Rory Gallagher – My Father´s Place (1979)

FrontCover1A class act is exactly what [My Father’s Place] got whenever Rory Gallagher came to town. Rory played at My Father’s Place on several occasions. This bootleg is from his performance there on September 7, 1979 during the American leg of his top priority tour. After doing a successful three-night stand at the Bottom Line that Robert Palmer calls, “creative and inspired,” Rory heads out to the quaint village of Roslyn, named after a Castle in Scotland, and part of what’s called the North Shore Gold Coast of Long Island… It’ll be a show you won’t want to miss.

With Gallagher’s death in 1995 at the age of 47, the world lost an ace guitarist and, for generations after, younger fans will think of Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page and RoryGallagherignore Gallagher when it comes to blues guitarist. This is what Gallagher said in a 1991 interview:

I have respect for Eric Clapton from the early days, but I’m surprised they always link his name with me. Maybe earlier on there might have been more of a comparison, but not at the moment. Clapton seems to be the icon of all guitarists including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. I suppose he’s the successful face of what the blues is and I’m probably the guy on the sidelines. He’s working in a different area from me now. And even in the blues field, I cover different blues tangents than Eric does. I work in country blues and even though I do some numbers that are in the B.B. King and Albert King area, I work in a lot of other influences in as well. My blues roots are all over the place, where Eric’s tend to be a little narrower. (shadowplays.com)

Listen to this great bootleg … That´s what I call high energy blues-rock !

What a concert !

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Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Shinkicker (Gallagher) 3.38
02. Last Of The Independents (Gallagher) 5.41
03. Keychain (Gallagher) 5.53
04. Moonchild (Gallagher) 5.10
05. The Mississippi Sheiks (Gallagher) 5.45
06. I Wonder Who (Morganfield) 7.48
07. Tattoo’d Lady (Gallagher) 5.10
08. Pistol Slapper Blues (Allen) 3.03
08. Too Much Alcohol (Hutto) 3.48

CD 2:
09. Shadow Play (Gallagher) 5.43
10. Bought And Sold (Gallagher) 4.59
11. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 5.26
12. Messin’ With The Kid (London/Wells) 5.23
13. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional)) 2.51
14. Sea Cruise (Gallagher) 2.59

*
**

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Laboratorium – Quasimodo (1979)

LPFrontCover1The end of the 60’s is an important period in jazz, as well as rock music. Both in Poland and the rest of the world, the year 1969 was a caesura for those who saw in records such us King Crimson’s debut the birth of progressive rock, and those for whom Krzysztof Komeda’s death marked the end of a certain stage in Polish jazz. The boundaries are of course a totally contractual and unspecified matter, but definitely the turn of the 60’s and 70’s was an extremely creative period, which set the foundations for various styles and trends. In this time – the year 1970 – in Krakow, Laboratorium was also born – although its roots must be searched for in a more distant past…

Janusz Grzywacz, Laboratorium’s leader, set his first musical steps in Krakow. Basically throughout the whole high school period he regularly formed bands: Smiacze, Lamparty, Tytani, in which also played Marek Stryszowski, his school companion, who happened to live on the same street. In that time Grzywacz had also connections with Krakow’s cabaret scene and with the emerging STU Theatre. During his collage years in Polish studies he formed another band. Eventually a five-person lineup was set, consisting of Janusz Grzywacz (piano), Mieczyslaw Górka (drums), Waclaw Lozinski (flute), Edmund Maciwoda (bass, soon to be replaced by Maciej Górski) and Marek Stryszowski, who did the vocals and played the bassoon, to finally replace it by a sax.

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Their live debut was on the Gitariada ’71 festival. They start to play fusion, jazz-rock music, as the predecessors of such sounds in Poland. The first years of their activity brought mainly acoustic music, cleverly escaping any definitions. The musicians searched and experimented. The situation in which Poland was at that time – the limited access to Western recordings and albums – was not an obstacle for the band. On the contrary, Laboratorium became an unique sound, which was often underlined in various reviews.

The band’s album debut was in January 1973. The record consisted of two tracks recorded in April ’72 in a studio that belonged to the PR III of the Polish Radio. That recording session was an award for taking second place on the Jazz Nad Odra ’72 festival. The tracks were noticed for a different approach both towards harmony and tension-building. The first song – ‘Choral’ – included also a vocal fragment by Marek Stryszowski. In the latter period his signing became an important and significant element building Labolatoriu’s style, although it limited only to vocalizations, often revealing the use of electronic voice-modulation effects – here, however, Stryszowski, as a ‘classical’ vocalist, sings the track’s lyrics.

