Various Artists – The Rocky Horror Picture Show (OST) (1975)

FrrontCover1The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the original soundtrack album to the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show, an adaptation of the musical The Rocky Horror Show that had opened in 1973. The soundtrack was released as an album in 1975 by Ode Records, produced by Richard Hartley.
This low-budget freak show/cult classic/cultural institution concerns the misadventures of Brad Majors (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss (Susan Sarandon) inside a strange mansion that they come across on a rainy night. After the wholesome pair profess their love through an opening song, their car breaks down in the woods, and they seek refuge in a towering castle nearby. Greeting them at the door is a ghoulish butler named Riff Raff (Richard O’Brien), who introduces them to a bacchanalian collection of partygoers dressed in outfits from some sort of interplanetary thrift shop. The host of this gathering is a transvestite clad in lingerie, Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry), a mad scientist who claims to be from another planet. With assistants Columbia (Nell Campbell) and Magenta (Patricia Quinn) looking on, Frank unveils his latest creation — a figure wrapped in gauze and submerged in a tank full of liquid.

With the addition of colored dyes and some assistance from the weather, Frank brings to life a blonde young beefcake wearing nothing but skimpy shorts, who launches into song in his first minute of life. Just when Brad and Janet think things couldn’t get any stranger, a biker (Meat Loaf) bursts onto the scene to reclaim Columbia, his ex-girlfriend. When Frank kills the biker, it’s clear that Brad and Janet will be guests for the night, and that they may be next on Frank’s list — whether for murder or carnal delights is uncertain. And just what is that mystery meat they’re eating for dinner, anyway? In addition to playing Riff Raff, O’Brien wrote the catchy songs, with John Barry and Richard Hartley composing the score. (vy Derek Armstrong)

MoviePic01
The album peaked at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 in 1978. It reached No. 12 on the Australian albums chart and No. 11 on the New Zealand albums chart. William Ruhlmann of Allmusic gave the album a star rating of five stars out of five and described it as the “definitive version of the [Rocky Horror] score”.

Following its initial release, the album was not successful, and was deleted everywhere but in Canada. Marty Scott, co-founder of Jem Records, obtained a licensing agreement from Ode Records owner Lou Adler, which enabled the album to be imported to the United States. Scott also obtained a production and distribution license from Adler, which resulted in renewed interest in the album.

The soundtrack omits two of the songs sung in the film: Rocky’s “The Sword of Damocles”, and the Frank-N-Furter-led “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” (often erroneously referred to as “Wise Up, Janet Weiss”). Also omitted is “Once in a While,” which was shot for the film but later unincluded.
MoviePic02
“The Sword of Damocles” and “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” are included on the album “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” however “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” is missing the last verse (don’t get hot and flustered) and they are in mono and ported directly from the film itself and so include all the sound effects and dialogue that would normally be omitted from a soundtrack album.
In 2011 these three songs were released, as MP3 format only, in their stereo, studio mixes on the download only release “The Rocky Horror Picture Show Complete Soundtrack: Absolute Treasures 2011 Special Edition”. The album was later issued on double red vinyl for the film’s 40th anniversary. However, incidental music and cues are not included and “The Sword of Damocles” features an unknown lead vocalist in place of Trevor White. The latter is included with Trevor White’s vocals as a bonus track for the iTunes edition; this is the same version found on the “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” release, albeit in stereo and contains the dialogue and sound effects from the film. (by wikipedia)
the-rocky-horror-picture-show
For the 1975 film version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, American producer Lou Adler wisely mixed the best of the London and Los Angeles stage versions, shooting the movie in England with Tim Curry and several of the other original cast members, plus Meatloaf (years before Bat Out of Hell), and Americans Barry Bostwick and Susan Sarandon as the innocent couple Brad and Janet. Adler also brought back original London stage musicians in place of the slick studio musicians who had marred the L.A. cast album. The film version resequenced the songs and reassigned some of the vocals, with Brad’s song “Once in a While” dropped. But it all worked out fine. The strings that were added to ballads like “Science Fiction/Double Feature” only improved them; the rockers rocked out; Bostwick and Sarandon proved to be the best Brad and Janet ever; the original cast members, especially Curry, reveled in the opportunity to immortalize their portrayals; and Rocky Horror’s potential as a witty parody of cheap movies, rock & roll, and sexual mores was fully realized.

