Herman’s Hermits – Same (1965)

FrontCover1.jpgHerman’s Hermits (sometimes called Introducing Herman’s Hermits) is the debut album of the band Herman’s Hermits, first issued in 1965. As was typical of the time, the album’s contents were different on the UK and US releases. UK albums did not have any singles included.

The success of Herman’s Hermits first single, “I’m Into Something Good”, #1 in the UK and #13 on the US Billboard Hot 100, led to a US release of their first album in February, 1965. After two other single releases which were eventually issued on their second US album Herman’s Hermits on Tour, MGM released “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” in April, 1965. It immediately went to #1 on the US Billboard Chart. The album itself peaked on the Billboard 200 chart at #2, and remained on the chart for 40 weeks.

The album was not released in the UK until September, 1965. As was customary at the time, UK album releases did not have any singles on them. The UK version peaked at #16, and was only on the charts for two weeks.

In his retrospective review of the album’s release, Richie Unterberger for AllMusic gave the album a modest response by saying, “Since those are the first songs on the album, it’s a letdown thereafter, since the oldies aren’t very creative or (in comparison to the better British Invasion groups) forcefully performed, and the pop numbers sound like filler Merseybeat.” (by wikipedia)

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In his retrospective review of the album’s release, Richie Unterberger for AllMusic gave the album a modest response by saying, “Since those are the first songs on the album, it’s a letdown thereafter, since the oldies aren’t very creative or (in comparison to the better British Invasion groups) forcefully performed, and the pop numbers sound like filler Merseybeat.”

This is the UK Version of the Album including The Yardbird hit “For Your Love” … most of the material is part of the innocent side of Beat Music !

Herman's Hermits, Barry Whitwam, Keith Hopwood, Peter Noone, Karl Green, Derek Leckenby, circa early

Personnel:
Karl Green (bass)
Keith Hopwood (guitar)
Derek Leckenby (guitar)
Peter Noone (vocals)
Barry Whitwam (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Heartbeat (Montgomery/Petty) 2.51
02. Travellin’ Light (Tepper/Bennett) 2.35
03. I’ll Never Dance Again (Mann/Anthony) 3.29
04. Walkin’ With My Angel (Goffin/King) 2.22
05. Dream On (Gordon) 2.05
06. I Wonder (Pearson) 2.10
07. For Your Love (Gouldman) 2.27
08. Don’t Try To Hurt Me (Hopwood) 2.07
09. Tell Me Baby (Leckenby/Hopwood) 2.15
10. I’m Henery VIII, I Am (Murray/Weston) 1.52
11. The End Of The World (Kent/Dee) 2.59
12. Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter (Peacock) 2.48

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The Pretty Things – Get The Picture (1965)

LPFrontCover1.jpgGet the Picture? is the second album by the English rock group The Pretty Things, released in 1965.

Recording began on The Pretty Things’ second album in around September 1965, just months after the release of their debut. It ended up being a haphazard affair thanks to a growing problem with drummer Viv Prince whose behaviour was becoming ever more erratic and reckless. With Prince being unreliable, the band had help in the form of producer Bobby Graham who was a renowned drummer in his own right, playing on several tracks. John Stax’s flatmate John C. Alder helped out on at least two tracks, one of which was “You’ll Never Do It Baby” Jimmy Page also made a couple of cameos, receiving a partial writing credit on “You Don’t Believe Me.” The album did see the band starting to move away from the staunch R&B direction that dominated the first album, exploring more soulful areas as well as Freakbeat with much use of distortion on guitar and bass parts.

Recorded on three-track tape at Philips Studios in London, the album was only mixed in mono. By the time it was released, Viv Prince had been fired from the band. It left them without a drummer for a few weeks whilst the search was on for a replacement.

