Gordon Lightfoot – Summertime Dream (1976)

FrontCover1Summertime Dream is Canadian singer Gordon Lightfoot’s twelfth original album, released on the Reprise Records label in 1976. It peaked at #1 on the Canadian RPM national album chart, and #12 on the US Billboard pop chart.[1]Summertime Dream is Canadian singer Gordon Lightfoot’s twelfth original album, released on the Reprise Records label in 1976. It peaked at #1 on the Canadian RPM national album chart, and #12 on the US Billboard pop chart.

The album marked Lightfoot’s commercial zenith in a remarkable period of popularity which began with the 1970 hit, “If You Could Read My Mind”. He would never again achieve the same level of commercial success.

The album shot to popularity on the back of the haunting ballad, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald”, which told the story of the final hours of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald which had sunk on Lake Superior in November 1975. The song remains popular to this day and has been credited with making the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald the most famous maritime incident in the history of the Great Lakes.
“The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” reached #1 in Canada on November 20, 1976. In the US, it peaked at #2 on the pop chart and #50 on the country chart while “Race Among the Ruins” peaked at #65 on the pop chart. (by wikipedia)

Gordon Lightfoot

With Summertime Dream, Gordon Lightfoot produced one of his finest albums, and wrapped up a six-year period of popularity that he would not recapture. Propelled by his second biggest hit, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” Summertime Dream summed up the sound that had served Lightfoot so well in his post-“If You Could Read My Mind” days. This distinctive sound featured Lightfoot’s strummed six- or 12-string guitar complemented by Terry Clements’ electric guitar lines and Pee Wee Charles’ pedal steel guitar accents. The material here is excellent, and the singer’s voice is at its strongest. Mixing upbeat songs like “Race Among the Ruins,” “I’d Do It Again,” and the title track with beautiful ballads such as “I’m Not Supposed to Care” and “Spanish Moss,” Lightfoot and his band deliver a tasty smorgasbord of intelligent, grown-up music. As for “Edmund Fitzgerald,” its continued popularity more than 20 years after its release attests to the power of a well-told tale and a tasty guitar lick. (by Jim Newsome)

In other words: What a great singer/songwriter !

Inlet01A

Personnel:
Pee Wee Charles (pedal steel guitar)
Terry Clements (guitar)
Rick Haynes (bass)
Barry Keane (drums, percussion)
Gordon Lightfoot – vocals, guitar, piano)
Gene Martynec (synthesizer)
+
Jim Gordon (drums on “The House You Live In”

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Race Among The Ruins 3.18
02. The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald 6.29
03. I’m Not Supposed To Care 3.29
04. I’d Do It Again 3.12
05. Never Too Close 3.02
06. Protocol 4.01
07. The House You Live In 2.52
08. Summertime Dream 2.28
09. Spanish Moss 3.49
10. Too Many Clues In This Room 4.49

All songs written by Gordon Lightfoot
LabelB1
*
**

Gordon Lightfoot

Advertisements

Back Street Crawler – Second Street (1976)

LPFrontCover12nd Street is a 1976 album by Back Street Crawler and was released on the Atco Records label. It was released after Paul Kossoff’s death in March 1976, ans is dedicated to him. The album is regarded as a considerable advance on their 1975 debut The Band Plays On, but Kossoff’s involvement in it is limited to lead guitar lines over the completed tracks. (by wikipedia)

This is simply one of the great-underrated rock albums of the 1970’s and the last album to feature Paul Kossoff on guitar. He actually died before the album was released due to a heroin addiction. It almost seems as if Koss knew this was to be his last effort and his playing is of an unusually melancholic and lilting quality on tracks like, “Blue Soul”, “Some Kind Of Happy” and particularly the end portion of “Leaves in the Wind.”

Blending beautifully with Koss’ guitar is the keyboard work of John ‘Rabbit’ Bundrick. He has a haunting and equally reflective style that embraces aspects of melancholy and longing. His unique style brought a similar layer of sophistication to Free’s final album “Heartbreaker.” In more recent years, he has been the regular touring keyboard player with The Who.

