Beach Boys – Live In London (1969)

originalfrontcover1Live in London is a live album by American rock band the Beach Boys released by EMI in the UK in May 1970. When released in the US on November 15, 1976, the album was renamed Beach Boys ’69 via Capitol Records.

1968 was a very difficult year for The Beach Boys at home, where their reputation had soured considerably, yet their European success was still strong as evidenced by these confident performances recorded while the group were making their 20/20 album. After the surprise success of the Endless Summer and Spirit of America hits packages in 1974 and 1975, the Beach Boys enjoyed a resurgence of popularity at home, especially on the concert circuit. It was during this time that Capitol decided to strike while the iron was hot and issue a renamed edition of the album for the first time in the US. The reissue had art by rock artist Jim Evans, and a new title, Beach Boys ’69. Besides the fact that the live performance was actually recorded in December 1968, the LP’s appearance added confusion to the marketplace as the group had recently issued a new, live double album—The Beach Boys in Concert—on their own Brother Records label, as part of a distribution deal with their new label, Reprise. Despite this, the record became a small chart success in the US, following the Top 10 placing of 15 Big Ones, reaching #75 in the Fall of 1976 during a US chart stay of 10 weeks. The UK edition failed to chart.

It is believed that The Beach Boys owed Capitol one more album (this may have been it, instead of the Fading Rock Group Revival/Reverberation project), and so, this release ended their relationship with the record label, and with EMI in the UK. (by wikipedia)

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Though their studio output is the stuff of legend, the Beach Boys’ live performances aren’t as familiar to the casual fan. Live in London (also released as Beach Boys ’69) represented the second live set from the band, after 1964’s teen-scream Beach Boys Concert. By the turn of the 1960s into the ’70s, the group was finally rising to the task of translating its lush, layered sound into a live arena. Classics like “Wouldn’t It Be Nice” and “Darlin'” carry all of their original beauty, bolstered by the energy of the live setting and by swinging horn accompaniment. More unexpected cuts, such as the celebratory “Wake the World” and a bluesy take of “Bluebirds Over the Mountains,” fit in perfectly with staples like the tempo-shifting, musically precise version of “Good Vibrations,” just one crowd-pleaser among many on Live in London. (by Rovi Staff)

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Personnel:
Al Jardine (vocals, guitar)
Bruce Johnston (vocals, keyboards, bass)
Mike Love (vocals, tambourine)
Carl Wilson (vocals, guitar)
Brian Wilson (vocals, bass, keyboards)
Dennis Wilson (vocals, drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Darlin’ (B. Wilson/Love) 2.14
02. Wouldn’t It Be Nice (B. Wilson/Asher) 1.45
03. Sloop John B (Tradotional) 2.20
04. California Girls (B.Wilson) 1.48
05. Do It Again (B. Wilson/Love) 2.15
06. Wake The World (Jardine/B. Wilson)1.48
07. Aren’t You Glad (B. Wilson/Love) 2.26
08. Bluebirds Over The Mountain (Hickey) 2.31
09. Their Hearts Were Full Of Spring (Troup) 1.47
10. Good Vibrations (B. Wilson/Love) 3.34
11. God Only Knows (B. Wilson/Asher) 2.27
12. Barbara Ann (Fassert)  1.57
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13. Don´t Worry Baby (B.Wilson/Christian) 2.57
14. Heroes And Villains (B.Wilson/Parks) 3.45

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Lightnin’ Hopkins – Lightnin’ (1969)

frontcover1Sam “Lightnin'” Hopkins was one of the most influential musicians in modern days blues music. Born and raised in Texas, Hopkins lived early life as a rambler, playing music for most of his career on street corners and in local bars. As blues and folk music took the world by storm in the early 1960s, Hopkins became famous for his contributions, having recorded a number of widely popular albums and gaining a worldwide fan base. His music changed the way the world viewed blues music. (by highbeam.com)

“This is a twin LP package of twenty tracksby the great blues singer and guitarist and includes many of his older classics as well as a lot of new material. It is excellently recorded and is one of the best blues packages of the year.” (by Ralph J. Gleason, Rolling Stone)

“Lightnin’ Hopkins may have made more records than any other bluesman and with a few exceptions those records were remarkably consistent. There were peaks and valleys but the general form remained the same: a solid rhythmic accompaniment in E or A broken by bright fierce guitar runs and that amazing voice.