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In 1973 the band was again awarded on the Jazz Nad Odra festival, this time taking first place and the award for best composition (Janusz Grzywacz’s ‘Prognoza na jutro’). This prize actually meant an advance from the amateur status to professionalism. In 1975 Czeslaw Niemen, who just left his band Aerolit, offered the group his cooperation. He performed with Laboratorium on several shows and festivals, presenting music from the album ‘Katharsis’ along with new songs, which became the basis for a double-album ‘Idee Fixe’, released a few years later. The cooperation had however only a ‘guest’ character – Niemen soon formed a new band, while Laboratorium kept following their own path. The band met at that time with another musician – Tomasz Stanko, with whom they performed at Zaduszki Jazzowe ‘ 75. The music undergone some changes (Janusz Grzywacz replaced his acoustic piano for a novelty at that time – Fender Rhodes), so did the lineup. The band parted with Waclaw Lozinski and Maciej Górski was soon replaced by Krzysztof Scieranski (known from playing with Marek Grechuta), followed by his brother Pawel Scieranski, who became the first guitarist in the history of Laboratorium. In this lineup the band recorded its first official album – ‘Modern Pentathlon’.

The record consisted of a long, five-part title track – „Pieciobój nowoczesny’ and four shorter songs, apart from one (‘Grzymaszka’), strongly settled in the funky style. In the title suite we can hear electronically modulated vocalizations by Marek Stryszowski (whose experiments could resemble the style of Urszula Dudziak), as well as a rich usage of sound potentiality of a single, monophonic Roland synthesizer (which was operated at that time by Janusz Grzywacz) and accelerated, fragments based on twitchy, pulsating drums, and recalling the achievements of Mahavishnu Orchestra. What is important, the band with all those various references kept their artistic identity, confirmed with musical sensitivity and the musicians’ skills.

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The album was released in the Polish jazz series (nr 49) in an unbelievable pace considering the Polish phonographic standards at that time. There often occurred such situations when the time from recording the album to releasing it took about a year or even longer, while Laboratorium’s debut – recorded in the beginning of summer ’76 – was launched in fall, during the next Jazz Jamboree festival. An innovatory (at that time) album premiere was organized in the Polish Recordings hall in Warsaw, along with record-signing (years after it was announced that the sales count for ‘Modern Pentathlon’ reached 115 thousand copies!). Following the success of their album the band begins to perform again, apart from playing in Poland it also visits Germany, as well as the exotic Jazz Yatra festival, which took place in 1978 in India and was another important step in the group’s career (apart from Laboratorium the Polish representation consisted also of Czeslaw Niemen’s and Zbigniew Namyslowski’s bands).

Laboratorium05Even before the trip to the festival, in 1997 the group recorded another two albums with a lineup extended by Pawel Valde-Nowak, playing the congas. During the September shows in Warsaw’s ‘Akwarium’, an album for the „Bialy Kruk Czarnego Krazka’ series was recorded – ‘Aquarium Live No. 1’, which tried to capture the atmosphere present on Laoratorium’s concerts. Meanwhile, in Krakow’s ‘Rotunda’ the band recorded the album ‘Nurek’, which was supposed to be released by Polskie Nagrania, at the time of the Jazz Yatra festival. Unfortunately that didn’t happen. Simultaneously the band was contacting Helicon (the International Jazz Federation’s record label), which eventually released ‘Nurek’ under the English title ‘Diver’. As for Polskie Nagrania, the group prepared in 1979 a one-record album ‘Quasimodo’ (Polish Jazz series, nr 58), while the material meant for Elacoli, ‘Nogero’, was released on the German market by View Records. The first of the albums contained a few longer compositions intertwining with various and fascinating miniatures.

The end of the 70’s brought another personal changes within the band – the group parted with Mieczyslaw Górka, who was in Laboratorium from the beginning. Andrzej Mrowiec, previously known from Maanam, became Laboratorium’s new drummer. Soon after that Krzysztof Scieranski left the band and started a cooperation with Zbigniew Namyslowski (he was replaced by Krzysztof Olesinski, also from Maanam) and so did his brother Pawel (Ryszard Styla took his place in Laboratorium).

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After a successful performance at the Zurich Jazz Festival, a Swiss agency Face Music took care of the band. In these years Laboratorium performed on less shows in Poland, more often visiting the West. In the turn of February and March ’82 the group recorded its performances in Krakow’s STU Theatre and released them on an album ‘The Blue Light Pilot’ (with the following lineup: Grzywacz – Stryszowski – Styla – Olesinski – Mrowiec). The band’s music slowly changed, so did the instrumentation – Janusz Grzywacz more often used various synthesizers, as well as one of the first in Poland, custom-made 16-step sequencer. On that album for the first (and only) time appeared a track which wasn’t written by the band – Thelonious Monk’s ‘Straight No Chaser’, arranged in an unique way, mostly thanks to the mentioned sequencer. In the title track, extremely mechanical and full of energy, there are interwoven various citations and references. The next album – ‘No. 8’ (1984) – continued the band’s search, giving more original ideas. Among them worth mentioning are the use of a vocoder, the enrichment of the rhythmic pattern by adding Jan Pilch’s various percussion instruments and the guest appearance by violin player Jan Bledowski, who later toured with the band. The last studio album with brand new material was prepared two years later. ‘Anatomy Lesson’ was another logical step in Laboratorium’s career. Sampled sounds appeared – yet another progress in the musical search. The album till this day intrigues with the variety of its sound, in the same time being compact and characteristic to the band’s overall creation.