KossoffWilson-Slesser

Paul Kossoff + Terry Wilson-Slesser, 1975

Of equal importance are the powerful, soulful and curiously unaffected vocals of Terry Wilson Slesser. His voice is just perfect for these well-crafted songs that vary between the funky “Stop Doing What Your Doing”, the acoustic driven “Raging River” and the pleading “Some Kind Of Happy.” The latter song also features some nice blending of his voice with some impassioned female back-up singers. His voice never falls into any overwrought bellowing or bluster and always provides what the song needs without drawing special attention to his voice. A perfect example of this is on the song “Just for you” which many other singers of the era would have delivered in an overdone bluesy growl. Here Slesser sings like a man truly pining for a woman he has recently lost. No bravado just a wish unfulfilled.

Two real highlights are the last two songs, “On Your Life” and “Leaves in the Wind.” “On Your Life” is a perfect example of this band working as one with no showboating. The keyboards blend perfectly with the vocals, and the drumming of Tony Braunagel is tight but never intrusive. It’s a sad remembrance captured in song. “Leaves In The Wind” starts out as a nice funky groove with some tasty bass from Terry Wilson (like this band in general, an underrated bass player) before moving into its reflective second half where, appropriately, Paul Kossoff shows off his lilting guitar playing in all its glory.

Inlay1

This is simply one of the great-underrated rock albums of the 1970’s and the last album to feature Paul Kossoff on guitar. He actually died before the album was released due to a heroin addiction. It almost seems as if Koss knew this was to be his last effort and his playing is of an unusually melancholic and lilting quality on tracks like, “Blue Soul”, “Some Kind Of Happy” and particularly the end portion of “Leaves in the Wind.”

Blending beautifully with Koss’ guitar is the keyboard work of John ‘Rabbit’ Bundrick. He has a haunting and equally reflective style that embraces aspects of melancholy and longing. His unique style brought a similar layer of sophistication to Free’s final album “Heartbreaker.” In more recent years, he has been the regular touring keyboard player with The Who.

Of equal importance are the powerful, soulful and curiously unaffected vocals of Terry Wilson Slesser. His voice is just perfect for these well-crafted songs that vary between the fune use…Leaves in the wind” with Kossoff’s sad guitar weeping along it’s true magic and a perfectly fitting end to a very brief life, of not only Paul Kossoff, but a band with great promise. Of course, the band would carry on under the shortened moniker Crawler, with a new guitarist, but the rare magic captured here was never quite matched again. The only negative about this album is that it is too short! (source: unknown)

PaulKossoff2

Personnel:
Tony Braunagel (drums, vocals)
John “Rabbit” Bundrick (keyboards, vocals)
Paul Kossoff (guitar)
Terry Wilson (bass, guitar)
Terry Wilson Slesser (vocals)
+
Snuffy Walden (guitar)

LPBackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Selfish Lover (Bundrick) 3.24
02. Blue Soul (Wilson) 3.43
03. Stop Doing What You’re Doing (Braunagel/Bundrick/Kossoff/Wilson/Wilson-Slesser) 3.25
04. Raging River (Wilson) 3.10
05. Some Kind Of Happy (Wilson) 4.55
06. Sweet Beauty (Wilson) 3.13
07. Just For You John (Bundrick/Rutherford) 6.21
08. On Your Life (Bundrick) 3.57
09. Leaves In The Wind (Bundrick/Rutherford) 5.08

LabelB1
*
**

PaulKossoffPaul Kossoff

Rainbow – On Stage (1977)

OriginalFrontCover1Captured from various performances on the 1976 Rainbow world tour, ‘Rainbow On Stage’ showcases the power and improvisation displayed by Rainbow’s Mk.II line up. Not content with merely replicating the original recorded work, Blackmore would extend many numbers into lengthy guitar showcases lasting up to 20 minutes on some occasions.

The album was mixed and edited by Martin Birch, once again given sole duties at the production helm. The overall sound is impressive for a live show, although it later transpired that several performances had been edited together to create better versions of some songs. This was fairly standard practice for live albums, however, as it was unlikely that a single show would ever be good enough as a stand alone performance to be released as an album (e.g. Deep Purple’s ‘Made In Japan’ was compiled from three separate shows). Other well known sections of the Rainbow live set were cut altogether, such as Cozy Powell’s ‘1812 Overture’ drum solo and recent tracks off the ‘Rainbow Rising’ LP, namely ‘Do You Close Your Eyes’ and ‘Stargazer’. Some of these decisions were made in order to get the tracks to fit on a double LP, some because the performances weren’t quite good enough; ‘Stargazer’ was a tough one to replicate live without the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra filling out the sound as on the ‘Rising’ album…! The running order was also chopped around to fit across 4 sides of vinyl, and again, many purists felt disappointed at the final representation of a Rainbow gig.

