Big Mama Thornton – Stronger Than Dirt (1969)

FrontCover1This is one of my favorite albums ever. I bought it at the time because of my love for Janis Joplin & wanted to hear the woman that had had such an affect on her. The album was made on the heels of Cheap Thrills as a comeback but never achieved the success she hoped for. It includes a remake of Hound Dog Man & Ball & Chain, as well as a version of Summertime that Joplin had covered earlier. All of them are strong sets comparable to her earlier versions. The rest is material that is chosen wisely.

Her version of That Lucky Old Sun, to me, is one of the great songs of transcendent honesty. She lets you feel the truth of life & it’s burden. It was the first time, at the age of 18, that I “got” the blues. I understood & more than likely it was the first time I realized it was never going to be easy on this earth, but that it was endurable. The title of the album itself says this very thing.

Her version of I Shall Be released, has much the same feel, & is to my mind, the most interesting arrangement of the song. It’s always been the one Dylan song I found great & has been covered well by many. To me this is the best. It is the one & only time that this song swings & when she belts out “You know, Big Mama, I was framed” you know she knows exactly what he’s talking about. She expounds the universal.

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The album starts off with Born Under A Bad Sign, another song that she was born to sing. It’s material she has lived. All the songs on this album are good, not a filler in the lot & all are handled by her with ease. It’s clear it’s all material she enjoyed giving her Big Mama interpretation to, from Funky Broadway to Let’s Go Get Stoned to Rollin’ Stone to Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do. This is her strongest outing in the studio.

There seems to be almost a contradiction in the fact that here was this big voice that came out effortlessly. Something that, no matter how good she was, Joplin did not have. It took a lot of effort & burned her out. Big Mama despite living the blues was never buried in them. She knew how to let the good times roll, specifically, because she knew how hard it could be. On this album, after years of obscurity she’s enjoying the attention that’s finally come back to her, rolling up her sleeves & saying: “This is what they’re talking about, here’s the treasure. This is what you’ve been missing.” (by Robido)

Alternate frontcover:

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Personnel:
Big Mama Thornton (vocals)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01 Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.45
02. Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) 2.25
03. Ball And Chain (Thornton) 4.40
04. Summertime (Gershwin) 4.13
05. Rollin’ Stone (Morganfield) 3.56
06. Let’s Go Get Stoned (Armstead/Ashford/Simpson) 4.30
07. Funky Broadway (Christian) 4.16
08. That Lucky Old Sun (Smith/Gillespie) 3.35
09. Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do (Malone/Scott) 3.39
10. I Shall Be Released (Dylan) 4.38

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Jimi Hendrix – Rainbow Bridge (1971)

FrontCover1Rainbow Bridge is a compilation album by American rock musician Jimi Hendrix. It was the second posthumous album release by his official record company and is mostly composed of recordings Hendrix made in 1969 and 1970 after the breakup of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Despite the cover photo and subtitle Original Motion Picture Sound Track, it does not contain any songs recorded during his concert appearance for the 1971 film Rainbow Bridge.Rainbow Bridge is a compilation album by American rock musician Jimi Hendrix. It was the second posthumous album release by his official record company and is mostly composed of recordings Hendrix made in 1969 and 1970 after the breakup of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Despite the cover photo and subtitle Original Motion Picture Sound Track, it does not contain any songs recorded during his concert appearance for the 1971 film Rainbow Bridge.
Continuing in the vein of The Cry of Love, the first official posthumous Hendrix album, Rainbow Bridge explores new guitar styles and textures. All the songs, except for a solo studio version of “The Star Spangled Banner”, are written by Hendrix and mostly performed with Mitch Mitchell on drums and Billy Cox on bass.
The songs on Rainbow Bridge represent material in various stages of development and were never finalized or approved for release by Hendrix. Four of the songs on the album, along with the ten songs from The Cry of Love and three from War Heroes, were planned for Hendrix’s follow-up album to the live Band of Gypsys, released in March 1970. These songs were later included on Voodoo Soup in 1995 and First Rays of the New Rising Sun in 1997, which were attempts at completing the double album Hendrix was working on at the time of his death.