The film soundtrack album became the definitive version of the score, despite lacking the songs “Planet Shmanet Janet” and “The Sword of Damocles.” The Rocky Horror Picture Show was not successful in its initial theatrical run, but then a strange thing happened. In 1976, the Waverly Theater in New York’s Greenwich Village began showing the film at midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Soon, a cult of repeat viewers began turning up every week; they began to dress like the characters, call out their own comments at strategic moments, sing along, and add their own theatrical effects. The phenomenon spread across the U.S., with fans rivaling Trekkies and Deadheads for loyalty and eccentricity, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show took on a life Richard O’Brien never could have anticipated. (William Ruhlmann)

MoviePoster
Personnel:
Count Ian Blair (guitar)
John Bundrick (keyboards)
Mick Grabham (guitar)
Phil Kenzie (saxophone)
B.J. Wilson (drums)
Dave Wintour (bass)
+
background vocals:
Abigale Haness – Susan Morse – Bruce Scott
BackCover
Trackist:

Richard O’Brien:
01. Science Fiction/Double Feature 4.30

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon:
02. Dammit Janet 2.51

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Richard O’Brien:
03. Over At The Frankenstein Place 2.37

Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Little Nell:
04. Time Warp 3.15

Tim Curry:
05. Sweet Transvestite 3.21
06. I Can Make You A Man 2.07

Meat Loaf:
07. Hot Patootie – Bless My Soul  3.00

Tim Curry:
0
8. I Can Make You A Man (Reprise) 1.44

Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Patricia Quinn:
09. Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch Me 2.27

Jonathan Adams, Little Nell, Susan Sarandon, Tim Curry:
10. Eddie 2.44

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Peter Hinwood, Tim Curry, Trevor White, Jonathan Adams   :
11.1. Rose Tint My World :
11.2. Floor Show
11.3. Fanfare/Don’t Dream It
11.4. Wild and Untamed Thing 8.13

Tim Curry:
12. I’m Going Home 2.48

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Jonathan Adams:
13. Super Heroes 2.45

Richard O’Brien:
14. Science Fiction/Double Feature (Reprise) 1.26
+

15. Time Warp (1989 remix – extended version) 5.36
16. Time Warp (music – 1 = background track = U mix) 4.09

All Songs written by Richard O’Brien.
LabelB1

 

*
**

Booklet02A

Eagles – One Of These Nights (1975)

frontcover1One of These Nights is the fourth studio album by the Eagles, released in 1975. The record would become the Eagles’ first number one album on Billboard’s album chart in July that year, and yielded three Top 10 singles, “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Take It to the Limit”. Its title song is the group’s second number one single on the Billboard Hot 100. The album sold four million copies and was nominated for Grammy Album of the Year. A single from the album, “Lyin’ Eyes”, was also nominated for Record of the Year, and won the Eagles’ first Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

