Lighthouse – Can You Feel It (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgOne of Canada’s most original pop groups ever, Lighthouse was formed in Toronto early in 1969 when drummer Skip Prokop (ex of The Paupers, Janis Joplin, Al Kooper and Carlos Santana) had a vision of incorporating horns and strings with modern rock, sort of a heavy-hitting ‘big band’ sound. After a chance meeting in New York with Paul Hoffert – who was actually trained in more classical stylings and already an established sessions-player. Ralph Cole joined soon after. Originally a native of Kalamazoo, Michigan, Cole knew Prokop when he was in Thyme, who had actually performed on many bills with The Paupers during the latter half of the decade. They added mul

The ‘full orchestra sound’ which would become the band’s trademark was at first rounded out by an additional 10 members including singer Pinky Dauvin. Their sound was as diverse as their listening audience, and contained cellos, violas, an array of horns and a full percussion section. The band was doing their first gig outdoors by May of that year and were signed to a deal with RCA shortly thereafter. They went to Toronto’s Eastern Sound Studios in the spring of ’69 and released their self-titled debut that same year. Produced by Prokop and Hoffert, it was met with critics’ praises, following the success of such tracks as “Mountain Man” and the cover of the Byrds’ “Eight Miles High”.

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“Can You Feel It”? came out in ’73, recorded in New York’s Record Plant. The upbeat pop-smash “Pretty Lady”, along with the title track and “Set The Stage” fetched the band more gold. But despite following their proven forumula, they were finding themselves in the middle of a changing musical environment. (canadianbands.com)

If you love groups like the early Chicaog or Blood, Sweat & Tears …than you should listen to Lighthouse, too.

Lighthouse was one of the best Jazz/Brass-Rock bands in the early Seventies !

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Personnel:
Dick Armin (cello)
Ralph Cole (guitar, vocals)
Dale Hillary (saxophone, vocals)
John Naslen (trumpet)
Don DiNovo (viola)
Skip Prokop (drums, percussion, guitar, vocals)
Larry Smith piano, vocals)
Rick Stepton (trombone)
Alan Wilmot (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Set The Stage (Cole) 4.47
02. Same Train (Prokop) 5.58
03. Magic’s In The Dancing (Cole) 4.09
04. Pretty Lady (Prokop) 4.01
05. Disagreeable Man (Prokop) 5.28
06. Can You Feel It (Prokop) 4.39
07. Is Love The Answer (Cole) 3.15
08. Lonely Hours (Prokop) 6.36
09. No More Searching (Hillary) 4.05
10. Bright Side (Cole) 4.26

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Still alive and well (here their website from 2019):

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Ronald Harry “Skip” Prokop (December 13, 1943 – August 30, 2017)

Blue Ash – No More No Less (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgBlue Ash is a United States band, formed in Ohio in the summer of 1969 by bassist Frank Secich & vocalist Jim Kendzor. Guitarist Bill Yendrek and drummer David Evans were recruited later that summer.

The band debuted at “The Freak Out”, a club in Youngstown, OH on October 3, 1969. They gained a loyal following playing an endless stream of one-nighters over that year. In October 1970, Bill Yendrek, was replaced by guitarist/songwriter Bill “Cupid” Bartolin.

Blue Ash continued playing 250-300 dates a year throughout Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio and West Virginia, while the songwriting team Frank Secich and Bill Bartolin accumulated an enormous amount of original material. In June 1972, Blue Ash signed a production contract with Peppermint Productions of Youngstown and started recording and sending out demos. In late 1972, they were signed to Mercury Records by A&R man Paul Nelson. Their first album No More, No Less was released in May 1973 and received rave reviews in the rock press. It is considered a power pop classic, and is regarded as highly collectible among fans of that genre (it was finally released on CD on the Collectors’ Choice label in September 2008). Blue Ash toured and opened for such acts as the Stooges, Bob Seger, Aerosmith, Ted Nugent and more but for lack of sales they were dropped by Mercury Records in May 1974.