Despite the title, Rainbow Bridge was not a soundtrack to the film of the same name but rather a compilation of one live song and studio recordings from a number of sources between 1968 and 1970, including some for his planned but unfinished double album Hendrix01First Rays of the New Rising Sun. “Look Over Yonder” began as “Mr. Bad Luck” while Hendrix was performing in Greenwich Village, New York City, with his group Jimmy James and the Blue Flames in the summer of 1966. The version included on Rainbow Bridge was recorded by the Experience in 1968.[5] Two songs by the Band of Gypsys, “Room full of Mirrors” and “Earth Blues” date from 1969, although the latter has subsequent drum overdubs by Mitchell. “The Star Spangled Banner” is a 1969 solo studio recording by Hendrix. The remainder of the songs were recorded with the “Cry of Love” group (Mitchell and Cox) in 1970: “Dolly Dagger”, “Pali Gap”, and “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)”. “Hear My Train A Comin'” is a live recording from the first show on May 30, 1970, at the Berkeley Community Theatre. An edited version appears in the 1971 concert film Jimi Plays Berkeley.
The album was the second to be produced by Eddie Kramer and Mitch Mitchell, with John Jansen assisting. It was released in October 1971 in the US, and the following month in the UK where it reached numbers 15 and 16 respectively in the album charts. “Dolly Dagger” with “The Star Spangled Banner” as the B-side was released as a single in the US in October 1971. It appeared at number 74 in the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart. In 2014, the original Rainbow Bridge album was reissued in both CD and LP formats.
According to Setting The Record Straight by John McDermott with Eddie Kramer, Izabella and Stepping Stone were pulled from the track listing in the final stages and replaced with the live version of Hear My Train A Comin’ from Berkeley. Izabella and Stepping Stone were instead used the improve the next posthumous release War Heroes per Mike Jeffery. Bleeding Heart was also considered but ultimately used on War Heroes. In a contemporary review for Rolling Stone magazine, Tony Glover wrote favorably of the songs on side one, particularly the “really majestic version” of “The Star-Spangled Banner”. Robert Christgau said in a retrospective review that The Cry of Love (1971) had highlighted Hendrix’s abilities as a songwriter, but Rainbow Bridge showcased his guitar playing:
Rich stuff, exploring territory that as always with Hendrix consists not merely of notes but of undifferentiated sound, a sound he shapes with a virtuosity no one else has ever achieved on an electric instrument. (by wikipedia)

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Back when Rainbow Bridge was originally released, it was actually among the best of the posthumous Hendrix releases. Billed as “the original motion picture soundtrack” (it wasn’t, really), it was a mix of excellent, finished studio tracks and a couple of live tracks. Despite this, it’s understandable why it didn’t appeared in the digital realm until 2014 (officially, at least).

Once the estate went back to the Hendrix family in the ’90s, three of the tracks from Rainbow Bridge were used on the album First Rays of the New Rising Sun, which had previously only existed as Jimi’s hand-written track listing. The remaining tracks were orphaned out on various box sets and compilations. So while all the tracks on Rainbow Bridge have been made available elsewhere, it’s nice to finally have it assembled the way the original LP was, with excellent remastered sound (not just for the old-timers who had the LP the first time around, but for others who don’t necessarily want to shell out for the box set needed to gather these tracks). Highlights include overlooked gems like “Pali Gap” and Jimi’s rarely heard studio version of “The Star Spangled Banner,” which is made of multi-tracked guitars and basses. (by Sean Westergaard)

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Personnel:
Billy Cox (bass)
Jimi Hendrix (guitar, vocals) backing vocals
Mitch Mitchell (drums)
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Buddy Miles (drums on 04., background vocals on 02.)
Noel Redding (bass on 06.)
Juma Sultan (percussion on 01., 03. + 06.)
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background vocals:
The Ghetto Fighters (Albert Allen and Arthur Allen) on 01.
The Ronettes (Veronica Bennett, Estelle Bennett, Nedra Talley) on 02.