Hopkins always sounds relaxed sometimes almost asleep but with an underlying edge that goes right to the heart and gut. He invites comparison with John Lee Hooker that other master of the dark brooding vocal but his guitar work has a sophistication that Hooker’s lacks and his tunes stay closer to the standard 12-bar framework (although in Hopkins’s hands that could shrink to 11 or stretch to 13 1/2 bars).

lightin-hopkinsHopkins had an endless ability to improvise new songs but he had a few favorites that he came back to again and again. Virtually all those favorites are here played by Hopkins either solo or with a drummer nailing down the rhythm and on one track with a full band. Hopkins plays his acoustic guitar through a magnetic pickup and amplifier giving his playing a bite and sustain that his pure acoustic recordings lack.
Drummer Francis Clay though listed on 16 tracks appears on only bout half of them. On classics like his trademark `Baby Please Don’t Go’ his reinvention of Ray Charles’ `What’d I Say’ and the humorous boogie romp `Ain’t It Crazy’ Hopkins appears solo allowing free rein to his unique sense of pacing and dynamics. When the drums do come in on a driving `Mojo Hand’ and a fine version of `See That My Grave Is Kept Clean’ (here called `One Kind Favor I Ask Of You’) Hopkins takes advantage of their presence to extend his high note runs leaving Clay to hold down the rhythm.

The one band cut `Rock Me Baby’ shows Hopkins flawlessly adopting the Muddy Waters Mississippi/Chicago sound with results Waters must have admired. For lagniappe one cut `I Hear You Calling Me’ gives an extremely rare glimpse of Hopkins playing slide. Hopkins was one of the true greats a master artist whose work transcended the blues genre and this album is an unmatched sampler of his music.” (Elijah Wald, SingOut!)

A superb blues album !

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Personnel:
Jeffrey Carp (harmonica)
Franis Clay (drums)
Sam “Lightnin'” Hopkins (guitar, vocals)
Geno Scaggs (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Hold Up Your Hand (Corley) 3.26
02. My Starter Won’t Start This Morning  3.20
03. What’d I Say (Charles) 2.46
04. One Kind Favor (Hopkins) 4.30
05. Baby Please Don’t Go (Broonzy) 3.00
06. Trouble In Mind (Jones) 3.13
07. Annie’s Blues (Hopkins) 2.31
08. Baby (Hopkins) 2.35
09. Little And Low (Hopkins) 3.33
10. I Hear You Calling (Hopkins) 2.06
11. Mojo Hand Part 1 (Hopkins/Robinson/Lewis) 3.06
12. Mojo Hand Part 2 Hopkins/Robinson/Lewis) 2.59
13. Have You Ever Had A Woman (Hopkins) 4.15
14. Ain’t It Crazy (Hopkins) 2.30
15. Black And Evil (Hopkins) 3.09
16. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 3.34
17. Hello Central (Hopkins) 4.35
18. Back Door Friend (Hopkins) 1.51
19. Little Girl, Little Girl (Hopkins) 6.03
20. It’s Better Down The Road (Hopkins) 2.36

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Mark Spoelstra – Same (1969)

frontcover1A week ago .. a reader of this blog wrote me:

Thank you for your great shares. One artist I see to little of is Mark Spoelstra. If you’ve got anything to share, I’m sure folks would appreciate it.

Mark Warren Spoelstra (June 30, 1940 – February 25, 2007) was an American singer-songwriter and folk and blues guitarist.

He was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri. He began his musical career in Los Angeles in his teens and migrated around to wind up in New York City in time to take part in the folk music revival of the early 1960s. He is best remembered for his activity in the Greenwich Village area. He performed with Bob Dylan soon after Dylan’s arrival in New York City, was a contributor to Broadside Magazine and recorded a number of albums for Folkways Records and other labels.

Spoelstra was raised as a Quaker. His career was put on hold from 1963 to 1965, when he performed alternative service as a conscientious objector in Fresno, California. In the mid-1960s, he frequently performed at the Ash Grove in West Hollywood. It was here that he wrote most of his best songs, including an album of country songs used as the sound-track for the movie Electra Glide in Blue.

