After Tea – National Disaster (1968)

FrontCover1After Tea was founded in 1967 by Hans van Eijck (organ), Ray Fenwick (guitar) and Polle Eduard (bass/vocals) – all ex-members of the Tee Set – with drummer Martin Hage (ex-Don’t). The group produced three moderate hits in 1967-1968: “Not Just A Flower In Your Hair”, “We Will Be There After Tea” and “Snowflakes on Amsterdam”, all in a psychedelic pop style.

Ray Fenwick left shortly after the recordings of the first LP, “National Disaster” (his work permit had expired) and returned to England to join the Spencer Davis Group. He was replaced by ex-Just Colours guitarist Ferry Lever.

In the Spring of 1968, Polle Eduard was arrested for possession of marijuana and incarcerated for a few months. His temporary replacements were singer Frans Krassenburg (ex-Golden Earrings) and bass player Henk Smitskamp (ex-Motions, to Livin’ Blues). In the Summer of that year, the band scored a surprise hit under the pseudonym De Martinos with “Moest dat nou?” (recorded as a joke).

Martin Hage left later that year, replaced temporarily by Pierre van der Linden (later to Focus, Trace) and then permanently by Ilja Gort (ex-IQ 150).

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Early 1969, the most important songwriter in the band, Hans van Eijck, left to rejoin the Tee Set. He was replaced by German keyboard player Uli Grün (ex-Boots). The group then switched to a more rock-oriented sound. Yet in 1970, Ferry Lever left (also to join the Tee Set) and was not replaced. The band continued as a three-piece for some time, but in 1971 After Tea finally folded. Polle Eduard and Uli Grün were then joined by guitarist Frank van der Kloot and drummer Shel Schellekens, calling themselves Drama. They scored a Top 20 hit with “Mary’s Mama” which they subsequently refused to play live (as the whole thing was a concoction by producer Peter Koelewijn). However, in 1975, Polle Eduard, Ferry Lever and Ilja Gort reunited once more to record the single “Mexico” under the After Tea moniker. Polle Eduard continued his career as a songwriter by penning a few hits for Nico Haak and subsequently recorded an album of Dutch songs one year later, in 1976. Polle continued playing solo and in bands like The Rest (with Hans Vermeulen of Sandy Coast).

AfterTea02Ilja Gort worked as a producer for Basart Records before making a fortune composing music for commercials like the famous Nescafe tune. He now owns a vineyard in France producing his La Tulipe wines.

After his stint with the Tee Set, Hans van Eijck concentrated on writing music for TV and became a successful record producer (Danny de Munck, Marco Borsato). Ferry Lever became a music teacher and a session player. He still plays in the band of singer Rob de Nijs. (by Alex Gitlin)

Based on the success of their debut 45, Decca management wasted no time rushing the group into the studio to record an album. Produced by Bert Schouten, 1967’s “National Disaster” offered up a an entertaining blend of mid-1960s freakbeat, pop, psych, and rock influences. Largely written by van Eijck and Fenwick the song titles pretty much told you what was going on. If tracks like the earlier single ‘Not Just a Flower In Your Hair’, ‘ In the Land of the Bubble Gum Tree’ and ‘The Time Is Nigh’ weren’t a reflection of the age of love, peace and lots of illicit substances, I don’t know what was. Sure it was hopelessly dated (probably within a matter of months of being released), but hearing a lyric like ‘throw away your LSD’ (off of ‘The Time Is Nigh’) had to make you laugh. Equally good were the band’s occasional stabs at blue-eyed soul (‘National Disaster’), and more conventional rock (‘Long Ago’). Hard to believe, but in spite of van Eijck’s heavily accented vocals, the combination of trippy studio effects (phasing, offbeat tempos, etc.) and some surprisingly strong material made for an album that stood up well against better know UK and US competitors.  (by badcatrecords.com)

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In other words: This is a pretty good pop-psychedelic album from the Sixties … one of these forgotten pearls of this wonderful decade !