The liner notes were written by Bryan Morrison. (by wikipedia)

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The Pretty Things’ second album, Get the Picture? (released December 1965), has not only been remastered from original session tapes so the group sounds like their amps are practically right in your lap, but it’s also been expanded to 18 songs with the addition of tracks cut for singles and EP releases from the same sessions. That’s enough to recommend it even to casual fans — this is now a record that’s just a few notches short of Rolling Stones level in the charisma department, and pretty tough any way you want to look at it. On “Rainin’ in My Heart,” they sound exactly like the Stones from the same era, missing only the little harmonica flourish that might have been added on the break. The liner notes go into the history of the group during this period in delightful detail, and the histories of various songs, most particularly “L.S.D.,” which, amazingly, was cut as a demo and never redone for release, but just put out the way it was. In their good moments here, the Pretty Things approach Rolling Stones’ territory, and even in their off moments, they’re flying at the same level as the Kinks’ album tracks. (by Bruce Eder)

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The frontcover of a rare French cover from 1965

Personnel:
Bobby Graham (drums on a handful of tracks)
Phil May (vocals)
Brian Pendleton (guitar, background vocals)
Viv Prince (drums on a handful of tracks)
John Stax (bass, background vocals)

Dick Taylor (guitar)
Twink (drums on a handful of tracks)
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Skip Alan (drums on 13. – 18.)

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Tracklist:
01. You Don’t Believe Me (May/Graham/Page/Morrell) 2.22
02. Buzz The Jerk (May/Taylor) 1.54
03. Get The Picture? (May/Taylor) 1.55
04. Can’t Stand The Pain (May/Taylor/Graham) 2.40
05. Rainin’ In My Heart (Moore/West) 2.31
06. We’ll Play House (May/Taylor) 2.32
07. You’ll Never Do It, Baby (Smith/Fox) 2.27
08. I Had A Dream (Witherspoon) 2.57
09. I Want Your Love (Dee/Tarr) 2.16
10. London Town (Hardin) 2.26
11. Cry To Me (Russell) 2.51
12. Gonna Find Me A Substitute (Turner) 2.57
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13. Get A Buzz (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Alan) 4.00
14. Sittin’ All Alone (May/Taylor) 2.47
15. Midnight To Six Man (Taylor/May) 2.19
16. Me Needing You (May/Taylor) 1.57
17. Come See Me (Tubbs/Jackson/Barnes) 2.39
18. L.S.D. (May/Taylor) 2.25
Multimedia Bonus Track – The Pretty Things 1966 movie

(“Midnight To Six Man”, “Me Needing You”, “Come See Me” and “L.S.D.” were produced by Glyn Johns)

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I never see
The people I know
In the bright light of day
So how can I say

That you’re any friend of mine
(See you anytime)
I’m feelin’ fine
(Midnight ’til six)
That’s my time
(That’s your time)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

I sleep through the day
I wake around four
But I always feel down
Never get off the floor

‘Til the night comes around
(See you downtown)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

(See you down town)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

 

Casey Jones & The Governors – Don’t Ha Ha (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a forgotten highlight of the British Beat Scene in the Mid-Sixties:

Brian Casser (born 21 March 1936, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a British singer and guitarist. He led the first notable beat group in Liverpool, Cass & the Cassanovas, who were early rivals of The Beatles in the city. He later led another group, Casey Jones & the Engineers, which was one of Eric Clapton’s first bands, and then, as leader of Casey Jones & the Governors, became successful in Germany in the mid-1960s.

Casser lived in Liverpool in the late 1950s, having previously worked in the Merchant Navy. As singer and rhythm guitarist, he formed a trio, Cass & the Cassanovas, in May 1959, with singer and guitarist Adrian Barber (born 13 November 1938, Ilkley, Yorkshire), and drummer and singer Brian J. Hudson (born Brian James Hudson, 21 April 1938, Cleveland, Yorkshire). After a few months, Hudson left and was replaced by Johnny Hutchinson (born 18 July 1940, Malta), known as Johnny Hutch. In need of a bass guitarist, Hutchinson then brought in Johnny Gustafson (born 8 August 1942, Liverpool) in December 1959.

