Jan Akkerman – Profile (1973)

LPFrontCover1Jan Akkerman (born 24 December 1946) is a Dutch guitarist.[1] He first found international commercial success with the band Focus, which he co-founded with Thijs van Leer. After leaving Focus, he continued as a solo musician, adding jazz fusion influences. (by wikipedia)

Profile is the second solo album by Dutch jazz guitarist Jan Akkerman.

In 1972, Focus was experiencing planetary success with the single “Hocus Pocus” and the accompanying LP Moving Waves. With this kind of momentum, guitarist and leader Jan Akkerman decided it was time for a parallel solo career. Profile is not disconnected from his work with Focus, but was at the time a good medium to show the extent of his talent. The two main musicians on this record apart Akkerman himself are Focus alumni Pierre van der Linden (drums) and Bert Ruiter (bass). The first half contains “Fresh Air,” a 20-minute epic in seven parts. This is a jazz-rock track like Focus rarely recorded (except maybe the In and Out of Focus version of “Anonymous”). Akkerman is smoking on the electric guitar and the whole thing sounds a lot like early Mahavishnu Orchestra: There is a strong sense of urgency to it coupled with the feeling that these guys were having a wonderful time.

Jan Akkerman 1974

The second half is more eclectic in styles and in results. Here, Akkerman indulges in his interest for medieval and classical music. A rendition of “Kemps Jig” (a medieval tune that was also part of Gryphon’s repertoire) and an Etude by Carcassi are both played on the lute, and Diabelli’s Andante Sostenuto is performed on Spanish guitar. A rather poor blues number and two Focus-inspired tracks complete the set. More technical, the album’s second half is a showcase for Akkerman’s guitar chops, but it is really “Fresh Air” that best exemplifies his talent both as a composer and a performer and puts this album Jan Akkerman 1974_02.jpga cut above other prog guitarists’ solo projects, namely Steve Howe’s first two records. (by François Couture)

This album is full of excellent electric & acoustic guitars and Baroque lute parts. Akkerman here can be classical (Baroque), hard rock and even slightly bluesy, and sometimes a bit folk. He includes some powerful rhythmic elements, especially on the first side of the record. The album is at least very original and unique. The first side is an epic track of nearly 20 minutes, full of good moments, sometimes melodic, although it may sound experimental, improvised and raw like the more bizarre stuff of Jimi Hendrix, if you consider the visceral electric guitar notes and the fast drums: it reminds me a bit the Lenny White’s “Venusian Summer” album. The other side is made of short tracks full of acoustic and electric string instruments, with sometimes good bass and drums parts. Jan Akkerman proves here that he is an outstanding guitarist. (by greenback)

LPBackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Jan Akkerman (guitar, bass)
Pierre Van Der Linden (drums)
Bert Ruiter (bass)
+
Jaap Van Eyck (bass on 08.)
Ferry Maat (piano on 08.)
Frans Smit (drums on 08.)

Booklet02A.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Fresh Air (Akkerman) 19.55
01.1Must Be My Land
01.2.Wrestling to Get Out
01.3. Back Again
01.4.This Fight
01.5.Fresh Air – Blue Notes for Listening
01.6.Water and Skies Are Telling Me
01.7. Happy Gabriel?
02. Kemp’s Jig (Anonymous) 1.35
03. Etude (Carcassi) 1.33
04. Blue Boy (Akkerman) 2.26
05. Andante Sostenuto (Diabelli) 4.09
06. Maybe Just A Dream (Akkerman) 2.35
07. Minstrel/Farmers Dance (Akkerman) 1.46
08. Stick (Akkerman) 3.39

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

TourPoster.jpg

More from Jan Akkerman:

More.jpg

The Who – Live At The Spectrum (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Who Tour 1973 was The Who’s first concert tour supporting their Quadrophenia album.

