‘Spider’ John Koerner – Spider Blues (1965)

FrontCover1

“Spider” John Koerner (born August 31, 1938, in Rochester, New York, United States) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. He is best known as a guitarist and vocalist in the blues trio Koerner, Ray & Glover, with Dave Ray and Tony Glover. He has also made albums as a solo performer and with Willie Murphy.

Koerner grew up in Rochester, New York, and after a brief military service attended the University of Minnesota. He intended to major in engineering but soon became involved in the Minneapolis music scene, where he met Dave Ray and Tony Glover. They formed a loose-knit trio, releasing albums under the name Koerner, Ray & Glover. The group gained notice with their first album, Blues, Rags and Hollers, originally released by Audiophile in 1963 and re-released by Elektra Records later that year.

Koerner was an early influence on Bob Dylan, who mentioned Koerner in his autobiography, Chronicles. Speaking of the early 1960s, Koerner later said, “We were all goofy, you know. We were thinkers and drinkers and artists and players, and Dylan was one of us. He was another guy.”

SpiderJohnKoerner01

In 1965, Koerner recorded his first solo album, Spider Blues, for Elektra and appeared at the Newport Folk Festival accompanied by Glover. He continued playing on the folk circuit and joined with Willie Murphy to record Running, Jumping, Standing Still in 1969.[4] The duo eventually split up, and Koerner pursued an unsuccessful career in filmmaking, retiring from music and moving to Copenhagen, Denmark.[5] He later returned to music in the traditional folk genre and continued to perform and release new albums from time to time. He now lives in Minneapolis and has two sons and a daughter.

JohnKoerner

Spider Blues is the debut solo album by blues artist “Spider” John Koerner, released in 1965. He was member of the loose-knit blues trio Koerner, Ray & Glover at the time of its release.

As a member of the blues trio Koerner, Ray & Glover, Koerner was recording on the Elektra label. While recording the trio’s albums Lots More Blues, Rags and Hollers and The Return of Koerner, Ray & Glover, he recorded a number of solo tracks. These tracks were assembled into Koerner’s debut solo album. He also appeared at the Newport Folk Festival that same year, accompanied by trio member Tony Glover.

In his subsequent releases, his style changed as he turned from the blues to traditional folk music. In a 2000 interview, Koerner said, “I finally decided I was not a blues guy. How could I be? I was too young and too white, all that shit. So I took a year off and when I started playing again, I treated the subject in general as folk music. It’s a new culture; it’s not music being made on a back porch anymore.”

JohnKoerner2

In his 1965 Jazz Monthly review, music critic Albert McCarthy excoriated the album and wrote, “This is, without any doubt, one of the worst records I have had to review for many a long day. In a sleeve note notable for the inane quotes from Koerner himself, Paul Nelson of The Little Sandy Review, which I understand is one of the better folk publications, makes the remarkable claim that ‘Koerner’s art is like Chaplin’s, as great and lasting as it is entertaining’. I nominate this as the most absurd remark of the year in the sleeve note field. In fact, Koerner is a passably competent guitarist, a poor harmonica player and a quite dreadful singer. ”

On the other hand, in the mid-late 1960s radio station WBCN in Boston used to regularly play “Rent Party Rag” on the first of every month. (by wikipedia)

JohnKoerner3

Personnel:
“Spider” John Koerner (guitar, harmonica, kazoo, vocals)
+
Tony “Little Sun” Glover – harmonica on 01.,  04.,  + 13.)

BackCover1.jpg
Tracklist:
01. Good Luck Child 2.07
02. I Want To Be Your Partner 3.07
03. Nice Legs 2.27
04. Spider Blues 2.17
05. Corrina 3.15
06. Shortnin’ Bread 2.08
07. Ramblin’ and Tumblin’ 3.12
08. Delia Holmes 2.54
09. Need A Woman 2.05
10. I Want to Do Something 3.35
11. Baby, Don’t Come Back 2.39
12. Hal C. Blake 1.42
13. Things Ain’t Right 3.30
14. Rent Party Rag 9.29

All songs written by “Spider” John Koerner

Label1

*
**

Brian Auger and The Trinity and Julie Driscoll – Streetnoise (1969)

FrontCover1Streetnoise is a 1969 album by Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger and the Trinity, originally released as a double LP.

