Erroll Garner – Turin Concert (2007)

FrontCover1Erroll Louis Garner (June 15, 1921 – January 2, 1977) was an American jazz pianist and composer known for his swing playing and ballads. His best-known composition, the ballad “Misty”, has become a jazz standard. Scott Yanow of Allmusic calls him “one of the most distinctive of all pianists” and a “brilliant virtuoso.” He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6363 Hollywood Blvd. His live album, Concert by the Sea,[10] first released in 1955, sold over a million copies by 1958 and Scott Yanow’s opinion is: “this is the album that made such a strong impression that Garner was considered immortal from then on.”(b wikipedia)

One of the more criticized omissions of Ken Burns’ ambitious documentary on Jazz was not even mentioning Erroll Garner among the most influential Jazz pianists ever. The omission may not seem accidental. For many critics, Garner’s own unpretentious and happy music seemed more akin with popular piano music than with Jazz. The extraordinary popularity Garner achieved during his career helped to propagate this idea, which nevertheless is thoroughly unacceptable when judging Garner’s work on a strictly musical basis.

ErrollGarner01

The live performance heard here, recorded in Turin, Italy, on May 9, 1971, shows Garner in a late phase of his extended career, playing in one of his most usual formats, the classic Jazz trio of piano, bass and drums plus a conga drummer. The same group is heard on a studio session recorded a few months later in New York, on December 2, 1971 (the album was titled Gemini). As a curiosity, Garner plays harpsichord on two tunes from this studio session, ‘When a Gipsy Makes His Violin Cry’ and ‘Tea for Two’. (by Gambit)

LinerNotes
This superb and very well-recorded concert, from May of ’71, is at long last available here in the states, and will prove to be a real treat for anybody acquainted with the genius of Mr. Garner. Erroll, heavily into the Latin groove at this time, swings his *** off here with his stellar quartet, on several very different versions of Misty and on other timeless standards. This dazzling concert is intelligently paired with the Gemini album, a brilliant, high energy studio date also from the early 70’s, recorded with the same sideman. Great, great music–don’t miss this one. A treasure from one of jazz’s greatest gaints. (by Jazz Pianist)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Erroll Garner (piano)
Jose Mangual (percussion)
Ernest McCarty(bass)
Jimmie Smith (drums)

Booklet03A

Tracklist:
01. The Shadow of Your Smile (Mandel/Webster) 4.42
02. The Girl From Ipanema (Jobim/Gimbel/Moraes) 5.41
03. Misty (Garner) 4.24
04. There Will Never Be Another You (Jacobs/Tinturin) 2.47
05. Misty #2 (Garner) 2.17
06. Variations on “Misty” (Garner) 1.40
07. Yesterday (Lennon/McCartney) 5.19
08. I’ll Remember April (DePaul/Johnston/Raye) 4.06
09. Tell It Like It Is (Garner) 4.38
10. How High the Moon? (Hamilton/Lewis) 5.07
11. It Could Happen To You (Burke/Van Heusen) 3.48
12. Gemini (Garner) 4.04
13. When A Gipsy Makes His Violin Cry (Deutch/Winegar/Smith/Rogan) 6.24
14. Tea For Two(Caesar/Youmans) 5.27
15. Something (Harrison) 1.51
16. Eldorado (Garner) 5.49
17. These Foolish Things (Link/Marvell/Strachey) 7.00

CD1

*
**

LinerNotes2

Erroll Garner
Erroll Louis Garner (June 15, 1921 – January 2, 1977)

Aretha Franklin – Montreux (1971)

FrontCover1Aretha Louise Franklin (March 25, 1942 – August 16, 2018) was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. Franklin began her career as a child singing gospel at New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan, where her father C. L. Franklin was minister. At the age of 18, she embarked on a secular-music career as a recording artist for Columbia Records. While Franklin’s career did not immediately flourish, she found acclaim and commercial success after signing with Atlantic Records in 1966. Hit songs such as “Respect”, “Chain of Fools”, “Think”, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman”, “I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)”, and “I Say a Little Prayer”, propelled her past her musical peers. By the end of the 1960s, Aretha Franklin had come to be known as “The Queen of Soul”.

Franklin continued to record acclaimed albums such as I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You (1967), Lady Soul (1968), Spirit in the Dark (1970), Young, Gifted and Black (1972), Amazing Grace (1972), and Sparkle (1976) before experiencing problems with her record company. Franklin left Atlantic in 1979 and signed with Arista Records. She appeared in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers before releasing the successful albums Jump to It (1982), Who’s Zoomin’ Who? (1985), and Aretha (1986) on the Arista label. In 1998, Franklin returned to the Top 40 with the Lauryn Hill-produced song “A Rose Is Still a Rose”; later, she released an album of the same name which was certified gold.