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At that time Gustafson did not have a proper bass guitar so Barber converted an acoustic for him. The group became popular playing a wide range of music, from Latin American music to rock and roll, in dance halls in the Liverpool area. Casser also started his own music club in Liverpool, the Casanova Club, whose guest groups included one known at the time as the “Silver Beetles”; according to some reports, Casser had suggested that they change their name from the earlier spelling of “Beatals” which Casser found “ridiculous”. In May 1960 Cass & the Cassanovas took part in auditions in front of leading manager Larry Parnes who was looking for backing bands for his stable of pop singers. The group secured a place as backing group for singer Duffy Power and toured with him.[3][4][5] By this time, Casser had begun using the stage names of “Casey Jones” and “Casey Valence”.

In December 1960, Gustafson, Hutchinson and Barber left the band, and formed themselves into a new trio, The Big Three. Casser moved to London around 1962, and managed the Blue Gardenia club in Soho. He also briefly formed a group called the Nightsounds, which featured Albert Lee on guitar. The following year, he won a recording contract with the Columbia label, and recorded a single, “One Way Ticket”, using the name Casey Jones. With drummer Ray Stock, he recruited two former members of R&B group the Roosters, guitarist Eric Clapton and bassist Tom McGuinness, and briefly toured as Casey Jones & the Engineers. Clapton and McGuinness left after a few performances, shortly followed by Stock.

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Casser then formed a new group with David Coleman (lead guitar), Roger Cook (rhythm guitar), Jim Rodford (bass) and Peter Richards (drums). They played at the Star-Club in Hamburg and became popular in Germany, releasing two singles, “Tall Girl” and “Don’t Ha Ha” on the Bellaphon label, before changing their name to Casey Jones & the Governors, apparently in an attempt to stress their British origins. The record label reissued “Don’t Ha Ha” – which in fact was a version of the 1958 Huey Smith and the Clowns song “Don’t You Just Know It” – under the new band name and it rose to # 2 on the German pop chart. Casey Jones and the Governors continued to tour and record successfully in Germany for a few years, achieving six top 40 singles and releasing two albums on the Gold 12 label, Casey Jones and the Governors (1965) and Don’t Ha Ha (1966).

In the 1970s, Casser, still using the name Casey Jones, worked as a disc jockey in Löhnberg, and recorded a solo album, Casey’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Show.[3] In the 1990s, he formed a new version of Casey Jones and the Governors to play the oldies circuit in Germany, and in 2006 was reported to be living in Unna near Dortmund. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s the very rare debut album … if you like the raw, sometimes sentimental Sixties Beat you should listen … here´s one of the best Album from this period … including many bonus tracks (Singles from 1963 – 1966) and … a killer vrsion of “Jack The Ripper” !

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Personnel:
David Coleman (guitar)
Roger Hook (guitar)
Casey Jones (vocals)
Jim Redford (bass)
Peter Richards (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Ha Ha (Smith/Vincent) 2.07
02. Love Potion No. 9 (Leiber/Stoller) 2.06
03. Mickeys Monkey (Robinson) 3.06
04. Parchman Farm (Allison) 2.56
05. Slow Down (Williams) 3.09
06. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 2.29
07. Sounds Like Locomotion (St. John) 1.52
08. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Williams) 2.06
09. Talking ‘Bout You (Berry) 2.05
10. Do The Dog (Thomas) 2.50
11. Can’t Judge A Book (McDaniels) 2.39
12. So Long Baby (Jones) 4.28
13. Jack The Ripper (Sutch) 3.04
14. Nashville Special (Larson) 2.30
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15. One Way Ticket  (Davis/Duncan/Jones) 2.49
16. I’m Gonna Love (Davis/Duncan) 2.04
17. Tall Girl (Jones) 2.04
18. Blue Tears (Jones) 2.49
19. Don’t Ha Ha (1st Version, 1963) (Smith/Vincent) 
20. Long Gone Train (Jones) 2.38
21. Candy Man (Ross/Neil) 2.20
22. Tallahassee Lassie (Slay/Crese/Picariello) 2.26
23. So Long Baby (Mono Single mix) (Jones) 2.03
24. Bumble Bee (German Version) (Fullylock/Baker/Holm) 2.21
25. Rootin Tootin Baby (Jones) 2.34
26. Yockomo (Mono Single mix) (Smith/Vincent) 2.34
27. Baby Why Did You Say Goodbye (Jones) 2.32
28. Little Girl (Jones) 3.08
29. A Legal Matter (Townshend) 2.55