Prior to recording the Quadrophenia album, the band played a one-off performance in Voorburg, Netherlands for a Dutch TV special in March. They then did one tour each in England and North America supporting the new rock opera, released in October; four additional dates in London were added after their November dates at the Lyceum failed to meet the large demand for tickets. The set list for these tours was altered considerably from their 1971 and 1972 tours, with a large part of the act devoted to Quadrophenia, while “Won’t Get Fooled Again” was the only Who’s Next track retained until “My Wife” was reintroduced during the North American dates. Unlike performances of the rock opera Tommy, the group opted to introduce and explain the context of most of the new numbers rather than play them one after the other without breaks. They often struggled with some of the new material, choosing to play to a number of pre-recorded backing tracks featuring the album’s original piano and synthesizer parts, as well as various sound effects. “The Dirty Jobs”, “Is It in My Head”, and “I’ve Had Enough” were only played in the first concert in Stoke-on-Trent before proving unworkable, and both “Helpless Dancer” and “The Rock” (also played to backing tracks) were eventually dropped. Drummer Keith Moon received a solo vocal spot during “Bell Boy”, with Pete Townshend often teasing him over his singing abilities.

TheWho02

Memorable (and infamous) performances during these tours included the group’s 5 November show in Newcastle upon Tyne, when troubles with the Quadrophenia backing tracks caused Townshend to suffer a meltdown that resulted in sound engineer Bob Pridden being dragged onstage and suffering an assault in front of the bemused audience. Additionally, Moon passed out about 70 minutes into the opening night of the North American tour at the Cow Palace in Daly City, California, resulting in audience member Scot Halpin sitting in with the band to help them finish the concert.[1] The show at the Spectrum in Philadelphia on 4 December was recorded and occasionally broadcast in incomplete form on the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio show starting in 1974; the following show at the Capital Center in Landover, Maryland was also recorded, but was not aired (the King Biscuit recordings were rumored to be from both dates, but eventually proved to all be from the Philadelphia performance). The King Biscuit Flower Hour Shows were recorded on the Record Plant NY Remote Truck with David Hewitt and Crew. (by wikipedia)

AlternateFront+BackCover1.jpgAlternate front + backcover

I grabbed this off of Dime in Feb 2008, but still appears to be under-circulated, considering this one of the best Who shows circulating in terms of performance and sound quality. This version is mostly intact from the original grab, but I did make a few minor changes. I included the original artwork, but appears to be missing a track.

This does appear to be the complete show – minus Love Reign O’er Me, so for most of you, this should be a nice upgrade with several extra Quadrophenia tracks unavailable on the boot and KBFH versions.

Here is the Famous “Tales From The Who” show that has been around and incomplete for years. This seems to be the whole unedited show with The Punk and the Godfather, 5:15, My Wife and a great version of Naked Eye. In-between song banter with references to “Philly” and cursing are intact.

John Entwistle

I also found a site that had pics of the 16 track tape boxes that these shows were allegedly sourced from. What I am uploading here is from the 3-disc CD-R set.

I have owned various versions of this show on vinyl, silver CD and downloads.This is the most complete version I have ever heard. This is from a different source as the mix is different. The drums seem to be more upfront and the vocals aren’t as echoey. This was recorded for The King Bisquit Flower Hour radio broadcast, and when they got their hands on it they definately mixed/added crowd noise and a bit of echo.They are notorious for that. Makes it easier to trim performances to fit in an hour.

TheWho03

I am assuming this is how it sounded before KBFH got it. I am not positive. Last time this show was posted by “Freezer” it led to a nasty argument about the source tape, was it mixed in Quad, etc. Personally, i’m not too concerned with those details and hope i’ve answered any questions about this recording you may have. I hope I don’t add to the confusion. If an argument should break out, try to keep it down, I am listening to The WHO!! (by whotrader)

In other words: One of the best Who bootlegs ever in a superb soundboard quality !!!

BackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Roger Daltrey (vocals, harmonica, tambourine)
John Entwistle (bass, background vocals)
Keith Moon (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Pete Townshend (guitar, tambourine, background vocals)

TheWho01

Tracklist:
01. I Can’t Explain (Townshend) 3.27
02. Summertime Blues (Cochran/Capehart) 4.03
03. My Wife (Entwistle) 7.17
04. My Generation (Townshend) 8.19
05. I Am The Sea (Townshend) 1:43
06. The Real Me (Townshend) 5.51
07. The Punk And The Godfather (Townshend) 6.07
08. I’m One (Townshend) 3.03
09. 5:15 (Townshend) 6.33
10. Sea And The Sand (Townshend) 8.10
11. Drowned (Townshend) 9.07
12. Bell Boy (Townshend) 5.28
13. Doctor Jimmy (Townshend) 8.32
14. Won’t Get Fooled Again (Townshend) 9.09
15. Pinball Wizard (Townshend) 2.56
16. See Me, Feel Me (Townshend) 14.08
17. Naked Eye (Townshend) 13.18

Ticket

*
**

More from The Who:

More

 

Bronco – Smoking Mixture (1973)

FrontCover1ABronco were an English five piece rock and country band, who were signed to Island and Polydor Records between 1969 and 1973. They released three albums during their existence, Country Home (1970), Ace of Sunlight (1971) and Smoking Mixture (1973).

Bronco were formed in August 1969 by Jess Roden following his split from The Alan Bown Set. They were signed to Island Records by Guy Stevens and, after initially recording tracks at Olympic Studios with him, recorded their first album, Country Home, at Island’s own Basing Street Studios during 1970, with the final mix being overseen by Paul Samwell-Smith. One of the album’s tracks, “Love” was included on Bumpers, an Island sampler album. The group similarly recorded their second album Ace of Sunlight at Basing Street (1971) which was produced by the band and Richard Digby Smith. Singer-songwriter Clifford T. Ward guested on their debut album Country Home. Trevor Lucas sang back-up vocals on Ace of Sunlight, and both Ian Hunter and Mick Ralphs from Mott The Hoople also guested on that album. In January 1971, Bronco appeared on BBC Two’s Disco 2.

Bronco01

Following a serious motorway accident between Cheltenham and Bristol (in which the group’s crew – Dick Hayes and Alan Stone – and drummer Pete Robinson and bassist John Pasternak were badly injured) and a later, ill-fated West Coast of America tour, Roden left the band after a final British tour with label-mates Mott The Hoople and John Martyn in the early 1972, to start a solo career. Guitarist Robbie Blunt soon followed and the remaining members drafted in Paul Lockey on vocals (who Kevyn Gammond knew from Band of Joy) and Dan Fone on guitar. This incarnation of Bronco signed to Polydor and released one album, Smoking Mixture.

John Pasternak

Bronco’s bass player John Pasternak died of a heart attack in September 1986. Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant fronted a tribute event for Pasternak in December of that year, that featured Plant and The Big Town Playboys, and concluded with an ensemble band featuring Plant, Jimmy Page on guitar and Jason Bonham on drums.

Two Bronco tracks are featured on Island records compilation albums: “Love” appeared on Bumpers released in 1970 and “Sudden Street” was on El Pea (1971). “Time Slips Away” was included on the Island Records compilation Meet on the Ledge, released as part of Island’s 50th anniversary in 2009. (by wikipedia)

Bronco are renowned as one of the UK’s most unfairly neglected early ’70s bands. Smoking Mixture was their third and final LP, and originally appeared in 1973. A superb collection of laid-back rock. (forcedexposure.com)

BackCover1.JPG

Personnel:
Dan Fone (piano, guitar, banjo,harmonica, vocals)
Kevyn Gammond (guitar, vocals)
Paul Lockey (vocals, guitar)
John Pasternak (bass, vocals)
Pete Robinson (drums, percussion, vocals)
+
Paul ‘Cosmic Charlie’ Gammond (tambourine)
Simon Lanzon (keyboards)
Royston ‘Aloysius Soul-Brother’ Williams (percussion)

+
unknown horn + string section conducted by Richard Hewson

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Attraction (Gammond/Ward) 5.11
02. Blueberry Pie (Gammond) 4.23
03. Southbound State Express (Gammond/Ward) 3.52
04. Steal That Gold (Gammond/Pasternak) 7.55
05. Strange Awakening (Gammond/Ward) 7.28
06. Tell Me Why (Gammond/Ward) 6.30
07. Tennessee Saturday Night (Gammond/Pasternak/Robinson) 2.56
08. Turkey In The Straw (Traditional/Gammond) 3.50
09. Zonker (Pasternak) 3.16

LabelB1.JPG

*
**

Booklet2

 

Buddy Miles Express – Bogger Bear (1973)

FrontCover1.JPGBooger Bear was an album released by The Buddy Miles Express in 1973. It was released in both stereo and quadraphonic formats. It made the Billboard charts in 1974.

