The Sharp Five – The Sidewinder (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgIn 1962, The Ventures made the first of what would be many tours of Japan and the Far East. While the shows attracted very little media attention, many had already been exposed to this new reverb-drenched instrumental music through imported records and overseas radio broadcasts, and some of these fans formed their own bands that would become the genesis for a new trend in music. Progenitors of this new sound were tossing out their acoustic guitars in favor of more powerful electric ones, which prompted the name “eleki”, taken from the Japanese for “electric guitar”.

When The Ventures returned back to Japan in 1965, a far different scene awaited them. By this time “eleki” was all the rage. Many established groups had by this time given up playing rockabilly, country, and even jazz to switch over to “eleki”, and high school kids across the nation were rushing out to buy electric guitars and jump on the “eleki” bandwagon, demand for these guitars far outstripping domestic supply for several years running.

In addition to the radio and concerts, there were at least four television programs dedicated exclusively to “eleki” music including Eleki Tournament, Exciting Show, Eleki Tournament Show, and New Eleki Sounds Jumping into the World, and the establishment had begun to cast a wary eye on the “disturbing” trend. This had happened in the past with the rockabilly boom of the 50s, and would happen again with the Group Sounds bands later in the 60s, but regardless of the pressure, “eleki” continued to flourish. (by radiodiffusion.wordpress.com)

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One of these eleki gtoups from Japan was The Sharp Five:

“Sharp Five were an instrumental eleki / psychedelic garage combo from japan. Wicked guitar licks and Ventures-esque surf wah-wah fuzzed-out and psyched-up with an oriental sonic garage back bass. Overall a slightly trippier flavour of eleki . This is generally regarded as their best albums…” (by musicofsixties.blogspot)

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Personnel:
Osamu Furuya (organ)
Munetaka Inoue (drums)
Nobuhiro Mine (lead guitar)
Akiyama Tsutomu (bass)
Hidemasa Yamauchi (guitar),

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Tracklist:
01. Paperback Writer (Lennon/McCartney) 2.22
02. What How My Love (Delanoe/Becaud) 2.19
03. Batman Theme (Hefti) 2.53
04. Secret Agentman (Sloan/Barri) 2.32
05. Theme From The “Man From U.N.C.L.E.” (Goldsmith) 1.48
06. Theme From “Our Man Flint” (Goldsmith) 4.23
07. Blue Eyes (Hashimoto/Inoue) 2.58
08. The Cat (Schifrin) 2.46
09. The “In” Crowd (Page) 3.36
10. The Sidewinder (Morgan) 3.14
11. Comin’ Home Baby (Tucher) 2.56
12. In Un Fiore (Mogol/Donida) 2.39
13. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 3.30

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Jefferson Airplane – Takes Off (1966)

LPFrontCover1.jpgJefferson Airplane Takes Off is the debut album of American rock band Jefferson Airplane, released in August 1966 as RCA Victor LSP-3584 (stereo) and LPM-3584 (mono). The personnel differs from the later “classic” lineup: Signe Toly Anderson was the female vocalist and Skip Spence played drums. Both left the group shortly after the album’s release and were replaced by Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, respectively

RCA executives found some of the lyrics too sexually suggestive. They had the band change the lyrics in “Let Me In” from “I gotta get in, you know where” to “You shut your door, now it ain’t fair”, and “Don’t tell me you want money” to “Don’t tell me it’s so funny”. In “Run Around” they had the line “Blinded by colors come flashing from flowers that sway as you lay under me” altered to “that sway as you stay here by me”. With “Runnin’ ‘Round This World” the executives insisted that “trips” in the line “The nights I’ve spent with you have been fantastic trips” referred to taking LSD, though the band insisted it was merely common slang. Even replacing the word “trips” with a guitar apreggio did not placate RCA’s concerns with the line’s sexual connotations and refused its inclusion on the album, and the recording remained unreleased for the next eight years.

