Yardbirds – Five Live Yardbirds (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgFive Live Yardbirds is the live debut album by English rock band the Yardbirds. It features the group’s interpretations of ten American blues and rhythm and blues songs, including their most popular live number, Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”. The album contains some of the earliest recordings with guitarist Eric Clapton.

Recorded at the Marquee Club in London on 20 March 1964, it was released in the United Kingdom by Columbia Records nine months later. Despite several favourable retrospective reviews, the album did not reach the UK album charts. It was not issued in the United States; however, four songs were included on the Yardbirds’ second American album, Having a Rave Up.

In October 1963, the Yardbirds took over the Rolling Stones’ position at the Crawdaddy Club and had signed a management contract with club owner Giorgio Gomelsky. After touring with Sonny Boy Williamson II, the band signed a contract with Columbia Records. In 1964, they recorded two singles, “I Wish You Would” and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”. These had limited success and Gomelsky was able to persuade Columbia to release a live album as the Yardbirds’ debut album.

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The Yardbirds were a popular live attraction at music clubs. Much of their reputation was built on their use of a “rave up” musical arrangement, an instrumental interlude that builds to a climax. Clapton credits the rave up to bassist Paul Samwell-Smith and explains: “While most other bands were playing three-minute songs, we were taking three-minute numbers and stretching them out to five or six minutes, during which time the audience would go crazy”. In was at such performances that Clapton often broke a guitar string. While he was putting on a new one, the audience would slowly clap their hands (slow handclapping). This led manager Gomelsky to nickname him “Eric ‘Slowhand’ Clapton”.

Five Live Yardbirds was recorded at the Marquee Club in London. Yardbirds’ biographer Gregg Russo describes the conditions and equipment for recording at the club was less than ideal, they were able to capitalise on their greater popularity there than at the Crawdaddy.

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He adds: The recording date for the album has been previously listed as Tuesday, March 10, 1964, but Gomelsky distinctly remembers the show taking place at Wardour Street. On March 10, the club was still at Oxford Street, and combined with the fact that the Yardbirds played on Fridays at the Wardour Street location, the March 20, 1964 recording date seems much more likely.

All of the songs that appear on Five Live Yardbirds were written by American blues and rhythm and blues artists and several of the original recordings appeared on the American record charts. The band’s early material reflects the repertoires of the early British rhythm and blues groups, such as the Rolling Stones and the Animals.[6] Clapton biographer David Bowling described the album as “a lot of straight electric blues, but at times they come close to a rock sound.” Their version of Chuck Berry’s “Too Much Monkey Business”, which is the album opener, is the most rock-oriented song on the album.

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18th May 1964: British rock group the Yardbirds, (left to right) lead guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Paul Samwell-Smith, singer Keith Relf, drummer Jim McCarty, and rhythm guitarist Christopher Dreja performing on a backyard patio for British playwright Lord Willis and his daughter Sally. (Photo by Daily Express)

Several songs feature extended instrumental improvisation. Bo Diddley’s “Here ‘Tis” and the Isley Brothers’ “Respectable” are high-energy tunes, which represent the use of double-time feature of the rave up for the entire songs. AllMusic critic Matthew Greenwald describes “Here ‘Tis” as “driven by a furious “Bo Diddley” beat and rhythm … Clapton’s interplay with bassist Paul Samwell-Smith is one of the great moments in the band’s recorded history” The instrumental spotlight was also shared with singer and blues harmonica player Keith Relf. Clapton and Relf trading riffs is one of the highlights of “Smokestack Lightning”. The Howlin’ Wolf song was the Yardbirds’ most popular live number and a regular in their sets. Performances of the song could last up to 30 minutes.[10] Howlin’ Wolf reportedly referred to the group’s 5:35 album version as “the definitive version of his song”.

The slow blues standard, “Five Long Years”, features extended guitar soloing by Clapton in a style he further developed with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Clapton and Samwell-Smith share the lead vocals on “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”, which is based on the version by the American R&B duo Don and Bob. Bo Diddley’s “I’m a Man” (which became a hit when the Yardbirds later recorded it with Jeff Beck) and songs by Slim Harpo and John Lee Hooker round out the album.

