Blue Mitchell – The Thing To Do (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Thing to Do is an album by American trumpeter Blue Mitchell recorded in 1964 and released on the Blue Note label.

This Blue Mitchell date is a classic, particularly the opening “Fungii Mama,” which is really catchy. The trumpeter’s quintet of the period (which includes tenor saxophonist Junior Cook, the young pianist Chick Corea, bassist Gene Taylor, and drummer Al Foster) also performs two Jimmy Heath tunes and a song apiece by Joe Henderson (“Step Lightly”) and Corea. The record is prime Blue Note hard bop, containing inventive tunes, meaningful solos, and an enthusiastic but tight feel. Highly recommended. (by Scott Yanow)

Recorded in changing times, with the Blue Note catalogue elsewhere reflecting the pull of more adventurous music – Grachan Moncur, Hancock’s Empyrean Island – Blue Mitchell offered a line of continuity for straight ahead bop inherited with the Horace Silver band. Recording prolifically in the early sixties, with bluesy soul jazz offerings, the most interesting contribution is that of the young Chick Corea, given his own title “Chicks Tune”. Polished performances, though with so much talent burgeoning on the jazz scene it must have been difficult to stand out. A good enjoyable outing nonetheless. (by londonjazzcollector.wordpress)

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uncaPersonnel:
Junior Cook (saxophone)
Chick Corea (piano)
Al Foster (drums)
Blue Mitchell (trumpet)
Gene Taylor (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Fungii Mama (Mitchell) 7.48
02. Mona’s Mood (Heath) 5.18
03. The Thing To Do (Heath) 7.03
04. Step Lightly (Henderson) 10.25
06. Chick’s Tune (Corea) 9.37

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Casey Jones & The Governors – Don’t Ha Ha (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a forgotten highlight of the British Beat Scene in the Mid-Sixties:

Brian Casser (born 21 March 1936, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a British singer and guitarist. He led the first notable beat group in Liverpool, Cass & the Cassanovas, who were early rivals of The Beatles in the city. He later led another group, Casey Jones & the Engineers, which was one of Eric Clapton’s first bands, and then, as leader of Casey Jones & the Governors, became successful in Germany in the mid-1960s.

Casser lived in Liverpool in the late 1950s, having previously worked in the Merchant Navy. As singer and rhythm guitarist, he formed a trio, Cass & the Cassanovas, in May 1959, with singer and guitarist Adrian Barber (born 13 November 1938, Ilkley, Yorkshire), and drummer and singer Brian J. Hudson (born Brian James Hudson, 21 April 1938, Cleveland, Yorkshire). After a few months, Hudson left and was replaced by Johnny Hutchinson (born 18 July 1940, Malta), known as Johnny Hutch. In need of a bass guitarist, Hutchinson then brought in Johnny Gustafson (born 8 August 1942, Liverpool) in December 1959.

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At that time Gustafson did not have a proper bass guitar so Barber converted an acoustic for him. The group became popular playing a wide range of music, from Latin American music to rock and roll, in dance halls in the Liverpool area. Casser also started his own music club in Liverpool, the Casanova Club, whose guest groups included one known at the time as the “Silver Beetles”; according to some reports, Casser had suggested that they change their name from the earlier spelling of “Beatals” which Casser found “ridiculous”. In May 1960 Cass & the Cassanovas took part in auditions in front of leading manager Larry Parnes who was looking for backing bands for his stable of pop singers. The group secured a place as backing group for singer Duffy Power and toured with him.[3][4][5] By this time, Casser had begun using the stage names of “Casey Jones” and “Casey Valence”.

