John Hammond – So Many Roads (1965)

FrontCover1John Hammond jr., son of the legendary Columbia Records A&R man who had signed Billie Holliday, Aretha Franklin and Bob Dylan, met the Hawks in Toronto in 1964 and was astonished by the perfection with which these young men played rhythm and blues. After several jam sessions with the Hawks, Hammond arranged for the Hawks to back him on this third album he would cut for Vanguard, but the record company insisted that he should use bassist Jimmy Lewis and piano player Mike Bloomfield. The old-time-blues inspired album So Many Roads ended up with Robbie, Levon and Garth contributing guitar, drums and keyboards. Robertson’s guitar work is among his most exciting blues performances, what Greil Marcus described as “all rough edges, jagged bits of metal ripping through the spare rhythm section”. (by http://theband.hiof.no)

So Many Roads is Hammond’s most notable mid-’60s Vanguard album, due not so much to Hammond’s own singing and playing (though he’s up to the task) as the yet-to-be-famous backing musicians. Three future members of the Band — Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson, and Levon Helm — are among the supporting cast, along with Charlie John Hammond01Musselwhite on harmonica, and Mike Bloomfield also contributes. It’s one of the first fully realized blues-rock albums, although it’s not in the same league as the best efforts of the era by the likes of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band or John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. In part that’s because the repertoire is so heavy on familiar Chicago blues classics by the likes of Willie Dixon, Bo Diddley, and Muddy Waters; in part that’s because the interpretations are so reverent and close to the originals in arrangement; and in part it’s also because Hammond’s blues vocals were only okay. Revisionist critics thus tend to downgrade the record a notch. But in the context of its time — when songs like “Down in the Bottom,” “Long Distance Call,” “Big Boss Man,” and “You Can’t Judge a Book By the Cover” were not as well known as they would become — it was a punchy, well-done set of electric blues with a rock touch. (by Richie Unterberger)

What a line-up !!!

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Personnel:
Michael Bloomfield (piano)
John Hammond (vocals, guitar)
Levon Helms (drums)
Eric Hudson (organ)
Jimmy Lewis (bass)
Charlie Musselwhite (harmonica)
Robbie Robertson (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.05
02. Long Distance Call (Morganfield) 3.22
03. Who Do You Love (McDaniels) 3.03
04. I Want You To Love Me (Morganfield) 4.09
05. Judgment Day (Johnson/Hammond) 3.26
06. So Many Roads, So Many Trains (Paul) 2.43
07. Rambling Blues (Johnson) 3.19
08. O Yea! (McDaniels) 3.36
09. You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover (Dixon) 3.32
10. Gambling Blues (Jackson) 3.14
11. Baby, Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.23
12. Big Boss Man (Smith/Dixon) 2.41

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Los Shakers – Same (1965)

LPFrontCover1Los Shakers were a popular rock band in 1960s and was a part of the Uruguayan Invasion in Latin America. They were heavily influenced by the look and sound of the Beatles.[1][2] In the late 1960s they would broaden and expand their musical direction before breaking up at the end of the decade.

The band was formed in 1964 in Montevideo, Uruguay by brothers, Hugo Fattoruso (lead guitar and keyboards) and Osvaldo Fattoruso (rhythm guitar), after watching the movie, A Hard Days Night, by the Beatles. They were modeled after The Beatles and even adopted similar haircuts and clothing, as can be seen in their record cover. The band sang many songs in English, despite their location, and gained their greatest popularity in Argentina.

They signed with the Odeon label of EMI in Argentina. The first single recorded as The Shakers was “Break it All”, in 1965, followed by self-titled album later that year. For obvious reasons, the band focused their attentions almost exclusively on Latin America, but did they did take one crack at the English-speaking market when they released the album Break it All, on the US-based Audio Fidelity label in 1966.

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The record (which featured re-recorded versions of many of the songs on their original LP and even a Spanish-language version of Beatles’ “Ticket to Ride”) was little more than a curiosity in America and was not a hit, but became a collector’s item decades later, as would their second album, Shakers For You (released in 1968).

