Traffic – Live At Winterland (1973)

FrontCover1Traffic were an English rock band, formed in Birmingham, in April 1967 by Steve Winwood, Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason. They began as a psychedelic rock group and diversified their sound through the use of instruments such as keyboards like the Mellotron and harpsichord, sitar, and various reed instruments, and by incorporating jazz and improvisational techniques in their music. Their first three singles were “Paper Sun”, “Hole in My Shoe”, and “Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush”.

Traffic disbanded in 1969, during which time Winwood joined Blind Faith, then reunited in 1970 to release the critically acclaimed album John Barleycorn Must Die. The band’s line-up varied from this point until they disbanded again in 1974. A partial reunion, with Winwood and Capaldi, took place in 1994.

Traffic were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004. (by wikipedia)

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Despite some dodgy edits, this is one of the best Traffic bootlegs. A soundboard warts ‘n’ all recording rumored to have once been the property of famous rock promoter Bill Graham. Great playing with the Muscle Shoals augmented line-up as on “On the Road”. The major plus about this recording is the inclusion of tracks that never made the aforementioned official live album – Roll Right Stones, Evening Blue, Empty Pages, 40,000 Headmen, and Rock ‘n’ Roll Stew. The sound quality on this set ranges from very good to excellent, with the bass and drum sound appearing much more dominant than on “On the Road”; the telepathy between the musicians is as good as it gets, thus making this a must for anyone’s collection. If there was any justice in the world, this would be available by doctor’s prescription! (winwoodfans.com)

Recorded live at th Winterland, San Francisco, CA January 26th 1973

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Personnel:
Rebop Kwaku Baah (percussion)
Barry Beckett (keyboards)
Jim Capaldi (drums, percussion, vocals)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
David Hood (bass)
Steve Winwood (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Chris Wood (saxophone, flute)

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Tracklist:
01. Shootout At The Fantasy Factory (Capaldi/Winwood) 6.14
02. Rock n’ Roll Stew (Capaldi/Winwood) 7.43
03. Roll Right Stones (Capaldi/Winwood) 13.16
04. Empty Pages (Capaldi/Winwood)  5.36
05. Evening Blue (Capaldi/Winwood) 5.34
06. 40.000 Headmen 40,000 Headmen 5.27
07. Glad (Winwood) 10.10
08. Freedom Rider (Capaldi/Winwood) 6.11
09. Tragic Magic (cut) (Wood) 1.55
10. (Sometimes I Feel So) Uninspired (Capaldi/Winwood) 12.03
11. Light Up Or Leave Me Alone (Capaldi/Winwood) 9.43

Steve Winwood
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Chris WoodChris Wood ( (24 June 1944 – 12 July 1983)

Jim CapaldiJim Capaldi (2 August 1944 – 28 January 2005)

John Martyn – Solid Air (1973)

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Iain David McGeachy OBE (11 September 1948 – 29 January 2009), known professionally as John Martyn, was a British singer-songwriter and guitarist. Over a 40-year career, he released 22 studio albums, and received frequent critical acclaim. The Times described him as “an electrifying guitarist and singer whose music blurred the boundaries between folk, jazz, rock and blues”.

Martyn began his career at age 17 as a key member of the British folk music scene, drawing inspiration from American blues and English traditional music, and signed with Island Records. By the 1970s he had begun incorporating jazz and rock into his sound on albums such as Solid Air (1973) and One World (1977), as well as experimenting with guitar effects and tape delay machines such as Echoplex. He struggled with substance abuse and domestic problems throughout the 1970s and 1980s, though continued to release albums while collaborating with figures such as Phil Collins and Lee “Scratch” Perry. He remained active until his death in 2009.

Solid Air is the fourth studio album by British folk singer-songwriter John Martyn, released in February 1973 by Island Records.

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The album was recorded over eight days and features instrumental contributions by bassist Danny Thompson and members of Fairport Convention. “Solid Air”, the title track, was dedicated to a friend of Martyn’s, Nick Drake, who would die of an antidepressant overdose 18 months after the album was released. Martyn said of the track “It was done for a friend of mine, and it was done right with very clear motives, and I’m very pleased with it, for varying reasons. It has got a very simple message, but you’ll have to work that one out for yourself.” The album features an avant-garde cover of Skip James’ “Devil Got My Woman,” here retitled “I’d Rather Be the Devil” and performed with heavy use of Martyn’s Echoplex tape delay effect.

