Harry Chapin – Portrait Gallery (1975)

LPFrontCover1Harry Chapin was an American singer-songwriter famous for his folk rock songs like ‘Taxi’, ’W*O*L*D’, and ‘Sniper’. A highly talented and popular singer, he gained much fame for his self-described ”story song”, a narrative form that borrowed heavily from older talking blues primarily dealing with themes related to lost opportunities, cruel ironies and life’s hypocrisies. Born as one of the sons of Jim Chapin, a legendary percussionist, Harry was exposed to music at an early age. He played the trumpet as a child and soon switched over to the guitar. He performed with his brothers as a teenager and also played music occasionally with his father who had divorced his mother when Harry was young. He graduated from the Brooklyn Technical High School and studied at Cornell University before embarking on a career as a documentary filmmaker. He soon switched gear and ventured into a musical career and found success with his debut album ’Heads & Tales’. He soon gained a reputation as a classy folk rock singer and also became known for his work on Broadway productions. Along with being a singer par excellence, he was also a committed humanitarian who fought to end world hunger.

The life of this amazing human being was cut short by a fatal accident which claimed him at the age of 38.  (by thefamouspeople.com)

Portrait Gallery is the fifth studio album by the American singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, released in 1975.

An early version of “Someone Keeps Calling My Name”, done in a folk-rock vein reminiscent of The Byrds, appeared on the obscure 1966 album Chapin recorded with his brothers, Chapin Music!. The main guitar riff (and entire arrangement) in this version is strikingly similar to The Blue Things’ equally obscure 1966 track “Doll House.”

The album artwork was designed and illustrated by Milton Glaser. (by wikipedia)

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 Portrait Gallery failed to follow up the great success of “Cats in the Cradle,” and perhaps that was what Chapin had in mind. Much more in line with his first two releases, Portrait Gallery shouldn’t be written off just because it didn’t get that Top 40 hit. The songs have again become more personal, and the track “Bummer” depicts a medal-winning veteran who never quite fit into society. Chilling, to say the least, Portrait Gallery is well worth the effort. (by James Chrispell)

Musically, the album is a solid mix of approachable, mostly ballad oriented, material in the long, narrative “story song” mold of song writing Chapin was most famous for. “Dreams Go By”, despite it’s title one of his more upbeat songs emotionally (Chapin had a penchant for crafting songs with sad or disappointing endings, often dealing with characters based upon life’s losers and societies most disenfranchised) became a fan favorite at his live shows for many years. “Tangled Up Puppett” , also known as “A Song For Jaime” was inspired by Chapin’s relationship with his oldest daughter, as she was entering her teen years. A beautiful melody complete with some of the violin and string arrangements famous in his more acoustic oriented work, with lyrics ripe with metaphor that none the less do a terrific job of expressing the poignancy of growing up and how it changes parent-child dynamics, it’s one of the best stories and from strictly from a pop music perspective one of his most approachable works, amazing that it didn’t enjoy greater success as a single. (by Tom From Pghon)
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Personnel:
Murray Adler (violin)
Ron Bacchiocchi (synthesiser, percussion)
Ed Bednarski (clarinet)
Gene Bianco (harmonica)
George Bohanon (rombone)
Bud Brisbois (rumpet)
Harry Chapin (guitar, vocals)
Steve Chapin (piano, clavinet, vocals)
Tom Chapin (vocals)
Rita Coolidge (vocals)
Assa Drori (violin)
Jesse Ehrlich (cello)
Joan Fishman (vocals)
Joe Flood (vocals)
Ronald Folsom (violin)
James Getzoff (violin)
Jeff Gross (vocals)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Paul Hubinon (trumpet)
Bill Hymanson (strings)
Armand Kaproff (Cello)
Jackie Kelso (saxophone)
Christopher von Koschembahr (vocals)
David Kondziela (vocals)
Kris Kristofferson (vocals)
Paul Leka (piano, celeste, harpsichord)
Jonathan B. Lindle (vocals)
Betty MacIver (vocals)
Pete MacIver (vocals)
Michael Masters (Cello)
Marti McCall (vocals)
Jay Migliori (saxophone, flute)
Tim Moore (keyboards, clavinet)
Todd Mulder (vocals)
Alexander Neiman (viola)
Gareth Nuttycombe (viola)
Ronald Palmer (guitar, vocals)
Geoff Parker (vocals, choir, Chorus)
Judi Parker (vocals)
Don Payne (bass)
Donald Peake (Synthesizer)
Stanley Plummer (violin)
Katherine Anne Porter (vocals)
Frank Porto (accordion)
Kathy Ramos (vocals)
Henry Roth (violin)
Allan Schwartzberg (drums)
Tim Scott (Cello)
Jack Shulman (violin)
Frank Simms (vocals)
George Simms (vocals)
Ken Smith (flute, mandolin)
Bob Springer (percussion)
Billy Swan (vocals)
John Tropea (guitar)
Sheila Turner (vocals)
John Wallace (bass, vocals)
Rob White (whistle)
Susan White (vocals)
Carolyn Willis (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Dreams Go By (H.Chapin) 4.46
02. Tangled Up Puppet (H.Chapin/S.Chapin) 3.45
03. Star Tripper (H.Chapin) 4.19
04. Babysitter (H.Chapin)  4.36
05. Someone Keeps Calling My Name (H.Chapin) 6.30
06. Rock (H.Chapin) 4.16
07. Sandy (H.Chapin) 2.48
08. Dirt Gets Under the Fingernails (H.Chapin) 3.48
09. Bummer (H.Chapin) 9.55
10. Stop Singing These Sad Songs (H.Chapin) 2.59

