Chicken Shack – Unlucky Boy (1973)

LPFrontCover1Unlucky Boy is the sixth studio album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1973

Originally released in 1973, but reissued with two extra  in 1994, Chicken Shack’s Unlucky Boy finds guitarist/vocalist/songwriter and band founder Stan Webb in fine form. Only drummer Paul Hancox remains from the uneven Imagination Lady, and indeed the horn-oriented approach here is much different than the plodding Led Zeppelin-isms of the previous disc. Webb contributes six originals, and even though they are derivative of Savoy Brown (a band he joined for the Boogie Brothers album just a year later), his approach here is much more subtle and controlled than on his last effort.

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Very rare factory sample discs

Chris Mercer’s saxes, often double tracked to sound like a horn section, bring a tough R&B to the mix, and drummer Hancox is a controlled powerhouse. Webb also reigns in his impulse to overextend guitar solos so prevalent on Imagination Lady, whipping off tight, controlled leads instead.

Articel1973_02Producer Neil Slaven contributes honest, witty, and often self-deprecating liner notes that help explain why two of these songs suffer from poor mixes (basically, he had consumed various substances and couldn’t salvage the songs after the fact). Strings on “As Time Goes Passing By,” (also included in a shorter single version) are a nice touch and bring a bit of class to the proceedings while maintaining the R&B slant of the disc. Two unedited studio jams make the cut as “Stan the Man” and the seven-minute “Jammin’ with the Ash,” both featuring pianist Tony Ashton, who really lets loose on the latter.

Things get stripped down for an unusually delicate version of Lonnie Johnson’s “Too Late to Cry” with just strummed guitar and bass. The opening trio of Webb-penned tunes shows some of his best songwriting with the instrumental “Prudence’s Party” a terrific capsule of Webb’s stinging, gritty guitar style. The album sounds dated but harkens back to a particular time in British blues that is charming in its anything goes attitude. That helps make this one of Stan Webb’s more consistent and successful offerings. (by Hal Horowitz)

This is the Masterpiece of Rock and on e of the best Blues-Rock
Album of All Time. Stan Webb, British Halfgod on Guitar in exciting form. (by Dani Rocksaurier)

This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less:

Ah, the wonderful Chicken Shack re-mastered, good news for blues freaks (such as myself)  … Here´s Chicken Shack with their charismatic frontman and lead guitarist Stan Webb. Webb was famous for his live performance, running down the aisles (before the wireless) with a mega long guitar wire, going banana while playing electrifying guitar soli!

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This of course do not apply to the studio albums, which actually didn’t get nowhere near their live performances! This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less, good clean blues tracks! Get their first album or a live session, If you want the Shack on fire!!  (by Tonny Larsen)

Single

Personnel:
Bob Daisley (bass)
Paul Hancox (drums, percussion)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)
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Tony Ashton (piano)
Chris Mercer (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. You Know You Could Be Right (Webb) 3.47
02. Revelation”(Webb) 5.13
03. Prudence’s Party (Webb) 3.13
04. Too Late To Cry (Johnson) 3.09
05. Stan The Man (Webb) 4.25
06. Unlucky Boy (Thornton/Dupree) 2.34
07. As Time Goes Passing By (Webb) 4.46
08. Jammin’ With Ash” (Webb) 7.04
09. He Knows The Rules (McCracklin) 4.05
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10. As Times Goes Passing By (single version) (Webb) 3.32
11. Doctor Brown (Brown) 3.05

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Bob Daisley & Stan Webb

Handwritten track list

A handwritten track list
and letter from Decca stating this was the first test pressing.

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Eagles – Desperado (1973)

FrontCover1Desperado is the second studio album by the American band the Eagles. It was recorded at Island Studios in London, England and released in 1973. The songs on Desperado are based on the themes of the Old West. The band members are featured on the album’s cover dressed like an outlaw gang; Desperado remains the only Eagles album where the band members appear on the front cover.Desperado is the second studio album by the American band the Eagles. It was recorded at Island Studios in London, England and released in 1973. The songs on Desperado are based on the themes of the Old West. The band members are featured on the album’s cover dressed like an outlaw gang; Desperado remains the only Eagles album where the band members appear on the front cover.

