Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Live ´77 (Montreal) (VHS rip) (1983)

FrontCover1Emerson, Lake & Palmer took an extended break in 1974. They regrouped in 1976 to record Works Volume 1 at Mountain Studios in Montreux, Switzerland and EMI Studios in Paris, France. It is a double album with one side of an LP containing songs by each member and a fourth of group material. Much of the album was recorded with an orchestral accompaniment; Emerson’s side consists of his 18-minute, three-movement “Piano Concerto No. 1”. Lake contributes five songs he co-wrote with Sinfield, and Palmer’s includes two covers of classical pieces by Sergei Prokofiev and Bach. One of the two group tracks, “Fanfare for the Common Man”, is a cover of the same-titled orchestral piece by Aaron Copland, who gave permission to have the band release it. Works Volume 1 was released in March 1977 and peaked at No. 9 in the UK and No. 12 in the US. A single of “Fanfare for the Common Man” was released and reached No. 2 in the UK, the band’s highest charting UK single.

In November 1977, Works Volume 2 was released as a compilation of shorter tracks recorded from 1973–76 during various album recording sessions. The album was not as commercially successful as the band’s previous albums; it reached No. 20 in the UK and No. 37 in the US. Three tracks from the album were released as singles: “Tiger in a Spotlight”, “Maple Leaf Rag”, and “Watching Over You”.

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The two Works albums were supported by North American tours which lasted from May 1977 to February 1978, spanning over 120 dates. Some early concerts in 1977 were performed with a hand-picked orchestra and choir, but the idea was shelved after 18 shows with the band due to budget constraints. The final concert with the orchestra and choir took place on 26 August 1977 at the Olympic Stadium in Montreal that was attended by an estimated 78,000 people, the highest attended Emerson, Lake & Palmer concert as a solo act.[49] It was released in 1979 as Emerson, Lake & Palmer in Concert and reached No. 73 in the US. Emerson wished for a double album release, but Atlantic Records decided against it due to the band’s pending dissolution at its time of release. In 1993, the album was repackaged with additional tracks as Works Live, and put out on video in 1998.[49] According to Lake on the Beyond the Beginning DVD documentary, the band lost around $3 million on the tour. Lake and Palmer blame Emerson for the loss as the use of an orchestra on tour was his idea (by wikipedia)

And here´s a VHS-rip from their show in Montreal …

I´m a strong fan of Ermson, Lake & Palmer but to be honest … in their last years they had lost the direction … but this is yet a nice performance …

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Personnel:
Keith Emerson (keyboards)
Greg Lake (vocals, bass, guitar)
Carl Palmer (drums, percussion)
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A 70 piece unknown orchestra

ELP02

Tracklist:
0.1. Abaddon’s Bolero (Ravel/Emerson)
02.. The Enemy God Dances With The Black Spirits (excerpt from ‘The Scythian Suite’, 2nd Movement) (Prokofiev)
03. Karn Evil 9 – First Impression – Part II (Emerson/Lake)
04.. Pictures At An Exhibition:
04.1. Promenade (Mussorgsky)
04.2. The Gnome (Mussorgsky/Palmer)
04.3. The Hut Of Baba Yaga (Mussorgsky(Lake)
04.4. The Curse Of Baba Yaga (Emerson/Lake/Palmer)
04.5. TheHut Of Baba Yaga (Mussorgsky)
04.6. The Great Gate of Kiev (Mussorgsky(Lake)
05. C’est La Vie (Lake/Sinfield)
06. Lucky Man (Lake)
07. Piano Concerto No.1, 3rd Movement, Toccata Con Fuoco (Emerson)
08.. Tank (Emerson/Palmer)
09. Nutrocker (Fowley)
10. Pirates (Emerson/Lake/Sinfield)
11. Fanfare For The Common Man (Copeland)

Total time: 1.25.30

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Dr. Feelgood – Down At The BBC In Concert 1977 – 78 (2002)