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The Animals – Live At Ed Sullivan (1964 – 1966)

FrontCover1The Animals had hit the ground running with “House of the Rising Sun”, which topped the US and UK charts in 1964. Bob Dylan had previously recorded the folk song about a brothel in New Orleans, but the Animals took it to Number One. This song was the perfect vehicle for their powerful take on rhythm and blues, highlighted by Eric Burdon’s gritty howl. The quintet was made up of lead singer Burdon, Hilton Valentine on guitar, Alan Price on keyboards, Bryan “Chas” Chandler on bass, and John Steel on the drums.

The boys first appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on October 18th 1964. With young girls screaming their lungs out, The Animals took the audience hostage as they played “I’m Crying” followed by their #1 hit “House of the Rising Sun.” The audience got so out of control that Sullivan had to shush them several times.

Eric Burden remembers, “I was making my way to CBS one time to do The Sullivan Show, and I ran down this back alley and got cornered and I had to get rescued by a couple of New York cops, and the kids were so wild, one cop lost his badge and his cap and his gun, I think, and the other one backed into a corner and he had a night stick, and he put the night stick across this doorway, and I was in the doorway. And the hounds were like this, and the door under the pressure just gave in, and I fell in through the door and landed in somebody’s front room.”

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For their second appearance on January 24, 1965 The Animals performed “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood.” These early shows recorded some of The Animals best performances as they energetically charged the audience. Although Burdon’s singing was emotionally raw, he came off as shy and somewhat awkward.

During 1965, they did two more Sullivan shows, singing “Bright Lights Big City,” “Bring it Home to Me” and “The Work Song.” On February 6, 1966 they again appeared, and performed the hit “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” and “Inside Looking Out.” For their last appearance on August 14th 1966, they sang Sam Cooke’s “Shake” and “Don’t Bring Me Down.” But by this time, they had begun to disintegrate.

The original lineup of the group only recorded three albums, yet nevertheless managed to break out eight Top 40 hits between 1964 and 1966. Price left in 1965, and Steel the following year. Also in 1966, Chandler left to start managing talent, and it was he who discovered Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now a very different group, they were known as Eric Burdon & The Animals, and had six additional Top 40 hits before finally disbanding in 1968.

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After a few unsuccessful attempts at reunions, The Animals got together for their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 1996, Chandler died in his sleep from a heart attack, and Rowberry died of heart failure in 2003. The Ed Sullivan Show remains an integral part of the group’s history. In a recent interview with The Examiner, Burdon recalls The Ed Sullivan Show as “Long hours of continuous rehearsals, but if you didn’t do the show, you went nowhere. It seems like he liked us. We were invited back to the show many times. Six appearances in all.” (by edsullivan.com)

And here ar six songs from this legendary perio of The Animals …

Listen and enjoy this fucking good band from Newcastle/UK.

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Personnel:
Eric Burdon (vocals)
Bryan “Chas” Chandler (bass)
Alan Price (keyboards)
John Steel (drums)
Hilton Valentine (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. The House of the Rising Sun (Traditional) 3.12
02. Don’t Bring Me Down (Goffin/King) 2.23
03. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (Benjamin/Caldwell/Marcus) 2.25
04. Baby Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.32
05. We’ve Gotta Get Out of This Place (Mann/Weil) 2.13
06. Inside Looking Out (J.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 2.53

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In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it
(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

George Shearing Quintet – Strolling (1965)

FrontCover1Sir George Shearing, OBE (13 August 1919 – 14 February 2011) was a British jazz pianist who for many years led a popular jazz group that recorded for Discovery Records, MGM Records and Capitol Records. The composer of over 300 titles, including the jazz standard “Lullaby of Birdland”, had multiple albums on the Billboard charts during the 1950s, 1960s, 1980s and 1990s. He died of heart failure in New York City, at the age of 91.

