strings) was recorded (as “The Summer Moon”) in early May for an extra-BB act he was recording, Bob & Vikki; this version was never released, although an acetate exists. Bob was Bob Norberg, Brian’s room mate in 1962.

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The recording date, July 16th, given on the sleeve for album tracks not previously released as a single, is not so much questionable as almost certainly impossible. Although there is documentary proof (a tape box label) that “Surfers Rule”, “South Bay Surfer” and “Boogie Woodie” were indeed recorded on that date at Western Sound Studios, it is noticeable that whilst Mike Love’s lead vocals for “Hawaii” and “Catch a Wave” are hampered by a heavy cold, his other leads on album cuts are fine. Therefore it is certain other dates/sessions were also used. Further, Alan Jardine is known to have played or sung on four tracks – bass on “Boogie Woodie”, “Surfer’s Rule” & “Catch a Wave” and vocals on “In My Room” – but not the others, while Hal Blaine contributed to “Our Car Club” (originally recorded for The Honeys as “Rabbit’s Foot”) and “Hawaii”. Thus, it is likely there were at least four sessions for the album tracks, but as the AFM (musicians union) documentation is missing, confirmation cannot be supplied.

The front cover of Surfer Girl features (from left to right) Dennis Wilson, David Marks, Carl Wilson, Mike Love and Brian Wilson holding a surfboard from the same 1962 photo shoot that produced the cover of their album debut Surfin’ Safari. The picture was taken by Capitol photographer Kenneth Veeder at Paradise Cove, north of Malibu.

Surfer Girl hit number seven in the US (where it went gold) and, later (in 1967) number thirteen in the UK. (by wikipedia)

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Capitol pushed the Beach Boys for too much material in too short a time for the group to maintain as much quality control as would have been desirable. Consequently, most of their pre-1965 albums contain a high degree of filler, and thus stack up poorly next to those of such contemporaries as the Beatles, who were able to maintain high standards on almost all of their tracks. Surfer Girl does have some great tunes, including the title song, the hot rod ditty “Little Deuce Coupe,” and “Catch a Wave” (which could have been a substantial hit single on its own merits). Most significant of all is the gorgeous ballad “In My Room,” which anticipated future Beach Boys releases both in its sophisticated production (strings, organ, dense harmonies) and its personal, solipsistic lyrics. The rest is surprisingly mediocre filler, especially as at this point they were restricting their lyrical themes to beach culture almost exclusively; “Your Summer Dream,” with its unusual harmonies, is about the most interesting of the obscure tracks. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Al Jardine (bass, background vocals)
Mike Love (vocals)
David Marks (guitar)
Brian Wilson (vocals, keyboards, bass)
Carl Wilson (guitar, bass, vocals)
Dennis Wilson (drums, vocals)
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Hal Blaine (drums, percussion)
Steve Douglas (saxophone)
Maureen Love (harp)

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Tracklist:
01. Surfer Girl  (B.Wilson) 2.26
02. Catch A Wave (B. Wilson/Love) 2.07
03. The Surfer Moon (B. Wilson) 2.11
04. South Bay Surfer (The Old Folks At Home) (Foster/B. Wilson/C,Wilson/Jardine) 1.45
05. The Rocking Surfer (Traditional) 2.00
06. Little Deuce Coupe  (B. Wilson/Christian) 1.38
07. In My Room (B. Wilson/Usher) 2.11
08. Hawaii (B. Wilson/Love) 1.59
09. Surfer’s Rule (B. Wilson/Love) 1.54
10. Our Car Club (B. Wilson/Love)  2.22
11. Your Summer Dream (B. Wilson/Norberg) 2.27
12. Boogie Woodie (Traditional) 1.56

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Bossa Três – Bossa Nova – Brazilian Jazz (1963)

OriginalFrontCover1The Bossa Três was the first instrumental group of the bossa nova. In 1961, Luís Carlos Vinhas (piano), Tião Neto (bass), and Edison Machado (drums) teamed up to form the trio. They went to the U.S. to accompany the dancers Lennie Dale, Martha Botelho, and Joe Benett on The Ed Sullivan Show.

They remained in the U.S. and recorded three albums in New York, which were released by Audio Fidelity in 1962 (one of them accompanying Jo Basile).

The group continued to perform in jazz nightclubs until its dissolution. Returning alone to Brazil, Vinhas regrouped the trio with other musicians and continued to work, recording and performing throughout Latin America. The Bossa Três recorded with Pery Ribeiro in 1966 and, in 2000, with Wanda Sá. (by Alvaro Neder)

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The trio was formed in 1961 at Beco das Garrafas (Copacabana nightclub area), home of the bossa nova. Their debut gigs were at the Ed Sullivan Show, where they played for ballet dancers Lennie Dale, Joe Benett e Martha Botelho. Bossa 3 remained in the States for a few more years, performing at jazz clubs. The group broke up their Brazilian line up, and pianist Luis Carlos Vinhas, the only one who returned to Brazil, put Bossa 3 together again, this time with new musicians. They made other 5 albums, touring Latin countries.

And this is their debut album from 1963 … listen to a real wonderful album !

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Personnel:
Edison Machado (drums)
Tiao Neto (bass)
Luis Parga (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Blues Walk (Brown) 3.15
02. Ceu E Mar (Alf) 3.14
03. Green Dolphin Street (Washington/Kaper) 2.55
04. Menina Feia (Neves) 2.25
05. Sol E Chuva (Payne) 3.28
06. Olhou P’ra Mim (Lincoln) 2.47
07. Bossa 3 Theme (Neto) 2.41
08. Nao Faz Assim (Neves) 2.38
09. Somebody Loves Me (Gershwin) 3.23
10. So Saudade (Jobim) 2.08
11. Influencia do Jazz (Lyra)  2.47
12. Zelao (Ricardo) 3.21

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