Kornet – Same (1975)

FrontCover1KORNET was a jazz-rock group formed at Framnäs college in Öjebyn by guitarist Stefan BJORKLUND, drummer Ake SUNDQVIST, and keyboardist Stefan NILSSON in 1974. They were joined by Anders JONSSON on Vibes, bassist Sten FORSMAN and a large ensemble including brass, woodwinds and strings. Their sought-after debut LP ‘Kornet’ was released in 1975 on Manifest. The collective went on to release two more albums during their heyday, ‘Fritt Fall’ in 1977 [also on Manifest] and ‘Kornet III’ in ’79 on PickUp Records. (by progarchives.com)

Very good Jazz Rock band from Ojebyn,Sweden,formed in 1974,which released 3 LP’s between 1975 and 1979.All members had a good background mostly in pop music,until they got tired and decided to choose a more demanding music path.This decision led them to the release of their self-titled debut in 1975,which is their strongest effort for many Prog/Jazz Rock collectors.The band consisted of Stefan Nillson on piano/synths, Stefan Björklund on guitars, Sten Forsman on bass/cello, Allan Lundström on saxes, Åke Sundqvist on drums/percussions/vibraphone and Johan Engström on flutes/acoustic guitars.

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The tracks can be split in three categories: These into fast and furious grooves with great guitar solos and powerful interplays,these into flute-driven calm jazzy prog with a slight Canterbury feeling,while the third category includes compositions in a Free Jazz from,dominated by improvisational saxes and nice work on bass/contrabass by Forsman.All of them are of very high quality without exception,which shows the band great talent and perfect collaboration.I can also make an honourable reference to the awesome electric piano work of Stefan Nillson,who also had an underground personal career in the 80’s,releasing 3 personal LP’S.Very decent work,highly recommended to Jazz Rock lovers. (by apps79)

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Personnel:
Stefan Björklund (guitar)
Johan Engström (flute)
Sten Forsman (bass, cello on 04.)
Allan Lundström (saxophone)
Stefan Nilsson (piano, synthesizer)
Åke Sundqvist (drums, percussion, french horn on 03., vibraphone 0n 04.)
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Johan Engström (guitar on 04.)
Anders Jonsson (xycolophone, percussion 0n 04.)
Jan Skoglund (bassoon on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Skriket Från Vildmarken (Björklund) 3.08
02. Sju Hungriga År (Nilsson) 4.45
03.  Jojk (Traditional) 0.45
04. Friska Fläktar (Nilsson) 5.06
05. Frunk (Sundqvist) 3.35
06. Intrude, Tretaktar’n (Nilsson) 7.06
07. Pygges Blues (Björklund) 3.43
08. Musik Ur Filmen ‘Adams Födelse’ (Jonsson) 3.32

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John Abercrombie – Gateway (1975)

FrontCover1John Abercrombie, renowned jazz guitar player, bandleader, and teacher, has died at the age of 72. He passed away yesterday evening at his home in Cortland, New York, according to an announcement on his Facebook page. The Ottawa Citizen and The Wire report the cause of death as heart failure, related to a stroke Abercrombie experienced earlier this year.

Abercrombie was an influential guitar stylist who, after getting his start as a session musician and sideman with artists like Gato Barbieri, Billy Cobham, and Gil Evans, came into prominence as a bandleader in the 1970s through his recordings on the ECM label. His debut album, Timeless, is particularly renowned, featuring synth/organist Jan Hammer (of Mahavishnu Orchestra and Miami Vice soundtrack fame) and Miles Davis and Keith Jarrett collaborator Jack DeJohnette on drums. Abercrombie helped to define the trademark, ethereal, and genre-defying sound of the ECM label along with artists like Jarrett, Gary Burton, and Pat Metheny. He also played and recorded on-and-off for decades in the trio Gateway, with Jarrett, DeJohnette, and legendary bassist Dave Holland.

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In the ’80s, Abercrombie began playing on a guitar synthesizer and experiments with outlandish effects to expand the sound palette of his instrument, working in fusion and free-jazz idioms. He was also gifted as a performer of traditional jazz standards, and known for his muted, technically adept style and complex and imaginative harmonic sensibility. He released an album in January, Up and Coming, on ECM in January of this year, billed to The John Abercrombie Quartet. (www.spin.com)

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And here´s his debut album from 1975 …

Gateway is the debut album by Gateway, a trio composed of John Abercrombie, Dave Holland and Jack DeJohnette. It was recorded in 1975 and released on the ECM label in 1976.