FrontCover1Dr. Feelgood was the ultimate working band. From their formation in 1971 to lead vocalist Lee Brilleaux’s untimely death in 1994, the band never left the road, playing hundreds of gigs every year. Throughout their entire career, Dr. Feelgood never left simple, hard-driving rock & roll behind, and their devotion to the blues and R&B earned them a devoted fan base. That following first emerged in the mid-’70s, when Dr. Feelgood became the leader of the second wave of pub rockers. Unlike Brinsley Schwarz, the laid-back leaders of the pub rock scene, Dr. Feelgood was devoted to edgy, Stonesy rock & roll, and their sweaty live shows — powered by Brilleaux’s intense singing and guitarist Wilko Johnson’s muscular leads — became legendary. While the group’s stripped-down, energetic sound paved the way for English punk rock in the late ’70s, their back-to-basics style was overshadowed by the dominance of punk and new wave, and the group had retreated to cult status by the early ’80s.

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Brilleaux (vocals, harmonica), Johnson (guitar), and John B. Sparks (bass) had all played in several blues-based bar bands around Canvey Island, England before forming Dr. Feelgood in 1971. Taking their name from a Johnny Kidd & the Pirates song, the group was dedicated to playing old-fashioned R&B and rock & roll, including both covers and originals by Johnson. John Martin (drums), a former member of Finian’s Rainbow, was added to the lineup, and the group began playing the pub rock circuit. By the end of 1973, Dr. Feelgood’s dynamic live act had made them the most popular group on the pub rock circuit, and several labels were interested in signing them. They settled for United Artists, and they released their debut album, Down by the Jetty, in 1974.

DrFeelgood02According to legend, Down by the Jetty was recorded in mono and consisted almost entirely of first takes. While it was in fact recorded in stereo, the rumor added significantly to Dr. Feelgood’s purist image, and the album became a cult hit. The following year, the group released Malpractice — also their first U.S. release — which climbed into the U.K. Top 20 on the strength of the band’s live performances and positive reviews. In 1976, the band released the live album Stupidity, which became a smash hit in Britain, topping the album charts. Despite its thriving British success, Dr. Feelgood was unable to find an audience in the States. One other American album, Sneakin’ Suspicion, followed in 1977 before the band gave up on the States; they never released another record in the U.S.

Sneakin’ Suspicion didn’t replicate the success of Stupidity, partially because of its slick production, but mainly because the flourishing punk rock movement overshadowed Dr. Feelgood’s edgy roots rock. Wilko Johnson left the band at the end of 1977 to form the Solid Senders; he later joined Ian Dury’s Blockheads. Henry McCullough played on Feelgood’s 1977 tour before John “Gypie” Mayo became the group’s full-time lead guitarist. Nick Lowe produced 1978’s Be Seeing You, Mayo’s full-length debut with Dr. Feelgood. The album generated the 1979 Top Ten hit “Milk and Alcohol,” as well as the Top 40 hit “As Long as the Price Is Right.” Two albums, As It Happens and Let It Roll, followed in 1979, and Mayo left the band in 1980. He was replaced by Johnny Guitar in 1980, who debuted on A Case of the Shakes, which was also produced by Nick Lowe.

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During their first decade together, Dr. Feelgood never left the road, which was part of the reason founding members John Martin and John Sparks left the band in 1982. Lee Brilleaux replaced them with Buzz Barwell and Pat McMullen, and continued touring. Throughout the ’80s, Brilleaux continued to lead various incarnations of Dr. Feelgood, settling on the rhythm section of bassist Phil Mitchell and drummer Kevin Morris in the mid-’80s. The band occasionally made records — including Brilleaux, one of the last albums on Stiff Records, in 1976 — but concentrated primarily on live performances. Dr. Feelgood continued to perform to large audiences into the early ’90s, when Brilleaux was struck by cancer. He died in April of 1994, three months after he recorded the band’s final album, Down at the Doctor’s. The remaining members of Dr. Feelgood hired vocalist Pete Gage and continued to tour under the band’s name. Former Feelgoods Gypie Mayo, John Sparks, and John Martin formed the Practice in the mid-’80s, and they occasionally performed under the name Dr. Feelgood’s Practice. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Mayo