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Tracklist:
01. Dolly Dagger (Hendrix) 4:45
02. Earth Blues (Hendrix)  4:20
03. Pali Gap (Hendrix) 5:05
04. Room Full Of Mirrors (Hendrix) 3:17
05. Star Spangled Banner (studio version) (Smith)  4:07
06. Look Over Yonder (Hendrix) 3:28
07. Hear My Train A Comin’ (live) (Hendrix) 11:15
08. Hey Baby (New Rising Sun) (Hendrix) 6:05

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Recording details:
Tracks 1, 3 and 8:
recorded at Electric Lady Studios, New York City, July 1, 1970

Track 2:
recorded at Record Plant Studios, New York City, December 19, 1969 and Electric Lady Studios, July 1970

Track 4:
recorded at Record Plant Studios, November 17, 1969 and Electric Lady Studios, July 1970

Track 5;
recorded at Record Plant Studios, March 18, 1969

Track 6:
recorded at TTG Studios, Hollywood, October 22, 1968

Track 7:
recorded at Berkeley Community Theatre, Berkeley, California, May 30, 1970 (first show)

 

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Janis Joplin – I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! (1969)

LPFrontCover1I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! is a 1969 studio album by Janis Joplin. It was the first solo studio album Joplin recorded after leaving her former band, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and the only one released in her lifetime (Pearl was released 3 months after Joplin’s death).I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! is a 1969 studio album by Janis Joplin. It was the first solo studio album Joplin recorded after leaving her former band, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and the only one released in her lifetime (Pearl was released 3 months after Joplin’s death).

Recording began on June 16, 1969 in New York City and ceased on June 26. For the album, Joplin recruited guitarist Sam Andrew of the Holding Company to take part in development, along with the Kozmic Blues band. Joplin installed a brass and horn section into the tracks, a feature her previous band would not allow. It was a total contrast to Joplin’s previous psychedelic rock as the compositions chosen were more soul Janis Joplinand blues driven. All but two tracks were cover versions that producer Gabriel Mekler and Joplin chose. The other two tracks, “One Good Man” and “Kozmic Blues”, were written by Joplin herself. Overall, the album was a more polished work, but with the lack prominent accompanists like the Holding Company, the album was not as successful as Cheap Thrills.

The LP was released on September 11, 1969 and reached gold record status within two months of its release.[5] It was issued by Columbia under #KCS 9913. The first pressing was titled only on the spine and disc labels. Later, the title of the album was added as a sticker designed by R. Crumb and stuck to the shrink wrap. The album was re-released by Columbia as WKPC 9913 and again as PC 9913 both on vinyl. The re-issued album did not have the same title sticker, instead the re-issues had the title printed on the cover and the Sony’s “Nice Price” sticker on the shrink wrap. Some of the newer PC 9913 have a bar code. A 180 Gram Limited Edition classic LP high-definition Virgin Heavy Vinyl pressing was also released in 2010. Technically, this album was reissued on vinyl a total of six times. Many collectors are mistaken in thinking the issue that included the R. Crumb sticker was the original issue; it was not. The hard-to-find original sealed issue is KCS 9913, which had no R. Crumb sticker, and the title was only on the spine of the cover. Columbia Records released as a single Kozmic Blues b/w Little Girl Blue 4-45023. The single peaked at #41 on the US Billboard charts.

I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! also contains the hits “Try (Just A Little Bit Harder)”, “Kozmic Blues” and “To Love Somebody”. The CD reissue of the album includes the outtake cover of Bob Dylan’s “Dear Landlord”, with new lyrics and arrangements provided by Joplin, and versions of “Summertime” and “Piece of My Heart” recorded live at Woodstock as bonus tracks.