The Penguin Guide to Jazz called it a “reflective album, but it is by no means sombre” stating “Abercrombie seems to like the open rhythmic weave and plays acoustically with great confidence and finely controlled timbre and dynamics. Holland is by no means playing at his best but he is incapable of mere journeywork and asserts his presence in the harmonic transitions i a way that more than makes up for the absence of keyboards”[3] The Allmusic review by Scott Yanow states “The interplay between the three musicians is quite impressive although listeners might find some of the music to be quite unsettling. It takes several listens for one to digest all that is going on, but it is worth the struggle”.[(by wikipedia)

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Guitarist John Abercrombie was one of the stars of ECM in its early days. His playing on this trio set with bassist Dave Holland and drummer Jack DeJohnette is really beyond any simple categorization. Abercrombie’s improvisations are sophisticated yet, because his sound is rockish and sometimes quite intense (particularly on the nearly 11-minute “Sorcery 1”), there is really no stylistic name for the music. Holland contributed four of the six originals while DeJohnette brought in the other two (one of which was co-written with Abercrombie). The interplay between the three musicians is quite impressive although listeners might find some of the music to be quite unsettling. It takes several listens for one to digest all that is going on, but it is worth the struggle. (by Scott Yanow)

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Personnel:
John Abercrombie (guitar)
Dave Holland (bass)
Jack DeJohnette (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Back-Woods Song (Holland) – 7:51
02. Waiting (Holland) – 2:10
03. May Dance (Holland) – 11:01
04. Unshielded Desire (DeJohnette/Abercrombie) – 4:49
05. Jamala (Holland) – 4:47
06. Sorcery I (DeJohnette) – 10:56

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Don McLean – Live At Manchester (1975)

FrontCover1Famed for — and ultimately defined by — his perennial “American Pie,” singer/songwriter Don McLean was born October 2, 1945, in New Rochelle, New York. After getting his start in the folk clubs of New York City during the mid-’60s, McLean struggled for a number of years, building a small following through his work with Pete Seeger on the Clearwater, a sloop that sailed up and down the eastern seaboard to promote environmental causes.

Still, McLean was primarily singing in elementary schools and the like when, in 1970, he wrote a musical tribute to painter Vincent Van Gogh; the project was roundly rejected by a number of labels, although MediaArts did offer him a contract to record a number of his other songs under the title Tapestry. The album fared poorly, but Perry Como earned a hit with a cover of the track “And I Love You So,” prompting United Artists to pick up McLean’s contract. He returned in 1971 with American Pie; the title track, an elegiac eight-and-a-half-minute folk-pop epic inspired by the tragic death of Buddy Holly, became a number one hit, and the LP soon reached the top of the charts as well.

The follow-up, “Vincent,” was also a smash, and McLean even became the subject of the Roberta Flack hit “Killing Me Softly with His Song”; however, to his credit — and to his label’s horror — the singer refused to let the success of “American Pie” straitjacket his career. Subsequent records like 1972’s self-titled effort and 1974’s Playin’ Favorites deliberately avoided any attempts to re-create the “American Pie” flavor; not surprisingly, his sales plummeted, and the latter release even failed to chart. After 1974’s Homeless Brother and 1976’s Solo, United Artists dropped McLean from his contract; he resurfaced on Arista the next year with Prime Time, but when it, too, fared poorly, he spent the next several years without a label.

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McLean enjoyed a renaissance of sorts with 1980’s Chain Lightning; his first Top 30 LP in close to a decade, it spawned a Top Ten smash with its cover of Roy Orbison’s classic “Crying,” and his originals “Castles in the Air” and “Since I Don’t Have You” both also reached the Top 40. However, 1981’s Believers failed to sustain the comeback, and after 1983’s Dominion, he was again left without benefit of label support. McLean spent the remainder of his career primarily on the road, grudgingly restoring “American Pie” to his set list and drawing inspiration from the country market; in addition to a number of live sets and re-recordings of old favorites, he also returned to the studio for projects like 1990’s For the Memories (a collection of classic pop, country, and jazz covers) and 1995’s River of Love (an LP of original material). (by Jason Ankeny)

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And here´s a great broadrecording from 1975:

The shutdown of Megaupload; and other cyberlockers such as Filesonic and Fileserve becoming pale shadows of what they once were, music fans will once again recall the immortal words of Don McLean.