Aretha Franklin01

That same year, Franklin earned international acclaim for her performance of “Nessun dorma” at the Grammy Awards; she filled in at the last minute for Luciano Pavarotti, who canceled his appearance after the show had already begun. In a widely noted performance, she paid tribute to 2015 honoree Carole King by singing “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” at the Kennedy Center Honors.

Franklin recorded 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top-ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries, and 20 number-one R&B singles. She is the most charted female artist in history. Franklin’s well-known hits include “Rock Steady”, “Call Me”, “Ain’t No Way”, “Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)”, “Spanish Harlem”, “Day Dreaming”, “Until You Come Back to Me (That’s What I’m Gonna Do)”, “Something He Can Feel”, “Jump to It”, “Freeway of Love”, “Who’s Zoomin’ Who”, and “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” (a duet with George Michael). She won 18 Grammy Awards, including the first eight awards given for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (1968–1975). Franklin is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 75 million records worldwide.

Aretha Franklin02 (1971)

Franklin received numerous honors throughout her career. She was awarded the National Medal of Arts and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 1987, she became the first female performer to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She also was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005 and into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 2012.[7] In 2010, Rolling Stone magazine ranked her number one on its list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”[8] and number nine on its list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”.[9] The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2019 awarded Franklin a posthumous special citation “for her indelible contribution to American music and culture for more than five decades. (by wikipedia)

Aretha Franklin03

Obviously there has been a great loss that leaves an irreparable void in the musical firmament of our world, but as we know the only way to memorialize the giants is to play the music, so here we are. This tape’s been around for a while and I always loved the performance, but felt it was imbalanced and that Aretha’s voice was a bit buried in the orchestral maelstrom of brass and horns. So I sat down when she passed this morning and spent the day excavating it from the soup so it’d be more prominent and audible. [Aretha Franklin passed away on August 16, 2018 at the age of 76.]

Aretha Franklin07

I used Sound Forge 11’s Graphic EQ and Graphics Dynamics tools, and increased the left channel volume to create a better balance with more lead vocal in the mix. I repaired the dropout in the transition between Dr Feelgood and Spirit In the Dark to be less egregiously disturbing, chopped off the filler track at the end of the original files, which seemed to have nothing at all to do with this performance (I think it was Traffic, and I have no idea how it got there, but no matter), and tracked the medleys into separate files. I created a new cover, made new fingerprints, and got everything titled and tagged properly as well. I also clarified who is playing on it and amended this text file.

Alternate frontcovers:
AlternateFrontCovers

This is a stunner of a set from the Aretha & King Curtis “Live at the Fillmore” era, taped as they both were just a few months before Curtis was so tragically murdered. We are all devastated that The Queen has left us, but hopefully this reworking of this magical tape will turn a little of that grief into the necessary celebration of a life lived as well as a human life can be lived. Farewell to Aretha Franklin – an artist whose music will never, ever die – and enjoy. (by Emperor Nobody)

Thanks to original uploader grooveon; and to Emperor Nobody (EN) for the remaster and for sharing the show at Dime.

Okay … Arthea Franklin … one of the greates ever … okay … lie at Montrreux … what a concert

Recorded live at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Casino, Montreux, Switzerland; June 12, 1971 (Early show). Fairly to very good FM broadcast.

BackCover1

Personnel:
King Curtis (saxophone)
Cornell Dupree (guitar)
Aretha Franklin (vocals, piano)
Jerry Jemmott (bass)
Pancho Morales (percussion)
Bernard Purdie (drums)
Truman Thomas (organ)
+
The Memphis Horns:
Jack Hale (trombone)
Roger Hopps (trumpet)
Wayne Jackson – trumpet
Andrew Love (saxophone)
Jimmy Mitchell (saxophone)
+
background vocals, percussion
Brenda Bryant – Margaret Branch – Pat Smith

Aretha Franklin04

Tracklist:
01. Soul Serenade (Ousley/Dixon) 3.23
02. Respect (Redding) 4.15
03. (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman (Goffin/King/Wexler) 4.28
04. I Say A Little Prayer (Bacharach/David) 3.40
05. Call Me (Franklin) 6.55
06. Brand New Me (Gamble/Butler) 4.16
07. Share Your Love With Me (Braggs/Malone) 4.01
08. Don’t Play That Song (You Lied) (Ertegün/Nelson) 3.59
09. Bridge Over Troubled Water (Simon) 5.53
10. Dr. Feelgood (Franklin/White) 6.50
11. Spirit In The Dark (Franklin) 6.04

Aretha Franklin05

*
**

Aretha Franklin06
Aretha Louise Franklin (March 25, 1942 – August 16, 2018)

Bloodrock – Bloodrock 3 (1971)

FrontCover1Bloodrock was an American hard rock band based in Fort Worth, Texas, that had success in the 1970s. The band emerged from the Fort Worth club and music scene during the early to mid-1970s.

