Traffic – On The Road (1973)

FrontCover1On The Road is a live album (2 LPs, reissued on 1 CD) by English rock band Traffic, released in 1973. Recorded live in Germany, it features the Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory lineup plus extra keyboardist (for live performances) Barry Beckett.

The initial U.S. release of On the Road (Island/Capitol) 1973 was as a single LP consisting of: “The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys” (edited to 15:10), “Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory,” “(Sometimes I Feel So) Uninspired” & “Light Up or Leave Me Alone.”

The album reached number 40 in the UK and number 29 in the USA. (by wikipedia)

One of the finest live albums….and who knew that Steve Winwood was such a fine guitarist? Was lucky enough to seem them in 1974 and this album is a fine reminder of just how good they were live. (by Cletus Dodgy-Mullet)

Strong effort live effort byTraffic. It’s pretty hard to sound bad when you have the Muscle Shoals rhythm section backing you up. The jams on Glad and Low Spark are burning! They could have eliminated one of the two songs from Shootout at the Fantasy Factory. But overall a good showing. (by Seanon)

TrafficLive01

Get “On The Road” the drive is so good that you will want to stay “On The Road” there are not any pot holes, but there is definitely one big Traffic jam! Piano-guitar-Percussion-Bass-Sax-Flute-Drums-Keyboards. A flowing Traffic jam like none you have ever been in, get “On The Road” and experience live Traffic! (by Tripp Gazzeron)

Backed by Muscle Shoals sidemen, Winwood, Capaldi, and Wood rock like never before. Traffic songs that were already great were transformed into extended jazzy jams with interesting interplay between all the players. A funky groove unites all the separate tracks, making this a great driving album or a soundtrack for doing housework. Too bad the sidemen split from Traffic after this, since the album promised potential future development that might have significantly altered the direction of contemporary music. As it is, it’s a lesser-known gem in the rock archive that is absolutely necessary for any true music fan of 70’s progressive rock. (by Manley Peebleson)

TrafficLive02

Thefirst time I saw Traffic was in 1973 at the Circus Krone, Munich … And it was such a thrilling concert … they played over 3 hours … one of the finest concerts I ever saw.

And here is one of the finest live albums ever … a timeless classic recording …  !

And a few weeks ago I saw Steve Winwood again … and he´still in a great shape !

Winwood2017

Personnel:
Reebop Kwaku Baah (percussion)
Barry Beckett (keyboards)
Jim Capaldi (drums, percussion, vocals)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
David Hood (bass)
Steve Winwood (vocals, guitar, piano)
Chris Wood (saxophone, flute)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Glad (Winwood) / Freedom Rider (Capaldi/Winwood) 21.00
02. Tragic Magic (Wood) 8.41
03. (Sometimes I Feel So) Un-Inspired (Capaldi/Winwood) 10.34
04. Shoot Out At The Fantasy Factory (Capaldi/Winwood) 7.04
05. Light Up Or Leave Me Alone (Capaldi) 10.49
06. Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys (Capaldi/Winwood) 12.46

LabelD1
*
**

Rabbit – Broken Arrows (1973)

FrontCover1Recorded around the time of Free’s demise this, Rabbit’s first solo album, is a pleasant enough collection of country and bluegrass tinged singer/songwriter tracks which I’m surprised more people on here haven’t tracked down. Especially given his affiliation with bands like “Free” and “The Who”.

The album is pure seventies band member solo output, from the very first note you can gauge exactly when it was recorded. Hopefully some of you will know what I mean by that and not just all think I’ve gone a bit doolally-tap.

There are some pretty heavyweight (for the time) guests on the album, including former Free men Tetsu Yamauchi and Simon Kirke. Snuffy Walden, who deputised for Paul Kossoff in places on the Free album ‘Heartbreaker’ contributes some guitar work as does Junior and Pete Carr. As well as Kirke the drum stool was occupied by such as Jim Capaldi and Conrad Isadore. Reebop Kwaku Baah also turns out on a couple of tracks with his congas. Rabbit himself plays so many different instruments throughout the album to list them would be almost ridiculous.