It includes cover versions of The Doors’ “Light My Fire”, Nina Simone’s “Take Me To The Water”, Laura Nyro’s “Save the Country”, Miles Davis’ “All Blues”, Richie Havens’ “Indian Rope Man”, and “Let The Sunshine In” and “I Got Life” from the musical Hair. Driscoll covers this wide range of musical influences easily and with her highly emotive and distinctive vocals, and with Auger’s intense Hammond organ, the album is instrumentally interesting, too. (by wikipedia)

The final collaboration between singer Julie Driscoll (by that time dubbed as “The Face” by the British music weeklies) and Brian Auger’s Trinity was 1969’s Streetnoise — it was an association that had begun in 1966 with Steampacket, a band that also featured Rod Stewart and Long John Baldry. As a parting of the ways, however, it was Trinity’s finest moment. A double album featuring 16 tracks, more than half with vocals by Driscoll, the rest absolutely burning instrumentals by Trinity. (Auger on keyboards and vocals, Driscoll on acoustic guitar, Clive Thacker on drums, and Dave Ambrose on bass and guitars.) “Tropic of Capricorn,” an instrumental Auger original, kicks off in high gear.

AugerDriscoll01

It’s a knotty prog rock number that contains elements of Memphis R&B. it sounds better than it reads; it twists and turns around a minor key figure that explodes into solid, funky grit with Thacker double timing the band. Driscoll enters next with “Czechoslovakia,” a wide-open modal tune that hints at the kinds of music she would explore in the very near future on her debut 1969 and later, with future husband Keith Tippett. Broken melody lines and drones are the framework for Driscoll to climb over and soar above, and she does without faltering before she slides into the traditional gospel tune, “Take Me to the Water.” And this is how this record moves, from roiling progressive rock instrumentals and art songs, done rock style, to inspired readings of the hits of the day such as “Light My Fire,” “Flesh Failures (Let the Sunshine In)” from Hair, and one of most stirring readings ever of Laura Nyro’s “Save the Country” that closes the album. “Indian Rope Man,” is a burning, organ-driven churner that fuses Stax/Volt R&B funkiness with psychedelic rock and jazz syncopation.

AugerDriscoll02.jpg

Driscoll’s vocal is over the top; she’s deep into the body of the tune and wrings from it every ounce of emotion from it. Auger’s organ solo is a barnburner; reeling in the high register, he finds the turnarounds and offers his own counterpoint in the middle and lower one with fat chords. The rhythm section keeps the groove, funking it up one side and moving it out to the ledge until the coda. Another steaming rocker is “Ellis Island,” with it’s dueling Fender Rhodes and organ lines. it may be the finest instrumental on the album. “Looking in the Eye of the World” features Driscoll in rare form, singing in her voice’s lower register accompanied only by Auger’s piano on a blues moan worthy of Nina Simone. Streetnoise was a record that may have been informed by its era, but it certainly isn’t stuck there, especially in the 21st century. The music sounds as fresh and exciting as the day it was recorded. This is a must-have package for anyone interested in the development of Auger’s music that was to change immediately with the invention of the Oblivion Express, and also for those interested in Driscoll’s brave, innovative, and fascinating career as an improviser, who discovered entirely new ways of using the human voice. Streetnoise is brilliant. (by by Thom Jurek)

In other words: One of most important albums from the Sixties !