One of These Nights is the last Eagles album to feature guitarist Bernie Leadon, who was later replaced by Joe Walsh. Leadon left the band after the One Of These Nights tour. The seventh track, “Visions”, is the only Eagles song on which lead guitarist Don Felder sang the lead vocals, despite his desire to write and sing more songs. The album was the band’s commercial breakthrough, transforming them into international superstars and establishing them as America’s number one band. They went on a worldwide tour to promote the Album.
The Eagles began working on their fourth album in late 1974. Glenn Frey and Don Henley wrote four of the nine songs by themselves, and they also collaborated with other members of the band on three other songs. Many of the songs were written while Frey and tshirtHenley were sharing a house in Beverly Hills, including “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, “Take It To The Limit” and “After The Thrill Is Gone”. Henley joked in an interview with Cameron Crowe that it was their “satanic country-rock period” because “it was a dark time, both politically and musically” in America, referring to the turmoil in Washington and disco music starting to take off. He added: “We thought, “Well, how can we write something with that flavor, with that kind of beat, and still have the dangerous guitars?” We wanted to capture the spirit of the times.”
Frey said that “One Of These Nights was the most fluid and ‘painless’ album [they] ever made”, and thought that the quality of the songs he wrote with Henley had improved dramatically. However, Leadon was becoming increasingly unhappy during the making of the album. He wrote three of the nine songs, none of which was released as a single. He was unhappy with the more rock direction of the band that Frey preferred, at one time walking out of a meeting to discuss which take to use after the recording of a rock track. Leadon would leave the band in late 1975, after the album was released.
Frey also began to sing less as a lead singer starting with this album, singing solo lead on only one song (“Lyin’ Eyes”) and sharing lead vocals with Henley on another (“After the Thrill Is Gone”). Henley later said: “[Glenn] was generous in that respect … If I began to do more than he did, it was because if someone had a strong suit he would play that card. ‘You sing this, you sing it better,’ that kind of thing.” Randy Meisner sings lead on two songs, one of which, “Take it to the Limit”, a composition he co-wrote with Frey and Henley, was released as the third single from the album. It is the only Eagles single on which Meisner sings lead.
singles
The cover for the album is an image of an artwork by Boyd Elder, also known as “El Chingadero”. Elder created artwork of painted skulls in the early 1970s, and pieces of his work, titled “American Fetish”, were exhibited in an art gallery in Venice, California in 1972. Among those who attended the opening were members of the Eagles who performed “Witchy Woman” at the show, an early appearance by the band as the Eagles. Elder was also a friend of the album cover designer Gary Burden, who had been responsible for the Eagles’ three previous albums and who was interested in using one of Elder’s pieces for this cover.[10] Elder presented two of his works to the Eagles in Dallas in late 1974, one of which was then chosen for the cover of One of These Nights. Later another work of Elder, an image of an eagle’s skull, would be used for the cover of Their Greatest Hits album. The painted animal skull motif was also used in the cover for their compilation album The Very Best of, and the skull of One of These Nights was used for the cover of the documentary History of the Eagles.
eagleslive1975
The album cover for One of These Nights is the last Eagles album design on which Burden was involved. He made the skull stand up off the page by debossing large areas together with detailed and elaborate embossing in the wings and feathers. According to Burden, the cover image represents where the band was coming from and where they were going – “The cow skull is pure cowboy, folk, the decorations are American Indian inspired and the future is represented by the more polished reflective glass beaded surfaces covering the skull. All set against the dark eagle feather wings that speak of mysterious powers.” The album artwork received a Grammy nomination for Best Album Package.
Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone, in an early review of the album, expressed a liking for the album for its relative lack of conceptual pretension compared to the Eagles’ previous albums, but did not consider it a great album. He thought the band’s ensemble playing “unprecedentedly excellent” but they “lack an outstanding singer”, and that while “many of their tunes are pretty, none are eloquent.” He added: “And for all their worldly perceptiveness, the Eagles’ lyrics never transcend Hollywood slickness. Their hard rock has always seemed a bit forced, constructed more from commercial considerations than from any urgent impulse to boogie. And when the Eagles attempt to communicate wild sexuality, they sound only boyishly enthused. These limitations, however, seem built-in to the latter-day concept of Southern California rock, of which the Eagles remain the unrivaled exponents.
eagleslive1975_02
“The Rolling Stone Album Guide judged the album to be the band’s “most musically adventurous outing yet, flirting with disco on the title song, a waltz on “Take It to the Limit”, and bluegrass psychedelia on Leadon’s “Journey of the Sorcerer”.
William Ruhlmann of AllMusic in a retrospective review was more favorable; he thought that it had more original material and that the material was more polished. He wrote: “One of These Nights was the culmination of the blend of rock, country, and folk styles the Eagles had been making since their start; there wasn’t much that was new, just the same sorts of things done better than they had been before. In particular, a lyrical stance—knowing and disillusioned, but desperately hopeful—had evolved, and the musical arrangements were tighter and more purposeful. The result was the Eagles’ best-realized and most popular album so far.”
The album first entered the Billboard 200 chart at No. 25 the week of its release, and climbed to No. 1 in its fourth week on the chart, where it then stayed the next four weeks. It is the first of the four consecutive No. 1 albums by the Eagles. The album was certified Gold three weeks after its release on June 30, 1975, and it received its 4× Platinum certification on March 20, 2001, signifying shipment of over 4 million copies in the United States.
eagles1975
Personnel:
Don Felder (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar,  piano, harmonium)
Don Henley (vocals, drums, percussion, tabla)
Bernie Leadon (vocals, guitar, banjo, mandolin, pedal steel-guitar)
Randy Meisner (vocals, bass)
+
David Bromberg (fiddle on 04.)
Albhy Galuten – Synthesizer on 03.)
Jim Ed Norman – piano on 05. + 06.)
+
The Royal Martian Orchestra conducted by Jim Ed Norman (04.)
eagles
Tracklist:
01. One Of These Nights (Henley/Frey) 4.51
02. Too Many Hands (Meisner/Felder) 4.43
03. Hollywood Waltz (B.Leadon/T.Leadon/Henley/Frey) 4.04
04. Journey Of The Sorcerer (B. Leadon) 6.40
05. Lyin’ Eyes (Henley/Frey) 6.22
06. Take It To The Limit (Meisner/Henley/Frey) 4.49
07. Visions (Felder/Henley) 3.58
08. After The Thrill Is Gone (Henley/Frey) 3.56
09. I Wish You Peace (Davis/B. Leadon) 3.45
labela1