AdThe opening track on side two ‘Music Is The Answer’ was actually played live by Free during their final tour although on every bootleg I have it has been retitled ‘Intro ’73’. There is therefore the strong possibilty that it was originally written to be a Free track. ‘Blues My Guitar’ also has a very Free like feel to it.

As I have already said the album is pleasant enough but does sound very dated now. A lot of the songs have an unfinished feel about them as though they could have been developed into something more. The main problem as with most Rabbit releases are the vocals. His voice is definately an acquired taste and his Texan drawl is a problem on some tracks. However, on others it is a bonus. This is of course never more evident than on ‘Music Is The Answer’ this Rabbit sung version being hugely inferior to the Paul Rodgers sung Free version. Having said that though it is still the best song on the album. More proof if any was needed that I haven’t got a clue what I am on about for a great majority of the time ! (by Martin Leedham)

In other words: A forgotten jewel from the early Seventies !!!

BackCover1

Personnel:
Reebop Kwaku Baah (percussion on 05., 06.)
John “Rabbit” Bundruck (keyboards, vocals, clarinet, harpsichort, mellotron, drums on 04., guitar on 04., glockenspiel on 09.)
Jim Capaldi, (drums on 05.)
Pete Carr (guitar on 06., 08., dobro on 08.)
The Dundee Horns (horns on 06.)
Alan Gerri (guitar on 05.)
Conrad Isidore (drums on 06.)
Junior (guitar on 05,)
Simon Kirke (drums on 05.)
George Larnyoh (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Chris Laurence (bass, cello on 03.)
Gerry Masters (bass on 02., 06.)
Eddy Quansah (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Randy (drums on 02., 09.)
Richard Reeves (bass on 05.)
Pete Vanderpuije (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Snuffy Walden (guitar on 02., 05.. + 09.)
Tetsu Yamauchi (bass on 01., 05.)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01 Love, Life And PeaceA1 Love, Life And Peace 2.12
02. Broken Arrows 2.23
03. I Don’t Mind 4.01
04. Ergot 3.06
05. Blues My Guitar 2.47
06. Music Is The Answer 3.50
07. Salt Annie Ginger 2.25
08. London Town 2.39
09. You’re There Somewhere + Boll Weevil Blues 5.36

LabelB1
*
**

Single
Rare German single from this album

Leon Russell – Leon Live (1973)

LPFrontCover1Leon Live would probably loom larger in the memories of more fans today if only it hadn’t come out after Joe Cocker’s Mad Dogs and Englishmen (which was almost more a showcase for Russell and his band than it was for Cocker) and The Concert for Bangladesh, which, between them, gave everyone a lengthy preview of Russell’s live act. On the other hand, it is 100 minutes of Russell’s concert work in one place, which is either very compelling or a little too intense for most peoples’ tastes.

Russell was the leading white practitioner of big band rock in the early 1970s, and his sound was something new for most of the listeners he attracted — the Rolling Stones may have brought aboard a horn section and pianist to their stage act, but Russell was the real article, leading an octet (complete with two pianists) and five backup singers, doing a descendant of 1950s-style R&B of a kind that had been banished from the airwaves since the early 1960s, apart from some one-off successes like John Fred & His Playboy Band.

Russell plays an authentic, classic New Orleans-style R&B, melded successfully to Bob Dylan’s “The Mighty Quinn” (in the “Mighty Quinn Medley”) and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” among other then-recent rock songs — mostly he animates his music and his singers and, from the sound of it, his audience for 11 minutes at a clip, with a sound that manages to be massive yet highly articulate, his band’s pounding, driving impact leaving lots of room for Don Preston’s and Joey Cooper’s guitars to cut through. Appearing at the height of Russell’s fame, this was originally a triple LP and one of the most successful of its era. (by Bruce Eder)

BackCover

Personnel:
Chuck Blackwell (drums)
Ambrose Campbell (percussion)
Joey Cooper (guitar, background vocals)
Patrick Henderson (piano, vocals)
Leon Russell vocals, piano)
Don Preston (guitar, vocals, background vocals)
Carl Radle (bass)
+
background vocals:
Black Grass – Phylliss Lindsey