RainbowLive1977

Taking that aside, the sound and individual performance of each song in its own right, is exemplary of the energy and quality of 1976 Rainbow at its peak.

‘Kill The King’ explodes as an opening track as the strains of the famous ‘Wizard Of Oz’ soundtrack introduction fade away. This song had been specifically written to open live shows and would not be committed to vinyl as an album track until 1978. Then a storming version of ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’, with much more power and vigour than the original studio cut, segueing into a familiar ‘Blues’ that Blackmore had introduced into Deep Purple Mk. III live shows 2 years earlier, a brief snippet of ‘Starstruck’ follows, which doesn’t quite seem to hit the mark or demonstrate the prowess displayed on ‘Rainbow Rising’, leading back into the closing finale of side 1 with Dio proclaiming “You’re all…the men…” and the closing ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’ riffs.

InnerSleeve02A

Side 2 opens in a restrained manner with Blackmore displaying his classical prowess and performing a reasonable section of Bach’s ‘Das Wohltemperierte Klavier’ to introduce ‘Catch The Rainbow’. A storming vocal performance from Dio and sublime phased guitar from Blackmore with a lengthy solo to extend the track to a single side of vinyl.

The iconic Deep Purple ‘Mistreated’ number opens side 3 with a dynamic, echo-laden introduction. Dio seems to add an extra dimension to the vocal and again, Blackmore extends this into a personal showcase. Impressive.

Finally, onto side 4, and two more re-energised classics from the debut Rainbow album. Blackmore deftly intro’s with the original ‘Greensleeves’ tune before launching into a much more powerful and pacy version of ‘Sixteenth Century Greensleeves’. ‘Still I’m Sad’ is likewise, and with the stunning vocals from Dio again, one wonders why the now seemingly rather tame instrumental version was ever considered for the original album. An awesome display, but this track does seem disjointed where the drum solo has been edited out.

Rainbow1976.jpg

According to the excellent book ‘Rainbow Rising’ by Roy Davies, his lengthy research has worked out where the tracks were used from each show:

Kill The King – opening first minute or so from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976) and the rest of the song from Munich (29th September 1976)

Man On The Silver Mountain section – from the afternoon and evening shows in Tokyo (16th December 1976)

Catch The Rainbow – mostly unedited from Hiroshima show (14th December 1976)

Mistreated – edited version from Cologne (25th September 1976)

Sixteenth Century Greensleeves – unedited version from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976)

Still I’m Sad – edited version from Munich (29th September 1976)

Blackmore had become frustrated at the lack of improvisational ability of Tony Carey during the tour, claiming he just played the same stuff over and over again, so Carey would become the next casualty of the Rainbow personnel changes, along with Jimmy Bain who Blackmore stated “couldn’t handle the complicated stuff…” (ritchieblackmoresrainbow.wordpress.com)

In other words: One of the finest hard & heavy live albums all time !

Recorded: September – December 1976, Germany, Tokyo

BackCover1

Personnel:
Jimmy Bain (bass)
Ritchie Blackmore (guitar)
Tony Carey (keyboards)
Ronnie James Dio (vocals)
Cozy Powell (drums)

InletA

Tracklist:
01. Intro: Over The Rainbow (Arlen/Harburg)/Kill The King (Blackmore/Dio/Powell) 5.32
02. Man On The Silver Mountain (Blackmore/Dio)/Blues (Blackmore)/Starstruck (Blackmore/Dio) 11.13
03. Catch The Rainbow (Blackmore/Dio) 15.36
04. Mistreated (Blackmore/Coverdale) 13.03
05. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves (Traditional/Blackmore/Dio)
06. Still I’m Sad (McCarthy/Smith) 11.01

LabelD1

*
**

 

Alquin – Best Kept Secret (1976)

FrontCover1This is the last Alquin studio album from the Seventies … and even it´s not so best Alquin  album … it´s a damn good album …

This fourth album is the logical follower of Nobody but that also means that it out of the scope of this site as this is rather poor in Prog contents : I would diagnose less than 5% which means that you will never overdose of it but will likely get bored before reaching the fatal level. Don’t get me wrong , this is correct FM rock along the lines of Foreigner (actually, they spring to mind quite often when I hear Alquin) . Even the longer tracks divided into subsection are relatively uninteresting for the proghead. Another comparison would be their great fellow Dutchmen Golden Earring (not any proggier but one hell of more adventure and inspiration , though). In another site , i might have given this a third star. (by Sean Trane)