Bloodrock initially formed in Fort Worth in 1963, under the name the Naturals. This first lineup featured Jim Rutledge – drums/vocals, Nick Taylor (1946-2010) – guitar/vocals, Ed Grundy – bass/vocals, and Dean Parks – guitar. They released their first single in 1965 “Hey Girl” b/w “I Want You” (Rebel MME 1003). Shortly thereafter they changed their name to Crowd + 1 and released three more singles: “Mary Ann Regrets” b/w “Whatcha Tryin’ to Do to Me” (BOX 6604), “Don’t Hold Back” b/w “Try,” and “Circles” b/w “Most Peculiar Things.”

In 1967, Parks left Crowd +1 to become the musical director for The Sonny & Cher Show (the beginning of a long career as a session musician). He was replaced by Lee Pickens on guitar. It was also at this time that Stevie Hill joined the group on keyboards and vocals. They continued as Crowd + 1 until 1969 when they changed their name to Bloodrock, conceived by Grand Funk Railroad manager/producer Terry Knight. They also recorded their first album under Knight, Bloodrock (Capitol ST-435). The album, released in March 1970, peaked at 160 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Bloodrock01

In 1970, Rutledge moved from behind the drum set to take on lead vocal duties exclusively. Rick Cobb took over the percussive duties and added his voice to the group as well. This lineup recorded their next four albums: Bloodrock 2 (ST-491), Bloodrock 3 (ST-765), Bloodrock USA (SMAS 645), and Bloodrock Live (SVBB-11038).

Bloodrock 2 was their most successful album peaking at number 21 on the Billboard Pop Album Chart in 1971, mostly on the strength of their single “D.O.A.”, which reached number 36 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 6, 1971. “D.O.A.” also gave the band considerable regional exposure throughout the Southwest and West, particularly in Texas and Southern California. “D.O.A.” was probably the band’s most well-known and well-remembered single. However, some radio stations would not play the song because of the use of sirens. The concern was that the siren sound would confuse motorists.The motivation for writing this song was explained in 2005 by guitarist Lee Pickens. “When I was 17, I wanted to be an airline pilot,” Pickens said. “I had just gotten out of this airplane with a friend of mine, at this little airport, and I watched him take off. He went about 200 feet in the air, rolled and crashed.” The band decided to write a song around the incident and include it on their second album.

Bloodrock02

In 1972 Lee Pickens left to form the Lee Pickens Group and released the album LPG in 1973 on Capitol Records. Jim Rutledge also left Bloodrock in 1972, later releasing a solo album in 1976 on Capitol Records titled Hooray for Good Times. Bloodrock replaced Rutledge on vocals and guitar with Warren Ham on vocals, flute and saxophone. Stevie Hill on keyboards adjusted to Ham’s presence by shifting his own style. These changes to personnel and style moved the hard rock sound of the band in a lighter direction, more toward progressive rock, pop and jazz, alienating some fans. The subsequent album, Passage was the last time Bloodrock visited the charts. It peaked at number 104 on the Billboard 200 in 1972.

1973 brought another personnel change: Rick Cobb vacated the drums to be replaced by Randy Reader. This line up recorded one album: Whirlwind Tongues (1974).

The end of the road for Bloodrock came in 1975. Randy Reader left the group and an album, Unspoken Words, remained unreleased until 2000, when it was included as part of the CD release Triptych (along with Passage and Whirlwind Tongues). Unspoken Words featured Bill Ham (Warren’s Brother) and Matt Betton.

Bloodrock03

A reunion concert featuring all five members of the original lineup (Jim Rutledge, Lee Pickens, Ed Grundy, Nick Taylor, and Stevie Hill), plus Chris Taylor (Nick’s son) in place of drummer Rick Cobb III from the classic six-member lineup, was held on March 12, 2005, in Fort Worth, for the benefit of their keyboardist Stevie Hill, to help with medical costs related to his combating leukemia. The reunion concert was filmed and released on DVD. Stevie Hill died on September 12, 2013, from leukemia.
Bloodrock’s music has been categorized primarily as hard rock. Bloodrock’s 1970 self-titled debut album was described in the context of hard rock and early heavy metal by AllMusic’s Donald A. Guarisco. Bloodrock 2 was not as morbid and heavy, and more of a chart success,[6] while Bloodrock 3 and Bloodrock U.S.A. saw the band introduce progressive rock elements. The band’s 1972 personnel changes shifted them toward prog rock, jazz and pop music.