In 1969, while living in Sonoma County, California, he formed the Frontier Constabulary with Mitch Greenhill and Mayne Smith. After Spoelstra left to resume his solo career in 1970, the band continued as the Frontier.

Spoelstra later settled near Modesto, California, where he lived until his death. Withdrawing from the touring life to raise a family, Spoelstra and his wife Sheri embraced Christianity. In the mid-1970s he became a minister and used his musical talents as a means to preach his spiritual messages. In the late 1970s, he recorded and released two albums of Gospel music, Somehow I Always Knew and Comin’ Back To Town.

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Mayne Smith, Mark Spoelstra, Mitch Greenhill, 1969

Retiring from music in the early 1980s, he worked for a number of years as a tour bus driver in Yosemite National Park. Throughout this period in his life, Spoelstra remained in touch with his music. In 2001, he recorded an album entitled, Out Of My Hands for the Origin Jazz Library label; the first record he’d made in 20 years. The album is a mix of new songs written for the album and some of his old favorites. In his later years he returned to the stage to perform on a limited scale. He would perform until the summer of 2006 when illness forced him to stop. Several of his albums recorded for Elektra Records, long out of print, have been reissued. Spoelstra died from complications of pancreatic cancer at his home in Pioneer, California on February 25, 2007. (by wikipedia)

After a few years without a label, Mark did manage to record  a rare self-titled 1969 album on Columbia, produced by James Guercio (who was then hot with Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears). “It was done at a time when folk, as I had been doing it on the previous four albums, just wasn’t gonna cut the mustard anymore,” concedes Spoelstra. “So this was more commercial than anything I’d previously done. [Guercio’s] backers wanted him to drop me; all they wanted was money, and they could see money with Chicago. But I got some of my old friends, and I had a band, and we were trying to go more commercial. I got Mitch Greenhill, I had Jim Gordon playing drums, and Michael Deasy played lead guitar. We had some good stuff going on there. But Guercio almost didn’t finish it, and didn’t talk to me for about four or five months after we had already recorded a number of songs. I think he just felt like he’d gotten himself into something that wasn’t gonna make any money. So he did decide finally, after pressure from me, that he should follow his word, and follow through on what he said he was gonna do. So we finished it, and there was very little promotion, if any.

And this is rare Columbia album, maybe not his best, but it´s still a pretty good one … and I will present more albums of this forgotten hero of the US folk-scene in the best months … It´s time to discover Mark Spoelstra again !

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Personnel:
Davd Blue (guitar)
Roy Blumenfeld (drums)
Harvey Brooks (bass)
James Burton (guitar)
Mike Deasy (guitar)
James Gordon (drums)
Mitch Greenhill (guitar, organ)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Michel Rubini (keyboards)
Meyer Snifin (violin)
Mark Spoelstra (guitar, vocal)
Ed Trickett (dulcimer)

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Tracklist:
01. Hobo Poet 2.50
02. Not So Inclined To Be Kind 3.57
03. Thanks Anyway 3.21
04. Sound Of The Rainbow 2.55
05. You Should Know 03:10
06. Meadow Mountain Top 2.49
07. Don Jaun’s Turn To Bow 2.48
08. Song Of Sad Bottles 4.06
09. Mona Sue 3.09
10. Dim Lights And Bar Fights 3.24
11. Child Statue 3.58
12. Empty Words 3.03

All songs written by Mark Spoelstra

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Dick Hyman – Moog – The Electric Eclectics Of Dick Hyman (1969)

frontcover1In the late ’60s, pianist Dick Hyman, famous for “Moritat, Theme from Threepenny Opera,” aexperimented with various keyboard instruments, including Baldwin and Lowrey organs. This release was his first with what was then a completely newfangled machine, the Moog synthesizer. Hyman took the Moog by the horns and milked it for all it was worth on nine originals, including the monster hit single “The Minotaur” (which inspired Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s “Lucky Man”).