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Five Live Yardbirds was released before critical rock music journalism became popular. However, Clapton biographer Christopher Sandford notes “When Five Live Yardbirds was released that winter, to generally favourable reviews (‘Raucous interplay … great guitar …feral energy of the ensemble’) it, too, failed to materially benefit the group.” The album did not appear in the British record charts and subsequently was not issued in the US.

Later, several critics have also given the album favourable reviews. AllMusic’s Eder gave the album four and a half out of five stars and describes it as “Five Live Yardbirds was the first important—indeed, essential—live album to come out of the 1960s British rock & roll boom. In terms of the performance captured and the recording quality, it was also the best such live record of the entire middle of the decade”. In a separate review for AllMusic, Rick Clark noted “Smokestack Lightning” [and other songs] were open-ended improvisations that helped lay the groundwork for groups like Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience.” Bowling calls the material “raw and powerful” and Russo adds it is “a completely faithful reproduction” of the group’s early shows. “Ultimate Classic Rock” ranked the album in the “Top 100 Live Albums, and called it an “explosive document of a British blues band fueling a decidedly American music with power, fireworks and amped-up resourcefulness. (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Eric “Slowhand” Clapton (lead guitar, co-lead vocals on 03.)
Chris Dreja (guitar)
Jim McCarty (drums)
Keith Relf (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Paul “Sam” Samwell-Smith (bass, vocals on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 3.49
02. I Got Love If You Want It (Moore a.k.a. Slim Harpo) 2.37
03. Smokestack Lightnin’ (Burnett) 5.35
04. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Demarais) 2.41
05. Respectable (K.Isley/R.Isley(R.Isley) 5.30
06. Five Long Years (Boyd) 5.16
07. Pretty Girl (McDaniel) 3.02
08. Louise (Hooker) 3.41
09. I’m A Man (McDaniel) 4.30
10. Here ‘Tis (McDaniel) 5.09
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11. You Can’t Judge A Book By Looking At The Cover (Dixon) 2.56
12. Let It Rock (Berry) 2.17
13. I Wish I Would (Arnold) 5.54
14. Who Do You Love (McDaniel) 5.07
15. Honey In Your Hips (Relf) 2.28
16. A Certain Girl (Neville) 2.17
17. Got To Hurry (Rasputin2.48
18. I Ain´t Got You (Carter) 1.59
19. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Single) (Demarais)

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Bob Dylan – Another Side Of Bob Dylan (1964)

FrontCover1Another Side of Bob Dylan is the fourth studio album by American singer and songwriter Bob Dylan, released on August 8, 1964 by Columbia Records.

The album deviates from the more socially conscious style which Dylan had developed with his previous LP, The Times They Are A-Changin’. The change prompted criticism from some influential figures in the folk community – Sing Out! editor Irwin Silber complained that Dylan had “somehow lost touch with people” and was caught up in “the paraphernalia of fame”.

Despite the album’s thematic shift, Dylan performed the entirety of Another Side of Bob Dylan as he had previous records – solo. In addition to his usual acoustic guitar and harmonica, Dylan provides piano on one selection, “Black Crow Blues”. Another Side of Bob Dylan reached No. 43 in the US (although it eventually went gold), and peaked at No. 8 on the UK charts in 1965.

With Dylan’s commercial profile on the rise, Columbia was now urging Dylan to release a steady stream of recordings. Upon Dylan’s return to New York, studio time was quickly scheduled, with Tom Wilson back as producer.

Dylan01The first (and only) session was held on June 9 at Columbia’s Studio A in New York. According to Heylin, “while polishing off a couple of bottles of Beaujolais”, Dylan recorded fourteen original compositions that night, eleven of which were chosen for the final album. The three that were ultimately rejected were “Denise Denise”, “Mr. Tambourine Man”, and “Mama, You Been on My Mind”.