*
**

Alquin – Nobody Can Wait Forever (1975)

frontcover1Alquin is a band from The Netherlands whose debut album is a versatile, Canterburish album. Alquin’s second album is the best in their catalogue. With the third album there were some changes. The band wanted to make less complicated music, and more rock music. To achieve this they asked producer Rodger Bain. They also had a new vocalist, Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). He had a more powerful voice, than Tarenskeen, and this fitted the music they were aiming for better.
The opener still sounds like the old Alquin, keyboard orientated music with good guitar and sax solos. Compared to the first two albums, the tracks are more vocal orientated. After the opener it is more straightforward rock as in Mr Widow and Farewell, Miss Barcelona, or even hardrock in Wheelchair Groupie. There are however still beautiful instrumental passages and great solos (for instance in the middle part of Stranger). The best track on this album and the most progressive is the last one. Still a good album, but not as impressive as their second one. (by Agemo)
This is the best Alquin album. On this album are some powerfull tracks like New Guinea Sunrise, Stranger, Darling Superstar, Revolution’s Eve and the single Wheelchair Groupie. Alquin plays progressive rock with some blues influences. Your hear the hammond organ, sax and guitar as the main instruments together with the beautiful voice of Michel van Dijk (ex-Ekseption). A good album is it’s predecessor Mountain Queen. (by hcklvanzessen )
single
Although less progressive than the two previous albums, this is by far my favourite ALQUIN record. This is the first album that feature vocalist Michael Van Dijk, his versatile performance in addition to the new approach of the compositions gives a powerful and overall fresher sound to the band. Highlights are the album opener, the almost hard-rocker Stranger and the album closer Revolution’s Eve, coincidentaly the proggiest tracks on this record.
While most people may enjoy the two previous albums better, I prefer the less complicated compositions featured on this album, as I said before ALQUIN managed to sound really fresh and powerful but keeping their progressive influences. (by Prosciutto)
inlet1
Personnel:
Ferdinand Bakker (guitar, piano, vocals)
Michel van Dijk (vocals)
Dick Franssen (keyboards, synthesizer)
Hein Mars (bass)
Ronald Ottenhoff (Saxophone, flute)
Job Tarenskeen (saxophone, vocals, drums, percussion)
Paul Weststrate (drums)
+
The Thunderthighs (background vocals)
backcover
Tracklist:
01. New Guinea Sunrise (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 6.37
01.1. Sunrise
01.2.Wake Me Up
02. Mr. Widow (Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff) 3.32
03. Stranger (Bakker/v.Dijk) 6.41
03.1. Stranger
03.2. You Might As Well Fall
04. Darling Superstar (Bakker/v.Dijk)
05. Farewell, Miss Barcelona (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 2.58
06. Wheelchair Groupie (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 3.12
07. Revolution’s Eve 7.27
07.1.Revolution’s Theme (Bakker/Mars/Franssen/Ottenhoff)
07.2. Nobody Can’t Wait Forever (Bakker/Tarenskeen)
labelb1
She moved her chair up on the stage
Her Hasselblad was on her knees
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Her wonderboy came down the stairs
With silver pants and golden hair
Watch her eyes, she lookes so happy
And see her smile, oh I know it’s not for me
Wheelchair groupie
Oooooh, wheelchair groupie
Watch it . . .