“May You Never” became something of a signature song for Martyn, becoming a staple of his live performances. Released in November 1971 as a single in an early form, the song JohnMartyn02was re-recorded during the Solid Air sessions.[8] Eric Clapton covered “May You Never” on his 1977 album Slowhand. When Martyn was presented with a lifetime achievement award by Phil Collins (a collaborator of Martyn’s) at the 2008 BBC Folk Awards, In 2006, Martyn performed the album live in its entirety as part of the All Tomorrow’s Parties-curated Don’t Look Back series and subsequently toured the UK.

A remastered CD was issued by Universal Records in October 2000. This CD was packaged in a card slipcase, and featured a remastered version of the original album with the addition of a live version of “I’d Rather Be The Devil”. Solid Air was given a further remastering and repackaging when a double CD reissue curated by John Hillarby was released in 2009, and which included several alternate studio and live versions.

The album cover is an example of schlieren photography demonstrating the ‘solid’ nature of air.

Solid Air was rated as the 67th Greatest British Album Ever by the British music magazine Q, and was also included in their list of Best Chill-Out Albums Of All Time. The album is included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die by Robert Dimery. It was voted number 826 in Colin Larkin’s All Time Top 1000 Albums 3rd Edition (2000).  (by wikipedia)

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Solid Air is one of the defining moments in British folk, in the same league as Fairport Convention’s Liege & Lief, Richard & Linda Thompson’s Shoot Out the Lights, and Michael Chapman’s Rainmaker. Martyn stepped out of his comfort zone to record and produce it, including not only jazz and blues but rock and plenty of sound effects, and featuring Rhodes piano on some of its tracks, dismaying some fans while winning a ton more for its genre-blurring presentation. A number of its cuts — such as the title track (written for Martyn’s friend, Nick Drake), “Over the Hill,” “I’d Rather Be the Devil,” and “May You Never” — remained staples in his live sets until the end of his life. (by by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
Neemoi “Speedy” Acquaye (percussion)
John “Rabbit” Bundrick (keyboards, clavinet)
John Martyn (guitar, vocals, keyboards on 09.)
Dave Mattacks (drums)
Dave Pegg (bass)
Danny Thompson (bass)
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Tristan Fry (vibraphone on 01.)
Tony Coe (saxophone on 01. + 06.)
Sue Draheim (violin on 02.)
Simon Nicol (autoharp on 02.)
Richard Thompson (mandolin on 02.)

Booklet
Tracklist:
01. Solid Air (Martyn) 5.47
02. Over The Hill (Martyn) 2.51
03. Don’t Want To Know (Martyn) 3.02
04. I’d Rather Be The Devil (James) 6.19
05. Go Down Easy (Martyn) 3.36
06. Dreams By The Sea (Martyn) 3.18
07. May You Never (Martyn) 3.43
08. The Man In The Station (Martyn) 2.55
09. The Easy Blues (Martyn) 3.22

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JohnMartyn03John Martyn (11 September 1948 – 29 January 2009)

 

Kevin Coyne – Marjory Razorblade (1973)

FrontCover1Marjory Razorblade is a double-LP by English rock singer Kevin Coyne and was one of the earliest releases on Virgin Records, which had launched four months earlier in June 1973. The double album includes the song “Marlene”, which was issued as a single, and “Eastbourne Ladies”, which was featured among the selection of tracks played by John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten) at the height of the Sex Pistols notoriety on the Capital Radio show A Punk & His Music, broadcast in London in the summer of 1977.

The gatefold album sleeve was designed by prominent graphic artist Barney Bubbles utilising photographs of Coyne by Phil Franks; Bubbles also designed the distinctive logo carrying the album title and artist name, though was content not to receive a credit himself.[3] Twenty five years later, in 1998, Virgin’s financial director Ken Berry recalled that, on his first day at the company’s west London offices, he was presented with artist royalty statements scrawled on the back of Bubbles’ invoice for the Marjory Razorblade design.

Awarding the album a B+, Robert Christgau wrote:

PromoPosterAnother British eccentric with a voice scratchy and wavery enough to make Mick Jagger sound like Anthony Newley, only this one can write songs. The annoying kid-stuff tone of the perversity here purveyed is redeemed by the fact that there isn’t a chance it will sell, not even with the Brit double-LP condensed down to one. Also, “House on the Hill” is as convincing a madman’s song as I know.” (by wikipedia)

There are not that many artists with 40 albums to their name who haven’t at least once enjoyed significant mainstream recognition. But despite the backing of Virgin Records, the late Kevin Coyne never reached these heights. His label tried – the delightful Marlene, from this collection, was released as a single first in 1973 and then again four years later, its initial under-performance a mystery to all. Ultimately, sadly, Coyne’s legacy is one that’s remained relatively under the radar.