 

Born in Battersea, London, Shearing was the youngest of nine children. He was born blind to working class parents: his father delivered coal and his mother cleaned trains in the evening. He started to learn piano at the age of three and began formal training at Linden Lodge School for the Blind, where he spent four years.

Though he was offered several scholarships, Shearing opted to perform at a local pub, the Mason’s Arms in Lambeth, for “25 bob a week” playing piano and accordion. He joined an all-blind band during that time and was influenced by the records of Teddy Wilson and Fats Waller. Shearing made his first BBC radio broadcast during this time after befriending Leonard Feather, with whom he started recording in 1937.

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In 1940, Shearing joined Harry Parry’s popular band and contributed to the comeback of Stéphane Grappelli. Shearing won seven consecutive Melody Maker polls during this time. Around that time he was also a member of George Evans’s Saxes ‘n’ Sevens band.

In 1947, Shearing emigrated to the United States, where his harmonically complex style mixing swing, bop and modern classical influences gained popularity. One of his first performances was at the Hickory House. He performed with the Oscar Pettiford Trio and led a jazz quartet with Buddy DeFranco, which led to contractual problems, since Shearing was under contract to MGM and DeFranco to Capitol Records.[citation needed]

In 1949, he formed the first George Shearing Quintet, a band with Margie Hyams (vibraphone), Chuck Wayne (guitar), later replaced by Toots Thielemans (listed as John Tillman), John Levy (bass) and Denzil Best (drums) and recorded for Discovery, Savoy and MGM, including the immensely popular single “September in the Rain” (MGM), which sold over 900,000 copies; “my other hit” to accompany “Lullaby of Birdland”. Shearing said of this hit that it was “as accidental as it could be.”

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Shearing’s interest in classical music resulted in some performances with concert orchestras in the 1950s and 1960s, and his solos frequently drew upon the music of Satie, Delius and Debussy for inspiration. He became known for a piano technique known as “Shearing’s voicing”, a type of double melody block chord, with an additional fifth part that doubles the melody an octave lower. (This style is also known as “locked hands” and the jazz organist Milt Buckner is generally credited with inventing it.[citation needed])

In 1956, Shearing became a naturalized citizen of the United States. He continued to play with his quintet, with augmented players through the years, and recorded with Capitol until 1969. He created his own label, Sheba, that lasted a few years. Along with dozens of musical stars of his day, Shearing appeared on ABC’s The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom. Earlier, he had appeared on the same network’s reality show, The Comeback Story, in which he discussed how to cope with blindness.

Shaering05In 1970, he began to “phase out his by-now-predictable quintet” and disbanded the group in 1978. One of his more notable albums during this period was The Reunion, with George Shearing (Verve 1976), made in collaboration with bassist Andy Simpkins and drummer Rusty Jones, and featuring Stéphane Grappelli, the musician with whom he had debuted as a sideman decades before. Later, Shearing played with a trio, as a soloist and increasingly in a duo. Among his collaborations were sets with the Montgomery Brothers, Marian McPartland, Brian Q. Torff, Jim Hall, Hank Jones and Kenny Davern. In 1979, Shearing signed with Concord Records, and recorded for the label with Mel Tormé. This collaboration garnered Shearing and Tormé two Grammys, one in 1983 and another in 1984.

Shearing remained fit and active well into his later years and continued to perform, even after being honoured with an Ivor Novello Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993. He never forgot his native country and, in his last years, would split his year between living in New York and Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire, where he bought a house with his second wife, singer Ellie Geffert. This gave him the opportunity to tour the UK, giving concerts, often with Tormé, backed by the BBC Big Band. He was appointed OBE in 1996. In 2007, he was knighted. “So”, he noted later, “the poor, blind kid from Battersea became Sir George Shearing. Now that’s a fairy tale come true.”

He was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1992 when he was surprised by Michael Aspel.

In 2004, he released his memoirs, Lullaby of Birdland, which was accompanied by a double-album “musical autobiography”, Lullabies of Birdland. Shortly afterwards, however, he suffered a fall at his home and retired from regular performing.