Bloodrock 3 is the third album by the Texan rock band Bloodrock, released on Capitol Records in April 1971. (by wikipedia)

Bloodrock04

On their third album, Bloodrock makes a full return to the ominous hard-rocking sound that made their debut album such a solid release. For proof, look no further than “Whiskey Vengeance”: This gutsy rocker starts with a creepy wordless vocal intro, then breaks into a galloping riff that provides a blood-pumping backdrop for its tale of heartless revenge. Bloodrock 3 also plays up the progressive edge to the group’s sound that was only hinted at on previous songs like “Melvin Laid an Egg” and “D.O.A.” For instance, the album opener, “Jessica,” boasts some instrumental breaks that throw out surprisingly intricate riffs at breakneck speed. “Breach of Lease” is another prog-ish cut that runs for nine minutes, but manages to avoid wearing out its welcome through a carefully crafted arrangement that alternates eerie, quiet organ-led verses with a pulse-pounding chorus. Bloodrock also continues their Grand Funk-like attempts at social commentary with “Song for a Brother” and “America, America”:

Single

The lyrics are a bit simplistic but are straightforward enough to get the point across and further benefit from being backed by energetic, well-arranged music. The group still has trouble with its ballads, though: “A Certain Kind” has a pretty piano-led melody but suffers from generic, mawkish love lyrics and a strained high-range vocal from Jim Rutledge. Despite occasional lapses like this, Bloodrock 3 is an effective hard rock album that boasts tight arrangements and a spirited performance by the band. It’s not for the casual listener, but anyone who enjoyed “D.O.A.” will probably enjoy this album. (by Donald A. Guarisco)

Oh yes … I enjoy this album very much !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Rick Cobb (drums, percussion, vocals)
Ed Grundy (bass, vocals)
Stephen Hill (keyboards, vocals)
Lee Pickens (guitar, vocals)
Jim Rutledge (vocals)
Nick Taylor (guitar, vocals)

Inlet

Tracklist:
01. Jessica (Nitzinger) 4.46
02. Whiskey Vengeance (Grundy/Rutledge/Cobb/Hill) 4.13
03. Song For A Brother (Hill) 5.19
04. You Gotta Roll (Rutledge/Nitzinger/Hill) 5.09
05. Breach Of Lease (Grundy/Rutledge/Nitzinger/Cobb/Hill) 9.03
06. Kool-Aid Kids (Nitzinger) 6.29
07. A Certain Kind (*) (Hopper) 4.19
08. America, America (Grundy/Cobb) 1.24

This song was originally performed by Soft Machine !

LabelB1
*
**

(Salvadore) Adamo – Olympia 71 (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgSalvatore, Knight Adamo (born 1 November 1943) is a Belgian singer and composer, who is known for his romantic ballads. Adamo was born in Italy and grew up from the age of three in Belgium. He holds dual citizenship of Belgium and Italy.

He first gained popularity throughout Europe and later in the Middle East, Latin America, Japan, and the United States. He has sold more than 80 million albums and 20 million singles making him one of the most commercially successful musicians in the world. He mainly performs in French but has also sung in Dutch, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, and Turkish. “Tombe la neige”, “La nuit”, and “Inch’Allah” remain his best known songs. He is currently the best selling Belgian musician of all time.

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately.

Adamo01.jpgAdamo was born in Comiso, Sicily. His father Antonio, a well digger, emigrated to Belgium in February 1947 to work in the mines of Marcinelle. Four months later his wife, Concetta, and their son, Salvatore, joined him in the town of Ghlin (Mons) before moving to Jemappes (Mons). In 1950, Salvatore was bedridden for a year with meningitis.

Salvatore’s parents did not want their son to become a miner, so he went to a Catholic school run by the Frères des Ecoles Chrétiennes. By 1960, the family of Antonio and Concetta Adamo had seven children overall. Salvatore grew up in Jemappes (Mons), where he was a dedicated student at school and distinguished himself in music and the arts.

Adamo’s early influences were the poetry of Victor Hugo and Jacques Prévert, the music of French singer-songwriters like Georges Brassens, and the Italian canzonette. He started singing and composing his own songs from an early age. His debut was in a Radio Luxembourg competition, where he participated as singer and composer of the song “Si j’osais” (“If I dared”), winning the competition’s final held in Paris on 14 February 1960.

Adamo’s first hit was “Sans toi, ma mie”, in 1963, from his debut album 63/64. He followed this with a series of hits, the most famous being “Tombe la neige” (“The snow falls”) in 1963, “La nuit” (“The Night”) in 1964, and “Inch’Allah”. The self-penned “Petit bonheur” (“Little Happiness”) sold over one million copies by April 1970, and was awarded a gold disc.

Adamo02.jpg

Adamo has sold over 100 million copies of recordings worldwide. He has recorded in many languages and, besides France and Belgium, had hits in Italy, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Turkey and also in Japan, where he toured repeatedly. He has had hits and toured also in Latin America and throughout the Middle East.

In Chile, the audience awarded him an appreciation prize known as the “Antorcha” (Gold and Silver Torch) at the “Festival de Viña del Mar” held yearly in the “Quinta Vergara”, at the seaside resort of Viña del Mar, where he once had to sing in three different, sold-out venues in the same night. In the 1980s, Adamo’s career faltered, as the style of his music was no longer fashionable. Since the 1990s, however, and on the crest of a nostalgia wave, he has successfully resumed composing, issuing records and touring, starting with a full season at the Casino de Paris venue in April 1990.