And “(We Will Be There) After Tea” is a classic song from the Sixties !

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Personnel:
Polle Eduard (organ, bass, vocals)
Hans van Eijck (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Ray Fenwick (guitar, vocals)
Martin Hage (drums, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Gotta Get You In My Garden Girl (v.Eijck) 2.53
02. A Lot To Do (v.Eijck) 2.04
03. Not Just A Flower In Your Hair (v.Eijck) 2.41
04. In The Land Of The Bubble Gum Tree (v.Eijck(Fenwick) 2.13
05. I’ll Push You For An Answer (v.Eijck) 2.10
06. Don’t Waste Your Love On Me (v.Eijck/Langenbach) 1.27
07. National Disaster (Renwick) 2.04
08. Long Ago (v.Eijck) 4.00
09. The Time Is Nigh (v.Eijck/Fenwick) 3.27
10. Play That Record (v.Eijck) 4.44
11. Been A Sad Day  (Fenwick) 2.53
12. It’s Too Late (v.Eijck) 2.29
+
13. (We Will Be There) After Tea (v.Eijck(Fenwick) 3.02
14. Lemon Coloured Honey Tree (v.Eijck(Fenwick) 3.49

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AfterTea05

Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – The Beat Of The Brass (1968)

FrontCover1The Beat of the Brass is the tenth album release by the popular 1960s instrumental group Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. The album was released on the heels of a television special by the same title (telecast April 22, 1968 over CBS). Tom Mankiewicz, who wrote the special, also provided two paragraphs of liner notes for the album. Explaining the concept behind the album, Mankiewicz writes, “The beat of America is more than a musical experience. It finds its pulse and rhythms in the very life of the country: the crack of a bat against a baseball, the spinning wheels and pounding machinery of a modern factory, a swinging crowd in New Orleans at Mardi Gras, a saddle twisting desperately against his rider…”[2]

It includes Alpert’s only major vocal hit, “This Guy’s In Love With You”, which became an overnight success due to its inclusion during the special, in a sequence featuring Herb and his (first) wife, Sharon. (by wikipedia)

Meant as the companion album to a Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass television special of the same name and packaged in a fancy double-fold LP jacket, The Beat of the Brass came out amid signs that Alpert’s hot streak was finally beginning to run out. Not quite. Viewer requests for a new Burt Bacharach song, “This Guy’s in Love with You” — featuring an Alpert vocal — were so strong that A&M released it as a single, which shot up to number one and took The Beat of the Brass with it to the top.

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Herb’s vocal is touching in its strained naïveté; he sounds sincere, and that overrides the lush, overbearing Bacharach orchestral arrangement. The rest of the album generated an often nostalgic quality then and now; the tunes by John Pisano and Sol Lake are exquisite, and Alpert’s arrangements of songs like “Thanks for the Memory” seem autumnal in quality, as if an era were about to close. The band still has the ability to groove; the vamp on Julius Wechter’s bossa nova “Panama,” with Wechter’s jazzy vibes and Pisano’s strong rhythm guitar, could have been stretched to half an hour. Yet Alpert’s trumpet sounds a bit withered at times, and the band vocals and cloying children’s chorus on “Talk to the Animals” could be done without. (by Richard S. Ginell)

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vocals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
Lou Pagani (piano)
John Pisano (guitar)
Pat Senatore (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Monday, Monday (J.Phillips/M.Phillips) 3.08
02. A Beautiful Friend (Lake) 3.17
03. Cabaret (Ebb/Kander) 2.38
04. Panama (Wechter) 3.36
05. Belz Mein Shtetele Belz (My Home Town) (Jacobs/Olshanetsky) 2.14
06. Talk To The Animals (Bricusse) 2.14
07. Slick (Alpert/Pisano) 3.29
08. She Touched Me (Lake) 2.58
09. Thanks For The Memory (Robin/Rainger) 2.05
10. The Robin (Pisano) 2.22
11. This Guy’s In Love With You (Bacharach/David) 3.55