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Lynn Redgrave and George Shearing at an
Arts and Entertainment Network Party in New York
 

In 2012 Derek Paravicini and jazz vocalist Frank Holder did a tribute concert to the recordings of Shearing. Ann Odell transcribed the recordings and taught Paravicini the parts, as well as being the MD for the concerts. Lady Shearing also endorsed the show, sending a letter to be read out before the Watermill Jazz Club performance.

Shearing was married to Trixie Bayes from 1941 to 1973. Two years after his divorce he married his second wife, the singer Ellie Geffert, who survived him.

Shearing was a member of the Bohemian Club and often performed at the annual Bohemian Grove Encampments. He composed music for two of the Grove Plays (by wikipedia)

And here´s a fine example of his tasteful mixture between jazz and easy listening …  Maybe you should imagine … sitting in a bar with a hot lady on your side … close your eyes an drift away …

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Personnel:
The George Shearing Quintet

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Tracklist:
01. Strolling (Levy Jr.) 3.01
02. November Sea Scape (Hyams) 2.31
03. Easy Livin’ (Wright/Forrest) 6.05
04, Lonely Moments (Williams) 3.14
05. This Is Cuba? (Shearing) 2.30
06. If You Were The Only Girl In The World (Ayer) ‎2.49
07. I’ll Never Smile Again (Lowe) 2.53
08. Loose Leaf (Zarantonello) 2.26
09. Midnight Mood (Shearing/Hazard) 3.03
10. Minoration (Pate) 2.28
11. My Silent Love (Suesse) 2.47
12. We’ll Be Together Again (Fischer) 2.24

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Sir George Shearing, OBE (13 August 1919 – 14 February 2011)

John Hammond – So Many Roads (1965)

FrontCover1John Hammond jr., son of the legendary Columbia Records A&R man who had signed Billie Holliday, Aretha Franklin and Bob Dylan, met the Hawks in Toronto in 1964 and was astonished by the perfection with which these young men played rhythm and blues. After several jam sessions with the Hawks, Hammond arranged for the Hawks to back him on this third album he would cut for Vanguard, but the record company insisted that he should use bassist Jimmy Lewis and piano player Mike Bloomfield. The old-time-blues inspired album So Many Roads ended up with Robbie, Levon and Garth contributing guitar, drums and keyboards. Robertson’s guitar work is among his most exciting blues performances, what Greil Marcus described as “all rough edges, jagged bits of metal ripping through the spare rhythm section”. (by http://theband.hiof.no)

So Many Roads is Hammond’s most notable mid-’60s Vanguard album, due not so much to Hammond’s own singing and playing (though he’s up to the task) as the yet-to-be-famous backing musicians. Three future members of the Band — Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson, and Levon Helm — are among the supporting cast, along with Charlie John Hammond01Musselwhite on harmonica, and Mike Bloomfield also contributes. It’s one of the first fully realized blues-rock albums, although it’s not in the same league as the best efforts of the era by the likes of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band or John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. In part that’s because the repertoire is so heavy on familiar Chicago blues classics by the likes of Willie Dixon, Bo Diddley, and Muddy Waters; in part that’s because the interpretations are so reverent and close to the originals in arrangement; and in part it’s also because Hammond’s blues vocals were only okay. Revisionist critics thus tend to downgrade the record a notch. But in the context of its time — when songs like “Down in the Bottom,” “Long Distance Call,” “Big Boss Man,” and “You Can’t Judge a Book By the Cover” were not as well known as they would become — it was a punchy, well-done set of electric blues with a rock touch. (by Richie Unterberger)

What a line-up !!!

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Personnel:
Michael Bloomfield (piano)
John Hammond (vocals, guitar)
Levon Helms (drums)
Eric Hudson (organ)
Jimmy Lewis (bass)
Charlie Musselwhite (harmonica)
Robbie Robertson (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.05
02. Long Distance Call (Morganfield) 3.22
03. Who Do You Love (McDaniels) 3.03
04. I Want You To Love Me (Morganfield) 4.09
05. Judgment Day (Johnson/Hammond) 3.26
06. So Many Roads, So Many Trains (Paul) 2.43
07. Rambling Blues (Johnson) 3.19
08. O Yea! (McDaniels) 3.36
09. You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover (Dixon) 3.32
10. Gambling Blues (Jackson) 3.14
11. Baby, Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.23
12. Big Boss Man (Smith/Dixon) 2.41

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More John Hammond:

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Los Shakers – Same (1965)

LPFrontCover1Los Shakers were a popular rock band in 1960s and was a part of the Uruguayan Invasion in Latin America. They were heavily influenced by the look and sound of the Beatles.[1][2] In the late 1960s they would broaden and expand their musical direction before breaking up at the end of the decade.