With 20 years having elapsed since the firestorm of punk first set hippie beards a-blazing, the late 1990s saw history finally get around to some serious re-evaluation: the realization that the bands which started the whole ball rolling were not American proto-snots from some vast Midwestern garage; that theStooges and the Velvets were unknown to most of the kids who were forming bands (you can’t afford imports when you’re young and on the dole); and that Dr. Feelgood kicked harder ass than all those Yankee squealers put together. (Russ Garrett)

Wow, what a treat! I’ve recently started listening to the Feelgoods again as I enter middle age (don’t go there), and I invested in this. it’s NOT just another hodge podge dragged out of the vaults, but a couple of great gigs, well recorded, with fantastic atmosphere. I remember, when the official ive albums As it Happens and On the Job were released, thinking they were a bit muted-sounding. Not this one. These live recordings capture the energy of a Feelgood show as well as anything else I’ve heard. (by Angry bluesman)

Tracks 1 to 11 recorded at Queen Mary College, Mile End Road, London on 1.12.77.Broadcast on BBC TV and Radio 1’s
“Sight And Sound In Concert” programme on 10.12.77.

Tracks 12 to 22 recorded at The Paris Theatre, Lower Regent Street, London on 1.11.78.Broadcast on BBC TV and Radio 1’s “In Concert” programme on 18.11.78.

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Personnel:
Lee Brilleaux (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Gypie Mayo (guitar)
John B. Sparks (bass, background vocals)
John “The Big Figure” Martin (drums, background vocals)

DrFeelgood04

Tracklist:
01. Looking Back (Watson) 2.17
02. Stupidity (Burke) 2.23
03. You’ll Be Mine (Dixon) 2.57
04. You Upset Me Baby (King/Josea/Davis)  4.03
05. Homework (Perkins/Clark) 2.19
06. Baby Jane (Simmonds/Reed/Bishop/Wilson/Nesbitt) 2.56
07. The Blues Had A Baby, And They Named It Rock’N’Roll (#2) (Morganfield/McGhee) 2.21
08. That’s It I Quit (Lowe) 2.46
09. Lucky Seven (Lewis) 2.31
10. She’s A Windup (Brilleaux/Mayo/Sparks/Martin) 2.11
11. Lights Out (David/Rebennack) 2.33
12. Looking Back (Watson) 2.03
13. Sugar Shaker (Brilleaux/Mayo/Sparks) 3.58
14. I Thought I Had It Made (Brilleaux/Mayo) 2.34
15. Ninety-Nine And Half (Won’t Do) (Cropper/Pickett/Floyd) 2.52
16. Milk And Alcohol (Lowe/Mayo) 2.38
17. Night Time (Gottehrer/Fieldman/Goldstein) 3.59
18. Shotgun Blues (Brilleaux/Mayo/Sparks/Martin) 4.50
19. You Upset Me Baby (King/Josea/Davis) 3.39
20. Down At The Doctors (Jupp) 3.06
21. She’s A Windup (Brilleaux/Mayo/Sparks/Martin) 1.50
22. Lights Out (David/Rebennack) 2.23

CD

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Cheers

Cheers !

Lee Brilleaux (born Lee John Collinson: 10 May 1952 – 7 April 1994

Gypie Mayo (born John Phillip Cawthra; 24 July 1951 − 23 October 2013)

Jackson Browne – Running On Empty (1977)

FrontCover1Running on Empty is the fifth album by American singer-songwriter Jackson Browne. Released in 1977, the album reached #3 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart in 1978 and stayed on the charts for 65 weeks. The single for the title track, “Running on Empty”, peaked at #11 and the follow-up single, “The Load-Out”/”Stay”, reached #20 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.

The album received two Grammy Award nominations in 1979: one for Album of the Year and the other for Pop Male Vocal Performance for the song “Running on Empty”.

In addition to tracks recorded on-stage during concerts, it also contains songs recorded in hotel rooms, on the tour bus, and backstage. It is unusual among live albums in that none of the tracks had ever appeared on a previous studio album. Browne was the sole writer on only two songs, co-writing four others and covering another four. The theme of the album was life on the road. In a Rolling Stone interview about the tour during which the album was recorded, Browne expressed pleasure at finally being able to afford the session musicians he wanted to go out on the road with him.