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Wally – Valley Gardens (1975)

LPFrontCover1Valley Gardens carries on in a similar vein to their debut album, Wally, including a side-long track, “The Reason Why”, which is possibly the best track in their repertoire. Dispensing with the production skills of Rick Wakeman this time around the album is produced by Bob Harris and Wally. (by wikipedia)

A sensitive artist, deafened by our endless noise of opinions, has questioned the value of amateur music criticism. Frankly Mr Shankly, I don’t know if I should give one jot for the opinion of an artist I’d never heard of until yesterday. In spite of my bias, ignorance and inability to make a critical evaluation, I’m going to keep on crawling out of my dunghill to write ”so-called” reviews for ProgArchives. If it wasn’t for this website I wouldn’t be aware of bands like Wally, or Porcupine Tree for that matter.
”Valley Gardens”, released in 1975 and named after the area of Harrogate where most of the band lived, was Wally’s second album. They split up following the album’s release due to a lack support from their record company, although they have recently reformed and released a DVD of their comeback concert and a CD of old demos and new material. Whereas the band’s debut album is a curious hybrid of country and progressive music ”Valley Gardens” is pure symphonic, although extremely light in weight and still featuring the prominent use of traditional instruments.

Wally

Nick Glennie-Smith, who had replaced original keyboards player Paul Gerrett, ploughs straight in with a fitful synthesizer flurry on the title track before it settles into a gossamer space rock groove of intertwining Mellotron and steel guitar. ”Nez Perce” features guest vocals by American soul singer Madeline Bell, probably most famous for her work with Blue Mink. The Nez Perce, a tribe of Native Americans, got their name from the French term for pierced noses. Among the traditions of the Nez Perce is the legend of the Wallowa Lake Monster, often referred to as Wally. This song artfully combines the band’s pop sensibility with Pete Sage’s ethereal electric violin, and it even managed to achieve some airplay back in the day.

”The Mood I’m In” is a fairly nondescript West Coast ballad with a bit of saxophone tagged onto the end for interest, but it’s ”The Reason Why” that grabs the most attention here. At over 19-minutes it takes up the entire second half of the album and is based on Lord Tennyson’s anti-war poem ”The Charge of the Light Brigade”. It’s an ambitious, moving piece and no mistake, with a lengthy improvised instrumental section.
”Valley Gardens” neither sucks nor rules. It will obviously have more appeal for fans of mellow progressive music, but others might even enjoy something along the way. Wally are sadly over-looked and I wonder if they would be whining if there were more than half a million reviews of their output online? (by seventhsojourn)