But the lyrics to McLean’s Bronco Bill’s Lament are no less poignant and apt for these times:

Well you may not recognize my face, I used to be a star,
A cowboy hero known both near and far.
I perched upon a silver mount and sang with my guitar,
But the studio of course,
owned my saddle and my horse…

All the voyeurs and the lawyers who can pull a fountain pen,
And put you where they choose,
With the language that they use,
And enslave you till you work your youth away,
Oh god how I worked my youth away.

Thanks to Otto who shared these tracks on the net in 2010.

Recorded live at The Hardrock Concert Theatre, Manchester, UK; May 25, 1975;
Excellent FM broadcast.

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Personnel:
Don McLean (guitar, vocals, banjo)

Tracklist:
01. Bronco Bill’s Lament 3.22
02. Empty Chairs 3.38
03. La La Love You 4.25
04. American Pie 10.03
05. Homeless Brother 4.16
06. Respectable 4.04
07. The Legend Of Andrew McCrew 6.20
08. Babylon 5.00
09. This Little Light Of Mine 2.58
10. Vincent 4.04

All songs written by DonMcLean

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Harry Chapin – Portrait Gallery (1975)

LPFrontCover1Harry Chapin was an American singer-songwriter famous for his folk rock songs like ‘Taxi’, ’W*O*L*D’, and ‘Sniper’. A highly talented and popular singer, he gained much fame for his self-described ”story song”, a narrative form that borrowed heavily from older talking blues primarily dealing with themes related to lost opportunities, cruel ironies and life’s hypocrisies. Born as one of the sons of Jim Chapin, a legendary percussionist, Harry was exposed to music at an early age. He played the trumpet as a child and soon switched over to the guitar. He performed with his brothers as a teenager and also played music occasionally with his father who had divorced his mother when Harry was young. He graduated from the Brooklyn Technical High School and studied at Cornell University before embarking on a career as a documentary filmmaker. He soon switched gear and ventured into a musical career and found success with his debut album ’Heads & Tales’. He soon gained a reputation as a classy folk rock singer and also became known for his work on Broadway productions. Along with being a singer par excellence, he was also a committed humanitarian who fought to end world hunger.

The life of this amazing human being was cut short by a fatal accident which claimed him at the age of 38.  (by thefamouspeople.com)

Portrait Gallery is the fifth studio album by the American singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, released in 1975.

An early version of “Someone Keeps Calling My Name”, done in a folk-rock vein reminiscent of The Byrds, appeared on the obscure 1966 album Chapin recorded with his brothers, Chapin Music!. The main guitar riff (and entire arrangement) in this version is strikingly similar to The Blue Things’ equally obscure 1966 track “Doll House.”

The album artwork was designed and illustrated by Milton Glaser. (by wikipedia)

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 Portrait Gallery failed to follow up the great success of “Cats in the Cradle,” and perhaps that was what Chapin had in mind. Much more in line with his first two releases, Portrait Gallery shouldn’t be written off just because it didn’t get that Top 40 hit. The songs have again become more personal, and the track “Bummer” depicts a medal-winning veteran who never quite fit into society. Chilling, to say the least, Portrait Gallery is well worth the effort. (by James Chrispell)