John Burks of Rolling Stone wrote in a November 1, 1969 interview praising Joplin’s vocal performance. However, he notes that her vocals are hindered by her backup band’s instrumental role in the album. Overall, Burks was satisfied with Joplin’s change in musical direction, but recommends “reaching the point where you are able to shut out the band”.

Janis JoplinLive

Janis Joplin’s solo debut was a letdown at the time of release, suffering in comparison with Big Brother’s Cheap Thrills from the previous year, and shifting her style toward soul-rock in a way that disappointed some fans. Removed from that context, it sounds better today, though it’s still flawed. Fronting the short-lived Kozmic Blues Band, the arrangements are horn heavy and the material soulful and bluesy. The band sounds a little stiff and although Joplin’s singing is good, she would sound more electrifying on various live versions of some of the songs. The shortage of quality original compositions — indeed, there are only eight tracks total on the album — didn’t help either, and the cover selections were erratic, particularly the Bee Gees’ “To Love Somebody.” On the other hand, “Try” is one of her best soul outings, and the reading of Rodgers & Hart’s “Little Girl Blue” is inspired. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Sam Andrew (guitar, vocals)
Maury Baker (drums)
Brad Campbell (bass)
Lonnie Castille (drums)
Terry Clements (saxophone)
Jerry Edmonton (drums; uncredited)
Cornelius Flowers (saxophone)
Luis Gasca (trumpet)
Janis Joplin (vocals, guitar)
Richard Kermode (keyboards)
Goldy McJohn keyboards; uncredited)
Gabriel Mekler (keyboards)
Michael Monarch (guitar; uncredited)
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Mike Bloomfield – guitar on 02., 03. ´08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Try (Just a Little Bit Harder) (Ragovoy/Taylor) 3.57
02. Maybe (Barrett) 3.41
03. One Good Man (Joplin) 4.12
04. As Good As You’ve Been To This World (Gravenites) 5.27
05. To Love Somebody (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 5.14
06. Kozmic Blues (Joplin/Mekler) 4.24
07. Little Girl Blue (Hart/Rodgers) 3.51
08. Work Me, Lord (Gravenites) 6.45
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09. Dear Landlord (Session outtake) (Dylan/Joplin) Joplin 2.32
10. Summertime (Live at Woodstock) (G.Gershwin/I.Gershwin) 5.04
11. Piece Of My Heart (Live at Woodstock) (Ragovoy/Berns) 6.31

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Andwella’s Dream – Love And Poetry (1969)

FrontCover1Andwella were a Northern Irish psychedelic rock band formed in 1968, originally as The Method and later renamed Andwellas Dream. The trio were fronted by Dave Lewis (Guitar/keyboard/vocals), with Nigel Smith (bass/vocals) and Gordon Barton (drums).[1]

Their first album, as Andwellas Dream, Love and Poetry, was recorded in London in 1968, and featured jazz musician Bob Downes on saxophone and flute, and Wilgar Campbell on drums on the track “Felix”. However, the album failed to sell, and Lewis then recorded a solo album, privately pressed, on the Ax label in 1970; which included new versions of some of the Andwella’s Dream songs. Then in 1970 David Lewis wrote the music for and produced poet David Baxter’s “Goodbye Dave” album, for which he was backed by Andwella.

With the addition of Dave McDougall on guitar and vocals, the band was renamed Andwella. This line-up issued World’s End, before Dave Struthers replaced Nigel Smith on bass and Jack McCullock joined as drummer. This lineup recorded the bands’ last album, People’s People, in 1971, after which the band broke up in 1972.

Lewis later went on to write “Happy to Be on an Island in the Sun”, recorded in the 1970s by Demis Roussos.

Love and Poetry is the first studio album by British psychedelic band Andwella’s Dream. It was released in 1969 on CBS Records.

Love and Poetry was composed entirely by band member Dave Lewis. It captures the true original sounds of Irish psychedelic rock. Relatively unknown, this album has achieved certain cult status after 40 years and is eagerly sought after by collectors of the genre.