SingleFront+BacktCover

Personnel:
David “Lobs” Ambrose (bass, guitar, vocals)
Brian “Auge” Auger (keyboards, vocals)
Julie “Jools” Driscoll (vocals, guitar)
Clive “Toli” Thacker (drums, percussion)

LPBooklet1.JPG

Tracklist:

HOW GOOD WOULD IT BE TO FEEL FREE:
01. Tropic Of Capricorn (Auger) 5.30
02. Czechoslovakia (Driscoll) 6.45
03. Take Me To The Water (Simone) 4.00
04. A Word About Colour (Driscoll) 1.35

KISS HIM QUICK, HE HAS TO PART:
05. Light My Fire (Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek/Morrison) 4.30
06. Indian Rope Man (Havens/Price/Roth) 3.00
07. When I Was Young (Traditional/Driscoll) 7.00
08. The Flesh Failures (Let the Sunshine In) (Rado/Ragni/MacDermot) 3.05

LOOKING IN THE EYE OF THE WORLD:
09. Ellis Island (Auger) 4.10
10. In Search Of The Sun (Ambrose) 4.25
11. Finally Found You Out (Auger) 4.15
12. Looking In The Eye Of The World (Auger) 5.05

SAVE THE COUNTRY:
13. Vauxhall To Lambeth Bridge (Driscoll) 6.30
14. All Blues (Davis/Brown) 5.40
15. I’ve Got Life (Rado/Ragni/MacDermot) 4.30
16. Save The Country (Nyro) 3,56

LabelC1

*
**

AugerDriscoll03

The Byrds – Turn! Turn! Turn! (1965)

LPFrontCover1Turn! Turn! Turn! is the second album by the folk rock band The Byrds and was released in December 1965 on Columbia Records. Like its predecessor, Mr. Tambourine Man, the album epitomized the folk rock genre and continued the band’s successful mix of vocal harmony and jangly twelve-string Rickenbacker guitar. The album’s lead single and title track, “Turn! Turn! Turn!”, was a Pete Seeger adaptation of text from the Book of Ecclesiastes that had previously been arranged in a chamber-folk style by the band’s lead guitarist Jim McGuinn, while working with folksinger Judy Collins. The arrangement that McGuinn used for The Byrds’ version utilized the same folk rock style as the band’s previous hit singles.

The album peaked at #17 on the Billboard Top LPs chart and went to #11 in the United Kingdom. The “Turn! Turn! Turn!” single preceded the album by two months and topped the chart in the United States. Another single taken from the album, “Set You Free This Time”, was less successful and failed to break into the U.S. Top 50. The album marked an increase in McGuinn’s songwriting output and rhythm guitarist David Crosby received his first writing credit on a Byrds’ album. However, the band’s prolific songwriter Gene Clark still contributed most of the original material. The album also included two Bob Dylan covers: “The Times They Are a-Changin'” and the then unreleased song, “Lay Down Your Weary Tune”. Turn! Turn! Turn! would be the last Byrds’ album to feature the full participation of Gene Clark until the release of the original quintet’s 1973 reunion album, Byrds. (by wikipedia)

TheByrds02

The Byrds’ second album, Turn! Turn! Turn!, was only a disappointment in comparison with Mr. Tambourine Man. They couldn’t maintain such a level of consistent magnificence, and the follow-up was not quite as powerful or impressive. It was still quite good, however, particularly the ringing number one title cut, a classic on par with the “Mr. Tambourine Man” single. Elsewhere, they concentrated more on original material, Gene Clark in particular offering some strong compositions with “Set You Free This Time,” “The World Turns All Around Her,” and “If You’re Gone.” A couple more Bob Dylan covers were included, as well, and “Satisfied Mind” was their first foray into country-rock, a direction they would explore in much greater depth throughout the rest of the ’60s. (by Richie Unterberger)

TheByrds01

Personnel:
Gene Clark (guitar, harmonica, vocals)
Mike Clark (drums)
David Crosby (guitar, vovals)
Chris Hillman (bass, vocals)
Jim McGuinn (guitar, vocals)