The album received a positive review in the November, 23, 1973 issue of Billboard. The reviewer referred to it as a production of the first order with time and care being put into the selections. The songs “Why” and “United Nations Stomp”, both composed by Miles were singled out as solid entries. The album was also released in the Quadraphonic SQ Matrix. A review in the February, 24 issue Billboard for Quadrasonic albums mentioned the spectrum being opened up by the Columbia sound engineers. It also made the distinction between this album and most of the others that relied on the “Front” stereo approach, with the music in Booger Bear actually surrounding the listener. (by wikipedia)

Buddy Miles (1972)Not as good as them changes or express your skull but what is really. probably my 3rd favorite buddy miles album but it is pretty hard to beat the first two i mentioned (by R. Hale)

One of my favorite Post-Band of Gypsys albums by Buddy Miles. You can clearly feel it in the bluesy guitar work.
RIP Booger Bear! (by an amazom customer)

‘And we here real funky version of the Kinks classic “You Really Got Me” and a superb jazzy blues tune called “Louie’s Blues”.

BackCover1.JPG

Personnel:
Donny Beck (keyboards, background vocals)
Steve Busfield (guitar)
Mingo Lewis (percussion)
Buddy Miles (vocals, drums, bass, guitar)
Roland Robinson (bass, drums on 03.)
+
Bill Atwood (trumpet)
Robert Hogans (organ on 05.)
Pat O’Hara (trombone)
Peter Welker (trumpet)
+
background vocals:
Annie Sampson – Jo Baker – Steve Busfield
+
The Campbell-Kurban String Section

Booklet1.JPG

Tracklist:
01. Booger Bear (Miles) 5.25
02. Thinking Of You (Messina) 4.25
03. Why (Miles) 3.52
04. You Really Got Me (Davies) 4.40
05. Love (Miles/Pantos) 3.45
06. United Nations Stomp (Miles) 4.44
07. Crazy Love (Miles) 3.06
08. You Are Everything (Creed/Bell) 4.10
09. Louie’s Blues (Miles) 7.27

LabelB1.JPG

*
**

Buddy Miles
George Allen “Buddy” Miles Jr. (September 5, 1947 – February 26, 2008)

Bee Gees – Live At The Shinjuku Koseinenkin Kaikan, Tokyo (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Bee Gees in the early Seventies …

By 1973, however, the Bee Gees were in a rut. The album Life in a Tin Can, released on Robert Stigwood’s newly formed RSO Records, and its lead-off single, “Saw a New Morning”, sold poorly with the single peaking at No. 94. This was followed by an unreleased album (known as A Kick in the Head Is Worth Eight in the Pants). A second compilation album, Best of Bee Gees, Volume 2, was released in 1973, although it did not repeat the success of Volume 1. On the 6 April 1973 episode of The Midnight Special they performed “Money (That’s What I Want)” with Jerry Lee Lewis. Also in 1973, they were invited by Chuck Berry to perform two songs with him onstage at The Midnight Special: “Johnny B. Goode”[44] and “Reelin’ and Rockin'”.

After a tour of the United States in early 1974 and a Canadian tour later in the year,[46] the group ended up playing small clubs.[47] As Barry joked, “We ended up in, have you ever heard of Batley’s the variety club in (West Yorkshire) England?” (by wikipedia)

Although Bee Gees gave nine concerts throughout Japan that year, most or all of the press coverage was about their first date in Tokyo – Shinjuku Kosei Nenkin Kaikan, September 1, 1973. This two-page spread from a music magazine is no exception.

BeeGees01.jpg

To sum up, the short concert review more or less reads:

The Bee Gees came back to serenade the capacity crowd, mainly consisting of teenage girls, with the pleasant sound they are known for.
Compared with their first Japanese tour from last March, there was more prancing around the stage, and the brothers were more casually dressed in jeans and stuff. All in all, there was a more relaxed, casual feel. The congenial audience laughed and applauded at the funny exchanges between Barry, Maurice, and Robin.