In December 1960, Gustafson, Hutchinson and Barber left the band, and formed themselves into a new trio, The Big Three. Casser moved to London around 1962, and managed the Blue Gardenia club in Soho. He also briefly formed a group called the Nightsounds, which featured Albert Lee on guitar. The following year, he won a recording contract with the Columbia label, and recorded a single, “One Way Ticket”, using the name Casey Jones. With drummer Ray Stock, he recruited two former members of R&B group the Roosters, guitarist Eric Clapton and bassist Tom McGuinness, and briefly toured as Casey Jones & the Engineers. Clapton and McGuinness left after a few performances, shortly followed by Stock.

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Casser then formed a new group with David Coleman (lead guitar), Roger Cook (rhythm guitar), Jim Rodford (bass) and Peter Richards (drums). They played at the Star-Club in Hamburg and became popular in Germany, releasing two singles, “Tall Girl” and “Don’t Ha Ha” on the Bellaphon label, before changing their name to Casey Jones & the Governors, apparently in an attempt to stress their British origins. The record label reissued “Don’t Ha Ha” – which in fact was a version of the 1958 Huey Smith and the Clowns song “Don’t You Just Know It” – under the new band name and it rose to # 2 on the German pop chart. Casey Jones and the Governors continued to tour and record successfully in Germany for a few years, achieving six top 40 singles and releasing two albums on the Gold 12 label, Casey Jones and the Governors (1965) and Don’t Ha Ha (1966).

In the 1970s, Casser, still using the name Casey Jones, worked as a disc jockey in Löhnberg, and recorded a solo album, Casey’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Show.[3] In the 1990s, he formed a new version of Casey Jones and the Governors to play the oldies circuit in Germany, and in 2006 was reported to be living in Unna near Dortmund. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s the very rare debut album … if you like the raw, sometimes sentimental Sixties Beat you should listen … here´s one of the best Album from this period … including many bonus tracks (Singles from 1963 – 1966) and … a killer vrsion of “Jack The Ripper” !

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Personnel:
David Coleman (guitar)
Roger Hook (guitar)
Casey Jones (vocals)
Jim Redford (bass)
Peter Richards (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Ha Ha (Smith/Vincent) 2.07
02. Love Potion No. 9 (Leiber/Stoller) 2.06
03. Mickeys Monkey (Robinson) 3.06
04. Parchman Farm (Allison) 2.56
05. Slow Down (Williams) 3.09
06. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 2.29
07. Sounds Like Locomotion (St. John) 1.52
08. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Williams) 2.06
09. Talking ‘Bout You (Berry) 2.05
10. Do The Dog (Thomas) 2.50
11. Can’t Judge A Book (McDaniels) 2.39
12. So Long Baby (Jones) 4.28
13. Jack The Ripper (Sutch) 3.04
14. Nashville Special (Larson) 2.30
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15. One Way Ticket  (Davis/Duncan/Jones) 2.49
16. I’m Gonna Love (Davis/Duncan) 2.04
17. Tall Girl (Jones) 2.04
18. Blue Tears (Jones) 2.49
19. Don’t Ha Ha (1st Version, 1963) (Smith/Vincent) 
20. Long Gone Train (Jones) 2.38
21. Candy Man (Ross/Neil) 2.20
22. Tallahassee Lassie (Slay/Crese/Picariello) 2.26
23. So Long Baby (Mono Single mix) (Jones) 2.03
24. Bumble Bee (German Version) (Fullylock/Baker/Holm) 2.21
25. Rootin Tootin Baby (Jones) 2.34
26. Yockomo (Mono Single mix) (Smith/Vincent) 2.34
27. Baby Why Did You Say Goodbye (Jones) 2.32
28. Little Girl (Jones) 3.08
29. A Legal Matter (Townshend) 2.55

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The Animals – Live At Ed Sullivan (1964 – 1966)

FrontCover1The Animals had hit the ground running with “House of the Rising Sun”, which topped the US and UK charts in 1964. Bob Dylan had previously recorded the folk song about a brothel in New Orleans, but the Animals took it to Number One. This song was the perfect vehicle for their powerful take on rhythm and blues, highlighted by Eric Burdon’s gritty howl. The quintet was made up of lead singer Burdon, Hilton Valentine on guitar, Alan Price on keyboards, Bryan “Chas” Chandler on bass, and John Steel on the drums.