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Linernotes

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Much more albums from this time by A & M Records

Rob Hoeke Boogie Woogie Quartet – Robby´s Saloon (1968)

FrontCover1Rob Hoeke (9 January 1939 – 6 November 1999) was a Dutch singer, pianist, composer and songwriter most famous for his renditions in the field of Boogie-woogie releasing over 20 albums. Besides that he played and recorded in a musical variety of styles ranging from Blues, Soul, Rock and Rhythm & Blues.
Rob Hoeke’s most successful period was in the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s with his Rob Hoeke’s Rhythm & Blues Group. He scored hits with “Margio” (number 12 on the Dutch Top 40 in 1966), “Drinking on My Bed” (number 11 in 1966) and “Down South” which would become Hoeke’s signature tune and biggest hit reaching number 6 in 1970. His sole charting album was Four Hands Up, a collaboration with fellow Boogie-woogie artist Hein van der Gaag which charted at number 7 in 1971.

In 1974, Rob Hoeke lost two fingers in a gardening accident and his career all but seemed to be over. After a few years, he started playing and performing for audiences again but his heyday was over. He recorded many more albums, one with Alan Price from the Animals. Hoeke made a solo performance at the first Amsterdam Blues Festival in 1983 where his solo performance received a standing ovation from the audience of 1,100. Subsequently, he made his first solo album Jumpin’ on the “88” for the Oldie Blues label in 1983.

Rob Hoeke died in 1999 after a short illness.(by wikipedia)

And here´s a fine example of this great boogie woogie Player … it´s an instrumentla Album and the musicians celebrate the “Wild West” (including the Comic stars Rantanplant and Lucky Luke !)

Enjoy it as I did  … it´s boogie time !

RobHoeke

Personnel:
Rob Hoeke (keyboards, harmonica)
Will de Meijer (guitar)
Martin Rudelsheim (drums)
Willem Schoone (bass)

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Tracklist:

01. Calamity Jane (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.08
02. Robby’s Saloon (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.46
03. Marsupilami (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.13
04. For My Little Gringo (Hoeke/de Meijer) 2.08
05. A Bone For Rataplan (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.52
06. Deep In The Heart Of Texas (Swander/Hershey) 2.23
07. San Antonio Rose (Wills) 2.25
08. Coyote Will (Hoeke/de Meijer) 2.53
09. Lotus 268 (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.33
10. Swinging Clock Boogie (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.09
11. Ode To Lucky Luke (Hoeke/de Meijer) 4.24
12. Red River Valley (Traditional) 2.04

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Fleetwood Mac – Carousel Ballroom (1968)

FrontCover1After distinguishing himself and achieving a level of recognition in Europe, like Eric Clapton before him, Peter Green departed John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, freeing himself of employment and artistic restrictions. However, unlike most of the British guitar greats, Green was never concerned with flash or becoming a guitar superstar – an attitude that made him one of the most compelling of all the British guitar players from the 1960s. Green could play incisively and cleanly, but was equally adept at ripping with tremendous power. This made listening to any of Green’s material a rewarding experience; many of his originals have a timeless quality that still sounds fresh and intriguing today.

This outstanding early performance by Fleetwood Mac occurred only a week into their first visit to the United States, when Peter Green was only 21 years old. Falling right between the release of their self-titled debut album and their follow-up, Mr. Wonderful, this show captures the band in its early incarnation, when they were still a quartet – and one of the Crusaders of the late ’60s English blues movement. Peter Green was the chief architect of the band’s sound at this point, and was providing the bulk of their original material. Green was beginning to explore music outside traditional blues, and his playing could be wonderfully restrained one minute and powerfully explosive the next, marked by a distinctive vibrato and economy of style. His haunting, sweet-yet-melancholy tone was very distinctive, and was blessed with an inherently human quality that other British guitarists often struggled for.