The album was certified as a Gold record in 1977 and Platinum in 1978 by the RIAA. It reached Multi-platinum in 1997 and 2001. It reached 7X platinum and is Browne’s best-selling album to date. In popular culture, the album cover can be seen framed and hanging on the wall next to the front door in the apartment on the set of Mork & Mindy. (by wikipedia)

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Having acknowledged a certain creative desperation on The Pretender, Jackson Browne lowered his sights (and raised his commercial appeal) considerably with Running on Empty, which was more a concept album about the road than an actual live album, even though its songs were sometimes recorded on-stage (and sometimes on the bus or in the hotel). Unlike most live albums, though, it consisted of previously unrecorded songs. Browne had less creative participation on this album than on any he ever made, solely composing only two songs, co-writing four others, and covering another four. And he had less to say — the title song and leadoff track neatly conjoined his artistic and escapist themes. Figuratively and creatively, he was out of gas, but like “the pretender,” he still had to make a living. The songs covered all aspects of touring, from Danny O’Keefe’s “The Road,” which detailed romantic encounters, and “Rosie” (co-written by Browne and his manager Donald Miller), in which a soundman pays tribute to auto-eroticism, to, well, “Cocaine,” to the travails of being a roadie (“The Load-Out”).

Singles

Audience noises, humorous asides, loose playing — they were all part of a rough-around-the-edges musical evocation of the rock & roll touring life. It was not what fans had come to expect from Browne, of course, but the disaffected were more than outnumbered by the newly converted. (It didn’t hurt that “Running on Empty” and “The Load-Out”/”Stay” both became Top 40 hits.) As a result, Browne’s least ambitious, but perhaps most accessible, album ironically became his biggest seller. But it is not characteristic of his other work: for many, it will be the only Browne album they will want to own, just as others always will regard it disdainfully as “Jackson Browne lite.” (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Jackson Browne (guitar, piano, vocals)
Craig Doerge (keyboards)
Danny Kortchmar (guitar, background vocals)
Russ Kunkel (drums, percussion)
David Lindley (lap steel guitar, fiddle, co-lead vocals on “Stay”
Leland Sklar (bass)
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background vocals on
Joel Bernstein – Rosemary Butler  Doug Haywood

LPBooklet01

Tracklist:
01. Running On Empty (Browne) 5.31
02. The Road (O’Keefe) 4.46
03. Rosie (Miller/Browne) 3.41
04. You Love The Thunder (Browne) 3.55
05. Cocaine (Davis/Frey/Browne) 4.57
06. Shaky Town (Kortchmar) 3.41
07. Love Needs A Heart (Browne/George/Carter) 3.30
08. Nothing But Time (Burke/Browne) 3.37
09. The Load-Out (Garofalo/Browne) 5.36
10. Stay (Just A Little Bit Longer) (Williams) 3.22

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Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
Looking back at the years gone by like so many summer fields
In sixty-five I was seventeen and running up one-oh-one
I don’t know where I’m running now, I’m just running on
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Gotta do what you can just to keep your love alive
Trying not to confuse it with what you do to survive
In sixty-nine I was twenty-one and I called the road my own
I don’t know when that road turned, into the road I’m on
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Everyone I know, everywhere I go
People need some reason to believe
I don’t know about anyone but me
If it takes all night, that’ll be all right
If I can get you to smile before I leave
Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
I don’t know how to tell you all just how crazy this life feels
Look around for the friends that I used to turn to to pull me through
Looking into their eyes I see them running too
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Honey you really tempt me
You know the way you look so kind
I’d love to stick around but I’m running behind
You know I don’t even know what I’m hoping to find
Running into the sun but I’m running behind

The Alan Parsons Project – I Robot (1977)

FrontCover1Robot is the second studio album by the British progressive rock band The Alan Parsons Project, released on 1 June 1977 by Arista Records. The album draws conceptually on author Isaac Asimov’s science fiction Robot trilogy, exploring philosophical themes regarding artificial intelligence.