It is featured in Record Collector’s Top 100 British Psychedelic Records of the 1960s. (by wikipedia)

Andwella´s Dream

Although Andwella’s Dream were a versatile psychedelic group, they were nonetheless generic no matter what angle they were taking. On Love & Poetry, you get sustained guitar that walks the line between freakbeat and heaviness, some swirling organ and husky vocals that betray the influence of Traffic and Procol Harum, pastoral acoustic folky tunes in the Donovan style, airy-fairy dabs of phased guitars and storybook lyrics, etc. Eclecticism is to be commended, and since late-’60s British psychedelia is an interesting genre in and of itself, generic music in the subgenre is more interesting than some other generic music in other styles. Still, generic music is generic music, and being able to do a bunch of different things in an unexceptional manner does not make you exceptional. The fairly tuneful folk-rocker “Midday Sun” is the best cut; it’s also interesting to hear a song about “Cocaine” in 1969, before the drug was too well known even in the counterculture. (by Richie Unterberger)

Single

Personnel:
Gordon Barton (drums)
Bob Downes (flute, percussion)
David Lewis (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Nigel Smith (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. The Days Grew Longer For Love 3.56
02. Sunday 3.12
03. Lost A Number Found A King 6.04
04. Man Without A Name 2.42
05. Clockwork Man 2.44
06. Cocaine 5.00
07. Shades Of Grey 3.37
08. High On A Mountain 2.32
09. Andwella 3.16
10. Midday Sun 3.41
11. Take My Road 3.23
12. Felix 4.17
13. Goodbye 2.18

All songs composed by Dave Lewis

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Live at the Marquee Club, London … what a time !

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Savoy Brown – A Step Further (1969)

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With Kim Simmonds and Chris Youlden combining their talents in Savoy Brown’s strongest configuration, 1969’s A Step Further kept the band in the blues-rock spotlight after the release of their successful Blue Matter album. While A Step Further may not be as strong as the band’s former release, all five tracks do a good job at maintaining their spirited blues shuffle.

Plenty of horn work snuggles up to Simmonds’ guitar playing and Youlden’s singing is especially hearty on “Made up My Mind” and “I’m Tired.” The first four tracks are bona fide Brown movers, but they can’t compete with the 20-plus minutes of “Savoy Brown Boogie,” one of the group’s best examples of their guitar playing prowess and a wonderful finale to the album.

This lineup saw the release of Raw Sienna before Lonesome Dave Peverett stepped up to the microphone for Looking In upon the departure of Youlden, but the new arrangement was short lived, as not long after three other members exited to form Foghat. As part of Savoy Brown’s Chris Youlden days,

A Step Further should be heard alongside Getting to the Point, Blue Matter, and Raw Sienna, as it’s an integral part of the band’s formative boogie blues years. (by Mike DeGange)

Savoy Brown Live 1969

 Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Lonesome Dave Peverett (guitar)
Kim Simmonds (guitar)
Tony Stevens (bass)
Chris Youlden (vocals)
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David Bellman (viola)
Eddie Blair (trumpet)
Des Bradley (violin)
Percy Coates (violin)
Raymond Davis (flugelhorn, horn)
John Edwards (trombone)
Bob Efford (saxophone)
Jack Fields (violin)
Bob Hall (piano)
Bobby Haughey (flugelhorn, horn)
Don Honeywell  (saxophone)
Don Honeywill (saxophone
Butch Hudson (trumpet)
Maurice Loban (viola)
Don Lusher (trombone)
John Meek (viola)
Rex Morris (saxophone)
Phil Reid (violin)
John Ronayne (violin)
Louis Rose (viola)
Louis Rosen (viola)
Lionel Ross (cello)
John Shineborne (cello)
John Tonayne (violin)
Mike Vernon (percussion)
Charles Vorzanger (violin)
Kenny Wheeler (trumpet)

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Tracklist:

Studio Side:
01. Made Up My Mind (Youlden) 2.59
02. Waiting In The Bamboo Grove (Simmonds) 3.38
03. Life’s One Act Play (Youlden) 6.31
04. I’m Tired (Youlden) + Where Am I (Willie/Brown) 5.05