The boys first appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on October 18th 1964. With young girls screaming their lungs out, The Animals took the audience hostage as they played “I’m Crying” followed by their #1 hit “House of the Rising Sun.” The audience got so out of control that Sullivan had to shush them several times.

Eric Burden remembers, “I was making my way to CBS one time to do The Sullivan Show, and I ran down this back alley and got cornered and I had to get rescued by a couple of New York cops, and the kids were so wild, one cop lost his badge and his cap and his gun, I think, and the other one backed into a corner and he had a night stick, and he put the night stick across this doorway, and I was in the doorway. And the hounds were like this, and the door under the pressure just gave in, and I fell in through the door and landed in somebody’s front room.”

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For their second appearance on January 24, 1965 The Animals performed “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood.” These early shows recorded some of The Animals best performances as they energetically charged the audience. Although Burdon’s singing was emotionally raw, he came off as shy and somewhat awkward.

During 1965, they did two more Sullivan shows, singing “Bright Lights Big City,” “Bring it Home to Me” and “The Work Song.” On February 6, 1966 they again appeared, and performed the hit “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” and “Inside Looking Out.” For their last appearance on August 14th 1966, they sang Sam Cooke’s “Shake” and “Don’t Bring Me Down.” But by this time, they had begun to disintegrate.

The original lineup of the group only recorded three albums, yet nevertheless managed to break out eight Top 40 hits between 1964 and 1966. Price left in 1965, and Steel the following year. Also in 1966, Chandler left to start managing talent, and it was he who discovered Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now a very different group, they were known as Eric Burdon & The Animals, and had six additional Top 40 hits before finally disbanding in 1968.

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After a few unsuccessful attempts at reunions, The Animals got together for their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 1996, Chandler died in his sleep from a heart attack, and Rowberry died of heart failure in 2003. The Ed Sullivan Show remains an integral part of the group’s history. In a recent interview with The Examiner, Burdon recalls The Ed Sullivan Show as “Long hours of continuous rehearsals, but if you didn’t do the show, you went nowhere. It seems like he liked us. We were invited back to the show many times. Six appearances in all.” (by edsullivan.com)

And here ar six songs from this legendary perio of The Animals …

Listen and enjoy this fucking good band from Newcastle/UK.

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Personnel:
Eric Burdon (vocals)
Bryan “Chas” Chandler (bass)
Alan Price (keyboards)
John Steel (drums)
Hilton Valentine (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. The House of the Rising Sun (Traditional) 3.12
02. Don’t Bring Me Down (Goffin/King) 2.23
03. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (Benjamin/Caldwell/Marcus) 2.25
04. Baby Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.32
05. We’ve Gotta Get Out of This Place (Mann/Weil) 2.13
06. Inside Looking Out (J.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 2.53

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In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it
(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

The Moody Blues – The Magnificent Moodies (1965)

FrontCover1The Magnificent Moodies is the 1965 debut album by The Moody Blues, first released in the UK, and the first and only album featuring their R&B line-up of guitarist Denny Laine, bassist Clint Warwick, keyboardist Mike Pinder, flautist–percussionist Ray Thomas, and drummer Graeme Edge. Lead vocals were shared by Laine, Pinder and Thomas. The album is a collection of R&B and Merseybeat songs, including the cover of “Go Now”, produced by Alex Wharton, that had been a Number 1 hit single earlier that year. For the U.S. release, on London Records, with the title of Go Now – The Moody Blues #1, four songs were replaced and the tracks re-ordered.

The album did not make the Record Retailer/Music Week chart even though it reached number 5 in August 1965 in the New Musical Express album chart. The U.S. album did not make the Billboard chart.