The album was intended to be based on the I, Robot stories written by Asimov, and Eric Woolfson spoke with Asimov himself, who was enthusiastic about the idea. As the rights already had been granted to a TV/movie company, the album’s title was altered slightly by removing the comma in “I,”, and the theme and lyrics were made to be more generically about robots rather than to be specific to the Asimov universe.[3][4] The cover inlay read: “I Robot… The story of the rise of the machine and the decline of man, which paradoxically coincided with his discovery of the wheel… and a warning that his brief dominance of this planet will probably end, because man tried to create robot in his own image.” The title of the final track, “Genesis Ch.1 v.32”, follows this theme by implying a continuation to the story of Creation, since the first chapter of Genesis only has 31 verses.

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The album cover photo features the band members in the escalator tubes of the circular Terminal 1 building of the Charles de Gaulle Airport outside of Paris. Over this is superimposed a painting of a robot with a stylised atom for a brain. This illustration appears in a two-dimensional form on the label of the record. The original vinyl release had a gatefold-style cover; the inside spread had printed the lyrics for the non-instrumental selections and a monochrome photograph of Parsons himself.

Three singles were released from the album: “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You”, “Don’t Let it Show” and “Day After Day (The Show Must Go On)”. The LP track “Breakdown” went into heavy rotation on AOR stations and continues to be played on classic rock radio.

“Don’t Let It Show” was covered by Pat Benatar for her In the Heat of the Night LP. Gail Godwin describes it as “much more sentimental than the usual Alan Parsons”. “Some Other Time” was also covered by Arjen Anthony Lucassen in his 2012 album Lost in the New Real. “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You” is featured in the 2013 video game Grand Theft Auto V on the fictional radio station Los Santos Rock Radio. “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You” is also featured in an episode of the Netflix series Mindhunter. (by wikipedia)

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Alan Parsons delivered a detailed blueprint for his Project on their 1975 debut, Tales of Mystery and Imagination, but it was on its 1977 follow-up, I Robot, that the outfit reached its true potential. Borrowing not just its title but concept from Isaac Asimov’s classic sci-fi Robot trilogy, this album explores many of the philosophies regarding artificial intelligence — will it overtake man, what does it mean to be man, what responsibilities do mechanical beings have to their creators, and so on and so forth — with enough knotty intelligence to make it a seminal text of late-’70s geeks, and while it is also true that appreciating I Robot does require a love of either sci-fi or art rock, it is also true that sci-fi art rock never came any better than this. Compare it to Jeff Wayne’s War of the ArticleWorlds, released just a year after this and demonstrating some clear influence from Parsons: that flirts voraciously with camp, but this, for all of its pomp and circumstance, for all of its overblown arrangements, this is music that’s played deadly serious. Even when the vocal choirs pile up at the end of “Breakdown” or when the Project delves into some tight, glossy white funk on “The Voice,” complete with punctuations from robotic voices and whining slide guitars, there isn’t much sense of fun, but there is a sense of mystery and a sense of drama that can be very absorbing if you’re prepared to give yourself over to it. The most fascinating thing about the album is that the music is restless, shifting from mood to mood within the course of a song, but unlike some art pop there is attention paid to hooks — most notably, of course, on the hit “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You,” a tense, paranoid neo-disco rocker that was the APP’s breakthrough. It’s also the closest thing to a concise pop song here — other tunes have plenty of hooks, but they change their tempo and feel quickly, which is what makes this an art rock album instead of a pop album. And while that may not snare in listeners who love the hit (they should turn to Eye in the Sky instead, the Project’s one true pop album), that sense of melody when married to the artistic restlessness and geeky sensibility makes for a unique, compelling album and the one record that truly captures mind and spirit of the Alan Parsons Project. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Asimov

Personnel:
Ian Bairnson (guitar)
B.J. Cole (steel guitar)
John Leach (cimbalom, kantele)
Duncan Mackay (keyboards)
Alan Parsons (keyboards)
David Paton (bass, guitar)
Stuart Tosh (drums, percussion)
Eric Woolfson (keyboards)
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vocals:
Allan Clarke (on 04.)
Steve Harley (on 06.)
Jack Harris (on 08.)
Peter Straker & Jaki Whitren (on 03.)
Dave Townsend (vocals on 05.)
Lenny Zakatek (on 02.)
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background vocals on 03.:

Tony Rivers – John Perry – Stu Calver.