A student of the blues, Coyne’s timbre wasn’t as pristine as charting artists of the time; the songs collected here – the original 20-track album, plus a second disc of bonus selections including BBC session takes and previously unreleased fare – wear their edges roughed, their imperfections proudly displayed. But while the pop market was resistant, Coyne found fans amongst the music world’s cognoscenti: John Lydon expressed his admiration of Marjory Razorblade in 1977, particularly praising the swaggering Eastbourne Ladies, and John Peel was an early supporter, signing Coyne’s pre-solo-career band Siren to his Dandelion label.

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This re-issue features some insightful liner notes, including contributions from bassist Tony Cousins as well as press release snippets. The original one-sheet for this album, generally considered to be Coyne’s landmark release (though his small but passionate fanbase still debate that), states that Coyne had 26 tracks laid down after just five recording sessions. Subsequently Marjory had to be a double album – making this set, with 37 tracks, effectively a four-album package by 12” timings. But indulgent it’s not, restraint expressed both lyrically – words cut deep, but with precise strokes rather than repeat swings – and exercised in the skeletal frames of several of these songs.

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There’s a lovely Rhodes warmth to Old Soldier, Coyne’s twangy guitar complemented by Jean Roussel’s organ contributions and subtle string arrangement; similarly notable of verdant texture is the synthesizer-embellished Mummy. But by and large this is a stripped-bare affair, a musical unit unburdened by technological temptation and just letting the music flow through them. At the heart might be Coyne, but each player is a vital component, more than a constituent part that could be swapped at a moment’s notice. There’s a comfortable compatibility evident, a synthesis of individual ability into one effective, enchanting end product.

So if you’ve never heard it before, don’t delay any longer: Marjory Razorblade is a trove of largely forgotten delights ready for rediscovery. (by Mike Diver)

BackCover1Personnel:
Chili Charles (drums, percussion)
Dave Clague (guitar)
Tony Cousins (bass, tuba)
Kevin Coyne (vocals, guitar)
Ed DeGenaro (guitar)
Malcom Healey (synthesizer)
Jean Roussel (piano)
Gordon Smith (guitar, mandolin)
Steve Verroca (piano)
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Mel Collins (horns on 21.)
Nick Cudworth (piano on 21.)
John Varnom (guitar on 21.)

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Tracklist:
01. Marjory Razorblade (Coyne) 1.47
02. Marlene (Coyne) 2.43
03. Talking To No One (Coyne) 2.31
04. Eastbourne Ladies (Coyne) 4.38
05. Old Soldier (Coyne) 3.55
06. I Want My Crown (Traditional) 4.20
07. Nasty (Coyne) 5.05
08. Lonesome Valley (Carter) 2.58
09. House On The Hill (Coyne) 4.55
10. Cheat Me (Coyne) 3.43
11. Jackie And Edna (Coyne) 4.05
12. Everybody Says (Coyne) 4.27
13. Mummy (Coyne) 4.11
14. Heaven In My View (Carter) 3.15
15. Karate King (Coyne) 3.19
16. Dog Latin (Coyne) 4.55
17. This Is Spain (Coyne) 2.11
18. Chairman’s Ball (Coyne) 3.14
19. Good Boy (Coyne) 2.41
20. Chicken Wing (Coyne) 4.23
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21. Lovesick Fool (Coyne) 2.20
22. Sea Of Love (Khoury/Baptiste) 3.08

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Kevin Coyne (27 January 1944 – 2 December 2004)

The Legends Of Jazz – Same (1973)

FrontCover1The title of this all-star group hast not been casually selected. Each of these illustriou gentlemen ois truly a living legend of jazz.

Their combined backgrounds total more than year of jazz activity !

Within their lifetime serveral oofThe Legens Of Jazz hve seen the spirited music of New Orleans move from the streets and riverboats to the ehalted concert stages of the world.

Paradoxically, this veteran group has been brought together by a young Englich drummer, Barry Martin, who is at least 40 years younger then his averae “dieman”. Despite his youth, Martyn looks back upon 15 years of intensive jazz productivity.