The sleeve notes on the original UK release include an (undated) review by Virginia Ironside, music critic of Daily Mail, which concludes, “With the Moody Blues, all you need to write is “MAGNIFICENT” in pink lipstick and leave it at that”; and a prose poem by Donovan recommending the band. All the tracks on the UK release were produced by Denny Cordell; except for “Go Now”, which was produced by Alex Wharton.

Laine and Warwick left the group in 1966, and were replaced by guitarist Justin Hayward and bassist John Lodge respectively. (by wikipedia)

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The pre-psychedelic Moody Blues were represented in England by this album, which is steeped in American soul. The covers include songs by James Brown, Willie Dixon, and Chris Kenner, plus the chart-busting “Go Now” (originally recorded by Bessie Banks), interspersed with a brace of originals by lead singer/guitarist Denny Laine and keyboardist Mike Pinder, and one Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich number, “I’ve Got a Dream.” The shouters, like “I’ll Go Crazy” and “Bye Bye Bird,” will be the big surprises, showcasing the rawest sound by the group, but “I’ve Got a Dream” shows a lyrical, harmony-based sound that is vaguely reminiscent of the Four Tops (which is ironic, as that group later cut a single of the latter-day Moody Blues original “So Deep Within You”), while “Thank You Baby,” a Laine/Pinder original, offers them doing a smooth, dance-oriented number with some catchy hooks. The group’s sound is good and loud, and Laine was a phenomenal singer, though the band lacked the charisma and built-in excitement of such rivals as the Rolling Stones and the Animals. This album is more interesting than its American equivalent, but also not as good, since it leaves off such single sides as “Steal Your Heart Away” and the Pinder/Laine “From the Bottom of My Heart,” the latter being the best side this version of the group ever recorded. (by Bruce Eder)

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018 …

Listen to his harmonica solo on “Bye Bye Bird” … bye bye Ray Thomas ….

The Moody Blues in Concert at The Pier - Summer 1987

Personnel:
Graeme Edge (drums, percussion, vocals)
Denny Laine (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Mike Pinder (keyboards, vocals)
Ray Thomas (flute, harmonica, percussion, vocals)
Clint Warwick (bass, vocals)
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Elaine Caswell (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. I’ll Go Crazy (Brown) 2.08
02. Something You Got (Kenner) 2.49
03. Go Now (Banks/Bennett) 3.09
04. Can’t Nobody Love You (Mitchell) 3.59
05. I Don’t Mind (Brown) 3.24
06. I’ve Got A Dream (Greenwich/Barry) 2.48
07. Let Me Go (Laine/Pinder) 3.11
08. Stop (Laine/Pinder) 2.02
09. Thank You Baby (Laine/Pinder) 2.26
10. It Ain’t Necessarily So (Heyward/G. Gershwin/I. Gershwin) 3.18
11. True Story (Laine/Pinder) 1.42
12. Bye Bye Bird (Williamson/Dixon) 2.47LabelB1

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Ray Thomas

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018, his record label said. He was 76. Cherry Red Records and Esoteric Recordings said in a statement: “We are deeply shocked by his passing and will miss his warmth, humour and kindness. It was a privilege to have known and worked with him and our thoughts are with his family and his wife, Lee, at this sad time.” In 2014 Thomas revealed on his website that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. He said he had received his diagnosis in 2013. Born in 1941, Thomas founded The Moody Blues in 1964 with fellow musicians including Mike Pinder and Denny Laine. The band soon swapped blues roots for a more orchestral sound that came to be called progressive rock. Thomas’s flute solo was a key ingredient on one of its biggest hits, “Nights in White Satin.” The band is due to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio in April 2018. – The Guardian/Billboard

Jim Messina & His Jesters – The Dragsters (1964)