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At this early stage, Jeremy Spencer comprised the band’s other creative force. Spencer could authentically recreate Elmore James onstage, and this novel ability, along with a ribald sense of humor (shared by the entire band), helped fuel the band’s early stage shows. Spencer could also create dead-on parodies of 1950s rock ‘n’ roll songs, often of the teen idol variety, giving the band an onstage theatrical element that was both funny and entertaining. The band’s overt sense of humor, in addition to their accomplished musicianship, certainly endeared them to many of the San Francisco music elite.

The set begins in fine fashion with Elmore James’ “Madison Blues,” and Green and Spencer trading relatively simple licks over a relaxed shuffle to warm things up. “My Baby’s Skinny” provides the audience their first taste of Peter Green’s delicious guitar tone. The number is a great early vehicle for Green, who takes lead vocal and peals off biting leads that display his innate ability to play with both penetrating directness and tensioned restraint. Riley King’s “Worried Dream” follows; a lengthy, slow blues number, the tune demonstrates Green at his best, delivering heartfelt vocals and delicious guitar work with great nuance and style.

Two more Elmore James classics are up next, showcasing Jeremy Spencer, and proving just how well he had mastered James’ feel for slide guitar. Both “Dust My Broom” and “Got To Move” feature distinctly different facets of James’ best work and Spencer has a strong handle on both. The group keeps a relaxed groove going underneath that lets Spencer shine. “Trying So Hard To Forget” is an early Peter Green original that has more of a vocal than an instrumental focus, but fits right in with the band’s early repertoire nonetheless.

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The most fascinating number of this set comes next, and again, clearly demonstrates Green’s greatest strengths as a performer. His take on Freddy King’s “Have You Ever Loved A Woman,” a song that would eventually become synonymous with Eric Clapton, is equally as virtuosic, and in some ways even more refined. This is the stuff that made B.B. King himself refer to Peter Green as “the only man to ever make me sweat.” The band increases the tempo and the set speeds to a close with one of Green’s original numbers from their forthcoming second album, Lazy Poker Blues. This new (at the time) number stays close to the studio arrangement, featuring tight ensemble playing and a sizzling guitar solo from Green. (by Alan Bershaw)

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 Personnel:
Mick Fleetwood (drums)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals)
John McVie (bass)
Jeremy Spencer (guitar, vocals)
+
Paul Butterfield (harmonica on 11. – 15.)

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Tracklist:
CD1: June 9, 1968 first set
01. Madison Blues (James) 4.31
02. My Baby’s Gone (Edwards) 6.00
03. My Baby’s Skinny (Green) 4.48
04. Worried Dream (King) 9.57
05. Dust My Broom (James) 4.32
06. Got To Move (Williamson) 3.00
07. Worried Mind (Bennett 4.41
08. Instrumental (unknown) 10.29
09. Have You Ever Loved A Woman? (Myles) 7.58
10. Lazy Poker Blues (Green/Adams) 4.49

CD 2: June 9, 1968 second set:
11. Stop Messin’ ‘Round (Green) 2.12
02. I Loved Another Woman (Green) 7.03
03. I Believe (Spencer) 5.17
04. The Sun Is Shining (James) 6.2705. Long Tall Sally (Penniman/Blackwell/Johnson)  4.53
06. Willie & The Hand Jive (Otis) 4.04
07. Tutti Frutti (Penniman/LaBostrie) 3.02
08. Thanks by Peter Green, announcer band intros + crowd noise before encore  0.32
09. Ready Teddy (Marascalco/Blackwell) 3.16

CD 2: June 7 or 8, 1968 S.F. Carousel Ballroom
10. I Need Your Love So Bad (John) 1.46
11. I Believe (James) 4.59
12. Shake Your Moneymaker (James) 9.12
13. Ready Teddy (Marascalco/Blackwell) 2.30
14 Peter Green says thanks, announcer outro + crowd noise 0.19