Although the title track is one of the Eagles’ signature songs, it was never released as a single. The song “Desperado” was ranked number 494 on Rolling Stone’s 2004 list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. The album did yield two singles, though: “Tequila Sunrise” and “Outlaw Man”. Those two singles reached number 64 and number 59 respectively. The album reached number 41 on the Billboard album chart and was certified gold by the RIAA on September 23, 1974, and double platinum on March 20, 2001.

Desperado was the last Asylum Records album to be distributed in North America by Atlantic Records (catalog no. SD 5068), prior to Asylum’s mid-1973 merger with Elektra Records by Asylum’s, Elektra’s and Atlantic’s parent company, Warner Communications.

Eagles

After a commercially successful first album, Frey wanted the second album to be one where they could be taken seriously as artists, and became interested in making a concept album. The original concept was for songs about anti-heroes; according to Glenn Frey, he was jamming together with Don Henley, Jackson Browne, and J. D. Souther after a Tim Hardin concert when they had the idea of doing an album about anti-heroes. One inspiration was a book on gunfighters of the Wild West given to Browne by Ned Doheny for his 21st birthday, and Browne showed them the book and suggested the theme. The book includes stories about Bill Dalton and Bill Doolin; from this came the song “Doolin-Dalton” about the Doolin-Dalton Gang. However, they ran out of ideas after writing “Doolin-Dalton” and “James Dean” about the eponymous actor. The idea for anti-heroes then become the Western-themed Desperado.

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Jackson Browne himself credited the song “Desperado” written by Frey and Henley as the origin of the outlaw theme of the album. Bernie Leadon said that Frey liked the idea of an analogy between outlaw gangs and rock-and-roll: “Glenn sat everybody down and mapped out which characters in the gang could have songs written about them, or encouraged us to write songs about this concept.” As Frey said of the album in an interview in 1973: “It has its moments where it definitely draws some parallels between rock-and-roll and being an outlaw. Outside the laws of normality, I guess. I mean, I feel like I’m breaking a law all the time. What we live and what we do is kind of a fantasy.” Henley also said that the album was to be their “big artistic commentary on the evils of fame and success, with a cowboy metaphor.” However, he admitted: “The metaphor was probably a little bullshit. We were in L.A. staying up all night, smoking dope, living the California life, and I suppose we thought it was as radical as cowboys in the old West. We were really rebelling against the music business, not society.” Part of the reasons for their dissatisfaction and cynicism with the music business was due to David Geffen selling his independent Asylum label to Warner Communications which then merged it with Elektra, and the band attributed this as the reason for the lack of interest in promoting the band internationally by EMI.

Eagles4The other songs in the album quickly came together after the theme had been decided. Even though Desperado is sometimes described as a concept album, it does not have a specific narrative, and the songs do not necessarily fit in with the theme explicitly. “Desperado” was the first song Frey and Henley wrote together, marking the beginning of their songwriting partnership. Henley noted: “That’s when we became a team.” “Tequila Sunrise” was written in the same week as “Desperado”; in all Frey and Henley were involved in writing 8 of the 11 songs in the album. The songwriting prowess of Frey and Henley in Desperado also marks the beginning of their dominance in the band. As Henley said; “That was a real crucial time for us. When we formed the band, it was supposed to be one of those ‘everybody’s equal’ affairs. We’d all sing and all write and so forth. But the fact is people aren’t all going to be able to do everything the same. It’s just like on a football team . . . . Some people quarterback and some people block. So we went through a lot of hassles for a while.”.

Leadon wrote two songs – “Twenty-One” and “Bitter Creek”, while Randy Meisner co-wrote “Certain Kind of Fool” and “Saturday Night”. “Twenty-One” refers to the age of Emmett Dalton, the youngest of the Dalton gang, when he was shot 23 times but survived during the raid on Coffeyville, Kansas in October 1892. Meisner came up with the idea for how someone became an outlaw in “Certain Kind of Fool”, wrote most of it, and said of his contribution: “I kinda started it. And that’s what usually happened – I’d get a verse or two, and I’m done, and they would help fill in the blanks” The only song on the album not written by the band members of Eagles is “Outlaw Man”, which was written by David Blue and chosen because it fit the theme.