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The group also functioned as a trio: Grzywacz – Stryszowski – Pilch, performing with this lineup on festivals such as ‘Electric Music Island’ in Wroclaw (1984). Meanwhile, Jan Pilch permanently joins the band. In the last years of their activity, Laboratorium was supported by Jaroslaw Smietana, among other places they visited Switzerland.

In various press articles from the 90’s one can see the year 1990 as the end of Laboratorium’s career. During the next decade the band appeared several times on stage, also during the celebration of their 25th anniversary (which was documented by TV production ’25 Years of Laborka’) – all the band’s guitarists appeared together on stage at that time. Janusz Grzywacz is an active illustrative musician, he writes for the theatre (more than 100 premieres) and for the film, he also released two solo albums – ‘Muzyka osobista’ and ‘Mlynek Kawowy’. Marek Stryszowski performs with his band Little Egoist, he’s also the boss of a PSJ branch in Krakow. It’s impossible not to write about all of Laboratorium’s musicians – some of them are still active on the scene, others ended their careers in music. Laboratorium, however, gained a solid and unquestionable status in Polish rock and jazz music. Janusz Grzywacz sums it up: I think we had our fantastic.. no, not five – eleven minutes, which I sincerely wish to all musicians. We played more than a thousand concerts, were invited by major festivals and recorded 9 albums. I know that such thing is impossible to achieve in the jazz market nowadays. I also know that Laboratorium never really fell apart, to be honest. It’s because that our music is still inside us. In each of us there’s still the same way of thinking and playing, the same sensitivity and perspective towards music, which characterized Laborka. And it always will. (Michal Wilczynski)

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This is the 2nd album by Polish Jazz-Rock Fusion ensemble Laboratorium, which was one of several great Polish bands (like Extra Ball for example) playing in that vein during the 1970s. Founded by keyboardist Janusz Grzywacz, the band’s founding members included also saxophonist / vocalist Marek Stryszowski and drummer Mieczyslaw Gorka. After an initial period of trying to find a musical identity, the band was joined by brothers Pawel Scieranski on guitar and Krzysztof Scieranski on bass (one of the greatest Polish bass players) and settled into the Fusion genre, with a musical approach and sound not far away from Weather Report. This, their second recording, presents them in their full power and the recording is quite stunning in its sophistication and instrumental aptitude. The music includes pieces composed by all members of the group. As opposed to most American Fusion at the time, which was mostly based on simplistic melodies and endless instrumental doodling, this music is atmospheric, intelligent, sophisticated, well developed and coherent, clearly well rooted in the European musical tradition. Fusion fans are well advised to try this out and explore this wonderful music, which is expanding the genre’s limitations to the max. This music will also interest fans Prog fans, as it is close in spirit to the Canterbury genre. Superb stuff (Adam Baruch)

In other words: High class Jazz-Rock !!!

CD1

Personnel:
Mieczysław Górka (drums, percussion)
Janusz Grzywacz (piano, synthesizer)
Krzysztof Ścierański (bass)
Paweł Ścierański (guitar)
Marek Stryszowski (saxophone, vocals, effects)

LPBackCover1Tracklist:
01. Przejazd (The Journey) (K. Ścierański) 1.35
02. I’m Sorry, I’m Not Driver (K. Ścierański) 7.07
03. Etiudka / Little Etude (Grzywacz) 1.26
04. Śniegowa Panienka (The Snow Girl) (M. Stryszowski) 8.16
05. Lady Rolland (M. Stryszowski) 1.44
06. Quasimodo (Grzywacz) 10.51
07. Kyokushinkai (Górka/P. Ścierański) 2.54
08- Ikona / An Icon (In Memory Of Zbigniew Seifert) (Grzywacz) 6.15
+
09.  Etiudka (Grzywacz) 2.34
10. Sniegowa Panienka (M. Stryszowski) 11.08
11. Odjazd (Górka/Grzywacz/K. Ścierański/P.Ścierański/Stryszowski) 5.36
12. Zdrowie Na Budowie (Grzywacz) 6.46

LabelB1*
**

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Source: jazz.umk.pl

Sky – Same (Vol. 1) (1979)

FrontCover1Sky were an English/Australian instrumental rock group that specialised in combining a variety of musical styles, most prominently rock, classical and jazz. The group’s original and best-known lineup featured classical guitarist John Williams, bass player Herbie Flowers, electric guitarist Kevin Peek, drummer Tristan Fry and keyboard player Francis Monkman.