Listen to the exciting sound ofThe Legends Of Jazz. They display a fresh, tasteful approach to a music that reflects their own enduring achievments

Age certainly hast not dimmed their brilliance. Like fine wine mellowing oin a cask. The Legends Of Jazz adroitly demonstrate the true value of their vintage. (taken from the original liner notes)

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So, enjoy another sentimental journey to the very early days of jazz from New Orleans, it´s a phantstic trip, believe me.

It´s up to you !

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Personnel:
Andrew Blakeney (trumpet, vocals on 10.)
Joe Darensbourg (clarinet)
Edward “Montudi” Garland (bass)
Barry Martyn (drums)
Alton Purnell (piano, vocals on 08.)
Louis Nelson (trombone)

LegendsOfJazz1Tracklist:
01. Conti Street Parade (Purnell/Delay) 3.08
02. Out In The Cold Again (Bloom/Kohler) 3.59
03. Legends Boogie (Martyn) 4.27
04. Apex Blues (Hines/Noone/Poston) 4.23
05. Down Among The Sheltering Palms (Olman/Rockman) 3.52
06. Lou-Easy-An-I-A (Darensbourg) 4.27
07. Just A Little While To Stay (Traditional) 3.35
08. Old Man Mose (Armstrong/Randolph) 2.26
09. Red Man Blues (Piron) 2.29
10. Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans (Delange/Alter) 4.53

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Jan Akkerman – Profile (1973)

LPFrontCover1Jan Akkerman (born 24 December 1946) is a Dutch guitarist.[1] He first found international commercial success with the band Focus, which he co-founded with Thijs van Leer. After leaving Focus, he continued as a solo musician, adding jazz fusion influences. (by wikipedia)

Profile is the second solo album by Dutch jazz guitarist Jan Akkerman.

In 1972, Focus was experiencing planetary success with the single “Hocus Pocus” and the accompanying LP Moving Waves. With this kind of momentum, guitarist and leader Jan Akkerman decided it was time for a parallel solo career. Profile is not disconnected from his work with Focus, but was at the time a good medium to show the extent of his talent. The two main musicians on this record apart Akkerman himself are Focus alumni Pierre van der Linden (drums) and Bert Ruiter (bass). The first half contains “Fresh Air,” a 20-minute epic in seven parts. This is a jazz-rock track like Focus rarely recorded (except maybe the In and Out of Focus version of “Anonymous”). Akkerman is smoking on the electric guitar and the whole thing sounds a lot like early Mahavishnu Orchestra: There is a strong sense of urgency to it coupled with the feeling that these guys were having a wonderful time.

Jan Akkerman 1974

The second half is more eclectic in styles and in results. Here, Akkerman indulges in his interest for medieval and classical music. A rendition of “Kemps Jig” (a medieval tune that was also part of Gryphon’s repertoire) and an Etude by Carcassi are both played on the lute, and Diabelli’s Andante Sostenuto is performed on Spanish guitar. A rather poor blues number and two Focus-inspired tracks complete the set. More technical, the album’s second half is a showcase for Akkerman’s guitar chops, but it is really “Fresh Air” that best exemplifies his talent both as a composer and a performer and puts this album Jan Akkerman 1974_02.jpga cut above other prog guitarists’ solo projects, namely Steve Howe’s first two records. (by François Couture)

This album is full of excellent electric & acoustic guitars and Baroque lute parts. Akkerman here can be classical (Baroque), hard rock and even slightly bluesy, and sometimes a bit folk. He includes some powerful rhythmic elements, especially on the first side of the record. The album is at least very original and unique. The first side is an epic track of nearly 20 minutes, full of good moments, sometimes melodic, although it may sound experimental, improvised and raw like the more bizarre stuff of Jimi Hendrix, if you consider the visceral electric guitar notes and the fast drums: it reminds me a bit the Lenny White’s “Venusian Summer” album. The other side is made of short tracks full of acoustic and electric string instruments, with sometimes good bass and drums parts. Jan Akkerman proves here that he is an outstanding guitarist. (by greenback)

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Personnel:
Jan Akkerman (guitar, bass)
Pierre Van Der Linden (drums)
Bert Ruiter (bass)
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Jaap Van Eyck (bass on 08.)
Ferry Maat (piano on 08.)
Frans Smit (drums on 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Fresh Air (Akkerman) 19.55
01.1Must Be My Land
01.2.Wrestling to Get Out
01.3. Back Again
01.4.This Fight
01.5.Fresh Air – Blue Notes for Listening
01.6.Water and Skies Are Telling Me
01.7. Happy Gabriel?
02. Kemp’s Jig (Anonymous) 1.35
03. Etude (Carcassi) 1.33
04. Blue Boy (Akkerman) 2.26
05. Andante Sostenuto (Diabelli) 4.09
06. Maybe Just A Dream (Akkerman) 2.35
07. Minstrel/Farmers Dance (Akkerman) 1.46
08. Stick (Akkerman) 3.39

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More from Jan Akkerman:

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The Who – Live At The Spectrum (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Who Tour 1973 was The Who’s first concert tour supporting their Quadrophenia album.