LPBackjCover

Tracklist:
01. Turn ! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is A Season) (*) 3.54
02. It Won’t Be Wrong (McGuinn) 2.02
03. Set You Free This Time (Clark) 2.53
04. Lay Down Your Weary Tune (Dylan) 3.34
05. He Was A Friend Of Mine (Traditional) 2.34
06. The World Turns All Around Her (Clark) 2.17
07. Satisfied Mind (Hayes/Rhodes) 2.30
08. If You’re Gone (Clark) 2.49
09. The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Dylan) 2.22
10. Wait And See (McGuinn/Crosby) 2.23
11. Oh! Susannah (Traditional) 3.13
+
12. The Day Walk (Never Before) (Clark) 3.00
13. She Don’t Care About Time (Single Version) (Clark) 2.29
14. The Times They Are A-Changin’ (First Version) (Dylan) 1.54
15. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue (Version 1) (Dylan) 3.03
16. She Don’t Care About Time (Version 1) (Clark) 2.35
17. The World Turns All Around Her (Alternate Mix) (Clark) 2.12
18. Stranger In A Strange Land (Instrumental) (Crosby) 3.04

(*) Words From The Book Of Ecciesiastes, Adaptation and music by Pete Seeger

LabelB1

*
**

Singles

To everything – turn, turn, turn
There is a season – turn, turn, turn
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time to be born, a time to die
A time to plant, a time to reap
A time to kill, a time to heal
A time to laugh, a time to weep

A time to build up, a time to break down
A time to dance, a time to mourn
A time to cast away stones
A time to gather stones together
A time of love, a time of hate
A time of war, a time of peace
A time you may embrace
A time to refrain from embracing

A time to gain, a time to lose
A time to rend, a time to sew
A time to love, a time to hate
A time of peace, I swear it’s not too late!

The Ventures – A Go-Go (1965)

FrontCover1.JPGThe Ventures are an American instrumental rock band formed in 1958 in Tacoma, Washington. Founded by Don Wilson and Bob Bogle, the group in its various incarnations has had an enduring impact on the development of music worldwide. With over 100 million records sold,[1] the group is the best-selling instrumental band of all time. In 2008, the Ventures were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Their instrumental virtuosity, experimentation with guitar effects, and unique sound laid the groundwork for innumerable groups, earning them the moniker “The Band that Launched a Thousand Bands”. While their popularity in the United States waned in the 1970s, the group remains revered in Japan, where they tour regularly to this day.

he Ventures a Go-Go is the seventeenth studio album by the band The Ventures; released in 1965 on Dolton Records BST 8037 (stereo) and BLP 2037 (monaural). It consists mostly of instrumental covers of popular tunes from the late 50’s and early 60’s, with a few original compositions. It was on the charts for 35 weeks and it peaked at # 16 on the Billboard 200. This album was the fourth highest charting album that The Ventures released. (by wikipedia)

TheVentures

Personnel:
Bob Bogle (bass , guitar)
Nokie Edwards (guitar)
Mel Taylor (drums)
Don Wilson (guitar)
+
Evelyn Freeman (keyboards)

BackCover1.JPG

Tracklist:
01. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 2.27
02. Go-Go Slow (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.16
03. Louie Louie (Berry) 2.38
04. Night Stick (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.07
05. La Bamba (Traditional) 2.29
06. The “In” Crowd (Page) 2.22
07. Wooly Bully (Samudio) 2.31
08. A Go-Go Guitar (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.18
09. A Go-Go Dancer (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.15
10. The Swingin’ Creeper (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.45
11. Whittier Blvd. (Espinoza/Garcia) 2.34
12. I Like It Like That (Kenner) 2.26
+
13. Gemini (single B-side) (Blanchard/Fenner) 2.18
14. Indian Summer (single A-side) (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.30
15. Tarantella (single B-side) (Bogle/Edwards/Taylor/Wilson) 2.10

LabelA1

*
**

Herman’s Hermits – Same (1965)

FrontCover1.jpgHerman’s Hermits (sometimes called Introducing Herman’s Hermits) is the debut album of the band Herman’s Hermits, first issued in 1965. As was typical of the time, the album’s contents were different on the UK and US releases. UK albums did not have any singles included.

The success of Herman’s Hermits first single, “I’m Into Something Good”, #1 in the UK and #13 on the US Billboard Hot 100, led to a US release of their first album in February, 1965. After two other single releases which were eventually issued on their second US album Herman’s Hermits on Tour, MGM released “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” in April, 1965. It immediately went to #1 on the US Billboard Chart. The album itself peaked on the Billboard 200 chart at #2, and remained on the chart for 40 weeks.