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Personnel:
Pete Cosker (guitar, vocals, bass)
Paul Middleton (steel guitar, bass)
Roger Narraway (drums, percussion)
Pete Sage (violin, bass, mandolin)
Nick Glennie-Smith (keyboards)
Roy Webber (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Valley Gardens (Gerrett/Cosker) 9.51
02. Nez Perce (Webber) 5.03
03. The Mood I’m In (Webber) 7.07
04. The Reason Why 1828

04.1. Nolan (Sage/Webber)
04.2.The Charge (Glennie-Smith/Sage)
04.3. Disillusion (Webbber)
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The New Order – Same (1977)

FrontCover1The New Order was an American hard rock and protopunk band. The band was based in Los Angeles and existed from early 1975 to October 1976.
After The Stooges imploded in 1974, former Stooges lead guitarist Ron Asheton formed a new band, ultimately acquiring drummer Dennis “Machine Gun” Thompson, bass player Jimmy Recca and keyboardist Scott Thurston. For a while, the new band shared rehearsal space at a house owned by Ray Manzarek, during his collaboration with Stooges’ lead singer Iggy Pop.
When The New Order’s first singer Jeff Spry was forced to quit the band (due to jail time incurred from a drinking/quaalude related DUI coupled with failure to perform community service), The New Order’s first drummer, K.J. Knight, recommended Dave Gilbert as a replacement. K.J. and Gilbert had both been veterans of the 1971/1972 incarnations of Ted Nugent’s Amboy Dukes. After keyboardist Scott Thurston quit, his position was filled by a second guitarist, Ray Gunn, another Detroit veteran who was recommended by Dennis Thompson.

Leading up to the making of The New Order’s first demo tapes, long time Blue Öyster Cult producer, Sandy Pearlman, was approached to produce the band but ultimately this didn’t come together. The back cover of the Declaration Of War album bears the inscription: “This album is dedicated to the CULT”, furthering the links with the Blue Öyster Cult.

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A projected collaboration with ’60s and ’70s Rock impresario, Kim Fowley, was also talked about, but never came to fruition.
The New Order had at least one classic, the song Rock ‘n’ Roll Soldiers, later covered by The Hitmen and more recently covered by The Hellacopters. One of the lyrics from the song, the infamous battle-cry “The War Against The Jive”, is used as the heading to the liner-notes of Radio Birdman’s 2001 release, The Essential Radio Birdman (1974 – 1978). The exact heading is: “Total Victory: Radio Birdman’s War Against The Jive”.
The New Order recorded demos twice in Los Angeles: First in 1975 with Jeff Spry as lead singer and then in 1976 with Dave Gilbert as lead singer. Both recordings were later released with a production by Neil Merryweather in 1977 as a single album “The New Order”, on the Fun Records/Isadora label and distributed by RCA Records. The album’s lo-fi quality was the result of it being produced from Ron Asheton’s inferior cassette copies, instead of the original master tapes.  (by wkipedia)
Really this is just a selection of demos – i love the Stooges and there are some good song ideas on here, however nothing is of a quality that could really be enjoyed of its own merit. I have no doubts that the New Order would have been great, IF they had been produced/recorded properly though. (by Pete)

Okay … rough, loud and dirty ! The New Order … Brothers and sisters !

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Personnel:
Ron Asheton (guitar)
Dave Gilbert (vocals on 05. – 07.)
Ray Gun (guitar)
Jimi Recca (bass)
Jeff Spry (vocals on 01. 04.)
Dennis Thompson (drums)
Scott Thurston (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Lucky Strike 3.52
02. Declaration Of War 2.48
03. Hollywood Holidays 3.53
04. Sidewinder 3.14
05. I Can’t Quit Ya 3.02
06. Rock ‘N’ Roll Soldiers 4.03
07. Of Another World 4.47

All Songs written by:

Tracks 01 – 04 (1975):
eton – Ray Gun – Jimi Recca – Jeff Spry – Dennis Thompson – Scott Thurston