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Blue Ash continued to play live and record, adding drummer Jeff Rozniata who replaced David Evans in 1974. They were signed to a singles deal with Playboy Records in 1977. The first single, “Look At You Now” became a regional hit in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Mississippi, as well as in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Playboy then offered an album deal. The LP Front Page News was recorded in Los Angeles in August 1977 and released in October of that year. It was selling well, but in early 1978 Playboy International pulled the plug on Playboy Records and Blue Ash was once again without a label. They called it quits in 1979.

A few audience-recorded live tapes of the band exist (including one of the original lineup from January 31, 1974 at the Packard Music Hall in Warren, OH) but are of generally poor recording quality. Other tapes recorded by a fan who followed Blue Ash to many of their gigs are rumored to exist, but have yet to surface on the collectors circuit.

In the summer of 2003 original members Frank Secich, David Evans, Bill Bartolin and Jim Kendzor got together privately in Ohio to play once again and decided to reform the band. On November 8 they played the International Pop Overthrow at the Khyber Pass in Philadelphia.

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In the late 1990s, renewed interest toward the band was given a boost as a large cache of unreleased Blue Ash recordings fell into circulation amongst collectors. In the summer of 2004 an official release of that material—a two CD retrospective called “Around Again”—was released on Not Lame Records. It contains 44 songs of unreleased material spanning their career.

For their “reunion” gigs from 2003–2009, Frank Secich moved from bass guitar to rhythm guitar, and former members Brian Wingrove (piano) and Jeff Rozniata (drums) completed the band along with Bobby Darke (bass).

On October 3, 2009, guitarist Bill “Cupid” Bartolin died from complications of cancer, thus bringing to a sad end the story of Blue Ash.

Frank Secich is now a member of Deadbeat Poets, who have released three critically acclaimed CDs: Notes From The Underground (2007), Circustown (2010) and Youngstown Vortex Sutra in 2011.

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In the late 1990s, Jim Kendzor’s nephew, guitarist Leonard Crist, and Bill “Cupid” Bartolin’s son, drummer Sean Bartolin, formed Cork, a short-lived band based out of Youngstown while Crist played in the Youngstown indie rock bands Savage Pastry, Isabella the Brave, You Are The War That I Want and Abortopotamus Rex.

In 2016, original Blue Ash members Frank Secich and Jim Kendzor began performing as Blue Ash, backed by Secich’s current band Deadbeat Poets. Sometimes jocularly referred to as Half Ash, this configuration toured Spain, a hotbed of power pop fandom, to great acclaim in June 2016. Secich, Kendzor and Deadbeat Poets member Pete Drivere have also performed several acoustic shows.

No More, No Less is the first album by the Youngstown, Ohio band Blue Ash, released in 1973 on Mercury Records SRM1-666. (see 1973 in music). The album is composed mostly of originals with two covers, “Dusty Old Fairgrounds” by Bob Dylan and “Any Time at All” by The Beatles. The album remained out of print for many years until re-released on CD by Collector’s Choice Music in late 2008. (by wikipedia)

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Hailing from Ohio just like the Raspberries, Blue Ash are the great forgotten power pop band of the early ’70s. Actually, “forgotten” may be too strong a word, for any power pop fan worth their salt knows of Blue Ash even if they’ve never to score either of their two LPs, whether in their original pressing or traded on cassette or CD-R. They were known as one of the key early power pop bands, standing alongside the Raspberries and Badfinger in how they drew equally from the Beatles and the Who. If anything, Blue Ash leaned on that Who influence harder than the Raspberries, rocking a vigor rarely heard in power pop and also opening themselves up to the lyrical vistas of Bob Dylan by covering the rarity “Dusty Old Fairgrounds,” a move rarely made by power poppers. All this indicates that Blue Ash were a rock band first and foremost, placing the sheer rush of sound over hooks, something that a lot of their progeny never did. That’s what gives their debut No More No Less — finally reissued by Collectors Choice in 2008, a full 35 years after its release — such a punch: they are one of the few groups that truly put some power in their pop.