Reflecting the move towards psychedelia, their music went in a new direction. Their last studio album with the original line up, La Conferencia Secreta del Toto’s Bar, released in 1968,[12] mixed psychedelic influences with candombe and some tango sounds; the album has been described as a Latin American Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. However, their recording label (EMI) did not approve of this new sound, and left them without any promotion or support; it led to the band’s split up. In 2005, the original lineup re-united, and recorded a CD Bonus Tracks and played in Argentina and Uruguay. Los Shakers would break up shortly thereafter.

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Osvaldo Fattoruso, guitarist and drummer, died on July 29, 2012 due to cancer at the age of 64.

And this is the first studio album by this Uruguayan beat band. It was released in July 1965 on the Odeon Pops label. (by wikipedia)

And we hear pretty good beat music … this time not from the Merseyside in UK, but from Uruguay … and the guys knows how to play this exciting music !

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Personnel:
Roberto “Pelín” Capobianco (bass, bandoneon, background vocals)
Hugo Fattoruso (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)
Osvaldo Fattoruso (guitar, vocals)
Carlos “Caio” Vila (drums, backing vocals

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Tracklist:
01. Rompan Todo (Break It All) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.30
02. Que Amor (What A Love) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 3.05
03. Nena Si, Si (Baby Yeah, Yeah) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.21
04. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.29
05. Corran Todos (Everybody Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.14
06. Estoy Pensando (I’m Thinking) (Vila) 2.20
07. Esta Es Mi Fiesta (It’s My Party) (Gold/Gluck Jr./Weiner/Gottlieb) 2.14
08. Sigue Buscando (Keep Searching) (Shannon) 2.00
09. Para Ti Y Para Mi (For You And Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
10. Corro Por Las Calles (Shake In The Streets) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.31
11. La Larga Noche (The Longest Night) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.12
12. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.13
13. No Me Pidas Amor (Don’t Ask Me Love) (O.Fattoruso/Capobianco) 2.03
14. Dame (Give Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.27
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15. My Bonnie (Traditional/Sheridan) 2.00
16. Solo En Tus Ojos (Only In Your Eyes) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
17. Mas (More) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.07
18. Boleto Para Pasear (Ticket To Ride) [sung in Spanish] (Lennon/McCartney) 2.13
19. Hasta Luego Cocodrilo (See You Later Alligator) (Guidry) 1.57
20. Solo Quiero Estar Contigo (I Only Want To Be With You) [sung in Spanish] (Hawker/Raymonde) 2.34
21. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.32
22. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.18

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Hugh Masekela – The Americanization of Ooga Booga (The Lasting Impressions Of Ooga Booga) (1966)

OriginalFrontCover1The Americanization of Ooga Booga is an album by South African jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela. The album is a blend of American jazz themes and traditional South African musical influences. It was recorded live in November 1965 at The Village Gate night club in New York City and released in June, 1966 via MGM Records label. MGM’s president was convinced that Masekela’s albums were too African for American tastes, so soon after Masekela moved to Chisa/Blue Thumb labels.The Americanization of Ooga Booga is an album by South African jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela. The album is a blend of American jazz themes and traditional South African musical influences. It was recorded live in November 1965 at The Village Gate night club in New York City and released in June, 1966 via MGM Records label. MGM’s president was convinced that Masekela’s albums were too African for American tastes, so soon after Masekela moved to Chisa/Blue Thumb labels.
Verve Records re-released the album in 1996 as a CD named The Lasting Impression of Ooga-Booga, adding five more tracks from his 1968 album The Lasting Impression of Hugh Masekela. (by wikipedia)