And I can´ agree with this review … this is another pretty good album by Alquin … one of the best dutch groups from the Seventies …

Listen and enjoy … to songs like “L.A. Rendez-Vous”, “Fool In The Mirror” or “One More Night” and you´ll know what I mean …

BackCover

Personnel:
Ferdinand Bakker (guitar, violin, background vocals)
Michel van Dijk (vocals)
Dick Franssen (keyboards)
Ron Ottenhof  (saxophone, flute)
Job Tarenskeen (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Jan Visser (bass, background vocals, percussion)
+
horns on 01.:
Buddy Beadle – Geoff Wright – Martin Droner – Steve Gregory
+
The Deadcenter Boys (on 05.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Fool In The Mirror:
01.1. Sham Fight (Bakker/v. Dijk)
01.2. Stars End (Franssen/Visser/Ottenhoff) 3.01
02. Central Station Hustle (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk) 5.58
03. L.A. Rendez-Vous (Bakker/Tarenskeen) 4.39
04. High Rockin’ (Bakker/Ottenhoff) 5.29
05. One More Night:
05.1. Bootleg Ballet (Franssen/Visser/Ottenhoff)
05.2. Laserlights (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk)
05.3. Back At The Losing End (Bakker/Tarenskeen/v.Dijk) 9.02
06 Amy (Bakker/v. Dijk) 4.21
07. Take Any Road (Bakker/v. Dijk) 5.50

LabelB1

*
**

Front+BackCover.jpg
More Alquin albums:

MoreAlquin

Procol Harum – Rockpalast (1976)

FrontCover1Procol Harum on Rockpalast 1976, an excellently filmed show in brilliant color, sadly suffering from muted sound. The selection of tracks is quite varied. As a technical aside, Chris Copping is playing one of the smaller M series Hammond organs in it as well as his ARP Soloist synth. His solo on As Strong As Samson is a delight. BJ is in top form during the entire programme. Mick, using his Strat, sounds a bit thinner than usual but his solos are quite good.. Gary was in top form as well, dressed in black velvet. Aside from the rather TV production-like sound values, the band is in good form. That’s about it … “in a nutshell.”

And here´s is the audio version from this great concert !

Recorded at the famous Rockpalast TV show on the 17th of January 1976, this is often proposed in DVD format but here only in audio file. The sound is quite deceiving for a TV show but I never found a better one (even on the payment sites). The setlist is much better than the Faithfield Halls one (no awful “Blue Danube” here, neither the weak “I Keep Forgetting”).

Rockpalast2
And the playing is also much better (strange since a TV show should decrease the individual involvement of musicians compared to a stage) with in particular a fantastic organ work done by Chris Copping and a great Mick Grabham (listen to him on “The Unquiet Zone” and tell me if he’s not an axe master). (by dkandroughmix-forgottensongs.blogspot)

Without any doubt:

Procol Harum was a very unique band in the the history of Rock !

Rockpalast1

Personnel:
Gary Brooker (piano, vocals)
Alan Cartwright (nass)
Chris Copping (organ)
Mick Grabham (guitar)
B.J. Wilson (drums)

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Conquistador 4.26
02. Bringing Home The Bacon 4.11
03. Strong As Samson 5.39
04. Pandora’s Box 4.06
05. The Unquiet Zone 5.12
06. Grand Hotel 8.49
07. Souvenir Of London 3.24
08. A Salty Dog 5.22
09. Nothing But The Truth 4.32
10. Power Failure 6.14

Music: Gary Brooker
Lyrics: Keith Reid

*
**

And here´s the TV show as a video:

Eric Clapton – No Reason To Cry (1976)

FrontCover1No Reason to Cry is a 1976 album by Eric Clapton, released for both Polydor and RSO records. The album was released in compact disc format on October 25, 1990.[citation needed]No Reason to Cry is a 1976 album by Eric Clapton, released for both Polydor and RSO records.

The album was recorded at The Band’s Shangri-la Studios in March 1976, and included involvement from all five members; Rick Danko shared vocals with Clapton on “All Our Past Times,” which he co-wrote with Clapton.

The album also includes a duet with Bob Dylan on his otherwise unreleased song “Sign Language.” The booklet in Bob Dylan’s box set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991 describes his involvement in this album: “Dylan dropped by and was just hanging out, living in a tent at the bottom of the garden. He would sneak into the studio to see what was going on. Dylan offered his new, unrecorded song “Seven Days” to Clapton. Clapton passed on it, but Ron Wood took him up on the offer and released it on his third solo album Gimme Some Neck”. The song “Innocent Times” is sung by Marcy Levy, who also shared vocals with Clapton on “Hungry.”