Deep Purple – Live In Graz 1975 (2014)

frontcover1Recorded live at the Liebenaur ice rink in Graz, Austria, ‘Graz 1975′ captures the Mark III Deep Purple lineup in one of its very last performances. However, this is hardly the sound of a band in its final hours.

Instead, it is that of a band charged and ready to take on the world. This show is often regarded as the “holy grail” of this lineup, and has been frequently traded in bootleg form by fans for years prior to this, its first official release.

Several shows on what turned out to be this lineup’s final tour were recorded using the fabled Rolling Stones mobile studio. Shortly after these concerts, guitarist Ritchie Blackmore would split to form Rainbow, and Purple would bring in Tommy Bolin to try and keep things rolling. ‘Graz 1975′ is a wall to wall feast, and may be the definitive portrait of this version of the band.

Deep Purple waste no time getting to the point here, kicking things off with the almighty ‘Burn.’ Without question it’s one of the greatest of all the band’s songs, and this version is absolutely captivating. The energy level goes right off the rails once that mighty riff kicks in.

labelSinger David Coverdale had clearly settled into his place in the band by this point. While he may never have captured the role with the brilliance that Ian Gillian had, he more than holds his own here. Newer recruit and bassist Glenn Hughes has also found a home here, adding his own personality to the mix both in playing and presentation.

Three tracks from the band’s then-current album ‘Stormbringer’ turn up here — ‘The Gypsy,’ ‘Lady Double Dealer’ and the title cut. All three are high octane stuff, surpassing the studio versions — with ‘Lady Double Dealer’ particularly killing. ‘Mistreated’ from the ‘Burn’ album gets a lengthy workout here, allowing Blackmore to show off with a bluesy but high energy solo. ‘You Fool No One,’ also from ‘Burn,’ maintains that same energy and surge for over 12 minutes.

There’s also a rock solid rendition of the all-time classic ‘Smoke On The Water.‘ One interesting thing about this version is the vocal harmonies provided by bassist Glenn Hughes during the second verse. His addition here adds a nice change up, taking the song somewhere else entirely.

blackmoreNow, time to nitpick. Do we really need another 20-minute-plus version of ‘Space Truckin’? Probably not. It’s noodle central for both Lord and Blackmore on this one. Thankfully, Mr. Paice holds down the fort, keeping the whole mess from blowing off into the wind.

That is the one main problem with any live Deep Purple outing, their tendency to go on and on. When they tighten it up, which is actually the case for most of the songs here, they are a force of nature. But when they meander, they get lost. As for the overall performance, it’s pretty damn amazing, and as for the sound quality, it’s all aces. This set was produced by the legendary Martin Birch, the man responsible for countless great hard rock records from Fleetwood Mac and Black Sabbath to Iron Maiden and beyond. His sharp approach on the initial recording, coupled with some tasty remixing and mastering from Martin Pullan shine this monster up just right.

In short, if you love Deep Purple, you will love this album. Even if you’re one of those who swear only by the Mark II lineup, there is no denying the band’s power here. Turn it up loud and let it rock! (by Dave Swanson)

lpinlet02

Personnel:
Ritchie Blackmore (guitar)
David Coverdale (vocals)
Glenn Hughes (bass, background vocals)
Jon Lord (keyboards)
Ian Paice (drums, percussion)

booklet0405

Tracklist:
01. Burn (Blackmore/Coverdale/Hughes/Lord/Paice) 7.51
02. Stormbringer (Blackmore/Coverdale) 5.08
03. The Gypsy (Blackmore/Coverdale/Hughes/Lord/Paice) 5.23
04. Lady Double Dealer (Blackmore/Coverdale) 4.31
05. Mistreated (Blackmore/Coverdale)  14.40
06. Smoke On The Water (Blackmore/Gillan/Glover/Lord/Paice) 9.43
07. You Fool No One (Blackmore/Coverdale/Hughes/Lord/Paice) 12.15
08. Space Truckin’ (Blackmore/Gillan/Glover/Lord/Paice) 20.22