The album’s release drew little press attention at a time when mainstream newspapers did not normally cover rock releases and the rock press was yet in its infancy. Crawdaddy! highlighted the album on the cover of its January 1967 issue, which included a three-page review by the magazine’s assistant editor Tim Jurgens, who called the album “faulted” yet “the most important album of American rock” of 1966. (by wikipedia)

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The debut Jefferson Airplane album was dominated by singer Marty Balin, who wrote or co-wrote all the original material and sang most of the lead vocals in his heartbreaking tenor with Paul Kantner and Signe Anderson providing harmonies and backup. (Anderson’s lead vocal on “Chauffeur Blues” indicated she was at least the equal of her successor, Grace Slick, as a belter.) The music consisted mostly of folk-rock love songs, the most memorable of which were “It’s No Secret” and “Come up the Years.” (There was also a striking version of Dino Valente’s “Get Together” recorded years before the Youngbloods’ hit version.) Jorma Kaukonen already displayed a talent for mixing country, folk, and blues riffs in a rock context, and Jack Casady already had a distinctive bass sound. But the Airplane of Balin-Kantner-Kaukonen-Anderson-Casady-Spence is to be distinguished from the Balin-Kantner-Kaukonen-Casady-Slick-Dryden version of the band that would emerge on record five months later chiefly by Balin’s dominance. Later, Grace Slick would become the group’s vocal and visual focal point. On Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, the Airplane was still Balin’s group. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Signe Toly Anderson (vocals, percussion)
Marty Balin (vocals, guitar)
Jack Casady (bass)
Paul Kantner (guitar, vocals)

Jorma Kaukonen (guitar)
Skip Spence – drums)
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Spencer Dryden (drums on 15., 18. + 19.)

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Tracklist:
01. Blues From An Airplane (Balin/Spence) 2.13
02. Let Me In (Balin/Kantner) 2.59
03. Bringing Me Down (Balin/Kantner) 2.24
04. It’s No Secret (Balin) 2.39
05. Tobacco Road (Warnick[n) (*) 3.30
06. Come Up The Years (Balin/Kantner) 2.32
07. Run Around (Balin/Kantner) 2.40
08. Let’s Get Together (Kantner/Anderson/Balin/Powers) 3.35
09. Don’t Slip Away (Balin/Spence) 2.34
10. Chauffeur Blues (Melrose) 2.28
11. And I Like It (Balin/Kaukonen) 3.20
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12. Runnin’ Round This World (from Early Flight) (Balin/Kantner) 2.25
13. High Flying Bird (from Early Flight) (Wheeler) 2.17
14. It’s Alright (from Early Flight) (Balin/Spence) 2:17
15. Go To Her” (from Jefferson Airplane Loves You) Kantner, Irving Estes 4:09
16. “Let Me In (from Jefferson Airplane Loves You) (Balin/Kantner) 3.31
17. Run Around (uncensored version) (Balin/Kantner) 2.35
18. Chauffeur Blues (alternate version) (Melrose) 2.49
19.1. And I Like It (alternate version) (Balin/Kaukonen) 8.16
19.2.. Blues From An Airplane (instrumental; hidden track) (Balin/Spence) 2.10

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Cream – Fresh Cream (1966)

FrontCoverA1Fresh Cream is the debut studio album by the British rock band Cream. The album was released in the UK on 9 December 1966, as the first LP on the Reaction Records label, owned by producer Robert Stigwood. The UK album was released in both mono and stereo versions, at the same time as the release of the single “I Feel Free”.

The album was released in a slightly different form in January 1967 by Atco Records in the US, also in mono and stereo versions. The album peaked at No. 6 on the UK Albums Chart and No. 39 on the U.S. Albums Chart.

The mono versions were deleted not long after release and for many years only the stereo recordings were available. The UK mono album was reissued on CD for the first time in Japan in late 2013 as part of a deluxe SHM-CD and SHM-SACD sets (both editions also contain the UK stereo counterpart).

In January 2017, the album was again reissued in a 3CD box-set containing mono and stereo versions of the original UK and US release along with singles and b-sides.

Bass player Jack Bruce later said that the opening song “N.S.U.” was written for the band’s first rehearsal. “It was like an early punk song… the title meant “non-specific urethritis. It didn’t mean an NSU Quickly – which was one of those little 1960s mopeds. I used to say it was about a member of the band who had this venereal disease. I can’t tell you which one… except he played guitar.”

In 2003, the album was ranked number 101 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.(by wikipedia)

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Fresh Cream represents so many different firsts, it’s difficult to keep count. Cream, of course, was the first supergroup, but their first album not only gave birth to the power trio, it also was instrumental in the birth of heavy metal and the birth of jam rock. That’s a lot of weight for one record and, like a lot of pioneering records, Fresh Cream doesn’t seem quite as mighty as what would come later, both from the group and its acolytes. In retrospect, the moments on the LP that are a bit unformed — in particular, the halting waltz of “Dreaming” never achieves the sweet ethereal atmosphere it aspires to — stand out more than the innovations, which have been so thoroughly assimilated into the vocabulary of rock & roll, but Fresh Cream was a remarkable shift forward in rock upon its 1966 release and it remains quite potent.