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This much is evident by the raucous album-opener “Abracadabra (Have You Seen Her),” a song with all the melodic rush of “Go All the Way” but leaner and meaner. Not all of the album keeps up at this same furious pace, as the guitars jangle as much as they roar and the group occasionally dips into a loping country-rock groove — not on the Dylan cover, which again sounds a bit like the Who, but on “Just Another Game” — and they do get sunbleached and mellow on “What More Can I Do.” But most of No More No Less filters old-time rock & roll (the big-time boogie “Let There Be Rock”) and ’60s guitar pop (“Plain to See” evokes the Searchers, “I Remember a Time” the Byrds, and “Anytime at All” is a Beatles cover) through the outsized amplification of ’70s hard rock. It’s an addictive sound — and one that hinted at the power pop that was to come even if it didn’t directly influence it — and it still carries a mighty punch all these years later. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Bill “Cupid” Bartolin (guitar, background vocals)
David Evans (drums, background vocals)
Jim Kendzor (vocals, guitar)
Frank Secich –(bass, background vocals)

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01. Abracadabra (Have You Seen Her?) (Secich/Bartolin) 3.06
02. Dusty Old Fairgrounds (Dylan) 2.48
03. Plain To See (Secich/Bartolin) 2.41
04. Just Another Game (Secich/Bartolin) 2.56
05. I Remember A Time (Secich/Bartolin) 2.56
06. Smash My Guitar (Secich/Bartolin) 3.17
07. Anytime At All (Lennon/McCartney) 2.20
08. Here We Go Again (Secich/Bartolin) 3.25
09. What Can I Do For You? (Kendzor) 3.47
10. All I Want (Secich/Bartolin) 2.57
11. Wasting My Time (Secich/Bartolin) 2.53
12. Let There Be Rock (Secich/Bartolin) 2.32

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Michal Urbaniak – Constellation In Concert (Polish Jazz Vol.36) (1973)

FrontCover1This is the second album on the legendary Polish Jazz series by the Polish saxophonist / violinist / composer / bandleader Michal Urbaniak. A veteran Polish Jazz musician, Urbaniak was a member of the legendary ensembles led by Krzysztof Komeda, where he played the saxophone, but by the early 1970 he switched to the violin and plunged into Jazz-Rock Fusion, rapidly becoming one of the most inventive and creative pioneers of the genre. This album and the albums recorded in Germany and later in the USA are absolute Fusion milestones, but also stand out as completely unique in their approach to the genre. Urbaniak combined the marvelous abilities of his wife Urszula Dudziak and her extraordinary and experimental vocalese technique with his common usage of Polish Folklore motifs, creating a superb and completely unparalleled Fusion music. This live recording captures his baseless / double keyboard ensemble, which also includes organist Wojciech Karolak, pianist Adam Makowicz and drummer Czeslaw Bartkowski.

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The music, all composed by Urbaniak, is simply out of this world, brilliant and fresh, absolutely resistant to the tides of time and fashion. In retrospect one can only regret that Fusion followed mostly the direction of flashy virtuosic display of neck-breaking guitar races rather than the direction proposed by Urbaniak’s Fusion, but it’s unfortunately too late now. At least we can savor this music, 40 years after it was recorded, well aged and beautifully eternal. A must! (by Adam Baruch)

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Personnel:
Czesław Bartkowski (drums)
Urszula Dudziak (vocals, percussion)
Wojciech Karolak (organ)
Adam Makowicz (piano, bass)
Michał Urbaniak (violin)

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Tracklist:
01. Bengal 17.40
02. Spokój 3.32
03. Lato 7.59
04. Seresta 9.40
05. Theme 3.05

Music composed by Michał Urbaniak

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Rory Gallagher – Blueprint (1973)

LPFrontCover1.jpgBlueprint is the fourth album by Irish guitarist Rory Gallagher, released as a vinyl record in 1973. With his first band Taste and with his solo band up to this point Gallagher was one of the first guitarists to lead a power trio lineup. With Blueprint Gallagher included a keyboardist for the first time.