Tracks 05 – 07. (1976):
on – Ray Gun – Jimi Recca – Dave Gilbert – Dennis Thompson – Scott Thurston

 

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Melanie Safka – BBC On Air (1997)

FrontCover1Ten of the 18 songs on this CD were recorded live in 1975, another four date from 1969, and the last four are from 1989. Thus, we get a glimpse of Melanie in performance across a period of 20 years, doing a variety of material ranging from her own originals (including familiar songs such as “Beautiful People” and “Baby Guitar”) to covers of Phil Ochs’s “Chords of Fame,” Alan J. Lerner and Frederick Loewe’s “Almost Like Being in Love” (from Brigadoon), and the Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday.” Her rendition of “Almost Like Being in Love” is a folk-blues style interpretation, and one of the most downbeat and interesting (if not necessarily successful) takes on the song ever done. There is a certain sameness to much of the rest of the material that works against too many people other than hardcore fans appreciating this disc, although some numbers, such as “The Nickel Song” and “Beautiful People,” always work. The version of “Ruby Tuesday,” like the other three 1989 vintage songs here, features a full band with synthesizers and drum machines, and is a bit jarring, though Melanie still throws herself impressively into the classic Rolling Stones song. (by Bruce Eder)

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Featuring a series of live recordings covering a period of 20 years this CD provides excellent sound and a unique record of Melanie’s live and session work for the BBC. The first 10 tracks feature a concert recorded for the BBC Radio One In Concert series in 1975. Track 5 is incorrectly listed and is actually a song called Here We Go Again. During this concert Melanie is accompanied by Barry Lee Harwood on guitar and mandolin. Barry played on Sunsets and Other Beginnings and As I See It Now but fails to be credited on the cover of the CD.

Tracks 11 to 14 are rare session recordings from 1969, just Melanie and her guitar. Visit My Dreams is perhaps better known as Deep Down Low from Melanie’s second album.
While all tracks have so far featured acoustic versions of songs, the last four feature Melanie with a full band. The tracks where recorded during a visit to the UK to promote Cowabonga. The musicians that accompany Melanie also accompanied her during two concerts at the Shaw Theatre in London in 1989. (by melaniesafkarecordings.uk)

And I confess … I´m a real fan of Melanie Safka … what  wonderful voice, what sensitive music and lyrics …

But … her 1989 recordings were not really good (especially tzhe Version of “Goodybye Ruby Tuesday is more than lousy …) … but …

… don’t miss “Rock An’ Roll Heart” — a song every baby boomer can relate to.
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Personnel:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:
Barry Lee Hardwood (guitar, mandolin)
Melanie (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 1969:
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 89:
Kay Langford (vocals)
Justin Myers (bass)
Neil Palmer (keyboards)
Alan Ross (guitar, background vocals)
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)
Chris Staines (background vocals)
Pete Thompson (drums)

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Tracklist:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:

01. Autumn Lady (Safka) 4.13
02. Chords Of Fame (Ochs) 5.14
03. Almost Like Being In Love (Lerner/Loewe) 5.09
04. Stoneground Words (Safka) 5.09
05. Here I Am (Safka) 2.37
06. Any Guy (Safka) 2.560
07. Do You Believe (Safka) 6.08
08. Leftover Wine (Safka) 5.44
09. The Nickel Song (Safka) 4.03
10. Beautiful People (Safka) 5.31

BBC Session, September 1969:
11. Visit My Dreams (Deep Down Low) (Safka) 3.51
12. Up Town And Down (Safka) 2.51
13. Baby Guitar (Safka) 2.49
14. Tuning My Guitar (Safka) 4.16

BBC Session, September 89:
15. Ruby Tuesday (Jagger/Richards) 3.50
16. Rock ‘n’ Roll Heart (Safka) 5.17
17. Racing Heart (Safka) 5.17
18. Apathy (Safka/Schekeryk) 3.50

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Various Artists – The Rocky Horror Picture Show (OST) (1975)