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Certainly at this early stage the trio was still grounded heavily in blues, only fitting given guitarist Eric Clapton’s stint in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, which is where he first played with bassist Jack Bruce, but Cream never had the purist bent of Mayall, and not just because they dabbled heavily in psychedelia. The rhythm section of Bruce and Ginger Baker had a distinct jazzy bent to their beat; this isn’t hard and pure, it’s spongy and elastic, giving the musicians plenty of room to roam. This fluidity is most apparent on the blues covers that take up nearly half the record, especially on “Spoonful,” where the swirling instrumental interplay, echo, fuzz tones, and overwhelming volume constitute true psychedelic music, and also points strongly toward the guitar worship of heavy metal. Almost all the second side of Fresh Cream is devoted to this, closing with Baker’s showcase “Toad,” but for as hard and restless as this half of the album is, there is some lightness on the first portion of the record where Bruce reveals himself as an inventive psychedelic pop songwriter with the tense, colorful “N.S.U.” and the hook- and harmony-laden “I Feel Free.”

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Cream shows as much force and mastery on these tighter, poppier tunes as they do on the free-flowing jams, yet they show a clear bias toward the long-form blues numbers, which makes sense: they formed to be able to pursue this freedom, which they do so without restraint. If at times that does make the album indulgent or lopsided, this is nevertheless where Cream was feeling their way forward, creating their heavy psychedelic jazz-blues and, in the process, opening the door to all kinds of serious rock music that may have happened without Fresh Cream, but it just would not have happened in the same fashion as it did with this record as precedent. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums, percussion, vocals)
Jack Bruce (vocals, bass, harmonica, piano)
Eric Clapton (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. I Feel Free (Bruce/Brown) 2.53
02. N.S.U. (Bruce) 2.48
03. Sleepy Time Time (Bruce/Godfrey) 4.23
04. Dreaming (Bruce) 2.01
05. Sweet Wine (Baker/Godfrey) 3.20
06. Cat’s Squirrel (Traditional) 3.06
07. Four Until Late (Johnson) 2.10
08. Rollin’ And Tumblin’ (Morganfield) 4.44
09. I’m So Glad (James) 3.59
10. Toad (Baker) 5.10

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Casey Jones & The Governors – Don’t Ha Ha (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a forgotten highlight of the British Beat Scene in the Mid-Sixties:

Brian Casser (born 21 March 1936, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a British singer and guitarist. He led the first notable beat group in Liverpool, Cass & the Cassanovas, who were early rivals of The Beatles in the city. He later led another group, Casey Jones & the Engineers, which was one of Eric Clapton’s first bands, and then, as leader of Casey Jones & the Governors, became successful in Germany in the mid-1960s.

Casser lived in Liverpool in the late 1950s, having previously worked in the Merchant Navy. As singer and rhythm guitarist, he formed a trio, Cass & the Cassanovas, in May 1959, with singer and guitarist Adrian Barber (born 13 November 1938, Ilkley, Yorkshire), and drummer and singer Brian J. Hudson (born Brian James Hudson, 21 April 1938, Cleveland, Yorkshire). After a few months, Hudson left and was replaced by Johnny Hutchinson (born 18 July 1940, Malta), known as Johnny Hutch. In need of a bass guitarist, Hutchinson then brought in Johnny Gustafson (born 8 August 1942, Liverpool) in December 1959.

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At that time Gustafson did not have a proper bass guitar so Barber converted an acoustic for him. The group became popular playing a wide range of music, from Latin American music to rock and roll, in dance halls in the Liverpool area. Casser also started his own music club in Liverpool, the Casanova Club, whose guest groups included one known at the time as the “Silver Beetles”; according to some reports, Casser had suggested that they change their name from the earlier spelling of “Beatals” which Casser found “ridiculous”. In May 1960 Cass & the Cassanovas took part in auditions in front of leading manager Larry Parnes who was looking for backing bands for his stable of pop singers. The group secured a place as backing group for singer Duffy Power and toured with him.[3][4][5] By this time, Casser had begun using the stage names of “Casey Jones” and “Casey Valence”.