HughMasekela02Getting Americanization of Ooga Booga released was evidently akin to pulling teeth, because MGM Records’ president was convinced it would be a bomb — what Hugh Masekela and his band had played at this early 1965 gig at the Village Gate was jazz, but it was too African-based for American tastes, or so the label chief maintained. What he missed was the infectious joy woven through every note of music here, which was enough to carry any kind of music from anyplace in the world over any unfamiliar patches, including the language, melodies, references to events, and places on the other side of the world; if this was to be New Yorkers’ (and the recording world’s) introduction to South African music, it was made incredibly genial and accessible, even from a jazz standpoint. The influence of Dizzy Gillespie and Freddie Hubbard can be heard, along with McCoy Tyner in the playing of pianist Larry Willis, and he shows his debt to John Coltrane as an inspiration on “Mixolydia” as well as his affinity for Brazilian music on “Mas Que Nada.” But the core sound was what Masekela called “township bop” — his short trumpet bursts, sometimes seemingly approaching microtonal territory, are engrossing celebrations of the melodies of his repertory, which is mostly of South African origin (including a pair written by his then-wife, Miriam Makeba).

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Among the latter, the opening number, “Bajabula Bonke,” aka “Healing Song,” got its first airing on record here — it would later receive a bolder performance at the Monterey Pop Festival, comprising one of that event’s numerous musical highlights, but where that later performance streaked and soared, this one starts out slowly and quietly, exquisitely harmonized and rising gradually and gently like a glider catching rising winds; it’s impossible to fully appreciate the Monterey performance without hearing this one. With Herbie Hancock’s “Cantelope Island” providing one firm reference point in the American jazz idiom, the set really wasn’t that removed from 1965 listeners, as its stronger-than-expected sales proved. (by Bruce Eder)

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As we all knew, Hugh Masakela died on  23 January 2018

Taken from the official website:

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Personnel:
Hal Dotson (bass)
Henry Jenkins (drums)
Hugh Masekela (cornet, flugelhorn, vocals)
Larry Willis (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Bajabula Bonke (Healing Song) (M.Makeba) 8.06
02. Dzinorabiro (The Good Old Days) (M.Makeba) 5.38
03. Unhlanhla (Lucky Boy) (A,Makeba) 5:01
04. Cantelope Island (Hancock) 5.30
05. U-Dwi (Song To My Mother) (Masekela) 5.26
06. Masquenada (Ben) 7.43
07. Abangoma (Song of Praise) (M.Makeba) 4.04
08. Myxolydia (Masekela) 7.01
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09. Con Mucho Carino (With Much Love) (Willis) 4.41
10. Where Are You Going? (Masekela) 7.43
11. Moroloa (Masekela) 5.07
12. Bo Masekela (Semenya)
13, Unohilo (The Bird, aka Ntyilo, Ntyilo) (Salenga) 6.49

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Hugh Ramapolo Masekela (4 April 1939 – 23 January 2018)

Manfred Mann – My Little Red Book Of Winners (1965)

LPFrontCoverA1The Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers were formed in London[3] by keyboard player Manfred Mann and drummer/vibes/piano player Mike Hugg, who formed a house band in Clacton-on-Sea that also featured Graham Bond. Bringing a shared love of jazz to the British blues boom, then sweeping London’s clubs (which also spawned Alexis Korner, the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds), the band was completed by Mike Vickers on guitar, alto saxophone and flute, bassist Dave Richmond and Paul Jones as lead vocalist and harmonicist.[1] By this time they had changed their name to Manfred Mann & the Manfreds. Gigging throughout late 1962 and early 1963 the band soon attracted attention for their distinctive sound.

After changing their name to Manfred Mann at the behest of their label’s producer John Burgess, the group signed with His Master’s Voice in March 1963 and began their recorded output that July with the slow, bluesy instrumental single “Why Should We Not?”, which they performed on their first appearance on television on a New Year’s Eve show.[5] It failed to chart, as did its follow-up (with vocals), “Cock-a-Hoop.”[1] The overdubbed instrumental soloing on woodwinds, vibes, harmonica and second keyboard lent considerable weight to the group’s sound and demonstrated the jazz-inspired technical prowess in which they took pride.

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In 1964 the group was asked to provide a new theme tune for the ITV pop music television programme Ready Steady Go!.[3] They responded with “5-4-3-2-1” which, with the help of weekly television exposure, rose to No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] Shortly after “5-4-3-2-1” was recorded, Richmond left the band,[6] though he would record with them occasionally later. He was replaced by Jones’ friend Tom McGuinness—the first of many changes. After a further self-penned hit, “Hubble Bubble (Toil And Trouble),” the band struck gold with “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, a cover of the Exciters’ No. 78 Hot 100 hit earlier that year.[3] The track reached the top of each of the UK, Canadian, and US charts.