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Mighty Quinn Medley 11.44
01.1. I’ll Take You There (Bell)
01.2. Idol With The Golden Head (Leiber/Stoller)
01.3. I Serve A Living Savior (Watson)
01.4. Mighty Quinn (Dylan)
02. Shoot Out On The Plantation (Russell) 4.51
03. Dixie Lullaby (Stainton/Russell) 3.07
04. Queen Of The Roller Derby (Russell) 1.53
05. Roll Away The Stone (Dempsey/Russell) 3.57
06. It’s Been A Long Time Baby (Hooker/Paub) 3.20
07. Great Day (Traditional) 3.08
08. Alcatraz (Russell) 4.19
09. Crystal Closet Queen (Russell) 6.33
10. Prince Of Peace (Dempsey/Russell) 4.27
11. Sweet Emily (Russell) 3.07
12. Stranger In A Strange Land (Russell) 4.57
13. Out In The Woods (Russell) 9.15
14. Some Day (Traditional) 3.19
15. Sweeping Through The City (Caeser) 2.29
16. Jumping Jack Flash / Youngblood Medley 16.09
16.1. Jumping Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards)
16.2.Youngblood (Pomus/Leiber/Stoller)
17. Of Thee I Sing / Yes I Am (Russell) 10.26
18. Delta Lady (Russell) 3.55
19. It’s All Over Now Baby Blue (Dylan) 6.39

 

LabelB
*
**

Leon Russell
Leon Russell (born Claude Russell Bridges) April 2, 1942 – November 13, 2016)

Jan Akkerman – Tabernakel (1973)

frontcover1This album — which, despite being third in most discographies, was actually Jan Akkerman’s first official solo album — must have been a real shocker to a lot of Focus. Rather than working from the flashy, electric guitar side of the group’s sound, Akkerman chose to expand on the lute sound that he’d explored on Focus III’s “Elspeth of Nottingham.” Tabernakel represented Akkerman at his most formalistic, playing almost entirely in a classical idiom on lute and acoustic and electric guitars (with one brief side trip to the bass). The repertory is drawn largely from 16th century Tudor England, including compositions by John Dowland and Antony Holborne, rearranged by Akkerman and harpsichord virtuoso and scholar George Flynn. He gives one major concession to progressive rock in the form of the fuzz-laden reinterpretation of “House of the King,” which misses the flute part from the Focus original but is still worth hearing as a guitar showcase. Tabernakel is otherwise the real article as far as its classicism — the 14-minute-long “Lammy” comes close to being pretentious without quite crossing the line, and all of the album is a fascinating solo departure for the guitarist. What makes this album doubly intriguing is that apart from Flynn, Akkerman’s accompanists come entirely from the rock world: Tim Bogert, Carmine Appice, and veteran R&B drummer Ray Lucas, none of whom seems to skip a beat in their work here. Recorded at Atlantic Records’ studios in New York and released in 1974, when Focus was still near the peak of its fame, Tabernakel sold reasonably well at the time, but had been unavailable from the late ’70s until 2002, when Wounded Bird Records reissued it in a good-sounding CD edition. (by Bruce Eder)