The first few tracks are in a pop-song mold, but they are pop songs composed as only a jazz musician with two decades of experience under his belt could. Hyman then hits the listener with a few spacier, improvised numbers that come off as very accessible avant-garde music. Following the “The Minotaur” are two improvised pieces. Moog: The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman ends with “Evening Thoughts,” an impressionistic track reminiscent of “Ebb Tide” by Earl Grant, on which the sounds of the seashore are conjured up on various keyboard instruments. Hyman writes about his intentions for each track in the liner notes.

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Aside from some other Moog tracks sprinkled throughout DCC Compact Classics’ Music for a Bachelor’s Den series, it’s surprising that it’s taken this long in the lounge reissue bonanza for the Moog to finally appear (not counting The Moog Cookbook, a fab spinning of modern rock nuggets into string cheese.) Moog features three bonus tracks from Hyman’s next album Age of Electronicus; his recasting of James Brown’s “Give It Up or Turn It Loose” is well worth the price of admission.

Though this album could easily be tossed into the novelty or “period piece” category, it was not originally intended as that. Hyman recorded a showcase what this new instrument could do, and in the process made an enjoyable album. (by Jim Powers)

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Personnel:
Dick Hyman (synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. The Topless Dancers Of Corfu 3.01
02. The Legend Of Johnny Pot 2.04
03. The Moog And Me 3.00
04. Tap Dance In The Memory Banks 2.30
05. Four Duets In Odd Meter 4.28
08. The Minotaur 8.26
09. Total Bells And Tony 2.01
10. Improvisation In Fourths 2.24
11. Evening Thoughts 3.20

Composed by Dick Hyman

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Review in “Variety”, 1969

 

Fairport Convention – Liege & Lief (1969)

frontcover1Liege & Lief is the fourth album by the English folk rock band Fairport Convention. It is the third and final album the group released in the UK in 1969, all of which prominently feature Sandy Denny as lead female vocalist. (Denny did not appear on the group’s 1968 debut album). It is also the very first Fairport album on which all songs have either been adapted (freely) from traditional British and Celtic folk material (for example “Matty Groves”, “Tam Lin”), or else are original compositions (such as “Come All Ye”, “Crazy Man Michael”) written and performed in a similar style. By introducing songs of this genre into the group’s repertoire Denny, who had previously sung and recorded traditional folk songs as a solo artist, was instrumental in this transformation. Although Denny quit the band even before the album’s release, Fairport Convention has continued to the present day to make music almost exclusively within the traditional British folk music idiom, and are still most strongly associated with it.

The album was moderately successful, peaking at number 17 on the UK Albums Chart during a 15-week run. It is often credited, though the claim is sometimes disputed, as the first major “British folk rock” album. (This term is not to be confused with American-style folk rock, which had first achieved mainstream popularity on both sides of the Atlantic with The Byrds’ early work several years prior.) The popularity of Liege & Lief did a great deal to establish the new style commercially and artistically as a distinct genre. In an audience vote at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards in 2006, the album was voted “Most Influential Folk Album of All Time”.

Following the motorway accident that had killed Martin Lamble, the band were left without a drummer. After the release of Unhalfbricking, Dave Mattacks took over the role and, having previously been a drummer at Mecca Ballrooms, had to “learn a whole new style of drumming.” Dave Swarbrick, a little older than the rest of the band, had already been in a successful duo with guitarist Martin Carthy. After his appearance on Unhalfbricking, he too joined Fairport full-time.

The band rehearsed and put together Liege & Lief over the summer of 1969 at a house in Farley Chamberlayne, near Braishfield, Winchester, launching it with a sold-out concert in London’s Royal Festival Hall late in 1969.

Gone were the covers of songs by Bob Dylan and others, replaced by electrified versions of traditional English folksongs and the first of a long line of instrumental medleys of folk dance tunes driven by Dave Swarbrick’s violin playing. Much of this material had been found by Ashley Hutchings in Cecil Sharp’s collection, maintained by the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

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The title is composed of two Middle English words: liege meaning loyal and lief meaning ready. The cover, a gatefold in grey and purple, featured cameo images of the band along with track listing and credits.

Soon after the release of Liege & Lief, Ashley Hutchings left to further pursue traditional music in a new band, Steeleye Span; Sandy Denny also left to form Fotheringay.