With the success of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” the sound of the group’s singles moved away from the jazzy, blues-based music of their early years to a pop hybrid that continued to make hit singles from cover material. They hit No. 3 in the UK with another girl-group cover “Sha La La”, (originally by the Shirelles) which also reached No. 12 in the US and Canada and followed with the sentimental “Come Tomorrow” (originally by Marie Knight) but both were of a noticeably lighter texture than their earliest output.

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Meanwhile, “B” sides and four-song EPs showcased original material and instrumental solos. The group also returned to jazz and R&B themes on their albums: their first, 1964’s The Five Faces of Manfred Mann, included standards such as “Smokestack Lightning”[3] while the second and last with this line-up, Mann Made, offered several self-composed instrumentals and a version of “Stormy Monday Blues” alongside novelties and pop ballads. With a cover of Maxine Brown’s “Oh No Not My Baby” began a phase of new depth and sophistication in the arrangements of their singles. The group began its string of successes with Bob Dylan songs with a track on the best-selling EP The One in the Middle, “With God on Our Side”, next reaching No. 2 in the UK with “If You Gotta Go, Go Now”.[2] The EP’s title track reached the British top ten singles, the last self-written song (by Jones) and the band’s last R’n’B workout to do so. The run climaxed with a second UK No. 1 single, “Pretty Flamingo” produced by John Burgess. (ny wikipedia)

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And this is the third album fir the US record market:
The big song off of the 1965 album “My Little Red Book of Winners” was the title song, written by Bacharach and David, which made it into the hit film “What’s New Pussycat.” Again, Jones has a nice original song with “The One in the Middle,” and there is a solid cover with “Oh No, Not My Baby.” The Beatles were cute, the Rolling Stones were dangerous, and Manfred Mann was staking out the intellectual field of rock ‘n’ roll. Of course, the Stones were into R&B as well, but without as much sophistication as Manfred Mann, mainly because the emphasis was more on keyboards than guitars. The band managed to stay true to its roots by only touring the United States oncein 1964 and continuing to record in Britain while establishing a large and faithful following in the Eastern Bloc by touring there instead.
Manfred Mann is an all or nothing group, especially since their pop hits are atypical compared to the rest of the songs on most of their albums. A lot of people can survive with “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” on a hits collection, but if you like Manfred Mann then they are going to end up wanting to get all of their albums from their myriad instantiations in the 1960s and beyond. This would be the first CD chronologically and would be one of the very best you can find (the soundrack for “Up the Junction” would probably be the first choice). Note: the band went with the name Manfred Mann despite the wishes of the South African board keyboardist who was originally born Manfred Lubowitz. (by Lawrance Bernabo)

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Personnel:
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Mike Vickers (flute, guitar, saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. My Little Red Book (Bacharach/David) 2.27
02. Oh, No, Not My Baby (Goffin/King) 2.21
03. What Am I To Do (Spector/Pomus) 2.42
04. The One In The Middle (Jones) 2.40
05. You Gave Me Somebody To Love (Andreoli/Poncia) 3.02
06. You’re For Me (Vickers) 2.55
07. Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.50
08. Without You (Jones) 2.20
09. Brother Jack (Traditional) 2.28
10, A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knocking Every Day) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 2.26
11, I Can’t Believe What You Say (Turner) 2.17
12. With God On Our Side (Dylan) 4.24

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The Moody Blues – The Magnificent Moodies (1965)

FrontCover1The Magnificent Moodies is the 1965 debut album by The Moody Blues, first released in the UK, and the first and only album featuring their R&B line-up of guitarist Denny Laine, bassist Clint Warwick, keyboardist Mike Pinder, flautist–percussionist Ray Thomas, and drummer Graeme Edge. Lead vocals were shared by Laine, Pinder and Thomas. The album is a collection of R&B and Merseybeat songs, including the cover of “Go Now”, produced by Alex Wharton, that had been a Number 1 hit single earlier that year. For the U.S. release, on London Records, with the title of Go Now – The Moody Blues #1, four songs were replaced and the tracks re-ordered.