In 1971, John Williams (already one of the most acclaimed classical guitarists in the world) released the fusion album Changes – his first recording of non-classical music, and the first on which he played electric guitar. Among the musicians working on the album were Tristan Fry (an established session drummer who was also the timpanist for the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, and had played Timpani on The Beatles ‘A Day In The Life’) and Herbie Flowers (a former member of Blue Mink and T. Rex, as well as a busy session musician who, amongst other things had recorded the bassline for Lou Reed’s ‘Walk on the Wild Side’).

The three musicians became friends, kept in touch and continued working together on various projects during the 1970s. One of these was Williams’ 1978 album Travelling, another substantially commercially successful cross-genre recording. As well as Fry and Flowers, the record featured former Curved Air member Francis Monkman (who in addition to his progressive and psychedelic rock background as guitar and synthesizer player, was a trained and accomplished classical harpsichordist).

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In 1979, Monkman performed on Louis Clark’s album (per-spek-tiv) n., on which he collaborated with an Australian session guitarist called Kevin Peek. Peek was a musician equally adept at classical guitar and pop/rock styles, having built up a reputation both as a chamber musician and as a long-standing member of Cliff Richard’s band, as well as for working Manfred Mann, Lulu, Tom Jones, Jeff Wayne, Shirley Bassey and Gary Glitter.

The success of Travelling inspired Williams and Flowers to set up Sky, their own long-term cross-genre band. Fry and Monkman were swiftly recruited, with Kevin Peek being the final addition. The band began writing and recording instrumental music drawing on their collective experience of classical, light pop, progressive and psychedelic rock, light entertainment and jazz. After a protracted search for a record company, Sky signed with the small European label Ariola Records.

Singles

Although Sky was run democratically (with all members contributed music and/or arrangements), the presence of John Williams in the lineup was regarded as the band’s biggest selling point and was emphasised in publicity. Williams’ concurrent solo instrumental hit – “Cavatina – Theme from The Deer Hunter” – also helped to raise the band’s profile. However, this selling was counterbalanced by some negative reviews from critics accustomed to Williams’ classical performances, who remained unimpressed by his new direction with Sky.

Sky’s self-titled debut album (released in 1979) was highly successful in Britain and Australia, quickly reaching gold record status and eventually topping out as a platinum record. The album featured versions of Eric Satie’s “Gymnopedie No. 1” and an Antonio Ruiz-Pipò ‘Danza’ , as well as original compositions by Monkman and Flowers. Monkman’s ‘Cannonball’ was a minor hit single, and the keyboard player also contributed the twenty-minute second-side composition “Where Opposites Meet” (intended to combine and display the band’s diverse influences) (by wikipedia)

This is the debut album from the session musician supergroup Sky. The idea behind this band was to assemble virtuoso instrumentalists and adept composers who possess an appreciation for classical music, allowing it to infiltrate their own playing and writing. The concept was admirable, and was manifested more fully in future albums; however, on this recording the songs never seem to unfold completely.

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With the exception of Kevin Peek’s fiery adaptation of Antonio Ruiz-Pipó’s Spanish guitar piece “La Danza,” this album plods along with no apparent destination. Melodies seem undeveloped but trudge forth nevertheless, presumably for the sake of completing the album. Given the presence of world-class guitarist John Williams, his contribution is hardly detectable, and Francis Monkman’s omnipresent harpsichord becomes tiresome midway through the album. And the monotonous rhythm of bassist Herbie Flowers and drummer Tristan Fry does nothing to alter the tediousness of these pieces. It would be a stretch to call this progressive or classical rock; it is merely instrumental pop/rock. (by Dave Sleger)

I can´t agree with this review … maybe this album is not a masterpiece, but´s it´s the beginning of one of the finest classic-rock formations from this time … with a lot of very interesting sounds … especially in “Where Opposites Meet” … or: listen to the guitars on “Danza” … what a sound …  !

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Personnel:
Herbie Flowers (bass)
Tristan Fry (drums, percussion)
Francis Monkman (piano, synthesizer, harpsichord)
Kevin Peek (guitar)
John Williams (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Westway (Flowers) 3.39
02. Carillon Flowers) 3.29
03. Danza (Ruiz-Pipò) 2.58
04. Gymnopedie No. 1 (Satie) 3,41
05. Cannonball (Monkman) 3.42
06. Where Opposites Meet (Monkman) 19.22.
06.1. Part 1 (3.38)
06.2. Part 2 (2.24)
06.3. Part 3 (5.28)
06.4. Part 4 (5.39)
06.4. Part 5 (2.21)

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*
**

Frankie Miller – Amsterdam (1979)

FrontCover1Francis John Miller (born 2 November 1949) is a Scottish rock singer-songwriter.