BenQ DC S1410“Early in his career — right at the outset, in fact — 18-year-old Jim Messina was a devotee of surf music, enamored of the music of Dick Dale, the Champs et al. The Jesters was among his early professional efforts, a surf band that included, along with Messina, Bill Beckman and Ron House on guitars, Jim Sholstedt on bass, Dave Archuleta on saxophone, and Larry Cundieff on drums. They won a lot of local band competitions in California, where the competition in the field was still fierce in 1965 and 1966, and were good enough to get to record an entire LP for Audio Fidelity. It was re-released on the Thimble label in the mid-1970’s, to capitalize on Messina’s success as one half of Loggins & Messina”

”The original Jesters LP was released sometime in ’64 and was credited to “Jim Messina and his Jesters” (notice the copy of “Dick Dale and HIS Del-tones”) and it was called The Dragsters. This is the LP that was reissued on CD on the semi-legit Euro label Surf in the ’90s. It’s great stuff, 14 songs, 11 of them written by Messina. The covers are: an uptempo version of the Breeze and I, and surf-guitar-led versions of fifties instro hits Honky Tonk and Raunchy. Messina’s guitar work is truly exceptional, sounding like DD’s flashier doppleganger, with a lot of nimble fingerwork full of fast hammer-ons and pull-offs, and not as much double-picking as you may expect. (I only recently started noticing how Dick-Dale-ish Messina’s playing was. Listen to “The Thing” – it’s a total rip-off of DD’s “Surfing Drums” – which of course was a Bo Diddley rip-off itself! – and the licks he’s playing are completely DD.

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Live at Lier´s Music, San Bernadino, California, ca. 1963

Messina also uses the pickup position #4 (neck and middle pickups) a LOT, which is also something that DD pioneered in surf music.) I HIGHLY recommend this CD. The highlights for me are “The Jester”, which is as good as any surf song I think, “The Cossack”, “High Voltage” (an apt title!), and “Yang Bu”. If there is one criticism I would have of the material is that it’s a bit light on melody, instead relying on groove, energy and improvisation. But it works most of the time. There’s a really nice jazz and even blues influence throughout, especially evident on “Suspense Run” and “Hollywood Sound” (both very jazzy in rhythm and featuring some tasty surf-blues guitar playing, with the latter obviously influenced by Mel Torme’s “I’m Comin’ Home Baby”). And as Messina mentioned in his interview, almost every song has a bunch of engine revving and tires skidding noises overdubbed. A lot of songs also have the noises of the band shouting along with the music, as if they’re really into it. I suspect these were overdubbed later, along with the car-related noises.” (by Ivan P. – Surf Guitar Magazine 101, June 25, 2004)

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Personnel:
Dave Archuleta (saxophone)
Bill Beckman (guitar)
Larry Cundieff (drums)
Ron House (guitar)
Jim Messina (lead guitar)
Jim Sholstedt (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. The Breeze And I (Lecuona/Stillman) 1.31
02. Raunchy (Justis) 1.37
03. No Name Dragster (Messina/Frey) 2.02
04. Strange Man (Messina/Frey) 1.40
05. High Voltage (Messina/Frey) 1.58
06. Yang Bu (Messina/Frey) 2.29
07. The Thing (Messina/Frey) 2.04
08. The Jester (Messina/Frey) 2.00
09. Suspense Run (Messina/Frey) 3.05
10. The Cossack (Messina/Frey) 1.55
11. Masatlan Rally (Messina/Frey) 1.54
12. Honkey Tonk (Oliver) 2.33
13. Chihiuaha (unknown) 2.05
14. Tamale Wagon (Messina/Frey) 1.43

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Jim Messina And The Jesters ( ’82 reissue with different mix; 10 tracks only)
01. The Jester (Messina/Frey) 2.31
02. Hollywood Sound (previously unreleased) (Messina/Frey) 2.15
03. Masatlan Rally (Messina/Frey) 2.08
04. High Voltage (Messina/Frey) 2.08
05. Yang Bu (Messina/Frey) 2.16
06. Honkey Tonk (Oliver) 3.45
07. Strange Man (Messina/Frey) 1.33
08. The Cossack (Messina/Frey) 2.02
09. Tamale Wagon (Messina/Frey) 1.57
10. The Thing (Messina/Frey) 2.00