The band was formed in 1964 in Montevideo, Uruguay by brothers, Hugo Fattoruso (lead guitar and keyboards) and Osvaldo Fattoruso (rhythm guitar), after watching the movie, A Hard Days Night, by the Beatles. They were modeled after The Beatles and even adopted similar haircuts and clothing, as can be seen in their record cover. The band sang many songs in English, despite their location, and gained their greatest popularity in Argentina.

They signed with the Odeon label of EMI in Argentina. The first single recorded as The Shakers was “Break it All”, in 1965, followed by self-titled album later that year. For obvious reasons, the band focused their attentions almost exclusively on Latin America, but did they did take one crack at the English-speaking market when they released the album Break it All, on the US-based Audio Fidelity label in 1966.

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The record (which featured re-recorded versions of many of the songs on their original LP and even a Spanish-language version of Beatles’ “Ticket to Ride”) was little more than a curiosity in America and was not a hit, but became a collector’s item decades later, as would their second album, Shakers For You (released in 1968).

Reflecting the move towards psychedelia, their music went in a new direction. Their last studio album with the original line up, La Conferencia Secreta del Toto’s Bar, released in 1968,[12] mixed psychedelic influences with candombe and some tango sounds; the album has been described as a Latin American Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. However, their recording label (EMI) did not approve of this new sound, and left them without any promotion or support; it led to the band’s split up. In 2005, the original lineup re-united, and recorded a CD Bonus Tracks and played in Argentina and Uruguay. Los Shakers would break up shortly thereafter.

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Osvaldo Fattoruso, guitarist and drummer, died on July 29, 2012 due to cancer at the age of 64.

And this is the first studio album by this Uruguayan beat band. It was released in July 1965 on the Odeon Pops label. (by wikipedia)

And we hear pretty good beat music … this time not from the Merseyside in UK, but from Uruguay … and the guys knows how to play this exciting music !

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Personnel:
Roberto “Pelín” Capobianco (bass, bandoneon, background vocals)
Hugo Fattoruso (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)
Osvaldo Fattoruso (guitar, vocals)
Carlos “Caio” Vila (drums, backing vocals

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Tracklist:
01. Rompan Todo (Break It All) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.30
02. Que Amor (What A Love) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 3.05
03. Nena Si, Si (Baby Yeah, Yeah) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.21
04. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.29
05. Corran Todos (Everybody Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.14
06. Estoy Pensando (I’m Thinking) (Vila) 2.20
07. Esta Es Mi Fiesta (It’s My Party) (Gold/Gluck Jr./Weiner/Gottlieb) 2.14
08. Sigue Buscando (Keep Searching) (Shannon) 2.00
09. Para Ti Y Para Mi (For You And Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
10. Corro Por Las Calles (Shake In The Streets) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.31
11. La Larga Noche (The Longest Night) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.12
12. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.13
13. No Me Pidas Amor (Don’t Ask Me Love) (O.Fattoruso/Capobianco) 2.03
14. Dame (Give Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.27
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15. My Bonnie (Traditional/Sheridan) 2.00
16. Solo En Tus Ojos (Only In Your Eyes) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
17. Mas (More) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.07
18. Boleto Para Pasear (Ticket To Ride) [sung in Spanish] (Lennon/McCartney) 2.13
19. Hasta Luego Cocodrilo (See You Later Alligator) (Guidry) 1.57
20. Solo Quiero Estar Contigo (I Only Want To Be With You) [sung in Spanish] (Hawker/Raymonde) 2.34
21. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.32
22. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.18

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