Miller wrote for and performed with many recording artists and is best known for his album Full House, the single “Darlin'” and his duet with Phil Lynott on the Thin Lizzy song “Still in Love with You”. In 1978 Bob Seger remarked that Miller “was a huge influence” on him.

Miller, with elder sisters Letty and Anne, was raised in Colvend Street, Bridgeton in Glasgow, by his parents, Cathy and Frank. He played football for the school team and Harmony Row Boys Club, his love of football probably inherited from his maternal grandfather Archie Kyle who was signed to Glasgow Rangers FC. He attended Sacred Heart Primary School and was an altar boy at the Sacred Heart church.

He first became aware of rock and R&B through his mother’s record collection. She had a fondness for Ray Charles while his sisters introduced him to Little Richard and Elvis Presley. He identified instinctively with Little Richard’s flamboyant aggression, once saying “The music was alive, exciting, I loved it. I realised later that I could get my own aggression out through music. R&B and Soul Music, I just knew was what I really loved”. He started writing songs at the age of nine after being given a guitar by his parents and wrote “I Can’t Change It” when he was twelve years old, this song was later recorded by Ray Charles. At 16 years of age, whilst still at school, Miller had his first audition in the Manhattan Club, Bridgeton, Glasgow, and was chosen in preference to Saul Byron to sing with The Deljaks. After a couple of years it was on to West Farm Cottage and then a soul outfit called Sock It To ‘Em JB which featured good friend Jimmy Dewar.

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Miller began singing professionally as a teenager with a Glasgow band called The Stoics. In mid 1970, he moved to London to further his career.[3] In 1971, he joined forces with the guitarist Robin Trower, who had just left Procol Harum. Miller introduced fellow Glaswegian bassist and vocalist James Dewar to Trower and the three of them, along with ex Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker, formed Jude in July 1971, but despite significant coverage in the British music press, they broke up in April 1972 without recording an album.[3] The Miller and Trower composition “I Can’t Wait Much Longer” later appeared on Trower’s first solo album Twice Removed from Yesterday.

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Later in 1972, Miller signed a solo recording contract with Chrysalis Records, and recorded his first LP Once in a Blue Moon, with record producer Dave Robinson. The album was an early example of pub rock, and featured backing by the pub rock band Brinsley Schwarz. Miller received consistently good reviews, although his singles and albums were not chart hits, Chrysalis continued to invest in his talent. In 1974 Miller sang “Still in Love with You”, as a duet with Phil Lynott; the song appeared on the Thin Lizzy album, Nightlife. Miller’s second album High Life, was produced and partly written by Allen Toussaint and recorded in Atlanta, Georgia during 1974. Although two album tracks, “Shoorah Shoorah” and “Play Something Sweet”, subsequently provided hits for Betty Wright and Three Dog Night respectively, the album was not a commercial success.
Miller’s next album The Rock (1975) was recorded in San Francisco using the producer Elliot Mazer, who had co-produced Harvest for Neil Young. The next album Full House (1977),[7] was produced by Chris Thomas. The lead off track “Be Good To Yourself” became Miller’s first UK Top 40 hit, peaking at No. 27 in the UK Singles Chart during June that year. In 1978 Miller hit the UK Top 10 with the song “Darlin’ “, which peaked at No. 6 on 14 October 1978. “Darlin’ ” also made the Billboard “Bubbling Under” chart in the US, peaking at No. 103. The next single penned by Miller “When I’m Away From You” rose to No. 42 in UK, but failed to chart in US. A few years later, the song became a US Country No. 1 hit for The Bellamy Brothers.

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Miller suffered a brain haemorrhage in New York City on 25 August 1994, while writing material for a new band he and Joe Walsh of the Eagles had formed with Nicky Hopkins and Ian Wallace. Miller spent five months in a coma; when he emerged, he was unable to speak or sing. He then went through rehabilitation The BBC Television documentary Stubborn Kinda Fella (1999), featured Miller and his battle to recover. In this documentary, Rod Stewart stated that Miller “was the only white singer to have brought a tear” to his eye.

Miller is no longer able to perform, but a new album containing old takes with Frankie was released 2016. The album, “Double Take” contain 19 songs brilliantly mastered and produced with artist like Rod Stewart, Bonnie Tyler, Joe Walsh, Elton John, Kid Rock among others who are performing duets with Frankie. (by wikipedia)

And here´s one of his finest bootlegs, recored live at the famous and legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam during his very sucessful European Tour in 1979 …

What a sjow, what a concert … including his excellent band …

Listen to one the finest singers of good ol´ Scotland !

And enjoy these rare recordings !