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The album was recorded at the Island Studios in London, which took four weeks at a cost of £30,000. The producer Glyn Johns wanted to produce the album quickly and economically, each track was therefore limited to four or five takes, and requests to record more were refused.

Henley would later state that his greatest regret was that he did not sing as well as he could on the title track “Desperado”, and would have liked to redo the song.

According to the producer Johns, he and Leadon tried to come up with a few musical links in an attempt to tie up the story for an outlaw concept in the album, however, the concept itself dissipated. The band was very happy with the finished result; after Johns had played the album back to them as an entity for the first time, they carried him on their shoulders out of the control room.

However, the finished recording was received poorly by Jerry Greenberg, the president of Atlantic Records, who said: “Jeez, they’ve made a fucking cowboy album!”

The film director Sam Peckinpah had planned to use the album as the basis for a film, but the plan did not come to fruition.

The photograph on the back cover as a reenactment of the capture of the Dalton Gang. On the ground are Jackson Browne, Bernie Leadon, Glenn Frey, Randy Meisner, Don Henley, J. D. Souther.

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The artwork for the album was done by artist Gary Burden with photos by Henry Diltz, both of whom were also responsible for Eagles’ first album. To illustrate the theme for the music in the album, the original concept was for a gatefold double album with the band dressed as outlaws on the front cover with images of gunfight and the Wild West inside. The centerfold idea however was scrapped by David Geffen.

On the back of the album is an image of all four members of the band together with Jackson Browne and J. D. Souther lying dead and bound on the ground, with a posse including the producer Glyn Johns (far right in a white hat), manager John Hartmann, road manager Tommy Nixon, artist Boyd Elder (later responsible for the skull artwork of Eagles’ later albums), roadies, and Gary Burden (far left) standing over them.

The photo is meant to be an reenactment of the historical image of the capture and death of the Dalton Gang. Jackson Browne said that the image on the back cover with the musicians lying dead is when the “whole thing really comes together”.

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The photo shoot took place at the Paramount Ranch, an old film set for Western movies in Malibu Canyon. It was however an expensive shoot, and to justify the cost, a promotional film for the album was also made at the same time. The film was shot on Super-8, then sepia-tinted, and transferred to videotape. In each process a little video quality is lost, which Frey described as a “nice accident” as it made the video appear aged and more realistic. Henley described the promotional film, like the album itself, as “a commentary on [their] loss of innocence with regard to how the music business really worked”]

Paul Gambaccini of Rolling Stone gave the album a positive review on its release in 1973. He wrote: “The beautiful thing about it is that although it is a unified set of songs, it is not a rock opera, a concept album, or anything pretending to be much more than a set of good tunes that just happen to fit together.” In conclusion, he wrote: “Desperado won’t cure your hangover or revalue the dollar, but it will give you many good times. With their second consecutive job well done, the Eagles are on a winning streak.”

Robert Christgau however took the view that “with its barstool-macho equation of gunslinger and guitarschlonger, its on-the-road misogyny, its playing-card metaphors, and its paucity of decent songs, this soundtrack to an imaginary Sam Peckinpah movie is “concept” at its most mindless.”[24] AllMusic editor William Ruhlmann praised that Henley had more involvement with the album, but wrote that it “was simultaneously more ambitious and serious-minded than its predecessor and also slighter and less consistent.”

The Eagles Dressed as Cowboys

The album is now considered by some critics to be the one of the significant albums of country rock. Music writer John Einarson argued in his book Desperados: The Roots of Country Rock that despite its weak initial sales, the album “would set the tone for all the later soft country rock sounds, and impact what would become the foundation of “new country”, in both image and music.”

Released in April of 1973, the album was not a commercial success initially. It debuted on the US Billboard 200 chart at a lowly number 145 on its week of its release, rising to number 41 in its eighth week on the chart, It remains Eagles’ lowest charting album and it produced no hit song, as both singles released from the album, “Tequila Sunrise” and “Outlaw Man”, failed to reach top 50 on the main singles chart.