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Front + back cover from the 1982 edition

Alan Jay Lerner & Frederick Loewe – My Fair Lady (OST (1964)

FrontCover1My Fair Lady is a 1964 American musical film adapted from the Lerner and Loewe eponymous stage musical based on the 1913 stage play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. With a screenplay by Alan Jay Lerner and directed by George Cukor, the film depicts a poor Cockney flower seller named Eliza Doolittle who overhears an arrogant phonetics professor, Henry Higgins, as he casually wagers that he could teach her to speak “proper” English, thereby making her presentable in the high society of Edwardian London.

The film stars Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison as Eliza Doolittle and Henry Higgins respectively, with Stanley Holloway, Gladys Cooper and Wilfrid Hyde-White in supporting roles. A critical and commercial success, it won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Director. In 1998, the American Film Institute named it the 91st greatest American film of all time.

In Edwardian London, Professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison), a scholar of phonetics, believes that the accent and tone of one’s voice determines a person’s prospects in society. In Covent Garden one evening, he boasts to a new acquaintance, Colonel Hugh Pickering (Wilfrid Hyde-White), himself an expert in phonetics, that he could teach any person to speak in a way that he could pass them off as a duke or duchess at an embassy ball. Higgins selects as an example a young flower seller, Eliza Doolittle (Audrey MoviePosterHepburn), who has a strong Cockney accent. Eliza’s ambition is to work in a flower shop, but her thick accent makes her unsuitable. Having come from India to meet Higgins, Pickering is invited to stay with the professor. The following morning, Eliza shows up at Higgins’ home, seeking lessons. Pickering is intrigued and offers to cover all expenses if the experiment should be successful.

Eliza’s father, Alfred P. Doolittle (Stanley Holloway), a dustman, shows up three days later, ostensibly to protect his daughter’s virtue, but in reality simply to extract some money from Higgins, and is bought off with £5. Higgins is impressed by the man’s honesty, his natural gift for language, and especially his brazen lack of morals. Higgins recommends Alfred to a wealthy American who is interested in morality. Eliza goes through many forms of speech training, such as speaking with marbles in her mouth, enduring Higgins’ harsh approach to teaching and his treatment of her personally. She makes little progress, but just as she, Higgins, and Pickering are about to give up, Eliza finally “gets it”; she instantly begins to speak with an impeccable upper class accent.

As a test, Higgins takes her to Ascot Racecourse, where she makes a good impression initially, only to shock everyone by a sudden lapse into vulgar Cockney while cheering on a horse. Higgins, who dislikes the pretentiousness of the upper class, partly conceals a grin behind his hand. Eliza poses as a mysterious lady at an embassy ball and even dances with a foreign prince. At the ball is Zoltan Karpathy (Theodore Bikel), a Hungarian phonetics expert trained by Higgins. After a brief conversation with Eliza, he certifies that she is not only Hungarian, but of royal blood, declaring her to be a Princess.

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After all the effort she has put in, however, Eliza’s actions aren’t even acknowledged; all the praise going to Higgins. This, and his callous treatment towards her afterwards, especially his indifference to her future, causes her to throw Higgins’ slippers at him, and to walk out on him, leaving him mystified by her ingratitude. Accompanied by Freddy Eynsford-Hill (Jeremy Brett), a young man she met at Ascot and who is charmed by her, Eliza returns to her old life, but finds that she no longer fits in. She meets her father, who has been left a large fortune by the wealthy American to whom Higgins had recommended him, and is resigned to marrying Eliza’s stepmother. Alfred feels that Higgins has ruined him, since he is now bound by morals and responsibility. Eventually, Eliza ends up visiting Higgins’ mother (Gladys Cooper), who is enraged at her son’s behaviour.