In December 1960, Gustafson, Hutchinson and Barber left the band, and formed themselves into a new trio, The Big Three. Casser moved to London around 1962, and managed the Blue Gardenia club in Soho. He also briefly formed a group called the Nightsounds, which featured Albert Lee on guitar. The following year, he won a recording contract with the Columbia label, and recorded a single, “One Way Ticket”, using the name Casey Jones. With drummer Ray Stock, he recruited two former members of R&B group the Roosters, guitarist Eric Clapton and bassist Tom McGuinness, and briefly toured as Casey Jones & the Engineers. Clapton and McGuinness left after a few performances, shortly followed by Stock.

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Casser then formed a new group with David Coleman (lead guitar), Roger Cook (rhythm guitar), Jim Rodford (bass) and Peter Richards (drums). They played at the Star-Club in Hamburg and became popular in Germany, releasing two singles, “Tall Girl” and “Don’t Ha Ha” on the Bellaphon label, before changing their name to Casey Jones & the Governors, apparently in an attempt to stress their British origins. The record label reissued “Don’t Ha Ha” – which in fact was a version of the 1958 Huey Smith and the Clowns song “Don’t You Just Know It” – under the new band name and it rose to # 2 on the German pop chart. Casey Jones and the Governors continued to tour and record successfully in Germany for a few years, achieving six top 40 singles and releasing two albums on the Gold 12 label, Casey Jones and the Governors (1965) and Don’t Ha Ha (1966).

In the 1970s, Casser, still using the name Casey Jones, worked as a disc jockey in Löhnberg, and recorded a solo album, Casey’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Show.[3] In the 1990s, he formed a new version of Casey Jones and the Governors to play the oldies circuit in Germany, and in 2006 was reported to be living in Unna near Dortmund. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s the very rare debut album … if you like the raw, sometimes sentimental Sixties Beat you should listen … here´s one of the best Album from this period … including many bonus tracks (Singles from 1963 – 1966) and … a killer vrsion of “Jack The Ripper” !

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Personnel:
David Coleman (guitar)
Roger Hook (guitar)
Casey Jones (vocals)
Jim Redford (bass)
Peter Richards (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Ha Ha (Smith/Vincent) 2.07
02. Love Potion No. 9 (Leiber/Stoller) 2.06
03. Mickeys Monkey (Robinson) 3.06
04. Parchman Farm (Allison) 2.56
05. Slow Down (Williams) 3.09
06. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 2.29
07. Sounds Like Locomotion (St. John) 1.52
08. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Williams) 2.06
09. Talking ‘Bout You (Berry) 2.05
10. Do The Dog (Thomas) 2.50
11. Can’t Judge A Book (McDaniels) 2.39
12. So Long Baby (Jones) 4.28
13. Jack The Ripper (Sutch) 3.04
14. Nashville Special (Larson) 2.30
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15. One Way Ticket  (Davis/Duncan/Jones) 2.49
16. I’m Gonna Love (Davis/Duncan) 2.04
17. Tall Girl (Jones) 2.04
18. Blue Tears (Jones) 2.49
19. Don’t Ha Ha (1st Version, 1963) (Smith/Vincent) 
20. Long Gone Train (Jones) 2.38
21. Candy Man (Ross/Neil) 2.20
22. Tallahassee Lassie (Slay/Crese/Picariello) 2.26
23. So Long Baby (Mono Single mix) (Jones) 2.03
24. Bumble Bee (German Version) (Fullylock/Baker/Holm) 2.21
25. Rootin Tootin Baby (Jones) 2.34
26. Yockomo (Mono Single mix) (Smith/Vincent) 2.34
27. Baby Why Did You Say Goodbye (Jones) 2.32
28. Little Girl (Jones) 3.08
29. A Legal Matter (Townshend) 2.55

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Alan Price – The Price To Play (1966)

LPFrontCover1Alan Price (born 19 April 1942) is an English musician, best known as the original keyboardist for the British band the Animals and for his subsequent solo work.

Price was born in Fatfield, Washington, County Durham, and was educated at Jarrow Grammar School, South Tyneside. He is a self-taught musician and was a founding member of the Tyneside group “The Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo”, which was later renamed the Animals. His organ-playing on songs by the Animals, such as “The House of the Rising Sun”, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” and “Bring It On Home to Me” was a key element in the group’s success.