The album did not make the Record Retailer/Music Week chart even though it reached number 5 in August 1965 in the New Musical Express album chart. The U.S. album did not make the Billboard chart.

The sleeve notes on the original UK release include an (undated) review by Virginia Ironside, music critic of Daily Mail, which concludes, “With the Moody Blues, all you need to write is “MAGNIFICENT” in pink lipstick and leave it at that”; and a prose poem by Donovan recommending the band. All the tracks on the UK release were produced by Denny Cordell; except for “Go Now”, which was produced by Alex Wharton.

Laine and Warwick left the group in 1966, and were replaced by guitarist Justin Hayward and bassist John Lodge respectively. (by wikipedia)

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The pre-psychedelic Moody Blues were represented in England by this album, which is steeped in American soul. The covers include songs by James Brown, Willie Dixon, and Chris Kenner, plus the chart-busting “Go Now” (originally recorded by Bessie Banks), interspersed with a brace of originals by lead singer/guitarist Denny Laine and keyboardist Mike Pinder, and one Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich number, “I’ve Got a Dream.” The shouters, like “I’ll Go Crazy” and “Bye Bye Bird,” will be the big surprises, showcasing the rawest sound by the group, but “I’ve Got a Dream” shows a lyrical, harmony-based sound that is vaguely reminiscent of the Four Tops (which is ironic, as that group later cut a single of the latter-day Moody Blues original “So Deep Within You”), while “Thank You Baby,” a Laine/Pinder original, offers them doing a smooth, dance-oriented number with some catchy hooks. The group’s sound is good and loud, and Laine was a phenomenal singer, though the band lacked the charisma and built-in excitement of such rivals as the Rolling Stones and the Animals. This album is more interesting than its American equivalent, but also not as good, since it leaves off such single sides as “Steal Your Heart Away” and the Pinder/Laine “From the Bottom of My Heart,” the latter being the best side this version of the group ever recorded. (by Bruce Eder)

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018 …

Listen to his harmonica solo on “Bye Bye Bird” … bye bye Ray Thomas ….

The Moody Blues in Concert at The Pier - Summer 1987

Personnel:
Graeme Edge (drums, percussion, vocals)
Denny Laine (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Mike Pinder (keyboards, vocals)
Ray Thomas (flute, harmonica, percussion, vocals)
Clint Warwick (bass, vocals)
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Elaine Caswell (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. I’ll Go Crazy (Brown) 2.08
02. Something You Got (Kenner) 2.49
03. Go Now (Banks/Bennett) 3.09
04. Can’t Nobody Love You (Mitchell) 3.59
05. I Don’t Mind (Brown) 3.24
06. I’ve Got A Dream (Greenwich/Barry) 2.48
07. Let Me Go (Laine/Pinder) 3.11
08. Stop (Laine/Pinder) 2.02
09. Thank You Baby (Laine/Pinder) 2.26
10. It Ain’t Necessarily So (Heyward/G. Gershwin/I. Gershwin) 3.18
11. True Story (Laine/Pinder) 1.42
12. Bye Bye Bird (Williamson/Dixon) 2.47LabelB1

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Ray Thomas

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018, his record label said. He was 76. Cherry Red Records and Esoteric Recordings said in a statement: “We are deeply shocked by his passing and will miss his warmth, humour and kindness. It was a privilege to have known and worked with him and our thoughts are with his family and his wife, Lee, at this sad time.” In 2014 Thomas revealed on his website that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. He said he had received his diagnosis in 2013. Born in 1941, Thomas founded The Moody Blues in 1964 with fellow musicians including Mike Pinder and Denny Laine. The band soon swapped blues roots for a more orchestral sound that came to be called progressive rock. Thomas’s flute solo was a key ingredient on one of its biggest hits, “Nights in White Satin.” The band is due to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio in April 2018. – The Guardian/Billboard

Trini Lopez – The Rhythm & Blues Album (1965)

FrontCover1Trinidad “Trini” López III (born May 15, 1937) is an American singer, guitarist, and actor. His first album included a version of “If I Had a Hammer”, which earned a Golden Disc for him. Other hits included “Lemon Tree”, “I’m Comin’ Home, Cindy” and “Sally Was a Good Old Girl”. He designed two guitars for the Gibson Guitar Corporation, which are now collectors’ items.