For Blueprint Gallagher replaced drummer Wilgar Campbell with Rod de’Ath and decided to add Lou Martin, the keyboardist from de’Ath’s previous band Killing Floor. This four-piece lineup was to be one of Gallagher’s most successful resulting in many of his most popular songs and documented in live film and TV appearances on shows such as Rockpalast and the Old Grey Whistle Test. The band would play together for five years. Blueprint, as with all the studio albums recorded by the Gallagher quartet illustrated Gallagher’s eclectic musical influences.

The album title and artwork were taken from the blueprint of a Stramp “Power Baby” amplifier that had been custom designed for Gallagher in Hamburg. “It was compact enough to fit into the small luggage compartment of a Volkswagen Beetle” recalled Gallagher’s brother and manager Donal. (by wikipedia)

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Kicking off with the furious “Walk on Hot Coals” where Rory Gallagher’s stinging guitar and Lou Martin’s insistent piano pounding spar within the context of one of Rory’s classic rockers, the album presents a well rounded picture of Gallagher’s eclectic influences. A jaunty, acoustic run through Big Bill Broonzy’s “Banker’s Blues” (oddly credited to Gallagher), the ragtime “Unmilitary Two-Step” as well as an unusually straightforward country tune “If I Had a Reason” with Rory on lap-steel and Martin doing his best honky-tonk, effectively break up the blues-rock that remains the soul of the album. The album’s centerpiece, a brooding “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” finds the band locked into a swampy groove for over eight minutes as Gallagher abbreviates his own solo providing room for Martin’s aggressive piano. On “Hands Off” the guitarist even picks up saxophone, and he shows off his spooky Muddy Waters’ inspired slide on the train chugging “Race the Breeze,” one of the guitarist’s best tunes.

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The final two bonus tracks tacked on for this reissue don’t add much of interest; an early, shuffle version of “Stompin’ Ground” lacks the tension of the song that later showed up as the only studio tracks on the live Irish Tour 1974 album, and Roy Head’s “Treat Her Right” sounds like a soundcheck warm-up, which it probably was. Concise track-by-track liner notes from Rory’s brother Donal provide useful background information, and the remastered sound taken from the original tapes is a revelation, with Gallagher’s guitar parts and especially vocals, clear and precise in the spiffed up mix. (by Hal Horowitz)

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Personnel:
Rod De’Ath (drums, percussion)
Rory Gallagher (vocals, guitar, mandolin, saxophone, harmonica)
Lou Martin (keyboards, guitar)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 7:00
02. Daughter Of The Everglades (Gallagher)  6:11
03. Banker’s Blues (Gallagher) 4:44
04. Hands Off (Gallagher) 4:32
05. Race The Breeze (Gallagher) 6:53
06. Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son (Gallagher) 8:25
07. Unmilitary Two – Step (Gallagher) 2:48
08. If I Had A Reason (Gallagher) 4:27
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09. Stompin’ Ground (alternate version)  3:27
10. Treat Her Right (Head) 4.04

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The Faces – Live At The Paris Theatre, London (BBC In Concert) (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Faces were an English rock band formed in 1969 by members of Small Faces after lead singer/guitarist Steve Marriott left that group to form Humble Pie. The remaining Small Faces—Ian McLagan (keyboards), Ronnie Lane (bass guitar, vocals), and Kenney Jones (drums and percussion)—were joined by Ronnie Wood (guitar) and Rod Stewart (lead vocals), both from the Jeff Beck Group, and the new line-up was renamed Faces.