janakkerman

Personnel:
Jan Akkerman (guitar, lute, bass, harpsichord, piano, glockenspiel, percussion)
+
Robert Alexander (trombone on 01. +08.)
Carmine Appice (drums on 04. + 10.)
Harold Bennett (flute on 01., 04. + 08.)
Lawrence Bennett (tenor vocals on 10.)
Eugene Bianco (harp on 08.)
Albert Block (flute on 08.)
Philip Bodner (oboe on 08.)
Tim Bogert (bass on 04. + 10.)
Raymond Crisara (trumpet on 01.)
Richard Davis (bass on 08. + 10.)
George Flynn (harpsichord on 08. + 10., glockenspiel on 08., piano on 08.)
Dominick Gravine (trombone on 01. + 08.)
Stephen M. Johns (tuba on 08.)
Elliot Levine (bass vocals on 10.)
Ray Lucas (drums on 01. + 10.)
Walter Kane (bassoon on 08.)
Josephine Mongiardo (soprano vocals on 10.)
Alan Rubin (trumpet on 08.)
Charles Russo (clarinet on 10.)
Russell Savakus (bass on 01. + 04.)
Daniel Waitzman (flute on 10.)
Joseph Wilder (trumpet on 01.)
William Zukof (countertenor vocals on 10.)
+
cello:
Charles McCracken – George Koutzen – George Ricci – Gloria Lanzarone – Jesse Levy – Kermit Moore – Lucien Schmit
+
viola:
Alfred Brown – David Sackson – Emanuel Vardi – Richard Maximoff – Selwart Clarke –  Seymour Berman
+
violin:
Arnold Eidus – Carmen Malignaggi – David Kunstler – Elliot Rosoff – Frederick Buldrini – Gene Orloff – Guy Lumia – Harold Kohon – Harry Cykman – Joseph Malignaggi – Kathryn Kienke – Lewis Eley – Norman Carr – Raoul Poliakin
+
french horn:
Earl Chapin – James Buffington – Ray Alonge – Tony Miranda
+
George Flynn (conducter)
Gene Orloff (concertmaster)

backcover

Tracklist:
01. Britannia (Dowland) 3.58
02. Coranto For Mrs. Murcott (Pilkington) 1,30
03. The Earl Of Derby, His Galliard (Dowland) 2.00
04. House Of The King (Akkerman) 2.25
05. A Galliard (Holborne) 2.13
06. A Galliard (Dowland) 1.35
07. A Pavan (Morley) 3.07
08. Javeh (Akkerman/Flynn) 3.24
09. A Fantasy (Laurencini Of Rome) 3.22
10. Lammy: (14.01)
10.01. I Am (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.02.Asleep, Half Asleep, Awake (Akkerman)
10.03. She Is (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.04. Lammy (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.05. We Are (Flynn/Akkerman)
10.06. The Last Will And Testament (Holborne)
10.07. Amen (Flynn/Akkerman)

labela1

*
**

booklet

The Rolling Stones – It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll (1974)

frontcover1It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll is the 12th British and 14th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. It was the last Rolling Stones album for guitarist Mick Taylor and the songwriting and recording of the album’s title track had a connection to Taylor’s eventual replacement, Ronnie Wood. It also marked the 10th anniversary since the band’s debut album. The album has a firmer rock sound than the band’s previous album, the more funk- and soul-inspired Goats Head Soup. The album reached #1 in the US and #2 in the UK.

Work began on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll following the Rolling Stones’ fall 1973 European tour. Production began in November at Munich, Germany’s Musicland Studios. According to guitarist Keith Richards, “We were really hot (off the road) and ready just to play some new material.”[1] The recording sessions were attended by Belgian painter Guy Peellaert, who Mick Jagger invited to do the album cover after seeing his work in the book Rock Dreams, which featured illustrations of various rock musicians such as the Stones. Peellaert eventually painted the band as “rock deities”, descending a temple staircase, surrounded by young girls and women worshipping them in Grecian clothing. The artist refused to sign a deal of exclusivity, and in 1974 provided another album art, David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs.

The album was at first developed as a half-live, half-studio production with one side of the album featuring live performances from the Stones’ European tour while the other side was to be composed of newly recorded cover versions of the band’s favourite R&B songs. Covers recorded included a take of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, Shirley & Company’s “Shame, Shame, Shame”, and The Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”. Soon the band began working off riffs by Richards and new ideas by Mick Jagger and the original concept was scrapped in favour of an album with all-new material. The cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” was the only recording to make the cut, while the “Drift Away” cover is a popular bootleg.

rollingstones1974_01It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll marked the Stones’ first effort in the producer’s chair since Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the first for Jagger and Richards under their pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins”. On the choice to produce, Richards said at the time:

“I think we’d come to a point with Jimmy (Miller) where the contribution level had dropped because it’d got to be a habit, a way of life, for Jimmy to do one Stones album a year. He’d got over the initial sort of excitement which you can feel on Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Also, Mick and I felt that we wanted to try and do it ourselves because we really felt we knew much more about techniques and recording and had our own ideas of how we wanted things to go. Goats Head Soup hadn’t turned out as we wanted to – not blaming Jimmy or anything like that… But it was obvious that it was time for a change in that particular part of the process of making records.”