Nat Hentoff’s The New Yorker article in late October 1964 on Dylan includes remarkable descriptions of the June 1964 recording session. Hentoff describes in considerable detail the atmosphere in the CBS recording studio and Dylan’s own asides and banter with his friends in the studio, with the session’s producers, and Hentoff himself.

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott was present during part of this session, and Dylan asked him to perform on “Mr. Tambourine Man”. “He invited me to sing on it with him,” recalls Elliott, “but I didn’t know the words ‘cept for the chorus, so I just harmonized with him on the chorus.” Only one complete take was recorded, with Dylan stumbling on some of the lyrics. Though the recording was ultimately rejected, Dylan would return to the song for his next album.

By the time Dylan recorded what was ultimately the master take of “My Back Pages”, it was 1:30 in the morning. Master takes were selected, and after some minor editing, a final album was soon sequenced. (by wikipedia)

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The other side of Bob Dylan referred to in the title is presumably his romantic, absurdist, and whimsical one — anything that wasn’t featured on the staunchly folky, protest-heavy Times They Are a-Changin’, really. Because of this, Another Side of Bob Dylan is a more varied record and it’s more successful, too, since it captures Dylan expanding his music, turning in imaginative, poetic performances on love songs and protest tunes alike. This has an equal number of classics to its predecessor, actually, with “All I Really Want to Do,” “Chimes of Freedom,” “My Back Pages,” “I Don’t’ Believe You,” and “It Ain’t Me Babe” standing among his standards, but the key to the record’s success is the album tracks, which are graceful, poetic, and layered. Both the lyrics and music have gotten deeper and Dylan’s trying more things — this, in its construction and attitude, is hardly strictly folk, as it encompasses far more than that. The result is one of his very best records, a lovely intimate affair. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. All I Really Want To Do 4.02
02. Black Crow Blues 3.12
03. Spanish Harlem Incident 2.22
04. Chimes Of Freedom 7.09
05. I Shall Be Free No. 10 4.45
06. To Ramona 3.50
07. Motorpsycho Nitemare 4.31
08. My Back Pages 4.20
09. I Don’t Believe You 4.20
10. Ballad In Plain D 8.15
11. It Ain’t Me Babe 3.30

All songs written by Bob Dylan

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Petula Clark – Down Town (1965)

LPFrontCover1Born November 15, with “a voice as sweet as chapel bells,” Petula Clark first broke into the limelight during World War II when as a child she entertained the troops, both on radio and in concert. She is said to have performed in over 200 shows for the forces all over England before the age of nine and by war’s end, Petula Clark–the British “Shirley Temple” who had come to represent childhood itself–was so popular in England she was asked to sing at a national victory celebration at Trafalgar Square. In 1944, Petula made her first movie and has since appeared in over 30 British and American films. Born November 15, with “a voice as sweet as chapel bells,” Petula Clark first broke into the limelight during World War II when as a child she entertained the troops, both on radio and in concert. She is said to have performed in over 200 shows for the forces all over England before the age of nine and by war’s end, Petula Clark–the British “Shirley Temple” who had come to represent childhood itself–was so popular in England she was asked to sing at a national victory celebration at Trafalgar Square. In 1944, Petula made her first movie and has since appeared in over 30 British and American films.

PetulaClark1Throughout the forties and fifties Petula was a regular guest on a vast number of radio shows and became something of a television “pioneer” in England, first appearing on experimental TV in the forties and later as host of several of her own television series during the very early years of British programming, with Pet’s Parlour being her longest running and most popular. Although she sang regularly in concert, on radio and TV all through the forties, it wasn’t until 1949 that she recorded her first song Music, Music, Music and that pretty much sums up her very prolific recording career.
She has never stopped recording — 50 plus years and over a 1,000 songs and still counting!  Her first hits were children’s songs like Where Did My Snowman Go (1952) and The Little Shoemaker (1954). To date, she has sold well in excess of 68 million records.
In answer to the rock-and-roll craze of the late fifties, Petula recorded Sailor, Romeo and My Friend The Sea and was back on the charts again. In 1957, she was invited to sing at the famed Olympia theatre in France. After one song the French crowd went wild, and an entirely new career was launched.