BeeGees03.jpg

“The concert with the London Philharmonic Orchestra in February” seems to have influenced the group a great deal. They kept talking about it at the press conference. Also, the experience seems to have prepared them to harmonize brilliantly backed by a full orchestra. They kept the promise that they would “choose to sing our greatest hits” as they belted out songs like ‘Massachusetts’ and ‘First of May’ in perfect harmony. (by beegeedays.com)

A trip down memory lane when the Bee Gees once sang: “Yesterday was history who knows what there is gonna be when we meet again/Will you smile and tell the world about me…”

Recorded live at the Shinjuku Koseinenkin Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan; September 15, 1973. Fairly to very good audio (ripped from video/TV broadcast). From the TV Special, “Love Sounds Special”. Last show of the Japanese leg of the “Life In A Tin Can” Tour.

BeeGees02.jpg

Personnel:
Robin Gibb, Barry Gibb & Maurice Gibb
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians
+
unknown Orchestra

BackCover1.jpg

Tracklist:
01. To Love Somebody (intro)/My World (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 4.48
02. Run To Me (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 3.10
03. How Can You Mend A Broken Heart (B.Gibb/R.Gibb/Michel) 3.47
04. I’ve Got To Get A Message To You (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 2.50
05. I Started A Joke (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 3.12
06. Saw A New Morning (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 1.02
07. I Can’t See Nobody (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 3.59
08. Words (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb)(Michel) 4.19
09. In The Morning (B.Gibb) 3.19
10. Wouldn’t I Be Someone (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 4.55
11. Massachusetts (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb) 3.03
12. Lonely Days (B.Gibb/M.Gibb/R.Gibb/Michel) 5.02

Front+BackCover1.jpg

*
**

Feel I’m goin’ back to Massachusetts
Something’s telling me I must go home
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
The day I left her standing on her own

Tried to hitch a ride to San Francisco
Gotta do the things I wanna do
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
They brought me back to see my way with you

Talk about the life in Massachusetts
Speak about the people I have seen
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
And Massachusetts is one place I have seen

(I will remember Massachusetts)

The MG’s – Same (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe MG’s is a 1973 album recorded by the MG’s for Stax Records, but by 1973, leader/keyboardist Booker T. Jones and guitarist Steve Cropper were both estranged from Stax and residing full-time in Los Angeles, so remaining members Donald “Duck” Dunn and Al Jackson, Jr. recruited Bobby Manuel and Carson Whitsett to replace Cropper and Jones respectively.

Billed as “The MG’s” since Jones was not involved with the project, the group released two singles, “Sugar Cane” and “Neck Bone”. The singles and the album were not commercially successful, but were critically well received. By 1975, Jones and Cropper agreed to reform the original lineup with Jackson and Dunn, but just days before their scheduled reunion, Jackson was murdered at his home in Memphis, Tennessee. (by wikipedia)

This is the first Stax effort from the principle members of the band since 1971’s Melting Pot. Of course, a lot transpired in the two short years. Booker T. and Steve Cropper left Stax for other opportunities in Los Angeles. Al Jackson began to do more work for rival Hi Records and became a big proponent in Al Green’s career. The M.G.’s features the lineup of drummer Jackson, bassist Duck Dunn, Carson Whitsett on keyboards, and Single2.jpgguitarist Bobby Manuel. Despite the fact that this 1973 effort captures a band without half of its most influential members, the playing is top-notch.