The album was not released in the UK until September, 1965. As was customary at the time, UK album releases did not have any singles on them. The UK version peaked at #16, and was only on the charts for two weeks.

In his retrospective review of the album’s release, Richie Unterberger for AllMusic gave the album a modest response by saying, “Since those are the first songs on the album, it’s a letdown thereafter, since the oldies aren’t very creative or (in comparison to the better British Invasion groups) forcefully performed, and the pop numbers sound like filler Merseybeat.” (by wikipedia)

Herman´s Hermits01

In his retrospective review of the album’s release, Richie Unterberger for AllMusic gave the album a modest response by saying, “Since those are the first songs on the album, it’s a letdown thereafter, since the oldies aren’t very creative or (in comparison to the better British Invasion groups) forcefully performed, and the pop numbers sound like filler Merseybeat.”

This is the UK Version of the Album including The Yardbird hit “For Your Love” … most of the material is part of the innocent side of Beat Music !

Herman's Hermits, Barry Whitwam, Keith Hopwood, Peter Noone, Karl Green, Derek Leckenby, circa early

Personnel:
Karl Green (bass)
Keith Hopwood (guitar)
Derek Leckenby (guitar)
Peter Noone (vocals)
Barry Whitwam (drums)

BackCover
Tracklist:
01. Heartbeat (Montgomery/Petty) 2.51
02. Travellin’ Light (Tepper/Bennett) 2.35
03. I’ll Never Dance Again (Mann/Anthony) 3.29
04. Walkin’ With My Angel (Goffin/King) 2.22
05. Dream On (Gordon) 2.05
06. I Wonder (Pearson) 2.10
07. For Your Love (Gouldman) 2.27
08. Don’t Try To Hurt Me (Hopwood) 2.07
09. Tell Me Baby (Leckenby/Hopwood) 2.15
10. I’m Henery VIII, I Am (Murray/Weston) 1.52
11. The End Of The World (Kent/Dee) 2.59
12. Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter (Peacock) 2.48

LabelB1.jpg*
**

 

The Pretty Things – Get The Picture (1965)

LPFrontCover1.jpgGet the Picture? is the second album by the English rock group The Pretty Things, released in 1965.

Recording began on The Pretty Things’ second album in around September 1965, just months after the release of their debut. It ended up being a haphazard affair thanks to a growing problem with drummer Viv Prince whose behaviour was becoming ever more erratic and reckless. With Prince being unreliable, the band had help in the form of producer Bobby Graham who was a renowned drummer in his own right, playing on several tracks. John Stax’s flatmate John C. Alder helped out on at least two tracks, one of which was “You’ll Never Do It Baby” Jimmy Page also made a couple of cameos, receiving a partial writing credit on “You Don’t Believe Me.” The album did see the band starting to move away from the staunch R&B direction that dominated the first album, exploring more soulful areas as well as Freakbeat with much use of distortion on guitar and bass parts.

Recorded on three-track tape at Philips Studios in London, the album was only mixed in mono. By the time it was released, Viv Prince had been fired from the band. It left them without a drummer for a few weeks whilst the search was on for a replacement.

The liner notes were written by Bryan Morrison. (by wikipedia)

PrettyThings1965_01A.jpg

The Pretty Things’ second album, Get the Picture? (released December 1965), has not only been remastered from original session tapes so the group sounds like their amps are practically right in your lap, but it’s also been expanded to 18 songs with the addition of tracks cut for singles and EP releases from the same sessions. That’s enough to recommend it even to casual fans — this is now a record that’s just a few notches short of Rolling Stones level in the charisma department, and pretty tough any way you want to look at it. On “Rainin’ in My Heart,” they sound exactly like the Stones from the same era, missing only the little harmonica flourish that might have been added on the break. The liner notes go into the history of the group during this period in delightful detail, and the histories of various songs, most particularly “L.S.D.,” which, amazingly, was cut as a demo and never redone for release, but just put out the way it was. In their good moments here, the Pretty Things approach Rolling Stones’ territory, and even in their off moments, they’re flying at the same level as the Kinks’ album tracks. (by Bruce Eder)

FrenchEP

The frontcover of a rare French cover from 1965

Personnel:
Bobby Graham (drums on a handful of tracks)
Phil May (vocals)
Brian Pendleton (guitar, background vocals)
Viv Prince (drums on a handful of tracks)
John Stax (bass, background vocals)

Dick Taylor (guitar)
Twink (drums on a handful of tracks)
+
Skip Alan (drums on 13. – 18.)