After leaving the Animals, Price went on to have success on his own with his own band the Alan Price Set and later with Georgie Fame. He introduced the songs of Randy Newman to a wider audience. Later, he appeared on his own television show as well as achieving success with film scores, including winning critical acclaim for his musical contribution to the 1973 film O Lucky Man! as well as writing the score to the stage musical Andy Capp. Price has also acted in films and television productions.

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The Price to Play is an album released in 1966 by singer songwriter Alan Price.

Debut album from Alan Price & The Alan Price Set (released in the U.K. only, although some tracks would come out in the U.S.) is a rather routine set of club R&B/soul. Fronting a six-piece that includes three horns, Price sticks mostly to covers of familiar American tunes like “Mercy Mercy,” “Ain’t That Peculiar,” “I Can’t Turn You Loose” and “Barefootin'”. (by wikipedia)

Price’s first album (released in the U.K. only, although some tracks would come out in the U.S.) is a rather routine set of club R&B/soul. Fronting a six-piece that includes three horns, Price sticks mostly to covers of familiar American tunes like “Mercy Mercy,” “Ain’t That Peculiar,” “I Can’t Turn You Loose,” and “Barefootin'” on this amiable, but hardly remarkable, set. Price’s voice is appealing, but lacks power, and in all it sounds like a clump of covers ground out hurriedly to get an album on the market. Georgie Fame did this kind of thing better, though Price’s approach isn’t as jazz-oriented.  (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Clive Burrows (saxophone)
Steve Gregory (saxophone)
Pete Kirtley (guitar)
“Little” Roy Mills (drums)
Alan Price (keyboards, vocals)
Rod “Boots” Slade (bass)
John Walters (trumpet)

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Tracklist:
01. Barefootin’ (Parker) 4.37
02. Just Once In My Life (Goffin/King/Spector) 3.27
03. Goin’ Down Slow (Jimmy) 4.46
04. Getting Mighty Crowded (McCoy) 2.16
05. Honky Tonk (Butler/Doggett/Scott/Shepherd) 4.41
06. Move On Drifter (Washington) 2.30
07. Mercy, Mercy (Covay) 3.10
08. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever (Hunter/Wonder) 2.46
09. Ain’t That Peculiar (Moore/Robinson/Rogers/Tarplin) 3.23
10. I Can’t Turn You Loose (Redding) 2.25
11. Critic’s Choice (Nelson) 2.02
12. Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo (Deutsch/Kaper) 2.50

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The Animals – Live At Ed Sullivan (1964 – 1966)

FrontCover1The Animals had hit the ground running with “House of the Rising Sun”, which topped the US and UK charts in 1964. Bob Dylan had previously recorded the folk song about a brothel in New Orleans, but the Animals took it to Number One. This song was the perfect vehicle for their powerful take on rhythm and blues, highlighted by Eric Burdon’s gritty howl. The quintet was made up of lead singer Burdon, Hilton Valentine on guitar, Alan Price on keyboards, Bryan “Chas” Chandler on bass, and John Steel on the drums.

The boys first appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on October 18th 1964. With young girls screaming their lungs out, The Animals took the audience hostage as they played “I’m Crying” followed by their #1 hit “House of the Rising Sun.” The audience got so out of control that Sullivan had to shush them several times.

Eric Burden remembers, “I was making my way to CBS one time to do The Sullivan Show, and I ran down this back alley and got cornered and I had to get rescued by a couple of New York cops, and the kids were so wild, one cop lost his badge and his cap and his gun, I think, and the other one backed into a corner and he had a night stick, and he put the night stick across this doorway, and I was in the doorway. And the hounds were like this, and the door under the pressure just gave in, and I fell in through the door and landed in somebody’s front room.”

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For their second appearance on January 24, 1965 The Animals performed “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood.” These early shows recorded some of The Animals best performances as they energetically charged the audience. Although Burdon’s singing was emotionally raw, he came off as shy and somewhat awkward.

During 1965, they did two more Sullivan shows, singing “Bright Lights Big City,” “Bring it Home to Me” and “The Work Song.” On February 6, 1966 they again appeared, and performed the hit “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” and “Inside Looking Out.” For their last appearance on August 14th 1966, they sang Sam Cooke’s “Shake” and “Don’t Bring Me Down.” But by this time, they had begun to disintegrate.

The original lineup of the group only recorded three albums, yet nevertheless managed to break out eight Top 40 hits between 1964 and 1966. Price left in 1965, and Steel the following year. Also in 1966, Chandler left to start managing talent, and it was he who discovered Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now a very different group, they were known as Eric Burdon & The Animals, and had six additional Top 40 hits before finally disbanding in 1968.