 

Trini Lopez was born in Dallas, Texas, son of Trinidad Lopez II (who was a singer, dancer, actor, and musician in Mexico) and Petra Gonzalez, who moved to Dallas from Mexico. Lopez has four sisters (two are deceased) and a brother, Jesse, who is also a singer. He grew up on Ashland Street in the Little Mexico neighborhood of Dallas[1] and attended grammar school and N. R. Crozier Tech High School. He had to drop out of high school in his senior year because he needed to earn money to help support the family.

Lopez formed his first band in Wichita Falls, Texas, at the age of 15. In 1958, at the recommendation of Buddy Holly, Trini and his group “The Big Beats” went to producer Norman Petty in Clovis, New Mexico. Petty secured a contract for them with Columbia Records, which released the single “Clark’s Expedition”/”Big Boy”, both instrumental. Lopez left the group and made his first solo recording, his own composition “The Right To Rock”, for the Dallas-based Volk Records, and then signed with King Records in 1959, recording more than a dozen singles for that label, none of which charted. In late 1962, after the King contract expired, Lopez followed up on an offer by producer Snuff Garrett to join the post-Holly Crickets as vocalist. After a few weeks of auditions in Los Angeles, that idea did not go through. He landed a steady engagement at the nightclub PJ’s, where his audience grew quickly. He was heard there by Frank Sinatra, who had started his own label, Reprise Records, and who subsequently signed Lopez.

TriniLopez01His debut live album, Trini Lopez at PJ’s (R/RS 6093), was released in 1963. The album included a version of “If I Had a Hammer”, which reached number one in 36 countries (no. 3 in the United States), and was a radio favorite for many years. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[4] He also performed his own version of the traditional Mexican song “La Bamba” on the album; his recording of the tune was later reissued as a single in 1966. Another live album from PJ’s was recorded later that same year under the title By Popular Demand More Trini Lopez at PJ’s (R/RS 6103) which contains the song “Green Green” which was written by Randy Sparks and Barry McGuire and originally recorded by the New Christy Minstrels earlier that year for their Columbia album Ramblin.

His popularity led the Gibson Guitar Corporation to ask him in 1964 to design a guitar for them. He ended up designing two: the Trini Lopez Standard, a rock and roll model based on the Gibson ES-335 semihollow body, and the Lopez Deluxe, a variation of a Gibson jazz guitar designed by Barney Kessel. Both of these guitars were in production from 1964 until 1971, and are now highly sought-after among collectors.[citation needed] Owners of the guitar include Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters and Noel Gallagher of Oasis.

He scored 13 chart singles through 1968, including “Lemon Tree” (1965), “I’m Comin’ Home, Cindy” (1966), and “Sally Was a Good Old Girl” (1968). On the adult contemporary chart, he racked up 15 hits, including the top-10 singles “Michael” (1964), “Gonna Get Along Without Ya’ Now” (1967), and “The Bramble Bush” (1967). Beyond his success on record, he became one of the country’s top nightclub performers of that era, regularly headlining in Las Vegas. In 1968, he recorded an album in Nashville entitled Welcome to Trini Country (R/RS 6300).

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In 1969, NBC aired a Trini Lopez variety special featuring surf guitar group The Ventures, and Nancy Ames as guests. [8] The soundtrack, released as “The Trini Lopez Show” has him singing his hits with The Ventures as his backing band.

During the 1960s and 1970s, Lopez moved into acting, though his film career was not as successful as his music. He continued his musical career with extensive tours of Europe and Latin America during this period; an attempt to break out by releasing a disco album in 1978 proved a flop. Lopez produced a single promoting the Coca-Cola soft drink Fresca in 1967.