LPBackCover1
Tracklist:
01. You Don’t Believe Me (May/Graham/Page/Morrell) 2.22
02. Buzz The Jerk (May/Taylor) 1.54
03. Get The Picture? (May/Taylor) 1.55
04. Can’t Stand The Pain (May/Taylor/Graham) 2.40
05. Rainin’ In My Heart (Moore/West) 2.31
06. We’ll Play House (May/Taylor) 2.32
07. You’ll Never Do It, Baby (Smith/Fox) 2.27
08. I Had A Dream (Witherspoon) 2.57
09. I Want Your Love (Dee/Tarr) 2.16
10. London Town (Hardin) 2.26
11. Cry To Me (Russell) 2.51
12. Gonna Find Me A Substitute (Turner) 2.57
+
13. Get A Buzz (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Alan) 4.00
14. Sittin’ All Alone (May/Taylor) 2.47
15. Midnight To Six Man (Taylor/May) 2.19
16. Me Needing You (May/Taylor) 1.57
17. Come See Me (Tubbs/Jackson/Barnes) 2.39
18. L.S.D. (May/Taylor) 2.25
Multimedia Bonus Track – The Pretty Things 1966 movie

(“Midnight To Six Man”, “Me Needing You”, “Come See Me” and “L.S.D.” were produced by Glyn Johns)

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

I never see
The people I know
In the bright light of day
So how can I say

That you’re any friend of mine
(See you anytime)
I’m feelin’ fine
(Midnight ’til six)
That’s my time
(That’s your time)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

I sleep through the day
I wake around four
But I always feel down
Never get off the floor

‘Til the night comes around
(See you downtown)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

(See you down town)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

 

Casey Jones & The Governors – Don’t Ha Ha (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a forgotten highlight of the British Beat Scene in the Mid-Sixties:

Brian Casser (born 21 March 1936, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a British singer and guitarist. He led the first notable beat group in Liverpool, Cass & the Cassanovas, who were early rivals of The Beatles in the city. He later led another group, Casey Jones & the Engineers, which was one of Eric Clapton’s first bands, and then, as leader of Casey Jones & the Governors, became successful in Germany in the mid-1960s.

Casser lived in Liverpool in the late 1950s, having previously worked in the Merchant Navy. As singer and rhythm guitarist, he formed a trio, Cass & the Cassanovas, in May 1959, with singer and guitarist Adrian Barber (born 13 November 1938, Ilkley, Yorkshire), and drummer and singer Brian J. Hudson (born Brian James Hudson, 21 April 1938, Cleveland, Yorkshire). After a few months, Hudson left and was replaced by Johnny Hutchinson (born 18 July 1940, Malta), known as Johnny Hutch. In need of a bass guitarist, Hutchinson then brought in Johnny Gustafson (born 8 August 1942, Liverpool) in December 1959.

CaseyJones01

At that time Gustafson did not have a proper bass guitar so Barber converted an acoustic for him. The group became popular playing a wide range of music, from Latin American music to rock and roll, in dance halls in the Liverpool area. Casser also started his own music club in Liverpool, the Casanova Club, whose guest groups included one known at the time as the “Silver Beetles”; according to some reports, Casser had suggested that they change their name from the earlier spelling of “Beatals” which Casser found “ridiculous”. In May 1960 Cass & the Cassanovas took part in auditions in front of leading manager Larry Parnes who was looking for backing bands for his stable of pop singers. The group secured a place as backing group for singer Duffy Power and toured with him.[3][4][5] By this time, Casser had begun using the stage names of “Casey Jones” and “Casey Valence”.