It also helps that Whitsett and Manuel all but replicate the keyboard and guitar styles of the singular sounds of Booker T. and Cropper, so the effects of their absence doesn’t detract as much as one might think. The funky “Sugar Cane” has Jackson’s amazing snare work and Whitsett’s good B-3 work. As The M.G.’s goes from song to song, it is clear that it is an enjoyable effort, due to a large part of the skills of producers Jackson and Dunn. “Black Side” is another soothing instrumental featuring great hi-hat work from Jackson. The last track, the propulsive and meditative “Frustration,” has a warm Fender Rhodes and, of course, the rhythmic dynamic of Jackson and Dunn. This well-recorded album gave Dunn and Jackson a chance to work again, and since they were the one of the best rhythm sections of the ’60s and ’70s, it makes The M.G.’s worth looking into, despite the absent members. (by Jason Elias)

Single1.jpg

Personnel:
Donald Dunn (bass)
Al Jackson Jr. (drums, percussion)
Bobby Manuel (guitar)
Carson Whitsett (keyboards, clavinet, celesta)

BackCover.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Sugar Cane (Madden) 3.09
02. Neck Bone (Dunn/Jackson/Manuel/Whitsett) 3.26
03. Spare Change (Dunn/Jackson/Manuel/Whitsett) 3.52
04. Leaving The Past (Dunn/Jackson/Manuel/Whitsett) 7.22
05. Left Overs (Bucaramanga) (Luiz/Sainz/Serrano) 2.53
06. Black Side (Dunn/Jackson/Manuel/Whitsett) 3.59
07. One Of A Kind (Love Affair) (Jefferson) 3.23
08. Frustration (Dunn/Jackson/Manuel/Whitsett) 6.30

LabelA1.jpg

*
**

Single3.jpg

Inlet02.jpg

Lighthouse – Can You Feel It (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgOne of Canada’s most original pop groups ever, Lighthouse was formed in Toronto early in 1969 when drummer Skip Prokop (ex of The Paupers, Janis Joplin, Al Kooper and Carlos Santana) had a vision of incorporating horns and strings with modern rock, sort of a heavy-hitting ‘big band’ sound. After a chance meeting in New York with Paul Hoffert – who was actually trained in more classical stylings and already an established sessions-player. Ralph Cole joined soon after. Originally a native of Kalamazoo, Michigan, Cole knew Prokop when he was in Thyme, who had actually performed on many bills with The Paupers during the latter half of the decade. They added mul

The ‘full orchestra sound’ which would become the band’s trademark was at first rounded out by an additional 10 members including singer Pinky Dauvin. Their sound was as diverse as their listening audience, and contained cellos, violas, an array of horns and a full percussion section. The band was doing their first gig outdoors by May of that year and were signed to a deal with RCA shortly thereafter. They went to Toronto’s Eastern Sound Studios in the spring of ’69 and released their self-titled debut that same year. Produced by Prokop and Hoffert, it was met with critics’ praises, following the success of such tracks as “Mountain Man” and the cover of the Byrds’ “Eight Miles High”.

Lighthouse01.jpg

“Can You Feel It”? came out in ’73, recorded in New York’s Record Plant. The upbeat pop-smash “Pretty Lady”, along with the title track and “Set The Stage” fetched the band more gold. But despite following their proven forumula, they were finding themselves in the middle of a changing musical environment. (canadianbands.com)

If you love groups like the early Chicaog or Blood, Sweat & Tears …than you should listen to Lighthouse, too.

Lighthouse was one of the best Jazz/Brass-Rock bands in the early Seventies !

Lighthouse02.jpg

Personnel:
Dick Armin (cello)
Ralph Cole (guitar, vocals)
Dale Hillary (saxophone, vocals)
John Naslen (trumpet)
Don DiNovo (viola)
Skip Prokop (drums, percussion, guitar, vocals)
Larry Smith piano, vocals)
Rick Stepton (trombone)
Alan Wilmot (bass)

BackCover1.JPG

Tracklist:
01. Set The Stage (Cole) 4.47
02. Same Train (Prokop) 5.58
03. Magic’s In The Dancing (Cole) 4.09
04. Pretty Lady (Prokop) 4.01
05. Disagreeable Man (Prokop) 5.28
06. Can You Feel It (Prokop) 4.39
07. Is Love The Answer (Cole) 3.15
08. Lonely Hours (Prokop) 6.36
09. No More Searching (Hillary) 4.05
10. Bright Side (Cole) 4.26

LabelB1.JPG*
**

Still alive and well (here their website from 2019):

website.jpg

 

SkipProkop.jpg
Ronald Harry “Skip” Prokop (December 13, 1943 – August 30, 2017)