Recorded live at The Paradiso Club, Amsterdam, May 11th, 1979
Excellent FM Radio Broadcast

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Personnel:
Fran Bryne (drums)
Tex Commer (bass)
Ed Deane (guitar)
Nick Judd (keyboards)
Frankie Miller (vocals, guitar)
Steve Simpson (guitar, accordion, violin)

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Tracklist:
01. Pappa Don’t Know (Miller) 3.42
02. When I’m Away From You (Miller) 3.19
03. Cold Turkey (Lennon) 5.10
04. Ann Eliza Jane (Miller) 4.03
05. Falling In Love With You (Miller) 6.36
06. When Something Is Wrong With My Baby (Hayes/Porter) 5.17
07. Be Good To Yourself (Fraser) 3.02
08. Is This Love (Marley) 3.40
09. Ain’t Got No Money (Miller) 5.58
10. Down The Honky Tonk (Miller) 5.27
11. Let’s Spend The Night Together (Jagger/Richards) 3.34

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*
**

Inlay

Various Artists – Havana Jam 1 (1979)

FrontCover1Havana Jam was a three-day music festival that took place at the Karl Marx Theater, in Havana, Cuba, on 2–4 March 1979. It was sponsored by Bruce Lundvall, the president of Columbia Records, Jerry Masucci, the president of Fania Records, and the Cuban Ministry of Culture.

The festival included, on the American side, Weather Report, the CBS Jazz All-Stars, the Trio of Doom, Fania All-Stars, Stephen Stills, Billy Swan, Bonnie Bramlett, Mike Finnigan, Kris Kristofferson, Rita Coolidge and Billy Joel. The Cuban acts included Irakere, Pacho Alonso, Zaida Arrate, Elena Burke, Orquesta de Santiago de Cuba, Conjunto Yaguarimú, Frank Emilio, Juan Pablo Torres, Los Papines, Tata Güines, Cuban Percussion Ensemble, Sara González, Pablo Milanés, Manguaré, and Orquesta Aragón.

In 1977, US President Jimmy Carter and Cuban President Fidel Castro started to loosen the political tension between the two countries and opened Interest Sections both in Havana and Washington. It was the first time in almost two decades after Castro’s rise to power that there was a real interest in establishing a normalization of diplomatic relations and the lifting of the United States embargo against Cuba.

With a real crisis in the music industry in the United States and the start of the salsa boom, in April 1978, CBS Records director, Bruce Lundvall, saw an open door to probe Cuban music and together with a group of the company’s music enthusiasts made a four-day trip to Havana, where they were overwhelmed by the sound of Cuban music, but especially by Afro-Cuban jazz band Irakere, one of Cuba’s most highly regarded and virtuoso musical acts.

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After months of talks, Lundvall managed to sign Irakere and in July the group traveled to New York to perform an unannounced guest set at the famed Newport Jazz Festival-New York. Rave reviews led to an invitation from the prestigious Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland.

A few months later, Irakere won their first Grammy with the album Irakere, recorded at their Montreux Jazz Festival and Newport Jazz Festival performances, and Lundvall wanted to try his luck with other Cuban bands too. So, in the Fall of 1978, he joined forces with Fania Records director Jerry Masucci and convinced the Cuban cultural authorities to organize a three-day festival in Havana with the participation of Cuban and American musicians. The event would be recorded and televised for the enjoyment of both the Cuban and American people.

So they all agreed to set a date for the festival, spontaneously entitled Havana Jam. March 2 through 4, 1979, were the days earmarked for this historical step toward establishing a cultural exchange between the two enemy nations. In order to carry out the Herculean task of planning, Lundvall brought aboard Jock McLean and Phil Sandhaus, of Columbia’s artists development department. Both veterans of major concert promotion, they knew the festival needed professional production of the highest caliber, and enlisted Showco (a Dallas-based concert production company) and Studio Instrument Rentals for the task.

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At this point in time, Lundvall was diligently “feeling out” select members of the Columbia artist roster, all of whom were honored to accept the invitation to perform in Cuba. By early February the talent was confirmed. Representing the U.S. would be Billy Joel, Stephen Stills, Weather Report, Kris Kristofferson with Rita Coolidge, the Fania All-Stars and the CBS Jazz All-Stars. The latter group was conceptualized by Lundvall and scheduled to feature more than 20 top jazz artists on the label.

With the festival within grasp, other CBS Records personnel were summoned into the picture-rehearsals were set up for the CBS Jazz All-Stars, travel accommodations were made, equipment was rented, a wide cross-section of media was invited, and both recording and videotaping plans were confirmed.

Record producers Bert deCoteaux and Mike Berniker flew down with a crew from the CBS Recording Studios along with a support team and mobile 24-track Recording Studio from Record Plant NY.

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Engineered by David Hewitt with Phil Gitomer and Michael Guthrie. McLean, Sandhaus, Freston and various other people were already busy working in Havana’s Karl Marx Auditorium when the musicians landed at the José Martí airport on March 1.

Havana Jam was an invitation-only event, with mostly cultural personalities and members of the Communist Party and their children in attendance, though some students from different art and music schools were also invited.