However, the success of their next album release, On the Border, as well as subsequent releases, spurred on the sales of the album. It was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on March 20, 2001, indicating shipment of 2 million copies in the United States. (by wikipedia)

Singles

Personnel:
Glenn Frey (guitar, vocals, keyboards, harmonica)
Don Henley (drums, vocals, guitar)
Bernie Leadon (guitar, vocals; banjo, mandolin, dobro)
Randy Meisner (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Doolin-Dalton (Henley/Frey/Browne/Souther) 3.34
02. Twenty-One (Leadon) 2.10
03. Out Of Control (Henley/Frey/Nixon) 3.05
04. Tequila Sunrise (Henley/Frey) 2.54
05. Desperado (Henley/Frey) 3.37
06. Certain Kind Of Fool (Henley/Frey/Meisner) 3.02
07. Doolin-Dalton (Instrumental) (Henley/Frey/Browne/Souther) 0.48
08. Outlaw Man (Blue) 3.35
09. Saturday Night (Leadon/Henley/Frey/Meisner) 3.20
10. Bitter Creek (Leadon) 5.04
11. Doolin-Dalton/Desperado (Reprise) (Henley/Frey/Browne/Souther) 4.51

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The Eagles Dressed as Cowboys

 

Gong – Flying Teapot (1973)

FrontCover1Flying Teapot is the third studio album by the progressive rock band Gong, originally released by Virgin Records in May 1973. It was the second entry in the Virgin catalogue (V2002) and was released on the same day as the first, Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells (V2001). It was re-issued later in the year, with different cover art, by BYG Actuel in France and Japan. Recorded at Virgin’s Manor Studios, in Oxfordshire, England, it was produced by Giorgio Gomelsky and engineered by “Simon Sandwitch 2 aided by Tom Zen” (Simon Heyworth and Tom Newman).

Subtitled Radio Gnome Invisible, Part 1, it is the first of the Radio Gnome Invisible trilogy of albums, followed by Angel’s Egg in December and You the following October. This trilogy forms a central part of the Gong mythology. The Flying Teapot idea itself was influenced by Russell’s teapot. It was the first Gong album to feature English guitarist Steve Hillage, although he contributed relatively little as he arrived late in the recording process. According to Daevid Allen, “Steve Hillage arrived eventually, but there wasn’t a lot of space left. He played some rhythmick wa wa [sic], some jazzy chords and a spacey solo on ‘Flying Teapot’.” (by wikipedia)

DaevidAllen1974AProduced by Giorgio Gomelsky, notable for his work with the Yardbirds, Brian Auger, and Magma, this relatively early Gong project is a great representation of the Daevid Allen-era Gong. Though not as intricate as its follow-up companion piece, Angel’s Egg, The Flying Teapot is more of a true prog/space rock outing, where hippie-trippy lyrics and space whispering abound, as evidenced in the opening track, “Radio Gnome Invisible.” The following cut, “Flying Teapot,” is the sprawling highlight of the album. At times reminiscent of some early Weather Report jams, though not as jazzy, the tune features prominent bass, standout percussion/drums, and space whispering courtesy of Smyth. Improvisational groaning and percussion bring this jam to a close. “Pothead Pixies” is a fun pop (pot?) tune which probably received very little, if any, airplay due to the lyrics, followed by Blake’s brief synth interlude, “The Octave Doctors and the Crystal Machine.” “Zero the Hero and the Witch’s Spell,” another lengthy composition, features Malherbe’s sax playing, which, at this early point in the Gong evolution, is credited for most of the jazz sounds heard in the music (remember, Pierre Moerlen has yet to join the band). This cut becomes quite heavy near its end before making a clever transition into the final cut, “Witch’s Song/I Am Your Pussy.” Here you hear Smyth’s strange, sexually explicit lyrics, which she embellishes with ethereal voicings and cackling. This, combined with a jazzy sax from Malherbe and some very groovy musical lines near the closing, make for another fun tune. by David Ross Smith)

Gong

Personnel:
Laurie Allan (drums)
Daevid Allen (vocals, guitar)
Tim Blake (synthesizer, vocals)
Steve Hillage (guitar)
Rachid Houari (percussion)
Didier Malherbe (saxophone, flute)
Francis Moze (bass, piano)
Christian Tritsch (guitar)
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Gilli Smyth (space whisper)