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Asked to record in French, Petula declined at first but was quickly persuaded to do so by Frenchman Claude Wolff with whom she fell madly in love – they were married in June 1961. (They have three children, daughters Barbara and Catherine and son Patrick and a granddaughter and grandson.) By the early sixties, Petula found herself reinvented as a French chanteuse, even rivaling the legendary Piaf–during Piaf’s own lifetime. (She is still classified as a “French” singer

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on the shelves in French and French-Canadian record stores.) In addition to her newfound French pop star status, Petula also began to enjoy success with the songs that she had begun to record in German and Italian. By the mid-sixties she’d established herself as superstar throughout Europe with Number One tunes sung in different languages in different countries all across the Continent. (Interesting to note, each of her early European hits were with entirely different songs–a feat not duplicated by any other singer since!)

pictured at the Ideal Home Exhibition 1965.
Urged by her friends in Britain to record something in English, Petula allowed Tony Hatch to visit her in Paris where he presented his new song, Downtown. Petula recorded it and the rest is music history. Downtown skyrocketed to number 1 in the USA, launching Petula’s American career and earning her a Grammy in 1964. She quickly followed with I Know A Place which went to number 3 and earned Petula her second Grammy in 1965. Numerous top 40 hits followed. All told, Pet has had 15 top 40 hits in the USA (two #1 hits). Internationally, Petula Clark has charted in the top 40 somewhere, sometime, with 159 recordings! (in her own words)

And here´s this album with this sensational chart sucess all over the world: Downtown! And this song is of course a milestone in the history of British pop …

I add thsi song in the Frechn, German and Italian version … just for fun.

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Personnel:
Petula Cark (vocals)
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unknown studio orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. True Love Never Runs Smooth (Bacharach/David) 2.13
02. Baby It’s Me (Anthony) 2.21
03. Now That You’re Gone (Ballay/Newell/Clark) 2.56
04. Tell Me (That It’s Love) (Clark/Bernet/Hatch) 2.33
05. Crying Through A Sleepless Night (Anthony) 2.26
06. In Love (Freed/Lester/Fuqua) 2.34
07. Music (Hatch) 3.10
08. Be Good To Me (Anthony/Clark) 2.04
09. This Is Goodbye (Aber/Anthony/Clark) 2.23
10. Let Me Tell You (Anthony) 2.15
11. You Belong To Me (Price/King/Stewart) 2.41
12. Downtown (Hatch) 3.07
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13. Downtown (German version) 3.05
14. Downtown (French version) 3.14
15. Downtown (Italian version) 3.00

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Manfred Mann – The Five Faces Of (1964)

FrontCover1The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is the first studio album by British beat/R&B group Manfred Mann. It was first released in the United Kingdom on 11 September 1964 by His Master’s Voice. In late October/early November, the album was released in Canada by Capitol Records. The Canadian track listing was almost the same as the UK version, except it included the hit “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” instead of “I’ve Got My Mojo Working”. The record has been called “one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well”.

The American version of the album (their second U.S. release following The Manfred Mann Album) was released in February 1965 by Ascot Records (a subsidiary of United Artists) with a very different track listing.

The songs on the original version of the Five Faces of Manfred Mann are R&B, including the band’s cover versions of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, Muddy Waters’ “Got My Mojo Working”, and Bo Diddley’s “Bring It to Jerome”, as well as a few of the group’s own jazzy compositions. Particularly noticeable in the instrumental sections are Manfred Mann’s keyboard work, Mike Vickers flute and saxophone work, and Mike Hugg’s vibes. The album includes the Cannonball Adderley song “Sack O’ Woe” from the R&B-influenced school of early 60s jazz .