The first collaboration among the future Faces was in a formation called Quiet Melon, which also featured Wood’s older brother Art Wood and Kim Gardner; they recorded four songs and played a few shows in May 1969, during a break in Ronnie Wood’s and Rod Stewart’s commitments with The Jeff Beck Group. Later that summer Wood and Stewart parted ways with Beck and joined Lane, McLagan and Jones full-time. Prior to any releases by the new Faces lineup, Wood and McLagan appeared on Stewart’s first solo album in 1969, An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down (known as The Rod Stewart Album in the US). The rest of the backing band on the album included drummer Micky Waller, keyboardist Keith Emerson and guitarists Martin Pugh (of Steamhammer, and later Armageddon and 7th Order) and Martin Quittenton (also from Steamhammer).

TheFaces01With the addition of Wood and Stewart, the “small” part of the original band name was dropped, partly because the two newcomers (at 5’9″ and 5’10” respectively) were significantly taller than the three former Small Faces.[5] Hoping to capitalise on the Small Faces’ earlier success, record company executives wanted the band to keep their old name; however, the band objected, arguing the personnel changes resulted in a group very different from the Small Faces. As a compromise, in the US their debut album was credited to the Small Faces, while subsequent albums appeared under their new name.

The group regularly toured Britain, Europe and the United States from 1970 to 1975, and were among the top-grossing live acts in that period; in 1974 their touring also encompassed Australia, New Zealand and Japan. They toured the United States and Canada in 1975. Among their most successful songs were “Had Me a Real Good Time”, their breakthrough UK hit “Stay with Me”, “Cindy Incidentally” and “Pool Hall Richard”. As Rod Stewart’s solo career became more successful than that of the group, the band became overshadowed by their lead singer. A disillusioned Ronnie Lane left the band in 1973; one reason given later for his departure was frustration over not having more opportunities to sing lead vocals.

Lane’s role as bassist was taken over by Tetsu Yamauchi (who had replaced Andy Fraser in Free). Released just months before Lane left the band, the Faces’ final studio album was Ooh La La.

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The following year a live album was released, entitled Coast to Coast: Overture and Beginners; it was criticised by reviewers for being poorly recorded and thought out.[9] It featured selections from their late 1973 tour, the first featuring Yamauchi.[9][10] They recorded a few tracks for another studio album, but had lost enthusiasm and their final release as a group was the late 1974 UK Top 20 hit “You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything”. In 1975 Wood began working with the Rolling Stones, which brought differences between Stewart and the others to a head, and after a troubled fall US tour (with Jesse Ed Davis on rhythm guitar), in December the band announced that they were splitting. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a superb braodcasting reording by The Faces, recorded live at the Pais Theatre, London for he legendary “BBC In Concer” series.

Ladies & Gentlemen: The Faces … loud and proud … listen !

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Personnel:
Kenny Jones (drums)
Ronnie Lane (bass, guitar)
Ian McLagen (keyboards)
Rod Stewart (vocals)
Ron Wood (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Silicone Grown (Stewart/Wood) 2.27
02. Cindy Incidentaly (McLagan/Stewart/Wood) 2.42
03. Angel (Hendrix) 4.19
04. Memphis Tennessee (Berry) 4.01
05. True Blue (Stewart/Wood) 3.53
06. I’d Rather Go Blind (Foster/Jordan) 5.06
07. You’re My Girl (Cooper/Beatty/Shelby) 4.56
08. Twistin’ The Night Away (Cooke) 4.08
09. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.48
10. Miss Judy’s Farm (Stewart/Wood) 3.54
11. I Know I’m Losing You (Whitfield/Holland, Jr./Grant) 5:43
12. Three Button Hand Me Down (Stewart/Wood/Lane/McLagan/Jones) 4.31
13. Maybe I’m Amazed (McCartney) 6.01

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Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Welcome Back My Friends To The Show That Never Ends (1974)

FrontCover1.JPGWelcome Back, My Friends, to the Show That Never Ends ~ Ladies and Gentlemen is the second live album by the English progressive rock band Emerson, Lake & Palmer, released as a triple album in August 1974 on Manticore Records. It was recorded in February 1974 at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California during the group’s 1973–74 world tour in support of their fourth studio album, Brain Salad Surgery (1973).