LPBooklet

Tracklist:
01. Radio Gnome Invisible (Allen) – 5:32
02. Flying Teapot (Allen/Moze) – 12:30
03. The Pot Head Pixies (Allen) – 3:00
04. The Octave Doctors And The Crystal Machine” (Blake) – 2:00
05. Zero The Hero And The Witch’s Spell (Allen/Blake/Tritsch) – 9:45
06. Witch’s Song/I Am Your Pussy (Smyth/Allen) – 5:10

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Van Morrison – It’s Too Late To Stop Now (1973)

FrontCover1It’s Too Late to Stop Now is a 1974 live double album by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. It features performances that were recorded in concerts at the Troubadour in Los Angeles, California; the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, and the Rainbow in London, during Morrison’s three-month tour with his eleven-piece band, the Caledonia Soul Orchestra, from May to July 1973. Frequently named as one of the best live albums ever, It’s Too Late to Stop Now was recorded during what has often been said to be the singer’s greatest phase as a live performer.It’s Too Late to Stop Now is a 1974 live double album by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. It features performances that were recorded in concerts at the Troubadour in Los Angeles, California; the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, and the Rainbow in London, during Morrison’s three-month tour with his eleven-piece band, the Caledonia Soul Orchestra, from May to July 1973. Frequently named as one of the best live albums ever, It’s Too Late to Stop Now was recorded during what has often been said to be the singer’s greatest phase as a live performer.

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Noted for being a mercurial and temperamental live performer, during this short period of time in 1973, Morrison went on one of his most diligent tours in years. With his eleven-piece band, The Caledonia Soul Orchestra, which included a horn and string section, he has often been said to have been at his live performing peak.

Morrison said about touring during this period:
I am getting more into performing. It’s incredible. When I played Carnegie Hall in the fall something just happened. All of a sudden I felt like ‘you’re back into performing’ and it just happened like that…A lot of times in the past I’ve done gigs and it was rough to get through them. But now the combination seems to be right and it’s been clicking a lot.[9]
It’s like watching a tiger. The tiger isn’t thinking about where he’s going to put his paws or how he’s going to kill… and [it’s the] same thing with Van. He’s just so there that you’re completely drawn to it.“”-Jim Rothernel

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Evidence of his newly invigorated joy in performing was on display during the ending of the over-ten-minute-long dynamic performance of “Cyprus Avenue”. When an audience member shouts out, “Turn it on!”, Morrison good-naturedly replies, “It’s turned on already.” At the very end he finished the concert with a final heartfelt, “It’s too late to stop now!” giving the album its title (this line first appeared on the song “Into the Mystic”).
The concert performances were described by Erik Hage as “sequences of a young soul lion whipping the crowd into a frenzy and then stopping on a dime—teasing out anticipation, rushing, receding, and coaxing every drop out of his band.”

Guitarist John Platania says “He had a funeral for a lot of his old songs on stage. With Caledonia, he really got off on performing. There was definitely joy getting onstage at that point. That was a wonderful time for everybody. It was really like a family. Ordinarily, with rock ‘n’ rollers, jazzers and classical musicians in the band, you’d think it was a three-headed serpent but everybody got along famously.”

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The performances on the live album were from tapes made at the beginning of the tour in Los Angeles and also in Santa Monica and London. Marco Bario, who attended the opening night concert at The Troubadour, said in Playgirl: “he was exceptional. The mood was right, the audience was receptive, and the music left no comparisons to be made. It was the finest opening night performance by a consummate musician that I have ever witnessed.”A large cream-coloured and tiled building stands at the intersection of two roads. Dark grey clouds dominate an overcast sky. Two flags are flying from the fascia of the building, which is covered mostly by a large advertising hoarding.The Rainbow Theatre in London
The London concerts were the first time he had appeared in that city since performing with Them, six years earlier. The two concerts at the Rainbow Theatre in London were referred to as “the rock event of the year” by critics according to Ritchie Yorke in his biography. The 24 July 1973 London Rainbow concert was the first BBC simulcast broadcast simultaneously on BBC 2 television and Radio 2 stereo so that viewers with strategically sited loudspeakers could enjoy “stereo TV”. The broadcast took place on 27 May 1974.

VanMorrison03A mixture of songs that inspired his own musical development, together with some of his own compositions, allied to a backing band and orchestra (The Caledonia Soul Orchestra) and several performances (as noted in the album’s liner notes) that were recorded in concerts at The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California (24–27 May 1973), the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium (29 June 1973) and The Rainbow (23–24 July 1973) in London.