FrrontCover1The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the original soundtrack album to the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show, an adaptation of the musical The Rocky Horror Show that had opened in 1973. The soundtrack was released as an album in 1975 by Ode Records, produced by Richard Hartley.
This low-budget freak show/cult classic/cultural institution concerns the misadventures of Brad Majors (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss (Susan Sarandon) inside a strange mansion that they come across on a rainy night. After the wholesome pair profess their love through an opening song, their car breaks down in the woods, and they seek refuge in a towering castle nearby. Greeting them at the door is a ghoulish butler named Riff Raff (Richard O’Brien), who introduces them to a bacchanalian collection of partygoers dressed in outfits from some sort of interplanetary thrift shop. The host of this gathering is a transvestite clad in lingerie, Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry), a mad scientist who claims to be from another planet. With assistants Columbia (Nell Campbell) and Magenta (Patricia Quinn) looking on, Frank unveils his latest creation — a figure wrapped in gauze and submerged in a tank full of liquid.

With the addition of colored dyes and some assistance from the weather, Frank brings to life a blonde young beefcake wearing nothing but skimpy shorts, who launches into song in his first minute of life. Just when Brad and Janet think things couldn’t get any stranger, a biker (Meat Loaf) bursts onto the scene to reclaim Columbia, his ex-girlfriend. When Frank kills the biker, it’s clear that Brad and Janet will be guests for the night, and that they may be next on Frank’s list — whether for murder or carnal delights is uncertain. And just what is that mystery meat they’re eating for dinner, anyway? In addition to playing Riff Raff, O’Brien wrote the catchy songs, with John Barry and Richard Hartley composing the score. (vy Derek Armstrong)

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The album peaked at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 in 1978. It reached No. 12 on the Australian albums chart and No. 11 on the New Zealand albums chart. William Ruhlmann of Allmusic gave the album a star rating of five stars out of five and described it as the “definitive version of the [Rocky Horror] score”.

Following its initial release, the album was not successful, and was deleted everywhere but in Canada. Marty Scott, co-founder of Jem Records, obtained a licensing agreement from Ode Records owner Lou Adler, which enabled the album to be imported to the United States. Scott also obtained a production and distribution license from Adler, which resulted in renewed interest in the album.

The soundtrack omits two of the songs sung in the film: Rocky’s “The Sword of Damocles”, and the Frank-N-Furter-led “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” (often erroneously referred to as “Wise Up, Janet Weiss”). Also omitted is “Once in a While,” which was shot for the film but later unincluded.
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“The Sword of Damocles” and “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” are included on the album “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” however “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” is missing the last verse (don’t get hot and flustered) and they are in mono and ported directly from the film itself and so include all the sound effects and dialogue that would normally be omitted from a soundtrack album.
In 2011 these three songs were released, as MP3 format only, in their stereo, studio mixes on the download only release “The Rocky Horror Picture Show Complete Soundtrack: Absolute Treasures 2011 Special Edition”. The album was later issued on double red vinyl for the film’s 40th anniversary. However, incidental music and cues are not included and “The Sword of Damocles” features an unknown lead vocalist in place of Trevor White. The latter is included with Trevor White’s vocals as a bonus track for the iTunes edition; this is the same version found on the “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” release, albeit in stereo and contains the dialogue and sound effects from the film. (by wikipedia)
the-rocky-horror-picture-show
For the 1975 film version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, American producer Lou Adler wisely mixed the best of the London and Los Angeles stage versions, shooting the movie in England with Tim Curry and several of the other original cast members, plus Meatloaf (years before Bat Out of Hell), and Americans Barry Bostwick and Susan Sarandon as the innocent couple Brad and Janet. Adler also brought back original London stage musicians in place of the slick studio musicians who had marred the L.A. cast album. The film version resequenced the songs and reassigned some of the vocals, with Brad’s song “Once in a While” dropped. But it all worked out fine. The strings that were added to ballads like “Science Fiction/Double Feature” only improved them; the rockers rocked out; Bostwick and Sarandon proved to be the best Brad and Janet ever; the original cast members, especially Curry, reveled in the opportunity to immortalize their portrayals; and Rocky Horror’s potential as a witty parody of cheap movies, rock & roll, and sexual mores was fully realized.