Liege & Lief was promoted by John Peel on his Top Gear radio programme[10] and the album spent fifteen weeks in the UK album chart, reaching number 17.[11] In a contemporary review, John Mendelsohn of Rolling Stone recommended the album only to devotees of “quietly arty traditional folk” and felt that “Deserter” is the only “arresting” song, as “not even the originals match up to the group-composed material on previous albums.”[12] Robert Christgau of The Village Voice gave Liege & Lief a “B–” and said that, because of his “anti-folk” tastes, he was disappointed with the album’s more traditional material after Unhalfbricking.

The album has come to be regarded as having a major influence in the development of British folk rock. It was voted the ‘most important folk album of all time’ by BBC Radio 2 listeners in 2002, and at the 2006 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards Liege and Lief won the award for Most influential Folk Album of all time. At the event, the original line-up of Simon Nicol, Richard Thompson, Ashley Hutchings, Dave Swarbrick, Dave Mattacks, with Chris While replacing Sandy Denny, performed Matty Groves. Georgia Lucas, the daughter of Sandy Denny and Trevor Lucas, accepted the award on behalf of her late mother. This commemoration was repeated on 10 August 2007 at Cropredy, when the complete album was performed.

In a retrospective review, Allmusic’s Mark Deming said of the album that “while [it] was the most purely folk-oriented Fairport Convention album to date, it also rocked hard in a thoroughly original and uncompromising way”.[14] In June 2007, Mojo magazine listed Liege & Lief at number 58 in its list of “100 Records that changed the world”.

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Personnel:
Sandy Denny (vocals)
Ashley Hutchings (bass, background vocals)
Dave Mattacks (drums, percussion)
Simon Nicol (guitar, background vocals)
Dave Swarbrick (fiddle, viola)
Richard Thompson (guitar, background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. Come All Ye (Denny/Hutchings) 4.55
02. Reynardine (Traditional) 4.33
03. Matty Groves (Traditional) 8.08
04. Farewell, Farewell (Thompson) 2.38
05. The Deserter (Traditional) 4.10
06. Medley 4.00
06.01. The Lark In he Morning  (Traditional)
06.02. Rakish Paddy  (Traditional)
06.03. Foxhunters’ Jig  (Traditional)
06.04. Toss the Feathers  (Traditional)
07. Tam Lin  (Traditional) 7.20
08. Crazy Man Michael (Thompson/Swarbrick) 4.35
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09. Sir Patrick Spens (Traditional) 4.02
10. Quiet Joys of Brotherhood (Traditional/Farina) 10.16

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Various Artists – American Folk Blues Festival 69 (1969)

frontcover1The American Folk Blues Festival was a music festival that toured Europe as an annual event for several years beginning in 1962. It introduced audiences in Europe, including the UK, to leading blues performers of the day such as Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson, most of whom had never previously performed outside the US. The tours attracted substantial media coverage, including TV shows, and contributed to the growth of the audience for blues music in Europe.

German jazz publicist Joachim-Ernst Berendt first had the idea of bringing original African-American blues performers to Europe. Jazz had become very popular, and rock and roll was just gaining a foothold, and both genres drew influences directly back to the blues. Berendt thought that European audiences would flock to concert halls to see them in person.

Promoters Horst Lippmann and Fritz Rau brought this idea to reality. By contacting Willie Dixon, an influential blues composer and bassist from Chicago, they were given access to the blues culture of the southern United States. The first festival was held in 1962, and they continued almost annually until 1972, after an eight-year hiatus reviving the festival in 1980 until its final performance in 1985. (by wikipedia)

And this is rare live recording from the 1969 show, recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall (October 3, 1969) and this album include rare recordings by more or less unknown blues artists like Juke Boy Bonner. John Jackson and Whistling Alex Moore but although well known artists like Earl Hooker and Carey Bell.

And not to fortget, the pioneer of Zydeco, the one and only Clifton Chenier !

Enjoy this mixture of American tradtional music !