In 1993, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to him.

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In 2002, Lopez teamed with Art Greenhaw for Legacy: My Texas Roots. The album used the “Texas Roots Combo” including Lopez, Greenhaw, and Lopez’ brother, Jesse. Said reviewer Steve Leggett of All Music Guide, “The album has an easygoing feel very similar to Lopez’ classic live sets from the 1960s, only it rocks a good deal harder.” Since then, Lopez has done charitable work and received honors such as being inducted into the International Latin Music Hall of Fame in 2003.

On May 15, 2008, his 71st birthday, Lopez was inducted into the Las Vegas Walk of Stars.[

Trini was still recording and appearing live in recent years. He took part in a benefit concert to raise money for the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami and has recently appeared as a guest performer in a number of shows held in Maastricht in the Netherlands with the Dutch violinist and composer André Rieu. Trini Lopez has continued to record, and in 2008, his 63rd album, “Ramblin Man,” was released. “El Immortal” was released in 2010 and in 2011, Trini released his 65th album “Into The Future.”

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Lopez’s first film role was in Marriage on the Rocks (1965), in which he made a cameo appearance in a nightclub scene; Lopez’s soundtrack song, “Sinner Man”, became a hit single (no. 54 pop/no. 12 adult contemporary). He was one of The Dirty Dozen (1967), appeared as himself in The Phynx (1970), and starred in Antonio (1973). He made two appearances (playing different characters) on the television program, Adam-12. In 1973, Lopez played the lead role of Antonio Contreras in “Antonio.” In 1977, he played the role of Julio Ramirez in “The Mystery of the Silent Scream” which was part of The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries TV series. (by Wikipedia)

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Trini’s ninth album and only three years since his first.

Trini’s go-go guitar sound which was part rock n roll, part pop, and all California was still the rage still in 1965. His audience wanted to dance to songs they knew but with a beat that didn’t require them to change their dance moves.

It’s all about the beat.

And here he serves up some solid R&B hits from years, but not distant years, past.

A good idea it was as in the immediate preceding two years Trini had served up similar themed albums all cashing in on his go-go beat … “The Latin Album” (1964), “The Folk Album” and “The Love Album” (both 1965).

The only odd thing is that Trini stays away, largely, from the heavy R&B and plays it safe with the more pop oriented tracks. There is nothing wrong with that but the thought of Trini tackling heavy R&B and pop-i-fying them is perhaps more interesting than tackling R&B material which already leans to pop.

TriniLopez05But as it stands this is an album for parties and would sound great as background at a dinner gathering ..one where any number of Screwdriver cocktails have been consumed whilst nibbling on Spicy Cheese Balls or dipping into a Clam or Guacamole Dip. The sit down menu would start off with a Shrimp Cocktail, followed by Zesty Pork Chops and Pork with Sauerkraut Pinwheels, and then for desert a Strawberry Shortcake Baked Alaska or any fruit in gelatin.

Fuck it … that sound’s a lot better than a generic Domino’s pizza.

Of course there is every chance that your guests would be dancing … especially if they had enough Screwdrivers.

The album was apparently “recorded live” … maybe it was but I suspect its was recorded in the studio with added on chatter and claps.

Producer Don Costa “discovered” Trini Lopez but is best known for his work with Frank Sinatra (whose label, “Reprise”, Trini is on).

And …

Not the best Trini but it’s still perfect for parties …. I’m keeping it. (by whatfrankislisteningto.negstar.com)

Inlays

Personnel:
Trini Lopez (vocals, guitar)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Wee Wee Hours (Berry) 3.08
02. Ooh Poo Pah Doo  (Hill) 2.44
03. Hurtin’ Inside  (Benton/Colacrai/Otis/Randazzo) 2.05
04. Double Trouble (Greenback/Larson/Marcellino) 2.15
05. Watermelon Man  (Hancock/Hendricks) 2.48
06.  Don’t Let Go (Stone) 2.51
07. I Got A Woman  (Charles) 3.20
08. So Fine (Randazzo/Weinstein) 2.25
09. She’s About A Mover (Sahm) 2.26
10. Little Miss Happiness (Greenback/Larson/Marcellino) 2.40
11. Let The Four Winds Blow (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.11
12. Shout (O’Kelly Isley/Ronald Isley/Rudolph Isley) 3.00