The festival was hardly mentioned on the Cuban press, and thirty years later not many Cubans know it ever existed. (by wikipedia)

In 1979 many of Columbia’s top recording artists made a rare visit to Cuba where they performed (and recorded) at a series of concerts with some of the top Cuban groups. This double LP (unlike the strictly jazz Havana Jam 2) covers a wide range of music from Weather Report, the CBS Jazz All-Stars (an allstar group with Dexter Gordon, Stan Getz and Woody Shaw) and The Trio of Doom (John McLaughlin, Jaco Pastorius and Tony Williams) to Irakere, Stephen Stills, Kris Kristofferson and Rita Coolidge. There is enough worthwhile jazz on the two-fer to make this set worth picking up (by Scott Yanow).

What a great jam recording !

Recorded live at the Karl-Marx Theatre, Havana, Cuba, March 2-4, 1979

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Personnel:

CBS Jazz All-Stars:
Willie Bobo (percussion)
Arthur Blythe (saxophone)
Stan Getz (saxophone)
Dexter Gordon (saxophone)
Jimmy Heath (saxophone)
Percy Heath (bass)
Bobby Hutcherson (marimba)
Hubert Laws (flute)
Woody Shaw (trumpet)
Cedar Walton (piano)
Tony Williams (drums)

Cuban Percussion Ensemble:
Frank Emilio Guillermo Barreto, Changuito, Tata Guines, Los Papines (percussion)

Irakere:
Jorge “El Nono” Alfonso (percussion)
Carlos Averhoff (saxophone)
Armando Cuervo (percussion)
Paquito D’Rivera (saxophone)
Carlos Emilio Morales (guitar)
Enrique Pla (drums)
Carlos del Puerto (bass)
Arturo Sandoval (trumpet)
Jesus “Chucho” Valdes (piano)
Oscar Valdez (percussion)
Jorge Varona (trumpet)

Stephen Stills Band:
Bonnie Bramlett (vocals)
Mike Finnigan (keyboards)
Joe Lala (percussion)
George “Chocolate” Perry (bass)
Stephen Stills (guitar, vocals)
Gerry Tolman (guitar)
Joe Vitale (drums)

Trio Of Doom:
John McLaughlin (guitar)
Jaco Pastorius (bass)
Tony Williams (drums)

Weather Report:
Peter Erskine (drums)
Jaco Pastorius (bass)
Wayne Shorter (saxophone)
Joe Zawinul (electric piano, synthesizer)

And now, I´m too lazy to search all other musicians … sorry …

 

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Tracklist:
01. Weather Report: Black Market (Zawinul) 8.59
02. Irakere: Concerto Para Flaut y Adagio de Mozart(Rivera/Mozart) 9.48
03. Stephen Stills: Cuba al Fin(Stills) 7.48
04. Sara González: Su Nombre Es Pueblo (Gonzalez) 3.54
05. CBS Jazz All-Stars:  Project “S” (Heath) 8.36
06. Orquesta Aragón: Que Barla Mionda (Valdés) 7.37
07. Kris Kristofferson: Living Legend (Kristofferson) 4.29
08. Rita Coolidge: (Your Love Has Lifted Me) Higher and Higher (Smith/Miner/Jackson) 3:33
09. CBS Jazz All-Stars: Black Stockings (Laws) 6.24
10. Mike Finnigan + Bonnie Bramlett: How Wrong Can You Be (Gronenthal/Grace) 4.46
11. Fania All-Stars: Juan Pachanga (Blades/Ramirez/Masucci) 4.41
12. Trio Of Doom: Dark Prince (McLaughlin) 3.54
13. Cuban Percussion Ensemble: Scherezada/Sun Sun (Rimsky-Korsakov/Traditional) 7.41

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Saga – Images At Twilight (1979)

FrontCover1Saga are a Canadian rock band, formed in Oakville, Ontario. Jim Crichton and Welsh-born vocalist Michael Sadler have been the principal songwriters for Saga. Ian Crichton is the band’s guitarist; apart from his work with Saga, he has recorded several solo albums as well as sessions with Asia.

Currently, Crichton, as well as his brother Jim, the band’s bassist, are the only two original members who have appeared on every album. Lead singer Michael Sadler has appeared on every release by the band apart from their 2008 album The Human Condition, in which he was replaced by Rob Moratti. Though not present on the group’s first two albums, current keyboardist Jim Gilmour has been with the band since 1979, making his debut on the album Silent Knight. He briefly departed from the band 1986, returning later in 1992, and has remained in the band since then. Saga have been awarded gold and platinum albums worldwide and have sold more than 8 million albums

Originally known as Pockets, Saga formed in 1977 from the nucleus of Canadian rock band Fludd. In June 1978, they released their self-titled debut album Saga. A modest success in Canada, it would eventually sell over 30,000 copies in Germany as an import. It also became a major seller in Puerto Rico, after a local stereo equipment store featured the guitar-keyboard duet of the band’s single, “Humble Stance” as part of its radio advertisements. Two other songs, “How Long?” and “The Perfectionist” (a song about a psychopath, Ellery Sneed, who secretly poisons the attendants to a feast he has organized), also became local favourites.