No Reason to Cry is one of Clapton’s most successful international albums from the 1970s. The release reached the Top 30 in seven national music album charts, reaching the Top 10 in United Kingdom (peaking at number eight) and in the Netherlands, where the studio release ranked on position nine. The album was certified with a platinum in the United Kingdom. In Norway and the United States, No Reason to Cry charted at #13 and #15. In New Zealand and Sweden, the 1976 album positioned itself on number 18 and 24.

Rolling Stone journalist Dave Marsh finds, the album recordings are “much more mélange than masterpiece”.  Robert Christgau rated the album with a “B-” and calls the album “a well-made, rather likable rock and roll LP”, noting the “singing is eloquent and the instrumental signature an almost irresistible pleasure” (by wikipedia)

EricClapton

When he gave a speech inducting the Band into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Eric Clapton said that after he heard their debut album, Music from Big Pink, he wanted to join the group, the fact that they already had a guitarist in Robbie Robertson notwithstanding. In the winter of 1975-1976, when he cut No Reason to Cry at the Band’s Shangri-La Studio in Malibu, California, he came as close as he ever would to realizing that desire. Clapton is a musical chameleon; though some of No Reason to Cry is identifiable as the kind of pop/rock Clapton had been making since the start of his solo career (the best of it being “Hello Old Friend,” which became his first Top 40 single in two years), the most memorable music on the album occurs when Clapton is collaborating with members of the Band and other guests. He duets with Band bassist Rick Danko on Danko’s “All Our Past Times,” and with Bob Dylan on Dylan’s “Sign Language,” as Robertson’s distinctive lead guitar is heard rather than Clapton’s. As a result, the album is a good purchase for fans of Bob Dylan and the Band, but not necessarily for those of Eric Clapton. (by William Ruhlmann)

And I cant agree with this review … I guess, this is one of Clapton´s finest albums in the Seventies … great music, and great vocals … listen to “Carnival” or “Hungry”

Inlet02A

Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar, vocals)
Rick Danko (bass)
Terry Danko (percussion)
Jesse Ed Davis (guitar)
Bobby Ellis (trumpet)
Georgie Fame (keyboards)
Albhy Galuten (piano)
Levon Helm (drums)
Garth Hudson (keyboards, saxophone)
Marcy Levy (vocals)
Richard Manuel (drums)
Ralph Moss (percussion)
Jamie Oldaker (drums)
Billy Preston (keyboards)
Carl Radle (bass)
Robbie Robertson (guitar, keyboards)
Sergio Rodriguez (percussion)
Dicky Simms (keyboards)
George Terry (guitar)
Wah Wah Watson (guitar)
Ron Wood (guitar)
+
Bob Dylan (vocals on 03.)
+
background vocals:
Sandy Castle – Yvonne Elliman – Chris Jagger

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Beautiful Thing (Danko/Manuel) 4:26
02. Carnival (Clapton) 3:44
03. Sign Language (Dylan) 2:58
04. County Jail Blues (Fields) 4:00
05. All Our Past Times (Clapton/Danko) 4:40
06. Hello Old Friend (Clapton) 3:36
07. Double Trouble (Rush) 4:23
08. Innocent Times (Clapton/Levy) 4:11
09. Hungry (Levy/Simms) 4:39
10. Black Summer Rain (Clapton) 4:55
+
11. Last Night (Jacobs) 4.51

LabelB1
*
**

InTheStudio

Paice Ashton Lord – Malice In Wonderland (1976) (2001 Special Edition)

LPFrontCover1Malice in Wonderland is the only studio album by Paice Ashton Lord. It was released in 1977.

Once they had decided to leave and disband Deep Purple, Paice and Lord began to plan a very different type of band, built around a trio of themselves and long time friend Tony Ashton, who was to handle the vocals and share keyboard duties. Ashton, Gardner & Dyke had supported Deep Purple in the early seventies, and shared management. Jon Lord found he got on well with Ashton, and helped AGD out in the studio culminating in the superb western soundtrack ‘The Last Rebel’ which the pair co-wrote and performed on.