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The next day, Higgins finds Eliza gone and searches for her, eventually finding her at his mother’s house. Higgins attempts to talk Eliza into coming back to him. He becomes angered when Eliza announces that she is going to marry Freddy and become Karpathy’s assistant. He makes his way home, stubbornly predicting that she will come crawling back. However, he comes to the realization that he has “grown accustomed to her face.” Henry returns to his study to lament his loneliness. As he listens to Eliza’s recorded voice, she reappears in the doorway behind him, turning off the recording and saying in her old Cockney accent, “I washed my hands and face before I come I did.” Higgins looks surprised then pleased before asking for his slippers once more as Eliza smiles on behind him, leaving the audience to decide what happens next. (by wikipedia)

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My Fair Lady is–deservedly–one of the most famous musicals of all time. Its popular 1964 film version, directed by George Cukor, has ensured that for most people Audrey Hepburn is Eliza Doolittle, while Broadway-heads swear by Julie Andrews’s stage performance, immortalized on the 1956 cast album. Of course, for the purposes of a CD review it’s more accurate to compare the performances of Andrews and Marni Nixon, who sang the songs lip-synched by Hepburn in the movie. While Andrews usually comes out on top (especially on “I Could Have Danced All Night”), Nixon is no slouch (after all, she also dubbed Natalie Wood in West Side Story and Deborah Kerr in The King & I). Rex Harrison, of course, does his own vocals, but then he doesn’t so much sing his songs as talk them. While Nixon and Harrison are tops, the truth is that Lerner and Loewe’s songs are so good as to endure almost anybody’s interpretation: “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” “With a Little Bit of Luck,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “Get Me to the Church on Time,” and so on–not many shows can boast as many classics. The movie version’s real bonus is Andre Previn’s swellegant orchestration. (by Elisabeth Vincentell)

And I add a large collection of lobby cards from this classic movie. Thanks to legendsofsfandfantasyart.blogspot

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Personnel:
Rex Harrison ( Professor Henry Higgins)
Audrey Hepburn (Eliza Doolittle)
Stanley Holloway (Alfred P. Doolittle)
Marni Nixon )as Eliza’s singing voice)
Bill Shirley (for Jeremy Brett) (Freddy Eynsford-Hill )
Wilfrid Hyde-White (Colonel Hugh Pickering)
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The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra conducted by André Previn

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Tracklist:
01. Overture 3.27
02. Why Can’t The English Learn To Speak? (Rex Harrison, Audrey Hepburn, Wilfrid Hyde-White)
03. Wouldn’t It Be Loverly? (Marni Nixon (for Hepburn))
04. I’m An Ordinary Man (Harrison)
05. With A Little Bit Of Luck (Stanley Holloway)
06. Just You Wait (Hepburn, Nixon)
07. The Rain In Spain (Harrison, Hepburn, Nixon, Wilfrid Hyde-White)
08. I Could Have Danced All Night (Nixon)
09. Ascot Gavotte
10. On The Street Where You Live (Bill Shirley (for Jeremy Brett))
11. You Did It (Harrison, Hyde-White) (without the choir “Congratulations”)
12. Show Me (Nixon, Shirley)
13. Get Me To The Church On Time (Holloway)
14. A Hymn To Him (Why Can’t A Woman Be More Like A Man?) (Harrison, Hyde-White)
15. Without You (Nixon, Harrison)
16. I’ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face (Harrison) 4.53

Music and lyrics: Alan Jay Lerner & Frederick Loewe

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Swinging Blue Jeans – Blue Jeans à Swinging (1964)

LPFrontCover1Blue Jeans a’Swinging is the first UK studio album by British Merseybeat band the Swinging Blue Jeans, released in November 1964 on HMV.