Starting with this release, all future Rolling Stones albums would either be produced by them or in collaboration with an outside producer.

Most of the album’s backing tracks were recorded first at Musicland; solo vocals were recorded later by Jagger, about whom Richards would say, “he often comes up with his best stuff alone in the studio with just an engineer.”

The song “Luxury” showed the band’s growing interest in reggae music, while “Till the Next Goodbye” and “If You Really Want to Be My Friend” continued their immersion in ballads. Seven of the album’s ten songs crack the four-minute mark, a feature that would come to be disparaged during the rising punk rock scene of the late 1970s.

rollingstones1974_02

Ronnie Wood, a longtime acquaintance of the band, began to get closer to the Rolling Stones during these sessions after he invited Mick Taylor to play on his debut album, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do. Taylor spent some time recording and hanging out at Wood’s house The Wick. By chance, Richards was asked one night by Wood’s wife at the time, Krissy, to join them at the guitarist’s home. While there, Richards recorded some tracks with Wood and quickly developed a close friendship, with Richards going as far as moving into Wood’s guest room. Jagger soon entered the mix and it was here that the album’s lead single and title track, “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”, was first recorded. Wood worked closely on the track with Jagger, who subsequently took the song and title for their album. The released version of this song features Wood on twelve-string acoustic guitar.

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was Mick Taylor’s last album with the Rolling Stones, and he played on just seven of the ten tracks (he did not play on tracks 2, 3, and 6). Due to Taylor’s absence, Richards is responsible for the brief lead guitar break on “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, the distorted electric guitar on the title track which includes the solo, and played both rhythm and lead guitar tracks on the “Luxury” studio recording. However, on the occasional live performances of “Luxury” during the Tour of the Americas ’75, lead guitar was provided by Ron Wood. Even though Mick Taylor is present on “Short and Curlies”, his slide guitar playing panned onto the right channel/speaker is mostly buried underneath Richards’ own lead guitar throughout most of the track which is panned to the left channel/speaker.

Similar to receiving no writing credits on the Stones’ previous album, Goats Head Soup, Taylor reportedly had made songwriting contributions to “Till the Next Goodbye” and “Time Waits for No One”, but on the album jacket, all original songs were credited to Jagger/Richards. Taylor said in 1997:

“I did have a falling out with Mick Jagger over some songs I felt I should have been credited with co-writing on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. We were quite close friends and co-operated quite closely on getting that album made. By that time Mick and Keith weren’t really working together as a team so I’d spend a lot of time in the studio.”

rollingstones1974_03
Taylor’s statement contradicts Jagger’s earlier comment concerning the album. Jagger stated in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview about “Time Waits for No One” that Taylor “maybe threw in a couple of chords”.

Alongside the usual outside contributors, namely Billy Preston, Nicky Hopkins and unofficial member Ian Stewart, Elton John sideman Ray Cooper acted as percussionist for the album. Several songs were finished songs and overdubs and mixing were performed at Jagger’s home, Stargroves, in the early summer of 1974.

In July, the lead single, “It’s Only Rock ’n Roll (But I Like It)”, was released, and despite the familiar sound, it surprised many by failing to reach the top 10 in the US (although it did reach the top 10 in the UK). With its sing-along chorus, it has become a staple at Rolling Stones concerts. The B-side “Through the Lonely Nights” dates back to the previous year’s Goats Head Soup sessions. A cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg”, originally a 1966 hit by The Temptations, was released as the second single in the US only, where it also became a top 20 hit. Its parent album appeared in October with brisk initial sales, reaching number two in the UK (breaking a string of number-one albums that stretched back to 1969’s Let It Bleed) and number one in the US, where it eventually went platinum.