The film soundtrack album became the definitive version of the score, despite lacking the songs “Planet Shmanet Janet” and “The Sword of Damocles.” The Rocky Horror Picture Show was not successful in its initial theatrical run, but then a strange thing happened. In 1976, the Waverly Theater in New York’s Greenwich Village began showing the film at midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Soon, a cult of repeat viewers began turning up every week; they began to dress like the characters, call out their own comments at strategic moments, sing along, and add their own theatrical effects. The phenomenon spread across the U.S., with fans rivaling Trekkies and Deadheads for loyalty and eccentricity, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show took on a life Richard O’Brien never could have anticipated. (William Ruhlmann)

MoviePoster
Personnel:
Count Ian Blair (guitar)
John Bundrick (keyboards)
Mick Grabham (guitar)
Phil Kenzie (saxophone)
B.J. Wilson (drums)
Dave Wintour (bass)
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background vocals:
Abigale Haness – Susan Morse – Bruce Scott
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Trackist:

Richard O’Brien:
01. Science Fiction/Double Feature 4.30

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon:
02. Dammit Janet 2.51

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Richard O’Brien:
03. Over At The Frankenstein Place 2.37

Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Little Nell:
04. Time Warp 3.15

Tim Curry:
05. Sweet Transvestite 3.21
06. I Can Make You A Man 2.07

Meat Loaf:
07. Hot Patootie – Bless My Soul  3.00

Tim Curry:
0
8. I Can Make You A Man (Reprise) 1.44

Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Patricia Quinn:
09. Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch Me 2.27

Jonathan Adams, Little Nell, Susan Sarandon, Tim Curry:
10. Eddie 2.44

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Peter Hinwood, Tim Curry, Trevor White, Jonathan Adams   :
11.1. Rose Tint My World :
11.2. Floor Show
11.3. Fanfare/Don’t Dream It
11.4. Wild and Untamed Thing 8.13

Tim Curry:
12. I’m Going Home 2.48

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Jonathan Adams:
13. Super Heroes 2.45

Richard O’Brien:
14. Science Fiction/Double Feature (Reprise) 1.26
+

15. Time Warp (1989 remix – extended version) 5.36
16. Time Warp (music – 1 = background track = U mix) 4.09

All Songs written by Richard O’Brien.
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Eagles – One Of These Nights (1975)

frontcover1One of These Nights is the fourth studio album by the Eagles, released in 1975. The record would become the Eagles’ first number one album on Billboard’s album chart in July that year, and yielded three Top 10 singles, “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Take It to the Limit”. Its title song is the group’s second number one single on the Billboard Hot 100. The album sold four million copies and was nominated for Grammy Album of the Year. A single from the album, “Lyin’ Eyes”, was also nominated for Record of the Year, and won the Eagles’ first Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