These performance result in what Myles Palmer of the Times reviewed as demolishing “all barriers between the soul, blues, jazz and rock genres”. The songs chosen went back to his days with Them with versions of “Gloria” and “Here Comes the Night”. His first solo hit “Brown Eyed Girl” was performed but not included on the album until the reissue in 2008. M. Mark called the album “an intelligent selection of songs that draws on six of Morrison’s records and five of the musicians he learned from.” These musicians were Bobby Bland, (“Ain’t Nothing You Can Do”), Ray Charles, (“I Believe to My Soul”), Sam Cooke (“Bring It On Home to Me”), two songs by Sonny Boy Williamson II (“Help Me” and “Take Your Hands Out of My Pocket”) and a cover of a Willie Dixon song, “I Just Want to Make Love to You” that was popularized by Muddy Waters.

Unlike most live rock albums, there was no studio overdubbing allowed by Morrison, which resulted in the exclusion of “Moondance” from the album due to one wrong guitar note. Morrison strictly adhered to his concept of authenticity in presenting the live performance but his musical perfectionism prevented him from including “Moondance”.[15] “It’s common practice to go back and fix things, but not with Van,” bass player David Hayes said, “I think that’s what makes it one of the best ever.” It is thought to be one of the first live albums with no overdubs and the first live album to have string players.

Fellow biographer Johnny Rogan said that “Morrison was in the midst of what was arguably his greatest phase as a performer.”

It’s Too Late to Stop Now has been on lists of greatest live albums of all time. (by wikipedia)

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Named for the mighty Belfast singer’s exhortation at the close of his song, Into The Mystic, It’s Too Late…is oft-referred to as one of the greatest live albums ever recorded. Included in the first batch of remasters of the ‘Man”s back catalogue, now’s your chance to argue the toss again.

When Morrison hit the road in the Summer of 1973 -ITLTSN collects material from gigs in LA, Santa Monic and London – he’d not only notched up a run of six absolutely flawless collections of what would probably now be referred to as ‘soul jazz’, but he’d also assembled a team of players that were the equal of his own perfectionism. Such was this perfectionism that the original running order was shorn of his most widely-known tune, Moondance, due to one bum guitar note. In other words this is one of the few live albums you’ll ever hear with NO overdubs.

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When you hear ITLTSN you realise why this had to be the case: Morrison’s blend of his own classics along with a fair smattering of tracks that influenced him is delivered with such passion, and belief that any studio tinkering would be like throwing a tin of paint over the Mona Lisa. In a live setting all the hyperbole about Morrison’s blend of genres into one Celtic, mystic vision makes perfect sense. This is soul music in a very real sense.

It was also a sign of how Van had matured that he can deliver classics like Ray Charles’ I Believe To My Soul or Sonny Boy Williamson’s Help Me and make them his own. Not only this he improves on his own compositions. Cypress Avenue, complete with the strings of the Caledonian Soul orchestra may even be better than the original on Astral Weeks. Quite a feat. And just listen to how playful Morrison is on the improvised breaks (”You say in France!”): grunting, wailing, going beyond mere words in his striving to convey the heart of this music. This is a master live performer at work. And enjoying it.

With just one bonus track (a version of Brown Eyed Girl) this polished edition gives you the chance to hear one of the best bands and their genius of a singer deliver the goods one more time, 35 years on. It’s never too late… (Chris Jones, BBC, 2008)

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Personnel:
Teressa Adams (cello)
Bill Atwood (trumpet, background vocals)
Nancy Ellis (viola)
Tom Halpin (vocals)
David Hayes (bass, background vocals)
Tim Kovatch (violin)
Jef Labes (keyboards)
Van Morrison (vocals)
John Platania (guitar, background vocals)
Nathan Rubin (violin)
Dahaud Shaar (David Shaw) (drums, background vocals)
Jack Schroer (saxophone, tambourine, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do (MaloneScott) 3.48
02. Warm Love (Morrison) 3.05
03. Into The Mystic (Morrison) 4.31
04. These Dreams Of You (Morrison) 3.37
05. I Believe To My Soul (Charles) 4.09
06. I’ve Been Working (Morrison) 3.55
07. Help Me (Williamson/Bass/Dixon) 3.25
08. Wild Children (Morrison) 5.04
09. Domino (Morrison) 4.48
10. I Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 5.16
11. Bring It On Home To Me (Cooke)4.43
12. Saint Dominic’s Preview (Morrison) 6.18
13. Take Your Hand Out Of My Pocket (Williamson) 4.05
14. Listen To The Lion (Morrison) 8.44
15. Here Comes The Night (Berns) 3.14
16. Gloria (Morrison) 4.15
17. Caravan (Morrison) 9.21
18. Cyprus Avenue (Morrison) 10.28
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19. Brown Eyed Girl (Morrison) 3.26