Musically, the album is a solid mix of approachable, mostly ballad oriented, material in the long, narrative “story song” mold of song writing Chapin was most famous for. “Dreams Go By”, despite it’s title one of his more upbeat songs emotionally (Chapin had a penchant for crafting songs with sad or disappointing endings, often dealing with characters based upon life’s losers and societies most disenfranchised) became a fan favorite at his live shows for many years. “Tangled Up Puppett” , also known as “A Song For Jaime” was inspired by Chapin’s relationship with his oldest daughter, as she was entering her teen years. A beautiful melody complete with some of the violin and string arrangements famous in his more acoustic oriented work, with lyrics ripe with metaphor that none the less do a terrific job of expressing the poignancy of growing up and how it changes parent-child dynamics, it’s one of the best stories and from strictly from a pop music perspective one of his most approachable works, amazing that it didn’t enjoy greater success as a single. (by Tom From Pghon)
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Personnel:
Murray Adler (violin)
Ron Bacchiocchi (synthesiser, percussion)
Ed Bednarski (clarinet)
Gene Bianco (harmonica)
George Bohanon (rombone)
Bud Brisbois (rumpet)
Harry Chapin (guitar, vocals)
Steve Chapin (piano, clavinet, vocals)
Tom Chapin (vocals)
Rita Coolidge (vocals)
Assa Drori (violin)
Jesse Ehrlich (cello)
Joan Fishman (vocals)
Joe Flood (vocals)
Ronald Folsom (violin)
James Getzoff (violin)
Jeff Gross (vocals)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Paul Hubinon (trumpet)
Bill Hymanson (strings)
Armand Kaproff (Cello)
Jackie Kelso (saxophone)
Christopher von Koschembahr (vocals)
David Kondziela (vocals)
Kris Kristofferson (vocals)
Paul Leka (piano, celeste, harpsichord)
Jonathan B. Lindle (vocals)
Betty MacIver (vocals)
Pete MacIver (vocals)
Michael Masters (Cello)
Marti McCall (vocals)
Jay Migliori (saxophone, flute)
Tim Moore (keyboards, clavinet)
Todd Mulder (vocals)
Alexander Neiman (viola)
Gareth Nuttycombe (viola)
Ronald Palmer (guitar, vocals)
Geoff Parker (vocals, choir, Chorus)
Judi Parker (vocals)
Don Payne (bass)
Donald Peake (Synthesizer)
Stanley Plummer (violin)
Katherine Anne Porter (vocals)
Frank Porto (accordion)
Kathy Ramos (vocals)
Henry Roth (violin)
Allan Schwartzberg (drums)
Tim Scott (Cello)
Jack Shulman (violin)
Frank Simms (vocals)
George Simms (vocals)
Ken Smith (flute, mandolin)
Bob Springer (percussion)
Billy Swan (vocals)
John Tropea (guitar)
Sheila Turner (vocals)
John Wallace (bass, vocals)
Rob White (whistle)
Susan White (vocals)
Carolyn Willis (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Dreams Go By (H.Chapin) 4.46
02. Tangled Up Puppet (H.Chapin/S.Chapin) 3.45
03. Star Tripper (H.Chapin) 4.19
04. Babysitter (H.Chapin)  4.36
05. Someone Keeps Calling My Name (H.Chapin) 6.30
06. Rock (H.Chapin) 4.16
07. Sandy (H.Chapin) 2.48
08. Dirt Gets Under the Fingernails (H.Chapin) 3.48
09. Bummer (H.Chapin) 9.55
10. Stop Singing These Sad Songs (H.Chapin) 2.59

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Wally – Valley Gardens (1975)

LPFrontCover1Valley Gardens carries on in a similar vein to their debut album, Wally, including a side-long track, “The Reason Why”, which is possibly the best track in their repertoire. Dispensing with the production skills of Rick Wakeman this time around the album is produced by Bob Harris and Wally. (by wikipedia)

A sensitive artist, deafened by our endless noise of opinions, has questioned the value of amateur music criticism. Frankly Mr Shankly, I don’t know if I should give one jot for the opinion of an artist I’d never heard of until yesterday. In spite of my bias, ignorance and inability to make a critical evaluation, I’m going to keep on crawling out of my dunghill to write ”so-called” reviews for ProgArchives. If it wasn’t for this website I wouldn’t be aware of bands like Wally, or Porcupine Tree for that matter.
”Valley Gardens”, released in 1975 and named after the area of Harrogate where most of the band lived, was Wally’s second album. They split up following the album’s release due to a lack support from their record company, although they have recently reformed and released a DVD of their comeback concert and a CD of old demos and new material. Whereas the band’s debut album is a curious hybrid of country and progressive music ”Valley Gardens” is pure symphonic, although extremely light in weight and still featuring the prominent use of traditional instruments.

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Nick Glennie-Smith, who had replaced original keyboards player Paul Gerrett, ploughs straight in with a fitful synthesizer flurry on the title track before it settles into a gossamer space rock groove of intertwining Mellotron and steel guitar. ”Nez Perce” features guest vocals by American soul singer Madeline Bell, probably most famous for her work with Blue Mink. The Nez Perce, a tribe of Native Americans, got their name from the French term for pierced noses. Among the traditions of the Nez Perce is the legend of the Wallowa Lake Monster, often referred to as Wally. This song artfully combines the band’s pop sensibility with Pete Sage’s ethereal electric violin, and it even managed to achieve some airplay back in the day.