*
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Savoy Brown – Blue Matter (1969)

FrontCover1Blue Matter is the third album by the band Savoy Brown. Teaming up once again with producer Mike Vernon, it finds them experimenting even more within the blues framework. Several tracks feature piano (played by Bob Hall, guitarist Kim Simmonds, and vocalist Chris Youlden, who even plays guitar here) as well as trombone.
This album featured a mix of live and studio recordings. The live tracks were recorded on December 6, 1968 at the now defunct City of Leicester College of Education because the band was scheduled to tour the USA and needed additional tracks to complete the album in time for the tour. The booking at the college represented their only chance to record the extra tracks in a live venue before embarking on the tour. An offer to perform the concert free of charge was accepted by Chris Green, the college Social Secretary, who had made the original booking, and the concert was duly recorded, a number of the live tracks being added to the album.
Because Chris Youlden was suffering from tonsillitis, Dave Peverett stood in as lead vocalist on the live tracks.
The album track “Vicksburg Blues” had first appeared as the B-side of Decca single F 12797 (released June 1968), fronted by “Walking by Myself”. (by wikipedia)
The third release by Kim Simmonds and company, but the first to feature the most memorable lineup of the group: Simmonds, “Lonesome” Dave Peverett, Tony “Tone” Stevens, Roger Earl, and charismatic singer Chris Youlden. This one serves up a nice mixture of blues covers and originals, with the first side devoted to studio cuts and the second a live club date recording. Certainly the standout track, indeed a signature song by the band, is the tour de force “Train to Nowhere,” with its patient, insistent buildup and pounding train-whistle climax. Additionally, David Anstey’s detailed, imaginative sleeve art further boosts this a notch above most other British blues efforts.(by Peter Kurtz)

Side One is marked “Studio”; Side Two is marked “Live” and was recorded at The City of Leicester College of Education, Friday 6th December 1968.

SavoyBrownLive1969
Savoy Brown, live in 1969
Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Bob Hall (piano)
“Lonesome” Dave Peverett (guitar, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, harmonica, piano)
Tone Stevens (bass)
Chris Youlden (vocals, guitar, piano)
+
Rivers Jobe (bass on 01., 02. + 04.)
Mike Vernon (percussion on 01.)
+
trombones on 01:
Terry Flannery – Keith Martin – Alan Moore – Brian Perrin – Derek Wadsworth

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Tracklist:
01. Train To Nowhere (Simmonds/Youlden) 4.12
02. Tolling Bells (Simmonds/Youlden) 6.33
03. She’s Got A Ring In His Nose And A Ring On Her Hand (Youlden) 3.07
04. Vicksburg Blues (Hall/Youlden) 4.00
05. Don’t Turn Me From Your Door (Hooker) 5.4
06. Grits Ain’t Groceries (All Around Te World) (bonus track) (Turner) 2.46
07. May Be Wrong (Peverett) 7.56

08. Louisiana Blues (Morganfield) 9.05
09. It Hurts Me Too (London) 6.51
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Alternate frontcover from Australia

The Herd – Lookin’ Through You (1968)

frontcover1The Herd were an British pop rock group, founded in 1965, that came to prominence in the late 1960s. They launched the career of Peter Frampton and scored three UK top twenty hits.