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Personnel:

Juke Boy Bonner:
Juke Boy Bonner (vocals, guitar, harmonica)

Earl Hooker Band + Carey Bell Band: :
Carey Bell (harmonica)
Earl Hooker (guitar, vocals)
Robert St. Julien (drums)
Mack Thompson (bass)

Clifton Chenier Band:
Cleveland Chenier (washboard)
Clifton Chenier (accordeon, vocals)
Robert St. Julien (drums)

John Jackson:
John Jackson (guitar, vocals)

Magic Sam Band:
Robert St. Julien (drums)
Magic Sam (guitar, vocals)
Mack Thompson (bass)

Whistling Alex Moore:
Whistling Alex Moore (piano, vocals, whistling)

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Tracklist:
01. Juke Boy Bonner: Jumpin’ With Juke Boy (Bonner) 1.40
02. Earl Hooker: Going Up And Down (Hooker) 5.07
03. Carey Bell: Rocking With Chromanica/I Feel Bad, Bad, Bad (Bell) 7.00
04. Juke Boy Bonner: Running Shoes (Bonner) 2.25
05. John Jackson: Poor Boy (Jackson) 3.02
06. Clifton Chenier:  Zydeco Et Pas Sale (Traditional) 2.50
07. Earl Hooker: Blue Shadows Fall (Hooker) 5.12
08. Clifton Chenier: Wrap It Up (Traditional) 3.08
09. Magic Sam: Easy Baby (Maghett) 3.24
10. Magic Sam: Looking Good (Maghett) 2.06
11. Whistling Alex Moore: Across The Atlantic Ocean (Moore) 6.34
12. John Jackson: John Jackson Breakdown (Jackson) 1.43

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Allman Brothers Band – Same (1969)

frontcover1The Allman Brothers Band is the debut studio album by American rock band the Allman Brothers Band. It was released in the United States by Atco Records and Capricorn Records on November 4, 1969 and produced by Adrian Barber. Formed in 1969, the Allman Brothers Band came together following various musical pursuits by each individual member. Following his session work in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, Duane Allman moved to Jacksonville, Florida where he led large jam sessions with his new band, one he had envisioned as having two guitarists and two drummers. After rounding out the lineup with the addition of his brother, Gregg Allman, the band played free shows in public parks and moved to Macon, Georgia, where they were to be one of the premiere acts on Capricorn.

The album was recorded and mixed in two weeks at Atlantic Studios in New York City. Much of the material presented was premiered live over the preceding months and combines blues, jazz and country music to varying degrees. It includes re-workings of “Trouble No More” and “Don’t Want You No More,” as well as notable originals such as “Dreams”, which highlighted the band’s jazz influence, and “Whipping Post”, which soon became a crowd favorite. Although the group was arranged to work with producer Tom Dowd (whose credits included Cream and John Coltrane), he was unavailable, and they instead recorded with house engineer Adrian Barber. The album’s artwork was photographed at various places in Macon and surrounding areas.

The record initially received a poor commercial response, charting in the lower levels of Billboard’s Top 200 Pop Albums chart. Despite this, the album received critical acclaim from publications such as Rolling Stone, who called it “consistently […] subtle, and honest, and moving.” Following the release of the album, the band remained on the road for an extended period of time. They chose to remain in Macon, despite suggestions from label executives to move to larger cities for a better shot at commercial acceptance. (by wikipedia)

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This might be the best debut album ever delivered by an American blues band, a bold, powerful, hard-edged, soulful essay in electric blues with a native Southern ambience. Some lingering elements of the psychedelic era then drawing to a close can be found in “Dreams,” along with the template for the group’s on-stage workouts with “Whipping Post,” and a solid cover of Muddy Waters’ “Trouble No More.” There isn’t a bad song here, and only the fact that the group did even better the next time out keeps this from getting the highest possible rating. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Duane Allman (guitar, slide-guitar)
Gregg Allman (organ, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion)
Berry Oakley (bass, background vocals)
Butch Trucks (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Want You No More (Davis/Hardin)  2.25
02. It’s Not My Cross to Bear (G.Allman)  5.02
03. Black Hearted Woman (G.Allman)  5.08
05. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 3.45
06. Every Hungry Woman (G.Allman)  4.13
07. Dreams (G.Allman) 7.18
08. Whipping Post (G.Allman)  5.17

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