Reviews were largely positive, with Jon Landau calling It’s Only Rock ’n Roll “one of the most intriguing and mysterious, as well as the darkest, of all Rolling Stones records.”[12] However rock critic Lester Bangs disparaged the album in The Village Voice, much like Goats Head Soup, saying, “The Stones have become oblique in their old age, which is just another word for perverse except that perverse is the corniest concept extant as they realized at inception… Soup was friendly and safe. I want the edge and this album doesn’t reassure me that I’ll get it, what a curious situation to be stuck in, but maybe that’s the beauty of the Stones, hah, hah, kid? This album is false. Numb. But it cuts like a dull blade. Are they doing the cutting, or are we?”

singles

Author James Hector added that It’s Only Rock ’n Roll was a definitive turning point for the band. “The album marked the band’s decisive entry into a comfortable living as rock’s elder statesmen. From this point on, their youth culture importance vanished, and there would be few musical surprises in the future.” Hector concluded with “On It’s Only Rock ’n Roll, the band had become what they imagined their mass audience desired them to be. They were wrong.”

Instead of immediately touring to promote the album, the band decided to head back into the Munich studios to record the next album, to Mick Taylor’s disappointment and subsequent resignation from the band. A tour didn’t happen until the following summer in the US, the ‘Tour of the Americas ’75’, with future member Ronnie Wood taking Taylor’s place on guitar.

The title track became a permanent staple of the band’s live setlist, but apart from some performances of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “If You Can’t Rock Me” on the Licks Tour, none of the other tracks have been performed since 1977. “Till The Next Goodbye”, “Time Waits For No-One”, “If You Really Want To Be My Friend” and “Short and Curlies” have never been played live.

In order to promote the album, music videos were filmed for several of the songs. The most commonly seen video from the album was the video for “It’s Only Rock’n’Roll (But I Like It)”, featuring the band (in sailor suits) playing in a tent, which gradually fills with soap bubbles (Taylor is featured in the video but did not actually play on the recorded cut). Videos were also filmed for “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” and “Till The Next Goodbye”.

backcover1

Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals; guitar on 04. + 10.)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals; bass on 01.)
Mick Taylor (guitar, slide-guitar, synthesizer on 05., congas on 07.,  bass on 10.)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer on 10.)
+
Ray Cooper (percussion)
Nicky Hopkins (piano on 04. – 06., 08. + 10.)
Charlie Jolly (tabla on 10.)
Ed Leach (cowbell on 02.)
Blue Magic (background vocals on 08.)
Billy Preston (piano on 01., 02., 10., clavinet on 02., organ on 08.)
Ian Stewart (piano on 03., 07. + 09.)

Basic track on “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”:
David Bowie (background vocals)
Kenney Jones (drums)
Willie Weeks (bass)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, background vocals)

inlet02a

Tracklist:
01. If You Can’t Rock Me (Jagger/Richards) 3.48
02. Ain’t Too Proud To Beg (Whitfield/Holland) 3.30
03. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) (Inspiration by Ronnie Wood) (Jagger/Richards)     5.07
04. Till The Next Goodbye (Jagger/Richards) 4.39
05. Time Waits For No One (Jagger/Richards) 6.48
06. Luxury (Jagger/Richards) 5,03
07. Dance Little Sister (Jagger/Richards) 4.12
08. If You Really Want To Be My Friend (Jagger/Richards)  6.19
09. Short And Curlies (Jagger/Richards) 2.45
10. Fingerprint File (Jagger/Richards) 7.01

labelb1

*
**

Waldo de Los Rios – Navidad con Waldo de Los Rios (1973)

fronzcover1Waldo de los Ríos (7 Septembre 1934 – 28 Mars 1977) was an Argentine composer, conductor and arranger.

De los Rios was born as Osvaldo Nicholas Ferrara in Buenos Aires into a musical family; his father was a musician and his mother a well known folk singer; he studied composition and arranging at the National Conservatory of Music under Alberto Ginastera and Teodoro Fuchs. He was inspired by an eclectic range of music and formed a musical group called “The Waldos” which crossed folk music with electronic sounds. De los Rios turned to work in cinema and film sound tracks where his compositions were heard in the 1967 film Pampa Salvaje, for which he received a prestigious award from the Argentine Cinematographic Association. He relocated to the USA in 1958 and then to Spain in 1962.