cd1

*
**

lpfrontcover
LP frontcover

Man – The Welsh Connection (1976)

frontcover1The Welsh Connection (stylized on the cover as Welsh-Connection) is the eleventh album by the Welsh psychedelic/progressive rock band Man and was released on the MCA Records label 1976. It was their first MCA release, and the first after a change of line-up that saw John McKenzie take over on bass from Martin Ace, and Phil Ryan rejoin. Ryan had worked with Pete Brown in the interim, and arranged for Brown to play on two tracks.

The track “Something is Happening” was sampled on “Break the Bank” a 2014 single by rapper Schoolboy Q.(by wikipedia)

“A new record company and another new line up. The March 1976 release of Welsh Connection saw the return of Phil Ryan on keyboards, with John McKenzie replacing the departing Martin Ace on bass. Writing and rehearsals (including auditioning the new bass player) took place at The Grange in Headley Down, Hampshire during November and December 1975 and the album was recorded at Olympic Studios in Barnes during December, January and February. As usual the band only sprang into life once the deadline was upon them.

Deke Leonard explains; “Three days before the deadline expired, we got down to work. Two days before, we were quietly confident. On the last day, we realised we were in the shit. We phoned Barry and said we, er, wouldn’t make the deadline.

“How many songs do you need?” he asked.
“Seven or eight” we said.
“And how many have you got?”
“Er, two-and-a-half. Ish.”
“Well, it’s alright,” he said, with a whiff of superiority. “I’ve already booked you in for another ten days, I did it about three weeks ago.”

Well that we said must have been the problem. We knew in our water it wasn’t a bona fide deadline – it never really felt like one……The next day, faced with a real deadline, we panicked.”

The new line up resulted in yet another radical change to the group’s sound. The combination of McKenzie, a more than usually lyrical bassist, and Ryan, whose performances are always cultured, worked very well. Together they turned out a pretty funky blend, especially when Phil got warmed up on the title track. As Deke commented later; “Phil is a bit of a funky player, while Micky and I don’t have a funky bone in our bodies. John tended to play with Phil.” McKenzie himself remembers most of the songs as being ready before he auditioned; “Pretty much people had their material written. Obviously arrangements were changed but it was pretty much nailed already.”

promotionposters
Promotion posters

Although critical reaction was generally good, an occasionally less positive note was struck. It was felt in some quarters that perhaps too many of Man’s rough edges had been smoothed off. Charles Shaar Murray, writing in the New Musical Express weighed in with the headline; “Man cracks four songs in under twenty minutes barrier”. Johnny Walker made “Out Of Your Head” his record of the week, and things were looking decidedly commercial. The band split up before another studio album could be recorded.

‘I’m a Lovetaker’ which was released as a B side to the ‘Out Of Your Head’ single, and is included as a bonus track on the Eagle Records and Esoteric CD release of ‘Welsh Connection’ is a Deke Leonard song, written and recorded during the sessions for his second solo album, ‘Kamikaze’. It’s not really a Man song at all and also features Brian Breeze on guitar, and Dave Charles on drums.” (by manband-archive.com)

mickyjones

Micky Jones

Personnel:
Micky Jones (vocals, guitar)
Deke Leonard (guitar, vocals)
John McKenzie (bass, vocals)
Phil Ryan (keyboards, vocals)
Terry Williams (drums, vocals)
+
Brian Breeze (guitar on 08.)
Nigel Brooke-Heart (vocals on 06.)
Pete Brown (african talking drums on 04. + 05.)
Dave Charles (drums on 08.)
Caromay Dixon (vocals on 05.)
Jeffrey Hooper (vocals on 02.)
Anton Matthews (vocals on 02.)