Prior to recording the Quadrophenia album, the band played a one-off performance in Voorburg, Netherlands for a Dutch TV special in March. They then did one tour each in England and North America supporting the new rock opera, released in October; four additional dates in London were added after their November dates at the Lyceum failed to meet the large demand for tickets. The set list for these tours was altered considerably from their 1971 and 1972 tours, with a large part of the act devoted to Quadrophenia, while “Won’t Get Fooled Again” was the only Who’s Next track retained until “My Wife” was reintroduced during the North American dates. Unlike performances of the rock opera Tommy, the group opted to introduce and explain the context of most of the new numbers rather than play them one after the other without breaks. They often struggled with some of the new material, choosing to play to a number of pre-recorded backing tracks featuring the album’s original piano and synthesizer parts, as well as various sound effects. “The Dirty Jobs”, “Is It in My Head”, and “I’ve Had Enough” were only played in the first concert in Stoke-on-Trent before proving unworkable, and both “Helpless Dancer” and “The Rock” (also played to backing tracks) were eventually dropped. Drummer Keith Moon received a solo vocal spot during “Bell Boy”, with Pete Townshend often teasing him over his singing abilities.

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Memorable (and infamous) performances during these tours included the group’s 5 November show in Newcastle upon Tyne, when troubles with the Quadrophenia backing tracks caused Townshend to suffer a meltdown that resulted in sound engineer Bob Pridden being dragged onstage and suffering an assault in front of the bemused audience. Additionally, Moon passed out about 70 minutes into the opening night of the North American tour at the Cow Palace in Daly City, California, resulting in audience member Scot Halpin sitting in with the band to help them finish the concert.[1] The show at the Spectrum in Philadelphia on 4 December was recorded and occasionally broadcast in incomplete form on the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio show starting in 1974; the following show at the Capital Center in Landover, Maryland was also recorded, but was not aired (the King Biscuit recordings were rumored to be from both dates, but eventually proved to all be from the Philadelphia performance). The King Biscuit Flower Hour Shows were recorded on the Record Plant NY Remote Truck with David Hewitt and Crew. (by wikipedia)

AlternateFront+BackCover1.jpgAlternate front + backcover

I grabbed this off of Dime in Feb 2008, but still appears to be under-circulated, considering this one of the best Who shows circulating in terms of performance and sound quality. This version is mostly intact from the original grab, but I did make a few minor changes. I included the original artwork, but appears to be missing a track.

This does appear to be the complete show – minus Love Reign O’er Me, so for most of you, this should be a nice upgrade with several extra Quadrophenia tracks unavailable on the boot and KBFH versions.

Here is the Famous “Tales From The Who” show that has been around and incomplete for years. This seems to be the whole unedited show with The Punk and the Godfather, 5:15, My Wife and a great version of Naked Eye. In-between song banter with references to “Philly” and cursing are intact.

John Entwistle

I also found a site that had pics of the 16 track tape boxes that these shows were allegedly sourced from. What I am uploading here is from the 3-disc CD-R set.

I have owned various versions of this show on vinyl, silver CD and downloads.This is the most complete version I have ever heard. This is from a different source as the mix is different. The drums seem to be more upfront and the vocals aren’t as echoey. This was recorded for The King Bisquit Flower Hour radio broadcast, and when they got their hands on it they definately mixed/added crowd noise and a bit of echo.They are notorious for that. Makes it easier to trim performances to fit in an hour.

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I am assuming this is how it sounded before KBFH got it. I am not positive. Last time this show was posted by “Freezer” it led to a nasty argument about the source tape, was it mixed in Quad, etc. Personally, i’m not too concerned with those details and hope i’ve answered any questions about this recording you may have. I hope I don’t add to the confusion. If an argument should break out, try to keep it down, I am listening to The WHO!! (by whotrader)

In other words: One of the best Who bootlegs ever in a superb soundboard quality !!!