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After a few unsuccessful attempts at reunions, The Animals got together for their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 1996, Chandler died in his sleep from a heart attack, and Rowberry died of heart failure in 2003. The Ed Sullivan Show remains an integral part of the group’s history. In a recent interview with The Examiner, Burdon recalls The Ed Sullivan Show as “Long hours of continuous rehearsals, but if you didn’t do the show, you went nowhere. It seems like he liked us. We were invited back to the show many times. Six appearances in all.” (by edsullivan.com)

And here ar six songs from this legendary perio of The Animals …

Listen and enjoy this fucking good band from Newcastle/UK.

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Personnel:
Eric Burdon (vocals)
Bryan “Chas” Chandler (bass)
Alan Price (keyboards)
John Steel (drums)
Hilton Valentine (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. The House of the Rising Sun (Traditional) 3.12
02. Don’t Bring Me Down (Goffin/King) 2.23
03. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (Benjamin/Caldwell/Marcus) 2.25
04. Baby Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.32
05. We’ve Gotta Get Out of This Place (Mann/Weil) 2.13
06. Inside Looking Out (J.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 2.53

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In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it
(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

Zakk Wylde – Book Of Shadows (1996)

FrontCover1Zakk Wylde (born Jeffrey Phillip Wielandt on January 14, 1967) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and occasional actor who is best known as the guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne, and founder of the heavy metal band Black Label Society. His signature bulls-eye design appears on many of his guitars and is widely recognized. He was the lead guitarist and vocalist in Pride & Glory, who released one self-titled album in 1994 before disbanding. As a solo artist he released Book of Shadows and Book of Shadows II.

Book of Shadows is the first solo studio album by the heavy metal guitarist Zakk Wylde. The album was first released in 1996, and was reissued by Spitfire in 1999 with the bonus disc containing “Evil Ways” (the Japanese bonus track from the album’s original release), “The Color Green”, and “Peddlers of Death” (an acoustic version of a track that features on Black Label Society’s Sonic Brew).

Unlike his work with Ozzy Osbourne and Black Label Society, here Zakk Wylde shows a different side to his music; an introspective and mostly acoustic style recalling many of the lighter moments from his previous project, Pride & Glory as well as classic folk rock artists such as Neil Young.

SinglePromotional singles were released for “Between Heaven and Hell” and “Way Beyond Empty”, the latter of which also had an accompanying music video.

“Throwin’ It All Away” was written about the death of Shannon Hoon from the band Blind Melon. Shannon and Zakk had lived together and became close friends a few months before he died of a drug overdose. (by wikipedia)

After spending several years with Ozzy Osbourne and recording one album with the heavy Southern rock trio Pride & Glory, guitarist Zakk Wylde released his debut solo album, Book of Shadows, in June of 1996. Naturally, the album is a guitar showcase, with each song boasting a dazzling guitar solo or two. That much was expected. What is a surprise is the musical diversity apparent throughout the album. Wylde does kick out some heavy riff-driven rockers, but he also detours into blues, country, and folk on occasion. That diversity ensures that Book of Shadows is more listenable for the average listener than most guitarist-led albums. However, Wylde’s songwriting skills remain weak; although the playing is memorable, the melodies rarely are. Nevertheless, there’s enough prime instrumental work here to make it a very worthwhile listen for guitar aficionados and a few of the tracks should satiate fans of straight-ahead heavy boogie rock.(by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

This isn´t a hevy rock album, it´s an album full with ballads with very pensive thoughts.

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Personnel:
James LoMenzo (bass)
Joe Vitale (drums, keyboards, piano on “I Thank You Child”)
Zakk Wylde (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica, bass on 10.)
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John Sambataro (background vocals on 05.)

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Tracklist:
01. Between Heaven And Hell 3.26
02. Sold My Soul (feat. Guiggs) 4.52
03. Road Back Home 5.48
04. Way Beyond Empty 5.25
05. Throwin’ It All Away 5.47
06. What You’re Look’n For 5.31
07. Dead As Yesterday 2.51
08. Too Numb To Cry 2.23
09. The Things You Do 4.11
10. 1,000,000 Miles Away 6.29
11. I Thank You Child 4.41

All songs written by Zakk Wylde

CDs

Two different labels

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