He is best remembered for his ability to transform European classical music into pop music. His 1971 arrangement of Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, recorded with the Manuel de Falla orchestra, reached the top spot in the Dutch charts and scored a top 10 hit in several other European countries. In 1970, prior to this success, Waldo de los Rios had already climbed the charts around Europe and America with Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ode To Joy, which he arranged and conducted for Miguel Ríos.

His record Mozart in the Seventies rearranged famous Mozart pieces in a contemporary style, with a large percussion section. Several tracks from it were used as theme tunes to BBC programmes of that era, including the theme to the BBC’s coverage of the Horse of the Year Show (his reworking of Mozart’s A Musical Joke). His re-working of Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, used for many years as the theme to the Radio 4 quiz show Brain of Britain, was the subject of frequent complaints from classical music fans (with whom the show was popular) and presenter Robert Robinson described it on air as “Mozart plus sacrilege”.

waldodelosrios01
He also issued an album Symphonies for the Seventies which included Mozart’s Symphony no. 40 and other major composers including Dvořák’s New World. In 1971, he arranged and conducted the Spanish entry for the Eurovision Song Contest, “En un mundo nuevo” for Karina. The song landed a respectable second position and hit the charts in several European countries.

He was married to actress turned journalist/author Isabel Pisano (born in Montevideo, Uruguay, 1944). Pisano later documented part of his life in her autobiography El Amado Fantasma (Plaza y Janés, 2002).

A victim of an acute depression while working on “Don Juan Tenorio”, de los Rios committed suicide in Madrid in 1977. (by wikipedia)

And this is his beautfil Christmas … listen to the unique sound of Waldo de Los Rios.

whitechristmas

Personnel:
The Waldo de Los Rios Orchestra

backcover1

Tracklist:
01. Carol Of The Drum (Little Drummer Boy) (Davis) 3.38
02. The First Noel (Traditional) 3.00
03. Silent Night (Gruber) 3.29
04. It Came Upon The Midnight Clear (Traditional) 2.27
05. O Tannenbaum (Traditional) 2.30
06. O Come All Ye Faithful (Traditional) 3.00
07. Oh Little Town Of Bethlehem (Traditional) 2.54
08. White Christmas (Berlin) 2.06
09. Hark! The Herald Angels Song (Traditional) 3.12
10. Jingle Bells (Traditional) 2.53

labelb1

*
**

Darryl Way’s Wolf – Saturation Point (1973)

frontcover1The band’s second album, released a few scant months after their debut, found Darryl Way and co. still edging away from the Curved Air ideal, without doing anything to truly alienate that band’s loyal followers. Indeed, there were moments throughout Wolf’s career when they sounded more like the original Air than that band’s current incarnation ever could. Of course it’s the mad violin that best confirms the similarities, but one can only dream of how dramatic this band could have been had they only reached a wider audience. Listening to Saturation Point is like walking a tightrope, a taut, nerve-bending ride that takes you from the eccentric peaks of “The Ache” and “Two Sisters” (combined, one of the greatest album overtures of the year), to the boleric attack of “Toy Symphony,” a cut that raises the specters of Caravan and ELP, even as it shakes off comparisons with anything else. This was indeed the peak of Wolf’s musical career, an album that snagged all the high points from its predecessor, then mashed them with the experience that the live show brought into reach. (by Dave Thompson)

This is another forgotten jewel of the British progressive rock scene in the early 70´s … a fantastic instrumental album,, inspired by four true musicians !

wolf1

Personnel:
John Etheridge (guitar)
Dek Messecar (bass, vocals)
Ian Mosley (drums)
Darryl Way (violin, keyboards)

backcover

Tracklist:
01. The Ache (Way) 4.50
02. Two Sisters (Way) 4.20
03. Slow Rag (Etheridge) 5.17
04. Market Overture (Way) 3.38
05. Game Of X (Etheridge) 5.48
06. Saturation Point (Way) 6.45
07. Toy Symphony (Way) 7.16
+
08. A Bunch Of Fives (Single release B-side) (Etheridge) 3.31
09. Five In The Morning (Single release A-side) (Way) 2.40
10. Two Sisters (Single version) (Way) 3.21

labelb1

*
**

single

Single: A Bunch Of Fives /bw Five In The Morning