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Personnel:
Roger Daltrey (vocals, harmonica, tambourine)
John Entwistle (bass, background vocals)
Keith Moon (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Pete Townshend (guitar, tambourine, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. I Can’t Explain (Townshend) 3.27
02. Summertime Blues (Cochran/Capehart) 4.03
03. My Wife (Entwistle) 7.17
04. My Generation (Townshend) 8.19
05. I Am The Sea (Townshend) 1:43
06. The Real Me (Townshend) 5.51
07. The Punk And The Godfather (Townshend) 6.07
08. I’m One (Townshend) 3.03
09. 5:15 (Townshend) 6.33
10. Sea And The Sand (Townshend) 8.10
11. Drowned (Townshend) 9.07
12. Bell Boy (Townshend) 5.28
13. Doctor Jimmy (Townshend) 8.32
14. Won’t Get Fooled Again (Townshend) 9.09
15. Pinball Wizard (Townshend) 2.56
16. See Me, Feel Me (Townshend) 14.08
17. Naked Eye (Townshend) 13.18

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Bronco – Smoking Mixture (1973)

FrontCover1ABronco were an English five piece rock and country band, who were signed to Island and Polydor Records between 1969 and 1973. They released three albums during their existence, Country Home (1970), Ace of Sunlight (1971) and Smoking Mixture (1973).

Bronco were formed in August 1969 by Jess Roden following his split from The Alan Bown Set. They were signed to Island Records by Guy Stevens and, after initially recording tracks at Olympic Studios with him, recorded their first album, Country Home, at Island’s own Basing Street Studios during 1970, with the final mix being overseen by Paul Samwell-Smith. One of the album’s tracks, “Love” was included on Bumpers, an Island sampler album. The group similarly recorded their second album Ace of Sunlight at Basing Street (1971) which was produced by the band and Richard Digby Smith. Singer-songwriter Clifford T. Ward guested on their debut album Country Home. Trevor Lucas sang back-up vocals on Ace of Sunlight, and both Ian Hunter and Mick Ralphs from Mott The Hoople also guested on that album. In January 1971, Bronco appeared on BBC Two’s Disco 2.

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Following a serious motorway accident between Cheltenham and Bristol (in which the group’s crew – Dick Hayes and Alan Stone – and drummer Pete Robinson and bassist John Pasternak were badly injured) and a later, ill-fated West Coast of America tour, Roden left the band after a final British tour with label-mates Mott The Hoople and John Martyn in the early 1972, to start a solo career. Guitarist Robbie Blunt soon followed and the remaining members drafted in Paul Lockey on vocals (who Kevyn Gammond knew from Band of Joy) and Dan Fone on guitar. This incarnation of Bronco signed to Polydor and released one album, Smoking Mixture.

John Pasternak

Bronco’s bass player John Pasternak died of a heart attack in September 1986. Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant fronted a tribute event for Pasternak in December of that year, that featured Plant and The Big Town Playboys, and concluded with an ensemble band featuring Plant, Jimmy Page on guitar and Jason Bonham on drums.

Two Bronco tracks are featured on Island records compilation albums: “Love” appeared on Bumpers released in 1970 and “Sudden Street” was on El Pea (1971). “Time Slips Away” was included on the Island Records compilation Meet on the Ledge, released as part of Island’s 50th anniversary in 2009. (by wikipedia)

Bronco are renowned as one of the UK’s most unfairly neglected early ’70s bands. Smoking Mixture was their third and final LP, and originally appeared in 1973. A superb collection of laid-back rock. (forcedexposure.com)

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Personnel:
Dan Fone (piano, guitar, banjo,harmonica, vocals)
Kevyn Gammond (guitar, vocals)
Paul Lockey (vocals, guitar)
John Pasternak (bass, vocals)
Pete Robinson (drums, percussion, vocals)
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Paul ‘Cosmic Charlie’ Gammond (tambourine)
Simon Lanzon (keyboards)
Royston ‘Aloysius Soul-Brother’ Williams (percussion)

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unknown horn + string section conducted by Richard Hewson

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Tracklist:
01. Attraction (Gammond/Ward) 5.11
02. Blueberry Pie (Gammond) 4.23
03. Southbound State Express (Gammond/Ward) 3.52
04. Steal That Gold (Gammond/Pasternak) 7.55
05. Strange Awakening (Gammond/Ward) 7.28
06. Tell Me Why (Gammond/Ward) 6.30
07. Tennessee Saturday Night (Gammond/Pasternak/Robinson) 2.56
08. Turkey In The Straw (Traditional/Gammond) 3.50
09. Zonker (Pasternak) 3.16

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