Live Side:
05. Savoy Brown Boogie (Youlden/Simmonds) 22.07
including
05.a. I Feel So Good (Willis)
06.b. Whole Lotta Shakin Goin On (Williams/David)
06.c. Little Queenie (Berry)
06.d. Purple Haze (Hendrix)
05.e. Hernando’s Hideaway (Ross/Adler)

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Harvey Mandel – Righteous (1969)

FrontCover1Harvey Mandel (born March 11, 1945, in Detroit, Michigan, United States) is an American guitarist known for his innovative approach to electric guitar playing. A professional at twenty, he played with Charlie Musselwhite, Canned Heat, The Rolling Stones, and John Mayall before starting a solo career. Mandel is one of the first rock guitarists to use two-handed fretboard tapping. Mandel was born in Detroit, Michigan but grew up in Morton Grove, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago.
His first record was the album Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band in 1966 with Charlie Musselwhite. Described in 1997’s Legends of Rock Guitar as a “legendary” album, it was influential in bridging the gap between blues and rock and roll, with Mandel’s “relentless fuzztone, feedback-edged solos, and unusual syncopated phrasing.”

He relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area, performing often at a club called The Matrix, where local favorites like Jerry Garcia or Elvin Bishop would sit in and jam. He then met up with pioneering San Francisco disc jockey and producer Abe ‘Voco’ Kesh (Abe Keshishian), who signed Mandel to Philips Records and produced his first solo album, Cristo Redentor in 1968. Mandel recorded with Barry Goldberg on a bootleg from Cherry Records and recorded with Graham Bond. He cut two more solo LPs for Philips, Righteous (1969) and Games Guitars Play (1970), followed by three more solo albums for the independent record label Janus in the early 1970s, which included Baby Batter. (by Wikipedia)

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And this is his second solo-album for Philips Records:

Not as consistent as his debut, due to the presence of a few pedestrian blues-rock numbers. The better tracks, though, show Mandel continuing to expand his horizons with imagination, particularly on the cuts with string and horn arrangements by noted jazz arranger Shorty Rogers. Harvey’s workout on Nat Adderley’s “Jive Samba” is probably his best solo performance, and an obvious touchstone for the Latin-rock hybrid of Carlos Santana (whose own debut came out the same year); on the other side of the coin, “Boo-Bee-Doo” is one of his sharpest and snazziest straight blues-rockers. (by Richie Unterberger)

As Mr. Ärmel wrote in this blog a year ago: “One of the most underrated guitar players ever.” …

HiteMandelHarvey Mandel with Bob Hite (Canned Heat), 1970

Personnel:
Duane Hitchings (organ)
Eddie Hoh (drums)
Harvey Mandel (guitar)
Art Stavro (bass)
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John Audino (trumpet on 07.)
Mike Barone (trombone on 07.)
Buddy Childers (trumpet on 07.)
Gene Cipriano (saxophone on 07.)
Stan Fishelson (trumpet on 07.)
Victor Feldman (vibraphone on 07.)
Plas Johnson (saxophone on 07.)
Pete Jolly (piano)
Bob Jones (guitar on 02., 05. drums, vocals on 04. + 09.)
Richard Leith (trombone on 07.)
Lew McCreary (trombone on 07.)
Ollie Mitchell (trumpet on 07.)
Pete Myers (trombone on 07.)
Jack Nimitz (saxophone on 07.)
Earl Palmer (percussion on 02., drums on 07.)
Bill Perkins (saxophone on 07.)
Howard Roberts (guitar on 07.)
Ernie Watts (saxophone on 07.)
Bob West (bass on 07.)