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. I Robot (Parsons/Woolfson) 6.02
02. I Wouldn’t Want To Be Like You (Parsons/Woolfson) 3.22
03. Some Other Time  (Parsons/Woolfson) 4.06
04. Breakdown (Parsons/Woolfson)  3:50
05. Don’t Let It Show (Parsons/Woolfson)  4.24
06. The Voice (Parsons/Woolfson) 5.24
07. Nucleus (Parsons/Woolfson) 3.31
08. Day After Day (The Show Must Go On) ( Parsons/Woolfson)  3:49
09. Total Eclipse (Powell) 3.09
10. Genesis Ch.1 V.32 (Parsons/Woolfson) 3.28
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11. Boules (I Robot experiment) (Parsons/Woolfson) 1.59
12. Breakdown (early demo of backing riff) (Parsons/Woolfson) 2.09
13. I Wouldn’t Want To Be Like You (backing track rough mix) (Parsons/Woolfson) 3.28
14. Day After Day (early stage rough mix) (Parsons/Woolfson) 3.40
15. The Naked Robot (Parsons/Woolfson) 10.19

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Marc-Antoine Charpentier ‎– Te Deum + Messe De Minuit Pour Noël (1989)

FrontCover1Marc-Antoine Charpentier composed his grand polyphonic motet Te Deum (H. 146) in D major probably between 1688 and 1698, during his stay at the Jesuit Church of Saint-Louis in Paris, where he held the position of musical director. The work is written for the group of soloists, choir, and instrumental accompaniment.

Charpentier authored six Te Deum settings, although only four of them have survived. It is thought that the composition was performed to mark the victory celebrations and the Battle of Steinkirk in August, 1692.

Charpentier considered the key D-major as “bright and very warlike”. The instrumental introduction, composed in the form of rondo, precedes the first verset, led by the bass soloist. The choir and other soloists join gradually. Charpentier apparently intended to orchestrate the work according to the traditional exegesis of the Latin text. The choir thus predominates in the first part (verset 1-10, praise of God, heavenly dimension), and individual soloists in the second part (verset 10-20, Christological section, secular dimension). In subsequent versets, nos. 21-25, both soloists and choir alternate, and the final verset is a large-scale fugue written for choir, with a short trio for soloists in the middle.

The composition is scored for five soloists (SSATB) and choir (SATB), accompanied with an instrumental ensemble of 2 nonspecified recorders or flutes, 2 oboes, 2 trumpets (second trumpet in unison with timpani), timpani, 2 violins, 2 violas (“haute-contres de violon” and “tailles de violon”) and basso continuo.

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Typical continuo instruments used in French baroque music are “basses de violon” (a cello-like, large scaled instrument often replaced by the cello in modern performances), organ, harpsichord, theorbo, bass viol and bassoon or “basse de cromorne” (a kind of bass oboe). Furthermore, serpents were frequently used to double the bass line of vocal choirs in 17th century France.

Since the instrumental ensemble is mostly constricted to 4 parts only (wind instruments and violins playing the same line), it is very easy to reduce the instrumentation if needed.

After the work’s rediscovery in 1953 by French musicologist Carl de Nys, the instrumental prelude, Marche en rondeau, was chosen in 1954 as the theme music preceding the broadcasts of the European Broadcasting Union. After over sixty years of use notably before EBU programs such as the popular Eurovision Song Contest and Jeux Sans Frontières, the prelude, as arranged by Guy Lambert and directed by Louis Martini, has become Charpentier’s best-known work. (by wikipedia)

Marc-Antoine Charpentier

Probably composed in 1690, the Messe de Minuït pour Noël, H 9, is perhaps Marc-Antoine Charpentier’s best-known composition after the Te Deum, H 146. The special appeal of this “Mass for the Midnight Service on Christmas Eve” lies in its use of no fewer than ten traditional French carols while impressively revealing Charpentier’s mastery of the concertante style.