The American release is more pop-oriented with the inclusion of the hits “Sha-La-La”, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” and “Come Tomorrow”; as well as Jones’ compositions and the American folk song “John Hardy”. It also includes a smaller selection of the band’s R&B and jazz influences. (by wikipedia)

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The debut album by Manfred Mann holds up even better 40 years on than it did in 1964. It’s also one of the longest LPs of its era, clocking in at 39 minutes, and there’s not a wasted note or a song extended too far among its 14 tracks. The Manfreds never had the reputation that the Rolling Stones enjoyed, which is a shame, because The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well, and some of the best singing of its era, courtesy of Paul Jones, who blew most of his rivals out of the competition with his magnificently impassioned, soulful performance on “Untie Me,” and his simmering, lusty renditions of “Smokestack Lightning” and “Bring It to Jerome.” The stereo mix of the album, which never surfaced officially in England until this 1997 EMI anniversary reissue (remastered in 24-bit digital sound), holds up very nicely, with sharp separation between the channels yet — apart from a few moments on “Untie Me” — few moments of artificiality. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Vickers (guitar, flute, saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 3.33
02. Don’t Ask Me What I Say (Jones) 3.02
03. Sack O’ Woe (Adderley) 2.10
04. What You Gonna Do? (Jones/Mann) 2.39
05. Hoochie Coochie (Dixon) 3.20
06. I’m Your Kingpin (Mann/Jones) 2.49
07. Down the Road Apiece (Raye) 2.27
08. Got My Mojo Working (Preston Foster; credited to Muddy Waters) 3.13
09. It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (Seneca/Lee) 2.37
10. Mr. Anello (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09
11. Untie Me (South) 3.39
12. Bring It To Jerome (Green) 3.27
13. Without You (Jones) 2.22
14. You’ve Got To Take It”(Jones) 2.17
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15. Smokestack Lightning (alternate version) (Burnett) 2.54
16. What You Gonna Do? (mono version) (Jones/Mann) 2.39
17. Sack O’ Woe (instrumental version) (Adderley) 2.09
18. Mr. Anello(instrumental version) (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09

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Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – Por El Camino De Mexico (South Of The Border) (1964)

FrontCover1South of the Border is the third album by American easy listening brass band Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, originally released in 1964. The name of the group, for this album, is “Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass”.South of the Border is the third album by American easy listening brass band Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, originally released in 1964. The name of the group, for this album, is “Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass”.
Alpert’s first top ten hit, and fifth gold record, the album continued the progression of the Tijuana Brass from its mostly-Mexican sound to a more easy-listening style, with a collection of cover versions of popular songs. Included were “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face”, originally featured in the Broadway musical My Fair Lady and The Beatles’ 1963 hit “All My Loving”. It also featured an instrumental cover of its title song, “South of the Border”, which was most famously done as a vocal by Frank Sinatra.
“Hello, Dolly!” had the band singing a couple of lines of the mostly-instrumental rendition, in what might now be considered stereotyping, using mock-Mexican accents. Alpert’s distinctive singing voice was not discernible in that portion. Also, in some versions, he can be heard whispering “Número Cinco”, effecting a Mexican accent, at the start of that song’s track.

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One number, a Sol Lake tune called “The Mexican Shuffle”, was reworked for a TV ad for a brand of chewing gum, and styled “The Teaberry Shuffle”. Bert Kaempfert, author of several songs covered by the Brass, returned the favor by issuing a cover of “The Mexican Shuffle”. The number called “El Presidente”, was a reorchestration of Sol Lake’s “Winds of Barcelona”, which had appeared on Volume 2.
The cover features Alpert and perennial HATB model Sandra Moss at the Patio del Moro apartment complex in West Hollywood.