One of These Nights is the last Eagles album to feature guitarist Bernie Leadon, who was later replaced by Joe Walsh. Leadon left the band after the One Of These Nights tour. The seventh track, “Visions”, is the only Eagles song on which lead guitarist Don Felder sang the lead vocals, despite his desire to write and sing more songs. The album was the band’s commercial breakthrough, transforming them into international superstars and establishing them as America’s number one band. They went on a worldwide tour to promote the Album.
The Eagles began working on their fourth album in late 1974. Glenn Frey and Don Henley wrote four of the nine songs by themselves, and they also collaborated with other members of the band on three other songs. Many of the songs were written while Frey and tshirtHenley were sharing a house in Beverly Hills, including “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, “Take It To The Limit” and “After The Thrill Is Gone”. Henley joked in an interview with Cameron Crowe that it was their “satanic country-rock period” because “it was a dark time, both politically and musically” in America, referring to the turmoil in Washington and disco music starting to take off. He added: “We thought, “Well, how can we write something with that flavor, with that kind of beat, and still have the dangerous guitars?” We wanted to capture the spirit of the times.”
Frey said that “One Of These Nights was the most fluid and ‘painless’ album [they] ever made”, and thought that the quality of the songs he wrote with Henley had improved dramatically. However, Leadon was becoming increasingly unhappy during the making of the album. He wrote three of the nine songs, none of which was released as a single. He was unhappy with the more rock direction of the band that Frey preferred, at one time walking out of a meeting to discuss which take to use after the recording of a rock track. Leadon would leave the band in late 1975, after the album was released.
Frey also began to sing less as a lead singer starting with this album, singing solo lead on only one song (“Lyin’ Eyes”) and sharing lead vocals with Henley on another (“After the Thrill Is Gone”). Henley later said: “[Glenn] was generous in that respect … If I began to do more than he did, it was because if someone had a strong suit he would play that card. ‘You sing this, you sing it better,’ that kind of thing.” Randy Meisner sings lead on two songs, one of which, “Take it to the Limit”, a composition he co-wrote with Frey and Henley, was released as the third single from the album. It is the only Eagles single on which Meisner sings lead.
singles
The cover for the album is an image of an artwork by Boyd Elder, also known as “El Chingadero”. Elder created artwork of painted skulls in the early 1970s, and pieces of his work, titled “American Fetish”, were exhibited in an art gallery in Venice, California in 1972. Among those who attended the opening were members of the Eagles who performed “Witchy Woman” at the show, an early appearance by the band as the Eagles. Elder was also a friend of the album cover designer Gary Burden, who had been responsible for the Eagles’ three previous albums and who was interested in using one of Elder’s pieces for this cover.[10] Elder presented two of his works to the Eagles in Dallas in late 1974, one of which was then chosen for the cover of One of These Nights. Later another work of Elder, an image of an eagle’s skull, would be used for the cover of Their Greatest Hits album. The painted animal skull motif was also used in the cover for their compilation album The Very Best of, and the skull of One of These Nights was used for the cover of the documentary History of the Eagles.
eagleslive1975
The album cover for One of These Nights is the last Eagles album design on which Burden was involved. He made the skull stand up off the page by debossing large areas together with detailed and elaborate embossing in the wings and feathers. According to Burden, the cover image represents where the band was coming from and where they were going – “The cow skull is pure cowboy, folk, the decorations are American Indian inspired and the future is represented by the more polished reflective glass beaded surfaces covering the skull. All set against the dark eagle feather wings that speak of mysterious powers.” The album artwork received a Grammy nomination for Best Album Package.
Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone, in an early review of the album, expressed a liking for the album for its relative lack of conceptual pretension compared to the Eagles’ previous albums, but did not consider it a great album. He thought the band’s ensemble playing “unprecedentedly excellent” but they “lack an outstanding singer”, and that while “many of their tunes are pretty, none are eloquent.” He added: “And for all their worldly perceptiveness, the Eagles’ lyrics never transcend Hollywood slickness. Their hard rock has always seemed a bit forced, constructed more from commercial considerations than from any urgent impulse to boogie. And when the Eagles attempt to communicate wild sexuality, they sound only boyishly enthused. These limitations, however, seem built-in to the latter-day concept of Southern California rock, of which the Eagles remain the unrivaled exponents.
eagleslive1975_02
“The Rolling Stone Album Guide judged the album to be the band’s “most musically adventurous outing yet, flirting with disco on the title song, a waltz on “Take It to the Limit”, and bluegrass psychedelia on Leadon’s “Journey of the Sorcerer”.
William Ruhlmann of AllMusic in a retrospective review was more favorable; he thought that it had more original material and that the material was more polished. He wrote: “One of These Nights was the culmination of the blend of rock, country, and folk styles the Eagles had been making since their start; there wasn’t much that was new, just the same sorts of things done better than they had been before. In particular, a lyrical stance—knowing and disillusioned, but desperately hopeful—had evolved, and the musical arrangements were tighter and more purposeful. The result was the Eagles’ best-realized and most popular album so far.”
The album first entered the Billboard 200 chart at No. 25 the week of its release, and climbed to No. 1 in its fourth week on the chart, where it then stayed the next four weeks. It is the first of the four consecutive No. 1 albums by the Eagles. The album was certified Gold three weeks after its release on June 30, 1975, and it received its 4× Platinum certification on March 20, 2001, signifying shipment of over 4 million copies in the United States.
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Personnel:
Don Felder (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar,  piano, harmonium)
Don Henley (vocals, drums, percussion, tabla)
Bernie Leadon (vocals, guitar, banjo, mandolin, pedal steel-guitar)
Randy Meisner (vocals, bass)
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David Bromberg (fiddle on 04.)
Albhy Galuten – Synthesizer on 03.)
Jim Ed Norman – piano on 05. + 06.)
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The Royal Martian Orchestra conducted by Jim Ed Norman (04.)
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Tracklist:
01. One Of These Nights (Henley/Frey) 4.51
02. Too Many Hands (Meisner/Felder) 4.43
03. Hollywood Waltz (B.Leadon/T.Leadon/Henley/Frey) 4.04
04. Journey Of The Sorcerer (B. Leadon) 6.40
05. Lyin’ Eyes (Henley/Frey) 6.22
06. Take It To The Limit (Meisner/Henley/Frey) 4.49
07. Visions (Felder/Henley) 3.58
08. After The Thrill Is Gone (Henley/Frey) 3.56
09. I Wish You Peace (Davis/B. Leadon) 3.45
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*
**