In 1974 Ashton and Lord finally finished the “The First Of The Big Bands” album (started three years before), influenced by the Phil Spector wall of sound idea. The album did not sell well, despite a BBC In Concert appearance and an all-star show in London, but did establish the heavy r’n’b foundations on which PAL were to build. To complete PAL, mysterious “guitarist and bassist wanted” press ads appeared in July 1976, and from the auditions guitarist Bernie Marsden (ex of Cozy Powell’s Hammer and Babe Ruth) and bassist Paul Martinex (from Stretch) were signed. Work then got underway on a debut album, the group accompanied off and on by a film crew for the eventual PAL documentary ‘Lifespan’. Jon Lord also broke off to help promote his latest (and some would say best) solo album Sarabande before finishing off the PAL album.

FamilyTree
PAL’s debut Malice In Wonderland in March 1977 got a mixed reception and a European tour was cancelled in favour of just five UK dates during which PAL expanded to an 11-piece group with a brass section and girl backing singers. A nervous world debut on BBC TV’s ‘Sight And Sound In Concert’ was with hindsight a PR blunder, and showed how uneasy Tony Ashton was fronting a band launched on such a grand scale but even so most of the subsequent gigs were packed and Tony enjoyed himself more when able to communicate a little with the first few rows. Paice and Lord tried unsuccessfully to bring in David Coverdale to take the pressure from Ashton’s shoulders (he was also being headhunted by Uriah Heep around the same time), before eventually deciding in early 1978 to cut their losses and call it a day with work on a second album abandoned (some tracks later being unearthed for a CD reissue).

PAL01

David Coverdale in turn brought Bernie Marsden into his new band Whitesnake, and a few months later managed to tempt Jon Lord into the fold. Ian Paice followed in mid 1979. Tony Ashton returned to sessions (appearing on one or two of Lord’s solo albums), production, occasional live work and painting. An all-star concert in his honour was held at Abbey Road in 2000 which included the only PAL reunion, with all the original group except for Martinez taking part. Tony Ashton was quite ill by this time and sadly passed away in 2001. (by deep-purple.net)

BernieMarsden
Paice Ashton Lord’s sole album is a rather anonymous-sounding late-1970s hard rock/AOR effort. There’s more funk, soul, boogie, and jazz influence than you would expect from Deep Purple alumni, but at heart these are typical period mainstream rock songs that don’t lend a distinctive personality to the short-lived band. There’s an outrageously blatant quote from Blood, Sweat & Tears’ “Spinning Wheel” in “Silas & Jerome.”

TonyAshton

The 2001 CD reissue on Purple Records adds eight bonus tracks from the sessions for their unreleased second album, which are of a similar but less polished quality. Some of the songs are instrumentals rather than fully worked-up compositions, and the fidelity on a few of them is substandard, though not truly bad. The liner notes for the reissue give a thorough history of the band. (by Richie Unterberger)

And the bonus tracks from the unreleased second album are fucking good … listen to “Steamroller Blues”, “Moonburn” and to all the other tracks … and you´ll know wha I mean !

PAL02

Personnel:
Tony Ashton (vocals, keyboards)
Jon Lord (keyboards, synthesizer)
Bernie Marsden (guitar, background vocals)
Paul Martinez (bass)
Ian Paice (drums, percussion)
+
Reg Brooks (trumpet, flugelhorn, trombone)
Howie Casey (saxophone)
Gilbert Dall’enese (saxophone, clarinet)
+
background vocals:
Jeanette McKinley – Sheila McKinley

LPBooklet1

Tracklist:
01. Ghost Story (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 5.47
02. Remember The Good Times (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden/Martinez) 5.46
03. Arabella (Oh Tell Me) (Ashton) 4.07
04. Silas & Jerome (Paice/Ashton/Lord)  3.24
05. Dance With Me Baby (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden/Martinez) 3.21
06. On The Road Again, Again (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden) 3.59
07. Sneaky Private Lee (Paice/Ashton/Lord7Marsden) 6.07
08. I’m Gonna Stop Drinking (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 5.09
09. Malice In Wonderland (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 6.06
+
10. Steamroller Blues (Taylor) 4.52
11. Nasty Clavinet (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden) 4.30
12. Black And White (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 4.13
13. Moonburn (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden/Martinez) 3.22
14. Dance Coming (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 4.57
15. Goodbye Hello LA (Paice/Ashton/Lord) 3.54
16. Untitled (Paice/Ashton/Lord/Marsden/Martinez) 3.16
17. Ballad Of Mr. Giver (Ashton/Lord) 5.53

LabelB1
*
**

Article