Adamo04.jpg

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately.

Adamo briefly attempted movie acting when he was cast in the film Les Arnaud (1967), which starred Bourvil. Amália Rodrigues recorded “Inch’Allah” in French. “Tombe la neige”, one of his many international hits, has been covered in Bulgarian, Turkish (“Her Yerde Kar Var”), Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian and Chinese (Cantopop).

Adamo05In 2001, Adamo was raised into the Belgian nobility (with motto Humblement mais dignement) by King Albert II and given for life the Belgian noble title Ridder, translated into English as “Knight”. He was appointed an Officer of the Belgian Order of the Crown in 2002. In 2014, Adamo was honoured at Victoires de la Musique in France.

In 1984, Adamo had heart problems which necessitated a heart bypass operation and a temporary though total withdrawal from work. Since 1993, he has been an honorary UNICEF ambassador from Belgium and, in this capacity, has visited countries such as Vietnam, Lebanon, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and others. In 2004, health problems forced him to cancel a scheduled tour but, since 2007, he is touring again. In December 2011, he performed in Espinho, Portugal and Bucharest, Romania.

At the end of the 1960s, Adamo married Nicole. Their children were Anthony (born in 1969), Benjamin, and then Amélie. At the height of his stardom, his own father died by drowning on 7 August 1966. His younger sister Délizia is also a recording artist. He wrote a number of songs for his sister, including her debut hit “Prends le chien” in 1974. She also joined him in his tour in 1975. (by wikipedia)

Adamo03.jpg

And here´s a pretty good album by Adamo, recorded live at the Olympia/Paris (a sould out concert, of course) in 1971.

And we here many of his romantic ballads and chansons .. and he was/is a real master of this genre.

Listen and enjoy !

BackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Salvadore Adamo (vocals)
+
Grand Orchestre De L’Olympia, I Delfini conducted by Alain Goraguer

BookletA.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Salut Vieux! 3.43
02. Le Pendu 5.12
03. Nous 4.10
04. Un Petit Caillou Gris Rose, Un Petit Caillou Vert Gris 4.39
05. Les Fees Ne Mourront Pas! 4.07
06. Buvons A Notre Souvenir 3.56
07. Et Tu T’en Vas 3.14
08. Mon Cinema 3.56
09. Elle Souriait 3.47
10. Enfant, Mon Ami 3.19
11. Sois Heureuse Rose 3.16
12. Que Voulez Vous Que Je Vous Chante? 3.29
13. Medley 3.36
13.1. Petit Bonheur
13.2. Vous Permettez Monsieur?

All songs written by Salvadore Adamo

LabelB1.JPG

*
**

AnotherBackCover1

Leo Kottke – Mudlark (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgMudlark is American guitarist Leo Kottke’s fourth album, his first on a major label (Capitol) and his first to feature other musicians. It reached #168 on the Billboard Pop Albums charts.

Recording started in Los Angeles and later moved to Nashville. Four of the cuts were recorded in Wayne Moss’s garage studio in Nashville. The song “Room 8” is titled after a neighborhood cat named Room 8 who wandered into a classroom in 1952 at Elysian Heights Elementary School in Echo Park, California and lived at the school each winter, leaving in the summer. (by wikipedia)

Mudlark rates highly on many a Kottke fan’s favorite list. This was Kottke’s Capitol Records debut, and his solo instrumental sound is augmented with the addition of studio sidemen (bass, drums, piano). His playing is superb (no surprise there) and full of youthful vigor — a fusion of high-speed picking, brash slide work, funky folk, acoustic rock, and melodicism. Most importantly, Mudlark marked the debut of Kottke as a singer, an indication that Capitol was trying to shoehorn him into the singer/songwriter genre. Kottke himself has made disparaging remarks about his own vocals, but they add personality to his virtuosic guitar chops. His acoustic 12-string cover of “Eight Miles High” is particularly strong at showing off the vocal richness.

Leo Kottke02.jpg

On later albums, the vocals would become more mannered; here Kottke takes a more forward approach — belting out the melodies with gusto. Kottke’s sound was too raucous and unpredictable to guarantee commercial success on a major label. Stylistically, Kottke is all over the map (as usual), blending traditional folk, bluegrass, blues, singer/songwriter, and classical into his own brand of high-octane eclecticism. There’s no mistaking the Leo Kottke “sound,” but it’s hard to label it. Versatility is paramount, from the down-home high-speed picking of “Cripple Creek” to the steely bottleneck slide work on “June Bug” to the Baroque classicism of “Bourrée” by J.S. Bach, all of it wrapped by Kottke’s wry, surreal wit. A landmark early album, Mudlark increased Kottke’s visibility and helped establish his reputation as a homegrown American original. (by Jim Esch)