The Herd were founded in 1965 in south London, England. The group recorded three unsuccessful singles with the record label Parlophone. In 1966 three members in succession (Terry Clark, Louis Cennamo and Mick Underwood) quit the Group and the group got the line-up that made it famous. The singer, Peter Frampton, was 16 when he joined the group in 1966 and had just left school. The other members were a few years older. Parlophone did not want to go on with them, but Fontana was willing to give them a try.[2] They also sent their manager Billy Gaff away and brought in the songwriters/producers Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley instead. This pair had been largely responsible for a string of hits by Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich.
Howard and Blaikley orchestrated for them a unique blend of pop and flower power. After a UK Singles Chart near-miss with “I Can Fly” (1967), the haunting “From the Underworld”, based on the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, reached Number 6 later that year with help from copious plays on pirate radio. It was a hit in other countries too. In the Netherlands the song reached Number 3. “From the Underworld” was followed by “Paradise Lost”, which made it up to Number 15 in 1968.
Their greatest success came with “I Don’t Want Our Loving to Die”, a Number 5 UK hit single (also in 1968).
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The Herd appeared at The Saville Theatre, London on Sunday 8 October 1967 supporting The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Also on the bill were The Crazy World of Arthur Brown and Eire Apparent.
With his boyish photogenic looks, Frampton was dubbed “The Face of ’68” by teen magazine Rave.
The last months of 1968 were tempestuous times for the group. Steele left the group, to be replaced by Henry Spinetti. The group dumped their managers Howard and Blaikley, and briefly found a new mentor in Harvey Lisberg who after three months found himself so bogged down with their personnel problems that he politely withdrew his services. Most songs on their first and only album Paradise Lost were written by Peter Frampton and Andy Bown, just like their next single, “Sunshine Cottage”.
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Dissatisfied with mere teen idol status, and disappointed with the failure of “Sunshine Cottage”, Frampton left by the end of 1968 to form Humble Pie with Steve Marriott.[2] The remaining members Bown, Spinetti and Taylor made another flop single, “The Game”,[5] then minus Taylor, formed the short-lived Judas Jump with Allan Jones, saxophonist from Amen Corner, and Welsh vocalist Adrian Williams. Taylor, who became a disc jockey, and Steele, reunited briefly for a one-off single “You’ve Got Me Hangin’ From Your Lovin’ Tree” in June 1971, to almost universal lack of interest.

By the late 1970s, after a stint back with a pre-“Frampton Comes Alive!” Peter Frampton band from 1973-1975, Bown had become a member of UK rockers Status Quo and both Taylor and Spinetti had joined up with Gerry Rafferty’s band. (by wikipedia)
And this is their debut Album … a superb mix of  Pop and psychedelic music … (listen to “From The Underworld” and “Paradise Lost” !)
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Personnel:
Andy Bown (keyboards, vocals, bass)
Peter Frampton (guitar, vocals)
Andrew Steele (drums)
Gary Taylor (bass, vocals, guitar)
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Tracklist:
01. I Don’t Want Our Loving To Die (Blaikley) 2.59
02. Come On – Believe Me (Taylor) 2.51
03. Our Fairy Tale (Bown/Frampton) 2.40
04. On My Way Home (Bown/Frampton) 2.03
05. Goodbye Groovy (Blaikley) 2.46
06. From The Underworld (Blaikley) 3.16
07. Paradise Lost (Blaikley) 3.33
08. Sweet William (Bown/Frampton)  2.19
09. I Can Fly (Blaikley) 3.13
10. Understand Me (Warland/Bown) 2.30

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Personnel note:
During the Seventies I played the bass in a prog band called “Cold Fever” (organ – bass -drums) and we did a few gigs and someday we went in a Studio and did a prog version of “From The Underworld” – we mixed it with “Paradise Lost” …(still unreleased *smile*)

“Cold Fever” was led by my brother, who died in 2013 …

I would like to dedicate his entry to him !