The Swinging Blue Jeans were near the top of Liverpool’s rock & roll bands, although Americans who’ve only heard their pile-driver-textured Top 30 version of “Hippy Hippy Shake” (utterly unrepresentative of their sound or range) might wonder at that statement. This album provides the evidence — ironically, with a little better choice of material, it would rate very close behind the With the Beatles LP as a fresh and brilliant piece of music-making, and even as it stands, it’s not too far behind. In order to fully appreciate Blue Jeans a’ Swinging, you have to put yourself back in 1964. Liverpool and the rest of the north are filled with acts that can thump away hard, or harmonize pleasingly, but only a handful that can do both, and even fewer that can do both well, and most of those, apart from the Beatles, can’t decide if they want to be the Everly Brothers or Chuck Berry. The Beatles knew that with a little care, they could be both — and based on the evidence on this album, the Swinging Blue Jeans were of the same mind and had the talent to pull it off.

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Blue Jeans a’ Swinging features punchy, crunchy rhythm guitar, jangling lead guitar, some pretty raw singing by all four bandmembers alternating with decent harmonizing. There are also a few offbeat song choices, starting with the opening track, “Ol’ Man Mose.” Their cover of “Save the Last Dance for Me” is a credible rendition of a contemporary Drifters hit, and their versions of “Lawdy Miss Clawdy” and “Long Tall Sally” are solid pieces of rock & roll. Their Buddy Holly-like versions of the Hank Marvin-Bruce Welch songs “That’s the Way It Goes” and “Don’t It Make You Feel Good” have enough hooks that either could’ve been a single and a hit; the ballad “All I Want Is You,” dominated by the quartet’s harmony vocals, sounding even more like Holly.

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The band reaches back further than the Shadows, covering, “It’s All Over Now,” an offbeat lament written by Wally Whyton of the Vipers Skiffle Group-this is their “Ringo Starr number, ” slightly goofy, with a vague country-ish tint. Even the one original here, a group composition called “It So Right,” is a good rock & roll number with acceptably clever wordplay. Only their version of the Boudleaux Bryant “Some Sweet Day” seems flaccid and second-rate. That flaw aside, this is one of the best rock & roll albums of its era to come out of Liverpool. (by Bruce Eder)

Many songs are from the innocent side of the early Beat music (like “Save The Last Dance For Me”)  … but on this album you can some real hightlights from this period of music like “TuttiFrutti”, a great version of “Around And Around” by Chuck Berry and of course “Long Tall Sally” … one of the est versions ever recorded …

Oh … let´s have some fun tonight …

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Personnel:
Les Braid (bass, keyboards)
Ray Ennis (lead guitar, vocals)
Ralph Ellis (guitar)
Norman Kuhlke (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Ol’Man Mose (Armstrong/Randolph) 3.07
02. Save The Last Dance For Me (Pomus/Shuman) 2.53
03. That’s The Way It Goes (Marvin/Welch) 2.38
04. Around And Around (Berry) 2.09
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 1.58
06. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Blackwell/Penniman) 1.45
07. Lawdy Miss Clawdy (Price) 1.42
08. Some Sweet Day (F.Bryant/B.Bryant) 2.07
09. It’s So Right (Braid/Kuhlke/Ellis/Ennis) 1.58
10. Don’t It Make You Feel Good (Welch/Marvin) 1.42
11. All I Want Is You (Ireland/Chilton) 2.11
12. Tutti Frutti (LaBostrie/Lubin/Penniman) 1.58

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They say the joint was rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well they never stop a rocking
Until the moon went down

Oh it sound so sweet
Gotta take me a chance
Rose out of my seat
Just had to dance
Started moving ma feet
Well and clapping my hands

Well the joint started rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well they never stoped rocking
Until the moon went down

Twelve o’clock
Well the place was packed
Front doors was locked
Well the place was packed
When the police knocked
Both doors flew back

Well they kept on rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well you never stop rocking
Until the moon went down

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The Swinging Blue Jeans, live in 2013 !!!