The album was a commercial success, reaching number 4 on the Billboard 200, the band’s highest charting album in the US.[1] In the UK, the album peaked at number 6. The album is certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for 500,000 copies sold in the US. Following its release, Emerson, Lake & Palmer took an extended break from writing and recording.

The album was recorded in February 1974 at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California during the group’s 1973–74 world tour in support of their fourth studio album, Brain Salad Surgery (1973). Its title comes from the introduction to the show spoken by the show’s Master of Ceremonies (Pete Murray, the UK disc jockey) and the opening line of “Karn Evil 9: First Impression, Part 2”.

To record the album, staff and equipment were brought in from Wally Heider Studios in Los Angeles, including a 24-track mobile recording unit and a 40-input console. Peter Granet, one of the engineers, called it “the finest recording experience I’ve ever had”. The band used a Quadrophonic PA system on the tour, allowing a Quadrophonic mix of the album to be released on three 8-track cartridges. A four-channel sound LP, known as Quadradisc, was planned for release but it was scrapped due to engineering issues with master recording which prevented JVC, the manufacturer, from cutting a stable master to meet the format’s specifications.

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Most of the recordings on the album were first used for broadcast on the American rock music radio show, The King Biscuit Flower Hour. In 1999, the radio recordings were released on CD.

AllMusic gave the album a mixed retrospective review, saying that it “makes one realise how accomplished these musicians were, and how well they worked together when the going was good.” They praised the set for including all but one song from Brain Salad Surgery, and particularly commended the performance of “Karn Evil 9” as being far superior to the studio rendition. However, they noted that unlike most live albums of the era, Welcome Back did not incorporate studio overdubs, limiting the band’s ability to recreate moments from their albums and resulting in poor sound quality: “Even the most recent remastered editions could not fix the feedback, the occasionally leakages, the JapanAd.jpgecho, the seeming distance – the listener often gets the impression of being seated in the upper mezzanine of an arena.” (by wikipedia)

The year was 1974, and progressive rock supergroup Emerson Lake & Palmer had just finished an unbelievable run of chart topping studio recordings since their inception in 1970, and headed out to a massive stadium world tour dubbed ‘Somebody Get Me a Ladder’, which was documented in this legendary live album Welcome Back My Friends to the Show That Never Ends-Ladies and Gentleman. Originally released as the first ever triple-vinyl live rock album, this live set showcased the true musical powers of the band onstage, pulling some of the best songs from their first four studio albums and turning them into musical theater for their fans.

A band fully capable of not only writing their own fantastic songs, but also taking traditional pieces and recreating them in their own vision, ELP put both on display here alongside daring improvisations for a live prog masterpiece. The late Keith Emerson’s uncanny abilities on his array of keyboards (Hammond organ, Moog, and piano) are on full display throughout, highlights being of course the epic “Tarkus”, the upbeat romps “Hoedown”, “Toccata”, and his gorgeous “Piano Improvisations”. Greg Lake adds some stellar lead guitar and Carl Palmer drops in an acrobatic drum solo on the classic “Karn Evil 9”, while the band deliver powerful melodic prog in the form of “Jerusalem” and the yearning “Take a Pebble”, with the lovely Lake ballads “Still…You Turn Me On” and “Lucky Man” housed within for good measure.

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Bombastic, virtuosic, and most importantly, melodic, are just a few descriptions of what you are in store for on Welcome Back My Friends to the Show That Never Ends-Ladies and Gentleman, quite simply a mandatory live album for any fan of ’70s rock … and a wonderful tribute to this legendary band. (seaoftranquility.org)