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Tracklist:

01. Righteous (Mandel) 3.22
02. Jive Samba (Adderley) 5.56
03. Love Of Life (Mandel/Jones) 3.14
04. Poontang (Jones) 3.54
05. Just A Hair More (Mandel) 3.39
06. Summer Sequence (Burns) 4.12
07. Short’s Stuff (Rogers) 7.19
08. Boo-Bee-Doo (Hitchings) 3.55
09. Campus Blues (Mandel) 4.43

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Melanie Safka – BBC On Air (1997)

FrontCover1Ten of the 18 songs on this CD were recorded live in 1975, another four date from 1969, and the last four are from 1989. Thus, we get a glimpse of Melanie in performance across a period of 20 years, doing a variety of material ranging from her own originals (including familiar songs such as “Beautiful People” and “Baby Guitar”) to covers of Phil Ochs’s “Chords of Fame,” Alan J. Lerner and Frederick Loewe’s “Almost Like Being in Love” (from Brigadoon), and the Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday.” Her rendition of “Almost Like Being in Love” is a folk-blues style interpretation, and one of the most downbeat and interesting (if not necessarily successful) takes on the song ever done. There is a certain sameness to much of the rest of the material that works against too many people other than hardcore fans appreciating this disc, although some numbers, such as “The Nickel Song” and “Beautiful People,” always work. The version of “Ruby Tuesday,” like the other three 1989 vintage songs here, features a full band with synthesizers and drum machines, and is a bit jarring, though Melanie still throws herself impressively into the classic Rolling Stones song. (by Bruce Eder)

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Featuring a series of live recordings covering a period of 20 years this CD provides excellent sound and a unique record of Melanie’s live and session work for the BBC. The first 10 tracks feature a concert recorded for the BBC Radio One In Concert series in 1975. Track 5 is incorrectly listed and is actually a song called Here We Go Again. During this concert Melanie is accompanied by Barry Lee Harwood on guitar and mandolin. Barry played on Sunsets and Other Beginnings and As I See It Now but fails to be credited on the cover of the CD.

Tracks 11 to 14 are rare session recordings from 1969, just Melanie and her guitar. Visit My Dreams is perhaps better known as Deep Down Low from Melanie’s second album.
While all tracks have so far featured acoustic versions of songs, the last four feature Melanie with a full band. The tracks where recorded during a visit to the UK to promote Cowabonga. The musicians that accompany Melanie also accompanied her during two concerts at the Shaw Theatre in London in 1989. (by melaniesafkarecordings.uk)

And I confess … I´m a real fan of Melanie Safka … what  wonderful voice, what sensitive music and lyrics …

But … her 1989 recordings were not really good (especially tzhe Version of “Goodybye Ruby Tuesday is more than lousy …) … but …

… don’t miss “Rock An’ Roll Heart” — a song every baby boomer can relate to.
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Personnel:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:
Barry Lee Hardwood (guitar, mandolin)
Melanie (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 1969:
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 89:
Kay Langford (vocals)
Justin Myers (bass)
Neil Palmer (keyboards)
Alan Ross (guitar, background vocals)
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)
Chris Staines (background vocals)
Pete Thompson (drums)

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Tracklist:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:

01. Autumn Lady (Safka) 4.13
02. Chords Of Fame (Ochs) 5.14
03. Almost Like Being In Love (Lerner/Loewe) 5.09
04. Stoneground Words (Safka) 5.09
05. Here I Am (Safka) 2.37
06. Any Guy (Safka) 2.560
07. Do You Believe (Safka) 6.08
08. Leftover Wine (Safka) 5.44
09. The Nickel Song (Safka) 4.03
10. Beautiful People (Safka) 5.31

BBC Session, September 1969:
11. Visit My Dreams (Deep Down Low) (Safka) 3.51
12. Up Town And Down (Safka) 2.51
13. Baby Guitar (Safka) 2.49
14. Tuning My Guitar (Safka) 4.16

BBC Session, September 89:
15. Ruby Tuesday (Jagger/Richards) 3.50
16. Rock ‘n’ Roll Heart (Safka) 5.17
17. Racing Heart (Safka) 5.17
18. Apathy (Safka/Schekeryk) 3.50

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