Alquin – Nobody Can Wait Forever (1975)

frontcover1Alquin is a band from The Netherlands whose debut album is a versatile, Canterburish album. Alquin’s second album is the best in their catalogue. With the third album there were some changes. The band wanted to make less complicated music, and more rock music. To achieve this they asked producer Rodger Bain. They also had a new vocalist, Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). He had a more powerful voice, than Tarenskeen, and this fitted the music they were aiming for better.
The opener still sounds like the old Alquin, keyboard orientated music with good guitar and sax solos. Compared to the first two albums, the tracks are more vocal orientated. After the opener it is more straightforward rock as in Mr Widow and Farewell, Miss Barcelona, or even hardrock in Wheelchair Groupie. There are however still beautiful instrumental passages and great solos (for instance in the middle part of Stranger). The best track on this album and the most progressive is the last one. Still a good album, but not as impressive as their second one. (by Agemo)
This is the best Alquin album. On this album are some powerfull tracks like New Guinea Sunrise, Stranger, Darling Superstar, Revolution’s Eve and the single Wheelchair Groupie. Alquin plays progressive rock with some blues influences. Your hear the hammond organ, sax and guitar as the main instruments together with the beautiful voice of Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). A good album is it’s predecessor Mountain Queen. (by hcklvanzessen )
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Although less progressive than the two previous albums, this is by far my favourite ALQUIN record. This is the first album that feature vocalist Michael Van Dijk, his versatile performance in addition to the new approach of the compositions gives a powerful and overall fresher sound to the band. Highlights are the album opener, the almost hard-rocker Stranger and the album closer Revolution’s Eve, coincidentaly the proggiest tracks on this record.
While most people may enjoy the two previous albums better, I prefer the less complicated compositions featured on this album, as I said before ALQUIN managed to sound really fresh and powerful but keeping their progressive influences. (by Prosciutto)
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Personnel:
Ferdinand Bakker (guitar, piano, vocals)
Michel van Dijk (vocals)
Dick Franssen (keyboards, synthesizer)
Hein Mars (bass)
Ronald Ottenhoff (Saxophone, flute)
Job Tarenskeen (saxophone, vocals, drums, percussion)
Paul Weststrate (drums)
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The Thunderthighs (background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. New Guinea Sunrise (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 6.37
01.1. Sunrise
01.2.Wake Me Up
02. Mr. Widow (Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 3.32
03. Stranger (Bakker/v.Dijk) 6.41
03.1. Stranger
03.2. You Might As Well Fall
04. Darling Superstar (Bakker/v.Dijk)
05. Farewell, Miss Barcelona (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 2.58
06. Wheelchair Groupie (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 3.12
07. Revolution’s Eve 7.27
07.1.Revolution’s Theme (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff)
07.2. Nobody Can’t Wait Forever (Bakker/Tarenskeen)
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She moved her chair up on the stage
Her Hasselblad was on her knees
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Her wonderboy came down the stairs
With silver pants and golden hair
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Watch it . . .