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Dick Heckstall-Smith – You Don’t Know Dick (2004)

DHSFrontCover1This book is a fascinating read and well worth the cover price of £16.95, because it includes a CD of 7 previously unreleased examples of Dick’s playing, with bands that cover a large spectrum of jazz and blues. The book shows Dick to be a well educated and highly intelligent individual, equally at home in Blues, Jazz and Contemporary Music bands.

In the semi-pro world where I played during the same period, it was the guys who could not hack the Jazz or Dance Band scene that formed the blues bands. The London scene must have been very different however, Dick and his contemporaries would have been capable of holding their own in any scene.

The life and times of musicians in any touring band are always interesting and Dick’s tales of his adventures, musical and otherwise, with The Graham Bond Organisation, Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, John Mayall’s Bluesbrakers and Jon Hiseman’s Colosseum make for a most interesting read.

Dick’s commentaries on his life and times are frank and detailed, but interestingly although he opens up to his readers on some matters, there is a reserve that somehow prevents the reader from getting a real measure of Dick until the whole of the book has been read. Whether this is intentional or it just happened that way I don’t know.

I have known other very highly talented musicians who have difficulty in coping with those things that us mere mortals find easy, one who springs directly to mind and may have been known to Dick was Brian Gray Brian was an enormously talented saxophone player but he struggled to make a living and eventually gave the business up. Dick on the other hand has ploughed on but always had to live from hand to mouth.

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Pete Grant’s part of the book attempts to analyse why this should have happened to someone as talented as Dick. His conclusion that the public are never sure whether he is in the blues world or the contemporary music world is probably correct. Before the UK public hand over their money, they want to be more certain of what they are going to get. The fact that a very large sector of the public prefer the Tenor playing of Stan Getz and Zoot Sims to that of John Coltrane, may also be a contributing factor.

The clearest insight into Dick that we get is where he writes about racism and proves quite rightly in my opinion that there can be no alternative but to classify people as those we like and those we don’t, colour race and creed have nothing to do with it. Having said that however people like people like themselves! (by Don Mather) (*)

CDNotes

And here´s this very rare CD (“not for sale seperately from the book”). Maybe I will scan this book later ..

And this is not onyl a very rare CD, bit a great tribute to one of he finest Bristish Jazz musicians ever: Mister Dick Heckstall-Smith.

Listen and enjoy !

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Tracklist:
01. The Deluxe Blues Band: Heatwave (McGrath/Heckstall-Smith) 4.10
02. Dick Heckstall-Smith: Aquamarine (1) (Heckstall-Smith) 10.46
03. Jon T-Bone Taylor’s Bop Brothers: Try (Green/Plotel) 5.13
04. Dick Heckstall-Smith:  Il Collingdale (1) (Heckstall-Smith) 20.26
05. The Hamburg Blues Band: Woza Nasu (2) (Heckstall-Smith) 16.14
06. The Wentus Blues Band: Looking Back (3) (unknown) 4.38
07. The Graham Bond Organisation: Only Sixteen (4) (Bond) 3.20

(1): previously unreleased live recording, Newcastle, 1991 (Heckstall-Smith)
(2): previously unreleased live recording, Flensburg/Germany, 2002
(3): previously unreleased live recording, Helsinki/Finland, 2002
(4): previously unreleased live recording, Broadcat, 1965

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(*) Don Mather plays Tenor Sax and Clarinet and runs a Big Band and a Quartet and Quintet in Coventry, he was for five years Chairman of the Coventry Jazz Festival Committee, during which time the festival joined the big league. Don is a member of the Musicians Union and a Coventry Branch Committee man. His jazz tastes are catholic, but he confesses to be sometimes bemused by some so called ‘contemporary jazz’.