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Personnel:
Keith Emerson (keyboards)
Greg Lake (bass, guitar, vocals)
Carl Palmer (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Hoedown (Copland) 4.27
02. Jerusalem (Parry/Blake) 3.18
03. Toccata (Ginastera) 7.22
04. Tarkus 27.12
04.1. Eruption (Emerson)
04.2. Stones Of Years (Emerson/Lake)
04.3. Iconoclast (Emerson)
04.4. Mass (Emerson/Lake)
04.5. Manticore (Emerson)
04.6. Battlefield (Lake) / Epitaph (Fripp/Lake/McDonald/Giles/Sinfield)
04.7. Aquatarkus (Emerson)
05. Take A Pebble / Still…You Turn Me On / Lucky Man (Lake) 11.05
06. Piano Improvisations (including Friedrich Gulda’s “Fugue” and Joe Sullivan’s “Little Rock Getaway”) (Emerson) 11.52
07. Take A Pebble (Conclusion) (Lake) 3.14
08. Jeremy Bender / The Sheriff (Emerson/Lake) 5.24
09. Karn Evil 9 / 35.14
09.1. 1st Impression (including “Percussion Solo (Con Brio)) (Emerson/Lake/Palmer) 17.26
09.2. 2nd Impression (Emerson) 7.36
09.3. 3rd Impression (Emerson/Lake/Sinfield) 10.17

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Keith Emerson:
02 November 1944 – 11 March 2016

Greg Lake:
10 November 1947 – 07 December 2016

Bonnie Raitt – Live at The Record Plant, Sausalito (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgHot tubs, water beds, sex, and drugs – all were staples of the Record Plant in Sausalito, home to some of the highest times of any Bay Area studio in the 1970s.

Yet there was no small amount of rock and roll too. The dozens of famous albums partially or fully recorded at the Plant in the ’70s include Sly Stone’s Fresh, Stevie Wonder’s Songs in the Key of Life and Prince’s debut album For You. The Plant continued its reign as one of the top studios in the Bay Area into the early 21st century, through several ownership changes that, at one point, saw the federal government running the facility.

Word about the Record Plant got out through its lavish opening party, as well as KSAN broadcasts of live-in-the-studio programs featuring such heavyweights as Bob Marley & the Wailers, Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt and Fleetwood Mac.

“At this time it wasn’t really common to do live broadcasts, especially from a recording studio,” explains Raechel Donahue. “When we were at KSAN, our version of a live broadcast was me and [DJ] Terry McGovern and a 100-foot microphone cord which I would feed out the window to him, so he could interview people on the street. It really was [KSAN manager] Tom [Donahue], Chris Stone, and Gary Kellgren who figured out, ‘Ah, there’s obviously a way to do this if we could only just figure this out.’” (kqed.org)

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As promised long ago, I can finally bring you this speed/pitch-adjusted edition. Tracking is updated, as well as a few other audio improvements. Artwork provided as ever by ethiessen1 – thanks for the bump! (…he’s a very busy 1-man art department for many of us here, for which we are eternally grateful…)

It’s a real fun show, with Bonnie in very jovial spirits having a great time with this band and a great set list. Many here already familiar with this one will finally be able to hear it as close to its original presentation as I could get it. Newcomers will enjoy it now and many times over as well! (by Goody)

And here´s a pretty live recording bby Bonnie Raitt … in this time she was a real Blues Lady … I call this music fantastic !

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Personnel:
Freebo (bass, kazoo)
David Maxwell (piano)
Bonnie Raitt (guitar, vocals)
Joel Tepp (guitar, clarinet)
Dennis Whitted (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Love Me Like A Man (Smither) 5.19
02. You Got To Know How (Wallace) 4.33
03. I Thought I Was A Child (Browne) 5.03
04. Under The Falling Sky (Jackson Browne) 4.06
05. Everybody’s Crying Mercy (Allison) 4.19
06. Give It Up Or Let Me Go (Raitt) / Band intro 5.42
07. Too Long At The Fair (Zoss) 3.23
08. I Feel The Same (Smither) 5.46
09. Guilty (Newman) 3.30
10. Women Be Wise (Wallace) 4.32
11. Love Has No Pride (Kaz/Titus) 4.48
12. Baby I Love You (Franklin) 3.22

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Thanks to daatmon for sharing the tracks at The Traders’ Den.

Thanks to Goody for all the efforts and for sharing the show at Dime.

Thanks also to ethiessen1 for the artwork.