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J. C. Livingstone – Momma Was A Steamroller Lady + Oh La La Me (1973)

FrontCover1Who knows J. C. Livingstone ? I guess only a few people in the wordl.

He recorded in the early 70´s some singles (no LP !) under the direction of Rod McQueen.

Don’t be fooled by the toothy Donny Osmond grin as an evil smirk and darkness lies within… Propelled by savage pounding drums and featuring a nifty slide riff and brash guitars, Momma Was A Steamroller Lady (what a great title) is a real blustering rocker somewhere along the lines of Fortune Teller with a bit of Jumpin’ Jack Flash thrown in for good measure..

Momma was a steamroller lady, sister had a problem or two
Poppa was a freeloading son of a gun who never left money for food
But we were high high high…

This is Glam Rock filtered through 60’s garage Punk and it’s a real classic through and through. (by purepop1uk.blogspot)

Glam Rock / Pop, with those clumping drums and some razzy guitar; not out of the top drawer perhaps, but perfectly acceptable to an enthusiast for the genre such as myself. The ‘B’ loses all the glam and contents itself with being a simple Pop song. (by The Toad)

And sometimes you will hear The Kinks on “Momma Was A Steamroller Lady” !

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Personnel:
J. C. Livingstone (vocals)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Momma Was A Steamroller Lady (McQueen/Michele) 2.07
02. Oh La La Me ((McQueen) 2.03

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Traffic – On The Road (1973)

FrontCover1On The Road is a live album (2 LPs, reissued on 1 CD) by English rock band Traffic, released in 1973. Recorded live in Germany, it features the Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory lineup plus extra keyboardist (for live performances) Barry Beckett.

The initial U.S. release of On the Road (Island/Capitol) 1973 was as a single LP consisting of: “The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys” (edited to 15:10), “Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory,” “(Sometimes I Feel So) Uninspired” & “Light Up or Leave Me Alone.”

The album reached number 40 in the UK and number 29 in the USA. (by wikipedia)

One of the finest live albums….and who knew that Steve Winwood was such a fine guitarist? Was lucky enough to seem them in 1974 and this album is a fine reminder of just how good they were live. (by Cletus Dodgy-Mullet)

Strong effort live effort byTraffic. It’s pretty hard to sound bad when you have the Muscle Shoals rhythm section backing you up. The jams on Glad and Low Spark are burning! They could have eliminated one of the two songs from Shootout at the Fantasy Factory. But overall a good showing. (by Seanon)

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Get “On The Road” the drive is so good that you will want to stay “On The Road” there are not any pot holes, but there is definitely one big Traffic jam! Piano-guitar-Percussion-Bass-Sax-Flute-Drums-Keyboards. A flowing Traffic jam like none you have ever been in, get “On The Road” and experience live Traffic! (by Tripp Gazzeron)

Backed by Muscle Shoals sidemen, Winwood, Capaldi, and Wood rock like never before. Traffic songs that were already great were transformed into extended jazzy jams with interesting interplay between all the players. A funky groove unites all the separate tracks, making this a great driving album or a soundtrack for doing housework. Too bad the sidemen split from Traffic after this, since the album promised potential future development that might have significantly altered the direction of contemporary music. As it is, it’s a lesser-known gem in the rock archive that is absolutely necessary for any true music fan of 70’s progressive rock. (by Manley Peebleson)

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Thefirst time I saw Traffic was in 1973 at the Circus Krone, Munich … And it was such a thrilling concert … they played over 3 hours … one of the finest concerts I ever saw.