backcover1

Tracklist:
01. The Ride And The View (Leonard) 5.01
02. Out Of Your Head (Leonard) 4.04
03. Love Can Find A Way (McKenzie) 5.13
04. The Welsh Connection (Ryan/Jones) 7.18
05. Something Is Happening (Ryan) 6.21
06. Car Toon (Leonard/Ryan) 6.01
07. Born With A Future (Jones/Leonard/Ryan) 7.07
+
08. (I’m A) Love-Taker” (B-side “Out of Your Head” single) (Leonard) 2.47

labela1

*
**

Jim Baker – A Steel Guitar Christmas (1975)

frontcover1Baker was born July 26, 1933 in Eldridge, Ala. and grew up in Flint, Mich. He moved to Nashville in 1963 after serving in the U.S. Army. Baker was a steel guitar player as a youth and later played Dobro and pedal steel guitar in Nashville. He played the Grand Ole Opry throughout the early part of his career and was a member of the Mel Tillis Statesiders Band in the early 1970s. He played on numerous country albums and was in steady demand as a steel session player. Ernie Ashworth, Mel Tillis, Jim and Jessie, Bill Carlisle, Roy Drusky, Justin Tubb and Leroy Van Dyke were among the artists Baker played with.

Pedal steel player Jim Baker, 75, who played on the Grand Ole Opry and with Mel Tillis’ band died Oct. 5.2008 (by countrystandardtime.com)

This is his christmas album and this will be the last entry of christmas music this year !

Enjoy the beautiful sound of the steel-guitar !

jim-baker

Personnel:
Kim Baker (steel-guitar)

backcover

Tracklist:
01. White Christmas 2.15
02. Winter Wonderland 2.15
03. Blue Christmas 2.21
04. Christmas Song 2.03
05. Little Drummer Boy 2.00
06. O’ Little Town Of Bethlehem 2.49
07. Silver Bells 2.48
08. Silent Night 2.01
09. Christmas In My Hometown 2.00
10. Jingle Bell Rock 1.54
11. Here Comes Santa Clause 2.15
12. Rock Around The Christmas Tree 2.42

labela1

*
**

 

 

Kenny Wheeler – Gnu High (1975)

frontcover1When Kenny Wheeler expatriated from his native Canada to England, it was not headline news. But upon the release of Gnu High, he became a contemporary jazz figure to be recognized, revered and admired. Playing the flugelhorn exclusively for this, his ECM label debut, Wheeler’s mellifluous tones and wealth of ideas came to full fruition. Whether chosen in collaboration with label boss Manfred Eicher or by Wheeler alone, picking pianist Keith Jarrett, bassist Dave Holland and drummer Jack DeJohnette was a stroke of genius. They support the elongated and extended notions of Wheeler’s in many real and important ways. What is also extant is a sense of self-indulgence, real for listeners with short attention spans.

“Heyoke” is such a piece rife for this discussion at nearly 22 minutes. This lilting waltz is at once atmospheric and soulful, a fairly fresh and inventive style turned more dramatic near the finish of this magnum opus. It’s all fueled by the reinvented swing of DeJohnette. Jarrett’s vocal whining is kept in check, as his pretty pianistics buoy Wheeler’s notions in Zen inspired time and eventually no time improvisations.

kennywheeler01“Gnu Suite” is similarly rendered in an unforced 4/4 rhythm, but Wheeler is more animated. There’s a plus-plus solo from Holland before the group merges into a floating and flowing discourse again in free time.

The special track is “Smatter” and at just under six minutes works better, not only for radio airplay, but also in its concise melodic construct by means of the regal and happy persona Wheeler portrays. Pure melody and a repeated anchoring seven-note phrase insert sets this tune apart from the rest.

It also clearly identifies the warm and cool stance only Wheeler wields, making seemingly simple music deep and profound. Certainly this was an auspicious starting point, albeit long winded, for a magical performer whose sound and smarts captured the imagination of so many fellow musicians and listeners from this point onward. (Michael G. Nastos)

kennywheeler02

Personnel:
Jack DeJohnette (drums)
Dave Holland (bass)
Keith Jarrett (piano)
Kenny Wheeler (flugelhorn)

backcover1

Tracklist:
01. Heyoke  21.47
02. ‘Smatter 5.56
03. Gnu Suite  12.47
All tracks composed by Kenny Wheeler

labelb1

*
**