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Herb Alpert was still using an array of SoCal studio all-stars as his Tijuana Brass when South of the Border (1964) began to restore the combo’s good name after the modest Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. 2 (1963) failed to ignite a fire in listener’s ears. Alpert later commented that the Sol Lake composition “Mexican Shuffle” “opened a new door for me.” That passageway meant the loss of the Tijuana Brass’ practically forced mariachi style and the rise of Alpert’s approach in arranging familiar melodies in fresh, creative settings. Nowhere would this stylistic progression be as pronounced as in the horn-driven updates of several then-concurrent chart hits. For instance, the mod sonic wrinkle in “Girl from Ipanema” emits a darkness veiled in mystery, directly contrasting the light buoyancy of “Hello! Dolly” or the footloose feel of the Beatles’ “All My Loving.” They seamlessly fit in with Sol Lake’s “Salud, Amor y Dinero” and a cover of Julius Wechter’s playful, midtempo “Up Cherry Street” — which Wechter’s own Baja Marimba Band had just recorded for their 1964 self-titled debut.

The ballads “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” “Angelito,” and “Adios, Mi Corazon” provide contrasts with Alpert’s sensitive scores never seeming maudlin or unnecessarily over the top. If the regal “El Presidente” sounds particularly familiar, it may well be due to Alpert’s slight renovation of the “Winds of Barcelona” from the Tijuana Brass’ previous effort, the less than impressive Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. 2. It was renamed “El Presidente,” presumably to honor the then-recent memory of the slain U.S. leader John Fitzgerald Kennedy. (by Lindsay Planer)

In other word: Another pretty good album by Herb Alpert ! My copy was especially produced for the Spanisch record market …

The EP:

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vovals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
Lou Pagani (piano)
John Pisano (guitar)
Pat Senatore (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Al Sur De La Frontera (South Of The Border) (Kennedy/Carr) 2.07
02. La Chica De Ipanema (The Girl from Ipanema) (Gimbel/Jobim)de Moraes) 2.39
03. Hello, Dolly! (Herman) 1.57
04. Me Acostumbre A Ti (‘ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face (Lerner/Loewe) 2.27
05. En La Calle Del Cerezo (Up Cherry Street) (Wechter) 2.19
06. Mexican Shuffle (Lake) 2.10
07. El Presidente (Lake) 2.40
08. Todo Mi Amor (All My Loving) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.57
09. Angelito (Herrera/Ornelas) 2.23
10. Salud, Amor y Dinero (Health, Love and Money) (Lake) 2.06
11. Número Cinco (Number Five) (Coleman) 2.18
12. Adiós, Mi Corazón (Goodbye, My Heart) (Lake) 2.40

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The original US front cover:

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The Rolling Stones – Chicago Chess Sessions (1998)

FrontCover1In the beginning, the Stones wanted nothing more than to be a blues band. And for a long time, they were — albeit one that realized it could never, ever be as good as the musicians who schooled them from overseas. Dixon once told the Tribune that he remembered playing Piccadilly Square in London during the early ’60s. The callow Jagger, Richards and Jones were in the audience. “(These kids would) tell us, ‘Look, man, we got a little group and we want to do some of your songs,'” Dixon said. “We put a lot of songs on tape for them … and then some years later, somebody played me a record of (Dixon’s classic) ‘Little Red Rooster’ and told me some fellows called the Rolling Stones had done that song out of England. … (But) back then they were just little kids, no hair on their faces or anything, so how would I remember them?”

The Stones early albums were stuffed with cover versions of American blues and soul music, and as soon as the quintet became popular enough to tour America in the late spring of 1964, they beelined to Chess studios in Chicago for a two-day recording session. There they were greeted by the mighty Waters himself, who, according to the oft-repeated story, was slapping a coat of paint on the studio walls. Waters had no idea who these long-haired kids were, but helped them unload their gear anyway. While there, the Stones recorded the master’s “I Can’t Be Satisfied,” which appeared on their second album, “Rolling Stones No. 2,” while Dixon’s “Little Red Rooster” wound up on its U.K. companion, “Rolling Stones Now!”