BackCover.jpg

Personnel:
Leo Kottke (guitar, bottleneck national steel guitar, vocals)
+
Kenneth Buttrey (drums, percussion, cowbell on 01., 05., 10. + 14.)
Roy Estrad (bass on track 02.)
Kim “Juke Box Phantom” Fowley (vocals on 07.)
John Harris (piano on 01., 05. + 14.)
Jeffrey Kaplan (piano on 08. + 11.)
Paul “Fast Foot” Lagos (drums on 02., 03., 07. – 09. + 11.)
Wayne Moss (bass on 01., 05., 10. + 14.)
Pat Smit (bass on 11.)
Larry Taylor (bass on 03,, 07. + 09.)

Leo Kottke01.jpgTracklist:
01. Cripple Creek (Traditional) 2.01
02. Eight Miles High (Clark/McGuinn/Crosby) 3.39
03. June Bug (Kottke) 2.17
04. The Ice Miner (Kottke) 2.03
05. Bumblebee (Kottke) 3.45
06. Stealing (Kottke) 1.42
07. Monkey Lust (Kottke/Fowley) 1.54
08. Poor Boy (White/Fahey) 2.10
09. Lullaby (Kottke) 3.24
10. Machine #2 (Kottke) 3.04
11. Hear The Wind Howl (Kottke) 3.04
12. Bourée (Bach) 1.28
13. Room 8 (Kottke) 3.00
14. Standing in My Shoes (Kottke/Bruce) 3.11

LabelB1

*
**

Raymond Lefevre – Soul Symphonies 1 (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgRaymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008) was a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer.

Born on November 20, 1929 in Calais, France, Raymond Lefèvre is best known for his interpretation of the 1968 theme “Soul Coaxing (Ame Caline)” (composed by Michel Polnareff), which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès such as La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the legendary series Le Gendarme de Saint Tropez. During the late 1950s and early 1960s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu peux tout faire de moi, Quand on n’a que l’amour), amongst many others. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay Records label. His recordings were released in the United States on the Kapp and Four Corners record labels until 1969.

He was accepted at the Paris Conservatory when 17 years old. During the early 1950s he played the piano for the Franck Pourcel orchestra. In 1953 he played the piano at the Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay label and recorded his debut album that year.

Raymond Lefevre1

He worked on the French television programmes Musicorama (1950s) and Palmarés des Chansons (1965, 1966, 1967) accompanying such famous artists as Dalida, Claude François, Richard Anthony, with his own orchestra.

His recording of “The Day the Rains Came” was a best seller in the United States in 1958. The song “Ame câline” (Soul Coaxing) became an international hit in 1968 and “La La La (He Gives Me Love)” was a minor hit in 1968 in Canada and the United States. In 1969 his recording of “La Reine de Saba” (Queen of Sheba) became a big hit in Japan. From 1972 until the early 2000s (decade), he undertook several successful tours of Japan.

He worked on the soundtracks of many Louis de Funès movies.

Raymond Lefevre2

Lefèvre conducted entries four times at the Eurovision Song Contest, three times for Monaco (in 1961, 1962, and 1963) and once for Luxembourg (in 1970).

Raymond Lefèvre died on June 27, 2008 at the age of 78. (by wikipedia)

And here´s his first album of the very sucessful “Soul Symphonies” … I guess the best way to play Classic tunes in a very uniques Easy Listening was ..

Enjoy, dream (like me) or whatever !

BackCover1.JPG

Personnel:
Raymond Lefevre Orchestra

AlternateFront+BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Allegro De La 40ème Symphonie De Mozart (Mozart) 3.05
02. Largo De Dvorak De La Symphonie Du Nouveau Monde (Dvorak) 3.03
03. Aria De Jean-Sebastien Bach (Bach) 2.45
04. Largo De Haendel (Händel) 2.31
05. Aranjuez (D’Après L’Adagio 2ème Mouvement Du Concerto D’Aranjuez De Joaquin Rodrigo-Vidre) (Rodrigo-Vidre) 4.43
06. 5ème Symphonie De Beethoven (Beethoven) 2.53
07. Prelude En Do De Jean-Sebastien Bach (Bach) 2.53
08. Adagio De La Sonate Pathetique De Beethoven (Beethoven) 3.07
09. Modinha (Préludio Tiré Des Bachianas Brasileiras № 1 De Villa-Lobos) (Villa-Lobos) 3.41
10. Adagio Cardinal (Vacquez) 2.40
11. Andante Maggiore Du Concerto Pour 2 Mandolines De Vivaldi (Vivaldi) 3.33
12. Le Canon De Pachelbel (Pachelbel) 3.29
+
13. Concierto en do menor para oboe – 2º mov, Adagio (Marcello) 2.40
14. Concierto para una voz (Saint-Preux) 3.31

LabelB1

*
**

Raymond Lefevre3
Raymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008)

The Band – Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 (2013)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is my last entry in this year, in this decade … including a New Year´s Eve concert:

During the final week of 1971, The Band played four legendary concerts at New York City’s Academy Of Music, ushering in the New Year with electrifying performances, including new horn arrangements by Allen Toussaint and a surprise guest appearance by Bob Dylan for a New Year’s Eve encore. Select highlights from the concerts were compiled for The Band’s classic 1972 double LP, Rock Of Ages, which peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 and remains a core album in the trailblazing group’s storied Capitol Records catalog.