In December 1960, Gustafson, Hutchinson and Barber left the band, and formed themselves into a new trio, The Big Three. Casser moved to London around 1962, and managed the Blue Gardenia club in Soho. He also briefly formed a group called the Nightsounds, which featured Albert Lee on guitar. The following year, he won a recording contract with the Columbia label, and recorded a single, “One Way Ticket”, using the name Casey Jones. With drummer Ray Stock, he recruited two former members of R&B group the Roosters, guitarist Eric Clapton and bassist Tom McGuinness, and briefly toured as Casey Jones & the Engineers. Clapton and McGuinness left after a few performances, shortly followed by Stock.

CaseyJonesGovernors02

Casser then formed a new group with David Coleman (lead guitar), Roger Cook (rhythm guitar), Jim Rodford (bass) and Peter Richards (drums). They played at the Star-Club in Hamburg and became popular in Germany, releasing two singles, “Tall Girl” and “Don’t Ha Ha” on the Bellaphon label, before changing their name to Casey Jones & the Governors, apparently in an attempt to stress their British origins. The record label reissued “Don’t Ha Ha” – which in fact was a version of the 1958 Huey Smith and the Clowns song “Don’t You Just Know It” – under the new band name and it rose to # 2 on the German pop chart. Casey Jones and the Governors continued to tour and record successfully in Germany for a few years, achieving six top 40 singles and releasing two albums on the Gold 12 label, Casey Jones and the Governors (1965) and Don’t Ha Ha (1966).

In the 1970s, Casser, still using the name Casey Jones, worked as a disc jockey in Löhnberg, and recorded a solo album, Casey’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Show.[3] In the 1990s, he formed a new version of Casey Jones and the Governors to play the oldies circuit in Germany, and in 2006 was reported to be living in Unna near Dortmund. (by wikipedia)

CaseyJonesGovernors03

And here´s the very rare debut album … if you like the raw, sometimes sentimental Sixties Beat you should listen … here´s one of the best Album from this period … including many bonus tracks (Singles from 1963 – 1966) and … a killer vrsion of “Jack The Ripper” !

Single

Personnel:
David Coleman (guitar)
Roger Hook (guitar)
Casey Jones (vocals)
Jim Redford (bass)
Peter Richards (drums)

BackCover1.JPG

Tracklist:
01. Don’t Ha Ha (Smith/Vincent) 2.07
02. Love Potion No. 9 (Leiber/Stoller) 2.06
03. Mickeys Monkey (Robinson) 3.06
04. Parchman Farm (Allison) 2.56
05. Slow Down (Williams) 3.09
06. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 2.29
07. Sounds Like Locomotion (St. John) 1.52
08. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Williams) 2.06
09. Talking ‘Bout You (Berry) 2.05
10. Do The Dog (Thomas) 2.50
11. Can’t Judge A Book (McDaniels) 2.39
12. So Long Baby (Jones) 4.28
13. Jack The Ripper (Sutch) 3.04
14. Nashville Special (Larson) 2.30
+
15. One Way Ticket  (Davis/Duncan/Jones) 2.49
16. I’m Gonna Love (Davis/Duncan) 2.04
17. Tall Girl (Jones) 2.04
18. Blue Tears (Jones) 2.49
19. Don’t Ha Ha (1st Version, 1963) (Smith/Vincent) 
20. Long Gone Train (Jones) 2.38
21. Candy Man (Ross/Neil) 2.20
22. Tallahassee Lassie (Slay/Crese/Picariello) 2.26
23. So Long Baby (Mono Single mix) (Jones) 2.03
24. Bumble Bee (German Version) (Fullylock/Baker/Holm) 2.21
25. Rootin Tootin Baby (Jones) 2.34
26. Yockomo (Mono Single mix) (Smith/Vincent) 2.34
27. Baby Why Did You Say Goodbye (Jones) 2.32
28. Little Girl (Jones) 3.08
29. A Legal Matter (Townshend) 2.55

LabelB1.JPG

 

*
**

CaseyJonesGovernors04