Their 1979 follow-up album Images at Twilight gave them their first charting single in Canada with the song “It’s Time” peaking at No. 84 in the Canadian Charts. From the album, the songs “See Them Smile” and “Slow Motion” became strong radio favourites elsewhere.

Images At Twilight is the second studio album by the Canadian progressive rock band Saga and was originally released in May 1979.Images At Twilight is the second studio album by the Canadian progressive rock band Saga and was originally released in May 1979. (by wikipedia)

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t’s hard to believe you can go back a couple of years before Saga’s breakthrough album, Worlds Apart, and discover that Images At Twilight is actually better and far more consistent. It’s hard to find a bad song on this one. It’s Time (Chapter Three), You’re Not Alone, and Take It Or Leave It are top notch songs, but the stand out song is definitely Hot To Cold. This album should have been big. If it was released when Worlds Apart came out, 1981, I think Images At Twilight would have done even better on the charts than Worlds Apart. It’s almost like the band peaked a little too early. Highly recommended. (by Captain Nemoon)

Incredible epic-styled melodies, hard to believe their melodies are not more well known indeed, particularly the media, sports channels, etc. As one commenter said, they should have been a lot more popular. I prefer the early years myself, but I have to admitt I have not listened the newest stuff.
Of the almost near or over a thousand of CD’s from the 80’s and 90’s and beyond that I have, this group is one of the few groups I listen to all the time, and I know many rock bands !!! Your stereo eqipmente will sound incredible ! Trust me ! This band is amazing. (by Fernando)

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Personnel:
Greg Chadd (keyboards, background vocals, synthesizer, vocoder effects)
Ian Crichton (guitar)
Jim Crichton (bass, synthesizer)
Steve Negus (drums, percussion)
Michael Sadler (vocals, keyboards, synthesizer, bass on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. It’s Time (Chapter Three) (J.Crichton/I.Crichton/Chadd/Negus/Sadler) 4.01
02. See Them Smile (J. Crichton) 3.25
03. Slow Motion (Sadler/J. Crichton) 3.55
04. You’re Not Alone (J. Crichton/I. Crichton/Negus/Rochon) 5.22
05. Take It Or Leave It (Sadler/J. Crichton) 3.58
06. Images (Chapter One) (J. Crichton/Sadler) 6.31
07. Hot To Cold (Sadler/Rochon) 5.02
08. Mouse In A Maze (J. Crichton/Negus/Rochon) 5.41

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Single sleeves from Germany

The English Concert + Trevor Pinnock – A Grad Concert Of Music – English Baroque Concerti (1979)

LPFrontCover1Archiv Produktion released A Grand Concert of Musick in 1985, and the performances by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert are a high point in the label’s catalog. This album of concertos by John Stanley, Thomas Arne, Francesco Geminiani, Pieter Hellendaal, and Charles Avison, along with a symphony by William Boyce, provides a quick survey of some of the music that was popular in England in the late Baroque era.

Performing on original instruments and led from the harpsichord by Pinnock, the ensemble plays with crisp articulation, vigorous bowing, and bright tone colors, and the strings are surrounded by a wonderful aural halo produced by resonant acoustics. Pinnock and the English Baroque Concert took pride not only in playing in authentic period style, but also in providing the historical context behind the music, so this program represents musical activity centered in London circa 1730, when the English national style was developing in the wake of Purcell and contemporaneously with Handel. (by Blair Sanderson)

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Personnel:
The English Concert conducted by Simon Standage
+
Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord)

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Tracklist:

John Stanley: Concerto in G major, Op. 2 No. 3:
01. Adagio – Allegro
02. Andante 1.43
03. Allegro

Thomas Arne: Concerto in G minor, for keyboard and orchestra:
04. Largo – Allegro con spirito 5.39
05. Adagio 1.20
06. Vivace 4.34

William Boyce: Symphony in B flat Major:
07. Allegro 2.37
08. Moderato e dolce 2.21
09. Allegro 2.02

Francesco Geminiani:
10. Concerto grosso in D minor (after Corelli: La Follia Variations, Op. 5 No. 12) 12.23

Pieter Hellendaal: Concerto in E flat major, Op. 3 No. 4
11. Grave sostenuto 3.57
12. Alla breve 1.40
13. Affettuoso 1.33
14. Presto 1.23
15. Pastorale 3.01

Charles Avison: Concerto grosso No. 9 in C major/A minor (after Domenico Scarlatti: Lessons for the Harpsichord)

16. Largo 2.10
17.Con spirito – Andante – Con spirito
18. Siciliana 3.17
19. Allegro 3.43Label1

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