For the first time, all four of the concerts’ multi-track recordings have been revisited for ‘Live At The Academy Of Music 1971,’ a new 4CD+DVD collection. The expansive new collection features new stereo and 5.1 Surround mixes, including 19 previously unreleased performances and newly discovered footage of two songs filmed by Howard Alk and Murray Lerner. ‘Live At The Academy Of Music 1971’ takes a deep dive into The Band’s historic shows for a definitive document of the pioneering group’s stage prowess at the apex of their career.

TheBand06

Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 is presented in a deluxe, 48-page hardbound book (not included) with previously unseen photos, a reproduction of Rolling Stone’s original Rock Of Ages review by magazine co-founder Ralph J. Gleason, an essay by The Band’s Robbie Robertson, and appreciations of The Band and the set’s recordings by Mumford & Sons and Jim James of My Morning Jacket. The collection’s first two discs feature performances of every song played over the course of the four concerts, and the New Year’s Eve soundboard mix on discs 3 and 4 puts the listener in the room for that entire legendary night: Uncut, unedited, taken straight from the master recordings and presented in full for the first time. The set’s DVD (not included) presents the tracks from discs 1 and 2 in 5.1 Surround, plus Alk and Lerner’s filmed performances of ‘King Harvest (Has Surely Come)’ and ‘The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show.’

TheBand04A

The Band’s historic performances at New York City’s Academy of Music on Dec. 28-31, 1971 have been collected before, on one of the ’70s’ best live albums, ‘Rock of Ages.’ But the five-disc ‘Live at the Academy of Music 1971’ (which includes a DVD) paints a more complete picture of the shows. The set gathers songs from their four-concert, three-night stand, just as 1971 turned into 1972. The first two CDs compile highlights from the shows, including 29 songs from ‘Up on Cripple Creek’ and ‘I Shall Be Released’ to ‘The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down’ and ‘The Weight’ as well as four from the New Year’s Eve concert where Bob Dylan joined them onstage. The third and fourth discs collect the complete New Year’s Eve concert 27 songs, including the same four with Dylan. Eleven songs in all are repeated from the first two CDs here, which can be both jarring and repetitive as you listen to the exact same performances within different contexts.

TheBand02

It might all be too much for casual fans, even if 19 of the tracks are previously unreleased. The thrill of Garth Hudson’s massive organ moving from ‘The Genetic Method’ into ‘Auld Lang Syne’ loses some of its power on the New Year’s Eve set when you know it’s coming. Same goes for Dylan’s surprise appearance. Still, the concert-closing version of ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ is almost as ferocious as the one Dylan and the Band played during their 1966 tour of the U.K. The DVD simply adds a visual element to some of the cuts from the album. But the Band find the various shadings in the songs without them. Listen to the way they swing through “Get Up Jake’ and pile their instrumental prowess onto the monumental ‘Chest Fever.’ Or even the way they spin the urbane Motown track ‘Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever’ toward their dusty-road Americana, all spiked by horn arrangements from New Orleans legend Allen Toussaint. That’s the sound of a band at the top of its game. (Promo text)

TheBand03.jpg

Not so much an expansion of 1972’s classic double-live album Rock of Ages, but an exhaustive tribute to its source material, the four-CD/one-DVD 2013 box set Live at the Academy of Music 1971 digs deep into the Band’s year-end four-night stint at New York City’s Academy of Music. The original 18-track sequence for the 1972 LP has been abandoned in favor of a double-concert construct, where the first two discs present one version of each of the 29 songs the Band played over the course of these four nights, while the final two discs present the entirety of the New Years Eve concert that capped off this residency; this CD is remixed from the soundboard tapes, and the DVD replicates this New Years Eve concert (note that there is no footage of the NYE concert, so the music is presented with a selection of stills; nevertheless, there are full clips of the Band performing “King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” and “The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show” on December 30, which are welcome). This structure is an appealing one but invites perhaps more duplications than are necessary.