”The Mood I’m In” is a fairly nondescript West Coast ballad with a bit of saxophone tagged onto the end for interest, but it’s ”The Reason Why” that grabs the most attention here. At over 19-minutes it takes up the entire second half of the album and is based on Lord Tennyson’s anti-war poem ”The Charge of the Light Brigade”. It’s an ambitious, moving piece and no mistake, with a lengthy improvised instrumental section.
”Valley Gardens” neither sucks nor rules. It will obviously have more appeal for fans of mellow progressive music, but others might even enjoy something along the way. Wally are sadly over-looked and I wonder if they would be whining if there were more than half a million reviews of their output online? (by seventhsojourn)

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Personnel:
Pete Cosker (guitar, vocals, bass)
Paul Middleton (steel guitar, bass)
Roger Narraway (drums, percussion)
Pete Sage (violin, bass, mandolin)
Nick Glennie-Smith (keyboards)
Roy Webber (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Valley Gardens (Gerrett/Cosker) 9.51
02. Nez Perce (Webber) 5.03
03. The Mood I’m In (Webber) 7.07
04. The Reason Why 1828

04.1. Nolan (Sage/Webber)
04.2.The Charge (Glennie-Smith/Sage)
04.3. Disillusion (Webbber)
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The New Order – Same (1977)

FrontCover1The New Order was an American hard rock and protopunk band. The band was based in Los Angeles and existed from early 1975 to October 1976.
After The Stooges imploded in 1974, former Stooges lead guitarist Ron Asheton formed a new band, ultimately acquiring drummer Dennis “Machine Gun” Thompson, bass player Jimmy Recca and keyboardist Scott Thurston. For a while, the new band shared rehearsal space at a house owned by Ray Manzarek, during his collaboration with Stooges’ lead singer Iggy Pop.
When The New Order’s first singer Jeff Spry was forced to quit the band (due to jail time incurred from a drinking/quaalude related DUI coupled with failure to perform community service), The New Order’s first drummer, K.J. Knight, recommended Dave Gilbert as a replacement. K.J. and Gilbert had both been veterans of the 1971/1972 incarnations of Ted Nugent’s Amboy Dukes. After keyboardist Scott Thurston quit, his position was filled by a second guitarist, Ray Gunn, another Detroit veteran who was recommended by Dennis Thompson.

Leading up to the making of The New Order’s first demo tapes, long time Blue Öyster Cult producer, Sandy Pearlman, was approached to produce the band but ultimately this didn’t come together. The back cover of the Declaration Of War album bears the inscription: “This album is dedicated to the CULT”, furthering the links with the Blue Öyster Cult.

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A projected collaboration with ’60s and ’70s Rock impresario, Kim Fowley, was also talked about, but never came to fruition.
The New Order had at least one classic, the song Rock ‘n’ Roll Soldiers, later covered by The Hitmen and more recently covered by The Hellacopters. One of the lyrics from the song, the infamous battle-cry “The War Against The Jive”, is used as the heading to the liner-notes of Radio Birdman’s 2001 release, The Essential Radio Birdman (1974 – 1978). The exact heading is: “Total Victory: Radio Birdman’s War Against The Jive”.
The New Order recorded demos twice in Los Angeles: First in 1975 with Jeff Spry as lead singer and then in 1976 with Dave Gilbert as lead singer. Both recordings were later released with a production by Neil Merryweather in 1977 as a single album “The New Order”, on the Fun Records/Isadora label and distributed by RCA Records. The album’s lo-fi quality was the result of it being produced from Ron Asheton’s inferior cassette copies, instead of the original master tapes.  (by wkipedia)
Really this is just a selection of demos – i love the Stooges and there are some good song ideas on here, however nothing is of a quality that could really be enjoyed of its own merit. I have no doubts that the New Order would have been great, IF they had been produced/recorded properly though. (by Pete)

Okay … rough, loud and dirty ! The New Order … Brothers and sisters !