 

Out of the land of shadows and
darkness, we were returning
Towards the morning light
Almost in reach of places I knew
Escaping the ghosts of Yesterday
You were behind me following
closely
“Don’t turn around now”
I heard you whisper in my ear
“If you should turn now,
All that you won
Will vanish just like a passing dream.
Just on the very verge of the
morning, daylight was dawning,
freedom was but a step away
Now with the deep dark river
behind us,
what could go wrong if I stayed
strong in mind.
What was the sudden lapse into
madness, what was the urge that
turned my head around to look at you?
What was the stubborn will
to destroy the love and the joy
I nearly held?
three times the thunder roared
in my ears
In all of my years I’ll see that lost
look in your eyes.
As, with a sigh like smoke in the wind
You slipped from my grasp into
the waiting shadows
so much I longed to say,
but my touch found only the
empty air and a black nights
coldness.
lnto another world you entered
And never again I can reclaim you.

The Murgatroyd Band (Spencer Davis Group) – Magpie + Twice A Week (1971)

frontcover1Let´s take a look back in the history of British TV Shows:

Magpie was a British children’s television programme shown on ITV from 30 July 1968 to 6 June 1980. It was a magazine format show intended to compete with the BBC’s Blue Peter, but attempted to be more “hip”, focusing more on popular culture. The show’s creators Lewis Rudd and Sue Turner named the programme Magpie as a reference to the magpie’s habit of collecting small items, and because of “mag” being evocative of “magazine”, and “pie” being evocative of a collection of ingredients.
The programme, made by Thames Television, was first transmitted on 30 July 1968 which was Thames Television’s first day of broadcasting, and was shown weekly until 1969. From that point, until it ended on 6 June 1980, it went out twice a week with approximately 1,000 episodes being made, each 25 minutes in duration. It was not fully networked to all other ITV companies until the autumn of 1969.
The first presenters were the former BBC Radio 1 disc jockey Pete Brady, Susan Stranks and Tony Bastable. Brady left the show in 1969 to be replaced by Douglas Rae, and Bastable left in 1972 when he was replaced by Mick Robertson. Jenny Hanley replaced Susan Stranks in 1974. This lineup remained until 1977, when Tommy Boyd replaced Rae.
Like Blue Peter, Magpie featured appeals for various causes and charities. Notably, however, it asked for cash donations rather than stamps or secondhand goods, familiar on Blue Peter. The cash totaliser was a long strip of paper which ran out of the studio and along the adjacent corridor walls. Unlike the BBC programme, Magpie was unscripted and the presenters were free to improvise the presentation of the show.
The show’s mascot was a magpie called Murgatroyd.
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Extremely rare promo Label

The theme tune was played by the Spencer Davis Group under the alias of The Murgatroyd Band, and composed by Eddie Hardin (lead voc., keyb.), Ray Fenwick (harm. voc., guit.) and Spencer Davis (harm. voc.guit.). The main lyric was cribbed from an old children’s nursery rhyme:

    One for sorrow
Two for joy
Three for a girl
Four for a boy
Five for silver
Six for gold
Seven for a story never to be told
Eight for Heaven
Nine for Hell
Ten for the Devil himself.
or, alternatively,
    Eight for a wish
Nine for a kiss, and
Ten for a big surprise!
The first seven lines of this song (from “One for sorrow” to “Seven for a secret never to be told”) have been used in the last verse of the song “Magpie”, by Patrick Wolf.
The rhyme refers to an old English superstition concerning the portent of the number of magpies seen together in a flock. The TV programme version altered the final lines to:
    Eight’s a wish and
Nine a kiss
Ten is a bird you must not miss.
(by wikipedia)
And here´s one of the rarest recordings by The Spencer Davos Group … the single to this TV Show ..
Side one is a more or less psychedelic track … and side two is fun, just fun !.
I guess they had to use the pseudonym “The Murgatroyd Band” because of the fact, they a in 1968/69 a contract with United Artists and not with Decca Records.
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The Magpie Crew
Personnel:
Spencer Davis (guitar, background vocals)
Ray Fenwick (guitar)
Eddie Hardin (keyboards, vocals)
Pete York (drums)
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Tracklist:
01. Magpie (Fenwick/Hardin/Davis) 2.26
02. Twice A Week (Hardin/York/Fenwick) 3.01