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The Stones early recordings — newly reissued on the boxed set “The Rolling Stones in Mono” (ABKCO) — affirm how much the Stones borrowed from the Chicago blues: the songs, the mix of jazzy swing and backstreet menace, even the recording engineer, Ron Malo. All told the Stones recorded more than two dozen songs in three visits to Chess studios in 1964-65, which they sprinkled across several albums. (chicagotribune.com)

And here´s  very fine bootleg from this period … excellent soundoard recording … the early days of the British Blues … what a great period, what an unforgetable period !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Brian Jones (guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian Stewart (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. 2120 South Michigan Avenue (long version) (Nanker/Phelge) 3.57
02. Confessin’ The Blues (stereo version) (McShann/Brown) 3.16
03. High Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham ) 3.16
04. Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Berry) 3.57
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.49
06. If You Need Me (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.30
07. Empty Heart (Nanker/Phelge) 2.59
08. Around And Around (Berry) 3.24
09. Good Times, Bad Times (Jagger/Richards) 2.59
10. Down The Road Apiece (stereo version) (Raye) 3.20
11. I Can’t Be Satisfied (stereo version) (Morganfield) 3.57
12. Look What You’ve Done (stereo version) (Morganfield) 2.51
13. Stewed And Keefed (Brian´s Blues) (Nanker/Phelge) 4.34
14. Tell Me Baby (How Many Times) (Broonzy) 2.18
15. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.07
16. Confessin’ The Blues (McShann/Brown) 3.07
17. I Can’t Be Satisfied (Morganfield) 3.49
18. Look What You’ve Done (Morganfield) 2.51
19.  2120 South Michigan Avenue (stereo version) (Nanker/Phelge) 2.30
20.  It’s All Over Now (stereo version) (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.53

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Laurindo Almeida – Guitar From Ipanema (1964)

FrontCover1Laurindo Almeida (September 2, 1917 – July 26, 1995) was a Brazilian virtuoso guitarist and composer who made many recordings of enduring impact in classical, jazz and Latin genres. He is widely credited, with fellow artist Bud Shank, for creating the fusion of Latin and jazz which came to be known as the jazz samba. Almeida was the first artist to receive Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. His discography encompasses more than a hundred recordings over five decades. (by wikipedia)

It is a bit ironic that guitarist Laurindo Almeida found himself in the 1960’s jumping on the bossa-nova bandwagon a bit late for he had actually pioneered the movement a decade earlier. The Brazilian guitarist plays well enough on the 11 bossa tunes included on this out-of-print Lp (mostly originals plus covers of “The Girl From Ipanema,” “Manha De Carnaval” and “Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars”) but the arrangements (which sometimes utilize the whistling of Jack Marshall, George Field’s harmonica and flutist Harry Klee among others) are commercial and overly concise; all but two of the songs are under three minutes. Irene Kral’s two vocals (quite early in her career) are a plus and the music is quite pleasing but there are no surprises. (by Scott Yanow)

This music is magical …. and I imagine to touch the body of my lady with a feather …

Laurindo Almeida

Personnel:
Laurindo Almeida (guitar)
Justin Gordon (flute)
Al Hendrickson (guitar)
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Djalma Ferreira (organ on 05.)
George Fields (harmonica on 02. + 10.)
Harry Klee (flute on 03., 06. + 07.)
Irene Kral (vocals on 03., 08.)
Fafá Lemos (violin on 11.)
Jack Marshall (guitar … occasional, whistling on 01., 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. The Girl From Ipanema (Jobim/Gimbel/DeMorares) 2.20
02. Manhã de Carnaval (Maria/Bonfa) 3.10
03. Sarah’s Samba (Almeida) 2.08
04. Winter Moon (Almeida/Nelson) 2.58
05. Izabella (Ferreira) 2.34
06. Choro For People In Love (Almeida) 2.50
07. Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars (Corcovado) (Jobim) 2.42
08. Old Guitaron (Mercer/Almeida) 3.51
09. Um Abraço No Bonfa (Gilberto) 2.12
10. Twilight In Rio (Almeida) 3.04
11. The Fiddler’s Wolf Whistle (Lemos) 2.11

LabelB1
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