The eight solo vocalists (SSAATTBB) can easily be taken from the chorus. They are divided into three groups – one group of two sopranos and two groups each comprising alto, tenor and bass – which interact with the chorus and instruments. This new edition represents the current state of scholarship and offers a completely revised Urtext of Charpentier’s masterpiece. (by musicroom.com)

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Personnel:

Te Deum:
Charles Brett (alto)
Eiddwen Harrhy (soprano)
Felicity Lott (soprano)
Ian Partridge (tenor)
Stephen Roberts (bass)
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Academy Of St. Martin-in-the-Fields conducted by Philip Ledger
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Choir Of King’s College, Cambridge

Messe De Minuit Pour Noël:
James Bowman (alto)
April Cantelo (soprano)
Helen Gelmar (soprano)
Christopher Keyte (bass)
Ian Partridge (tenor)
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English Chamber Orchestra conducted by David Willocks
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Choir Of King’s College, Cambridge conducted by David Willocks
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Andrew Davis (organ)

Booklet

Tracklist

Te Deum (recorded 1977):
01. Prélude 1.45
02. Te Deum Laudamus 1.18
03. Te Aeternum Patrem 1.55
04. Pleni Sunt Coeli Et Terra 2.20
05. Te Per Orbem Terrarum 3.19
06. Tu Devicto Mortis Aculeo 1.07
07. Judex Crederis 0.51
08. Te Ergo Quaesumus 2.08
09. Aeterna Fac Cum Sanctis 3.12
10. Dignare Domine 2.03
11. Fiat Misericordia 1.51
12. In Te Domine Speravi 3.21

Messe De Minuit Pour Noël (recorded: 1967):
13. Kyrie 6.27
14. Gloria 6.11
15. Credo 11.25
16. Offertoire 4.45
17. Sanctus 2.49
18. Agnus Dei 2.54

Music composed by Marc-Antoine Charpentier

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The Count Bishops – Same (1977)

FrontCover1The Count Bishops were a British rock band, formed in 1975 in London and which broke up in 1980. The Count Bishops had limited commercial success, but forged an important stylistic and chronological link between the root rhythm and blues band Dr. Feelgood and the proto punk sound of Eddie and the Hot Rods; together forming the foundation of the pub-rock scene, which influenced the emergence of punk rock. The group made history in England by releasing the first record from independent label Chiswick Records. They splintered following the death of guitarist Zenon DeFleur on 18 March 1979.

The Count Bishops formed in spring 1975 when members of the group Chrome joined the American vocalist Mike Spenser. In July of that year, Spenser (née Scolnick) called fellow countryman Johnny Guitar from Paris for five days straight and finally convinced him (guitar) to pack up two Les Pauls and fly to the UK and join up with Spenser and Zenon DeFleur (so named by Johnny after seeing him passed out on the floor at their first recording session). They found Steve Lewins (bass) and Paul Balbi (drums) within a few weeks. The new line-up recorded the next month at Pathway Studios with Barry Farmer at the desk and of these 13 tracks, four became the Speedball EP, the first release of Chiswick Records.

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Shortly before the release (on Dutch label Dynamite) of the single “Taking it Easy” (released in the UK as “Train, Train”), Spenser left the band after an incident involving a glass door and his boot. Johnny and Zen handled lead vocals for the next year, including on the Dutch release “Good Gear” on the Dynamite label. After recording the backing tracks for their first LP on Chiswick, they decided to bring over Dave Tice (formerly of Australian band Buffalo). With this lineup, the group finished recording its debut UK album, and toured heavily making a name for themselves and bringing to a new level their traditional influences of the 1960s: beat music (the Beatles, the Rolling Stones) and garage rock (the Standells, the Strangeloves).