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Personnel:
Ron Asheton (guitar)
Dave Gilbert (vocals on 05. – 07.)
Ray Gun (guitar)
Jimi Recca (bass)
Jeff Spry (vocals on 01. 04.)
Dennis Thompson (drums)
Scott Thurston (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Lucky Strike 3.52
02. Declaration Of War 2.48
03. Hollywood Holidays 3.53
04. Sidewinder 3.14
05. I Can’t Quit Ya 3.02
06. Rock ‘N’ Roll Soldiers 4.03
07. Of Another World 4.47

All Songs written by:

Tracks 01 – 04 (1975):
eton – Ray Gun – Jimi Recca – Jeff Spry – Dennis Thompson – Scott Thurston

Tracks 05 – 07. (1976):
on – Ray Gun – Jimi Recca – Dave Gilbert – Dennis Thompson – Scott Thurston

 

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Melanie Safka – BBC On Air (1997)

FrontCover1Ten of the 18 songs on this CD were recorded live in 1975, another four date from 1969, and the last four are from 1989. Thus, we get a glimpse of Melanie in performance across a period of 20 years, doing a variety of material ranging from her own originals (including familiar songs such as “Beautiful People” and “Baby Guitar”) to covers of Phil Ochs’s “Chords of Fame,” Alan J. Lerner and Frederick Loewe’s “Almost Like Being in Love” (from Brigadoon), and the Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday.” Her rendition of “Almost Like Being in Love” is a folk-blues style interpretation, and one of the most downbeat and interesting (if not necessarily successful) takes on the song ever done. There is a certain sameness to much of the rest of the material that works against too many people other than hardcore fans appreciating this disc, although some numbers, such as “The Nickel Song” and “Beautiful People,” always work. The version of “Ruby Tuesday,” like the other three 1989 vintage songs here, features a full band with synthesizers and drum machines, and is a bit jarring, though Melanie still throws herself impressively into the classic Rolling Stones song. (by Bruce Eder)

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Featuring a series of live recordings covering a period of 20 years this CD provides excellent sound and a unique record of Melanie’s live and session work for the BBC. The first 10 tracks feature a concert recorded for the BBC Radio One In Concert series in 1975. Track 5 is incorrectly listed and is actually a song called Here We Go Again. During this concert Melanie is accompanied by Barry Lee Harwood on guitar and mandolin. Barry played on Sunsets and Other Beginnings and As I See It Now but fails to be credited on the cover of the CD.

Tracks 11 to 14 are rare session recordings from 1969, just Melanie and her guitar. Visit My Dreams is perhaps better known as Deep Down Low from Melanie’s second album.
While all tracks have so far featured acoustic versions of songs, the last four feature Melanie with a full band. The tracks where recorded during a visit to the UK to promote Cowabonga. The musicians that accompany Melanie also accompanied her during two concerts at the Shaw Theatre in London in 1989. (by melaniesafkarecordings.uk)

And I confess … I´m a real fan of Melanie Safka … what  wonderful voice, what sensitive music and lyrics …

But … her 1989 recordings were not really good (especially tzhe Version of “Goodybye Ruby Tuesday is more than lousy …) … but …

… don’t miss “Rock An’ Roll Heart” — a song every baby boomer can relate to.
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Personnel:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:
Barry Lee Hardwood (guitar, mandolin)
Melanie (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 1969:
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 89:
Kay Langford (vocals)
Justin Myers (bass)
Neil Palmer (keyboards)
Alan Ross (guitar, background vocals)
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)
Chris Staines (background vocals)
Pete Thompson (drums)

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Tracklist:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:

01. Autumn Lady (Safka) 4.13
02. Chords Of Fame (Ochs) 5.14
03. Almost Like Being In Love (Lerner/Loewe) 5.09
04. Stoneground Words (Safka) 5.09
05. Here I Am (Safka) 2.37
06. Any Guy (Safka) 2.560
07. Do You Believe (Safka) 6.08
08. Leftover Wine (Safka) 5.44
09. The Nickel Song (Safka) 4.03
10. Beautiful People (Safka) 5.31

BBC Session, September 1969:
11. Visit My Dreams (Deep Down Low) (Safka) 3.51
12. Up Town And Down (Safka) 2.51
13. Baby Guitar (Safka) 2.49
14. Tuning My Guitar (Safka) 4.16

BBC Session, September 89:
15. Ruby Tuesday (Jagger/Richards) 3.50
16. Rock ‘n’ Roll Heart (Safka) 5.17
17. Racing Heart (Safka) 5.17
18. Apathy (Safka/Schekeryk) 3.50

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