TheBand05

The 29 songs on the first two disc contain 11 songs from the New Years Eve show — including the four-song encore with Bob Dylan — but the trade-off is the NYE concert is loaded with unheard versions of familiar songs: 16 of the 27 songs are previously unreleased (in contrast, the only unearthed song on the first two discs is a killer version of “Strawberry Wine”). Perhaps some of these performances are ever so slightly rougher than the accompanying ones on the first two discs, but that liveliness is part of the appeal (besides, this is hardly ragged; as enthusiastic as the Band is, they’re also supplemented by Allen Toussaint’s horn section, so they do need to hit their marks to ensure all the elements fit together). Rock of Ages and, in turn, Live at the Academy of Music 1971 do close out the early years of the Band. They’d tour again, supporting Bob Dylan in 1974, and they turned out a few more records before disbanding in 1976, but they never seemed as triumphant as they did at the end of 1971. Although this box is not perfect — it’s hard not to wish there were no duplications on the first two discs, or the last two — it is nevertheless a mighty testament to the Band at the peak of their powers. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

BackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Rick Danko (bass, violin, vocals)
Levon Helm (drums, mandolin, vocals)
Garth Hudson (keyboards, accordion, saxophone)
Richard Manuel (keyboards, drums, vocals)
Robbie Robertson (guitar, vocals)
+
Joe Farrell (saxophone, english horn)
Howard Johnson (saxophone, tuba, euphonium)
Earl McIntyre (trombone)
J.D. Parron (saxophone, clarinet)
Snooky Young (trumpet, flugelhorn)
+
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar on CD 2: 13 – 16.; CD 4: 13. – 16.)

Danko Rob

Tracklist:

CD 1: Live At The Academy Of Music (Part 1):
01. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.50
02. The Shape I’m In (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.49
03. Caledonia Mission (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.20
04. Don’t Do It (Wednesday, December 29) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.28
05. Stage Fright (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.22
06. I Shall Be Released (Thursday, December 30) (Dylan) 4.01
07. Up On Cripple Creek (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 4.40
08. This Wheel’s On Fire (Wednesday, December 29) (Danko/Dylan) 3.48
09. Strawberry Wine (Tuesday, December 28) (Previously Unissued Performance) (Helm/ Robertson) 3.31
10. King Harvest (Has Surely Come) (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.58
11. Time To Kill (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 4.09
12. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Wednesday, December 29) (Robertson) 4.41
13. Across The Great Divide (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.28

CD 2: Live At The Academy Of Music (Part 2):
01. Life Is A Carnival (Thursday, December 30) (Danko/Helm/Robertson) 4.04
02. Get Up Jake (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.17
03. Rag Mama Rag (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.04
04. Unfaithful Servant (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.30
05. The Weight (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 5.16
06. Rockin’ Chair (Wednesday, December 29) (Robertson) 4.04
07. Smoke Signal (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 5.20
08. The Rumor (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 5.04
09. The Genetic Method (Friday, December 31) (Hudson) 7.31
10. Chest Fever (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 5.08
11. (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes (Wednesday, December 29) (Willis) 4.36
12. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever (Wednesday, December 29) (Hunter/Wonder) 3.31
13. Down In The Flood (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 5.11
14. When I Paint My Masterpiece (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 4.57
15. Don’t Ya Tell Henry (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 3.55
16. Like A Rolling Stone (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 5.26

CD 3: New Year´s Eve At The Academy Od Music 1971 (Soundboard Mix) (Part 1):
01. Up On Cripple Creek (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.11
02. The Shape I’m In (Robertson) 4.10
03. The Rumor (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.06
04. Time To Kill (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.23
05. Rockin’ Chair (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.10
06. This Wheel’s On Fire (Previously Unissued Performance) (Dank/Dylan) 4.03
07. Get Up Jake (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.41
08. Smoke Signal (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.31
09. I Shall Be Released (Previously Unissued Performance) (Dylan) 4.01
10. The Weight (Previously Unissued Performance) 5.15
11. Stage Fright (Robertson) 4.32

CD 4: New Year´s Eve At The Academy Od Music 1971 (Soundboard Mix) (Part 2):
01. Life Is A Carnival (Previously Unissued Performance) (Danko/Helm/Robertson) 5.12
02. King Harvest (Has Surely Come) (Robertson) 4.00
03. Caledonia Mission (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.29
04. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show (Robertson) 4.01
05. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.48
06. Across The Great Divide (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.52
07. Unfaithful Servant (Robertson) 4.37
08. Don’t Do It (Previously Unissued Performance) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.45
09. The Genetic Method (Hudson) 7.52
10. Chest Fever (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 6.29
11. Rag Mama Rag (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.15
12. (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes (Previously Unissued Performance) (Willis) 4.40
13. Down In The Flood (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 5.43
14. When I Paint My Masterpiece (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 4.15
15. Don’t Ya Tell Henry (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 4.11
16. Like A Rolling Stone (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 5.41

CDs

*
**

Article.jpg

Rick Danko
(December 29, 1943 – December 10, 1999)

Levon Helm
(May 26, 1940 – April 19, 2012)

Richard Manuel
(April 3, 1943 – March 4, 1986)