And here is one of the finest live albums ever … a timeless classic recording …  !

And a few weeks ago I saw Steve Winwood again … and he´still in a great shape !

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Personnel:
Reebop Kwaku Baah (percussion)
Barry Beckett (keyboards)
Jim Capaldi (drums, percussion, vocals)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
David Hood (bass)
Steve Winwood (vocals, guitar, piano)
Chris Wood (saxophone, flute)

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Tracklist:
01. Glad (Winwood) / Freedom Rider (Capaldi/Winwood) 21.00
02. Tragic Magic (Wood) 8.41
03. (Sometimes I Feel So) Un-Inspired (Capaldi/Winwood) 10.34
04. Shoot Out At The Fantasy Factory (Capaldi/Winwood) 7.04
05. Light Up Or Leave Me Alone (Capaldi) 10.49
06. Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys (Capaldi/Winwood) 12.46

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Rabbit – Broken Arrows (1973)

FrontCover1Recorded around the time of Free’s demise this, Rabbit’s first solo album, is a pleasant enough collection of country and bluegrass tinged singer/songwriter tracks which I’m surprised more people on here haven’t tracked down. Especially given his affiliation with bands like “Free” and “The Who”.

The album is pure seventies band member solo output, from the very first note you can gauge exactly when it was recorded. Hopefully some of you will know what I mean by that and not just all think I’ve gone a bit doolally-tap.

There are some pretty heavyweight (for the time) guests on the album, including former Free men Tetsu Yamauchi and Simon Kirke. Snuffy Walden, who deputised for Paul Kossoff in places on the Free album ‘Heartbreaker’ contributes some guitar work as does Junior and Pete Carr. As well as Kirke the drum stool was occupied by such as Jim Capaldi and Conrad Isadore. Reebop Kwaku Baah also turns out on a couple of tracks with his congas. Rabbit himself plays so many different instruments throughout the album to list them would be almost ridiculous.

AdThe opening track on side two ‘Music Is The Answer’ was actually played live by Free during their final tour although on every bootleg I have it has been retitled ‘Intro ’73’. There is therefore the strong possibilty that it was originally written to be a Free track. ‘Blues My Guitar’ also has a very Free like feel to it.

As I have already said the album is pleasant enough but does sound very dated now. A lot of the songs have an unfinished feel about them as though they could have been developed into something more. The main problem as with most Rabbit releases are the vocals. His voice is definately an acquired taste and his Texan drawl is a problem on some tracks. However, on others it is a bonus. This is of course never more evident than on ‘Music Is The Answer’ this Rabbit sung version being hugely inferior to the Paul Rodgers sung Free version. Having said that though it is still the best song on the album. More proof if any was needed that I haven’t got a clue what I am on about for a great majority of the time ! (by Martin Leedham)

In other words: A forgotten jewel from the early Seventies !!!

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Personnel:
Reebop Kwaku Baah (percussion on 05., 06.)
John “Rabbit” Bundruck (keyboards, vocals, clarinet, harpsichort, mellotron, drums on 04., guitar on 04., glockenspiel on 09.)
Jim Capaldi, (drums on 05.)
Pete Carr (guitar on 06., 08., dobro on 08.)
The Dundee Horns (horns on 06.)
Alan Gerri (guitar on 05.)
Conrad Isidore (drums on 06.)
Junior (guitar on 05,)
Simon Kirke (drums on 05.)
George Larnyoh (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Chris Laurence (bass, cello on 03.)
Gerry Masters (bass on 02., 06.)
Eddy Quansah (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Randy (drums on 02., 09.)
Richard Reeves (bass on 05.)
Pete Vanderpuije (horns, percussion on 02., 07. + 09.)
Snuffy Walden (guitar on 02., 05.. + 09.)
Tetsu Yamauchi (bass on 01., 05.)

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Tracklist:
01 Love, Life And PeaceA1 Love, Life And Peace 2.12
02. Broken Arrows 2.23
03. I Don’t Mind 4.01
04. Ergot 3.06
05. Blues My Guitar 2.47
06. Music Is The Answer 3.50
07. Salt Annie Ginger 2.25
08. London Town 2.39
09. You’re There Somewhere + Boll Weevil Blues 5.36

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Single
Rare German single from this album