For the rest of 1977, the Count Bishops toured continuously (including the support slot on the first Motörhead tour and John Cale’s tour that year, as well as their own shows) and built a formidable army of fans – despite the fact that they did not fit the mold considered against the backdrop of old-fashioned punk movement. In the spring of 1978, they signed up for a live album with the participation of six groups of the Chiswick Records roster. The project was not fully realised, but the label released it as a mini-album called Live Bishops, reducing the band name to the Bishops. With this material (and a new bass player Pat McMullan, who replaced Steve Lewins) the Count Bishops toured extensively.

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In 1978, two singles (“I Take What I Want” and “I Want Candy”) led the Count Bishops to an appearance on the TV show Top of the Pops. A few days after the release of their album Cross Cuts, which had been a year and a half in production, Zenon Hierowski crashed his Aston Martin and died on March 17, 1979, and instead of the anticipated “breakthrough”, the Bishops were forced to retrench. They toured with Blitz Krieg (of Blast Furnace fame) deputising for Zen, and then Paul Balbi (drums) was deported back to Australia after returning from a Spanish festival. The band carried on with Charlie Morgan (Tom Robinson Band, Elton John) on drums and just Johnny on guitar for some months, including a tour of Australia with Balbi, but Zen’s death had taken much of the impetus away and they split up. (by wikipedia)

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Kicking off with a great cover of the Kinks’ “I Need You,” this solid, unpretentious debut album belongs in the home of every fan of English R&B from the Yardbirds to the Pretty Things to Dr. Feelgood. Guitarists Johnny Guitar and Zenon de Fleur keep it tight and simple, never wasting a note, and vocalist Dave Tice is so macho, it’s enough to make you laugh. The originals are OK if somewhat predictable blues-based rave-ups, but the energy and good cheer more than make up for the album’s derivative nature. Not a deep album by any stretch of the imagination, just good dirty fun. (by John Dougan)

Ladies and gentlemen: Loud & proud, hot & dirty: The Count Bishops now !

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Personnel:
Paul Balbi (drums)
Zenon De Fleur (guitar, slide-guitar)
Johnny Guitar (guitar, vocals)
Steve Lewins (bass)
Dave Tice (vocals)
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Julian Holland (piano on 06.)

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Tracklist:
01. I Need You (Davies) 2.22
02. Stay Free (De Fleur) 3.08
03. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 2.52
04. Talk To You (Lewins) 3.45
05. Shake Your Moneymaker (James) 2.31
06. Down The Road Apiece (Raye) 2.51
07. Baby You’re Wrong (De Fleur) 2.44
08. Don’t Start Crying Now (Moore/West) 2.05
09. Someone’s Got My Number (Lewins) 2.33
10. Good Guys Don’t Wear White (Cobb) 2.47
11. You’re In My Way (Lewins) 3.11
12. Taste & Try (Youlden) 2.33

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JapanesEdition

The Japanese edtion

Keith Richards – Unknown Dreams (Toronto Sessions) (1977)

OriginalLPFrontCover1As the story goes: Keith recorded a full album titled: “Unknown Dreams” in 1978. This was right after his heroin bust in Canada.

This was a bootleg album and only 1000 copies were ever made.

And we can hear Keith Richards  .. playing the piano and singing old Rock N Roll and Country & Western tunes … in a very sentimental mood …

In other words: This is the most intimate Keith Richards album … this is the other side of Keith Richards … a  real treasure in the history of rock !

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Personnel:
Keith Richards (piano, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Say It’s Not You (Frazier) 3.29
02. Don’t (Leiber/Stoller) 3.29
03. Blue Monday (Domino/Bartholomew) 1.58
04. Oh What A Feelin’ (Everly) 3.50
05. Sing Me Back Home (Haggard) 4.18
06. Nearness Of You (Carmichael/Washinton) 3.52
07. Apartment No. 9 (Paycheck/Foley/Owen) 3.44
08. All I Have To Do Is Dream (Bryant) 4.00
09. Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On (Williams/David) 1.14
10. Oh What A Feelin’ (Everly) 2.32
11. Apartment No. 9 (version 2) (Paycheck/Foley/Owen)  4.41

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Alternate frontcovers:

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