The Kinks – Rockpalast Essen (1982)

FrontCover1The Kinks were an English rock band formed in Muswell Hill, north London, in 1963 by brothers Ray and Dave Davies. They are regarded as one of the most influential rock bands of the 1960s. #

The band emerged during the height of British rhythm and blues and Merseybeat, and were briefly part of the British Invasion of the United States until their touring ban in 1965.

Their third single, the Ray Davies-penned “You Really Got Me”, became an international hit, topping the charts in the United Kingdom and reaching the Top 10 in the United States.

The Kinks

The Kinks’ music drew from a wide range of influences, including American R&B and rock and roll initially, and later adopting British music hall, folk, and country. The band gained a reputation for reflecting English culture and lifestyle, fuelled by Ray Davies’ wittily observational writing style, and made apparent in albums such as Face to Face (1966), Something Else (1967), The Village Green Preservation Society (1968), Arthur (1969), Lola Versus Powerman (1970), and Muswell Hillbillies (1971), along with their accompanying singles including the transatlantic hit “Lola” (1970). After a fallow period in the mid-1970s, the band experienced a revival during the late 1970s and early 1980s with their albums Sleepwalker (1977), Misfits (1978), Low Budget (1979), Give the People What They Want (1981) and State of Confusion (1983), the last of which produced one of the band’s most successful US hits, “Come Dancing”. In addition, groups such as Van Halen, the Jam, the Knack, the Pretenders and the Romantics covered their songs, helping to boost the Kinks’ record sales. In the 1990s, Britpop acts such as Blur and Oasis cited the band as a major influence.

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Ray Davies (rhythm guitar, lead vocals, keyboards) and Dave Davies (lead guitar, vocals) remained members throughout the band’s 33-year run. Longest-serving member Mick Avory (drums and percussion) was replaced by Bob Henrit, formerly of Argent, in 1984. Original bass guitarist Pete Quaife was replaced by John Dalton in 1969. After Dalton’s 1976 departure, Andy Pyle briefly served as the band’s bassist before being replaced by Argent bassist Jim Rodford in 1978. Session keyboardist Nicky Hopkins accompanied the band in the studio for many of their recordings in the mid-to-late 1960s. The band became an official five-piece in 1970, when keyboardist John Gosling joined them. Gosling quit in 1978; he was first replaced by ex-Pretty Things member Gordon Edwards, then more permanently by Ian Gibbons in 1979. The band gave its last public performance in 1996 and broke up in 1997 as a result of creative tension between the Davies brothers.

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The Kinks have had five Top 10 singles on the US Billboard chart. Nine of their albums charted in the Top 40. In the UK, they have had seventeen Top 20 singles and five Top 10 albums. Four Kinks albums have been certified gold by the RIAA and the band have sold 50 million records worldwide. Among numerous honours, they received the Ivor Novello Award for “Outstanding Service to British Music”. In 1990, the original four members of the Kinks were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as well as the UK Music Hall of Fame in November 2005. In 2018, after years of ruling out a reunion due to the brothers’ animosity and the difficult relationship between longtime drummer Mick Avory and Dave, Ray and Dave Davies finally announced they were working to reform the Kinks, with Avory also on board. However, comments made by each of the Davies brothers in 2020 and 2021 would indicate that in the years since the initial announcement, little (if any) progress has been made towards an actual Kinks reunion for a new studio band album. (wikipedia)

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And here´s their legendary concert, recorded live at the Rockpalast, Essen/Germany:

There are lots of Kinks concert bootlegs out there, but few and far between that have excellent sound quality. Here’s one of those rare stellar sounding ones. It sounds so good because it was professionally recorded for the German TV show “Rockpalast.”

Alternate frontcovers:
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In 1980, the Kinks released the live album “One for the Road.” This comes two years later, and one album later, the 1981 “Give the People What They Want” studio album. So there’s some overlap between the songs on “One for the Road” and here, but the Kinks have such a deep catalog of popular songs that there are lots of differences as well. Seven of the songs played come from the “Give the People What They Want” album, and one song, “Bernadette,” came from their soon-to-come 1983 album, “State of Confusion.” (http://albumsthatshouldexist.blogspot.com)

In other words: Long live The Kinks !

Recorded live at the 10th Rockpalast Rockfestival,
Grugahalle Essen/Germany, April 3, 1982
(broadcast recording)

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Personnel:
Mick Avery (drums)
Dave Davies (guitar, vocals)
Ray Davies (vocals, guitar)
Ian Gibbons (keyboards)
Jim Rodford (bass)

Another alternate front + backcover:
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Tracklist:
01. Introduction / Around The Dial 8.02
02. The Hard Way 2.34
03. Where Have All The Good Times Gone 2.27
04. (Catch Me Now) I’m Falling 3.38
05. Come On Now 2.41
06. Destroyer 4.53
07. Yo, Yo 7.09
08. Lola 7.06
09. Dead End Street 2.25
10. Add It Up 3.34
11. Low Budget 7.03
12. Art Lover 4.03
13. Back To Front 4.35
14. A Gallon Of Gas 4.15
15. Celluloid Heroes 8.25
16. Till The End Of The Day 2.41
17. Bernadette 4.51
18. All Day And All Of The Night 5.56
19. Give The People What The Want 4.45
20. Pressure 2.28
21. You Really Got Me 4.50
22. Stop Your Sobbing 1.21
23. David Watts 2.55

All songs written by Ray Davies

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The official website:
Website

More from The Kinks:
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Chris Hinze – Mirror Of Dreams (1982)

LPFrontCover1Christiaan Herbert “Chris” Hinze (born June 30, 1938, Hilversum, Netherlands) is a Dutch jazz and New age flautist.

Hinze initially performed publicly as a pianist until the mid-1960s, when he began studying flute at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague and then at Berklee College of Music. As a pianist, he played with Boy Edgar until 1966, but by 1967 was playing flute professionally with the bassist Dick van der Capellen. His first releases as a leader were issued in 1969, and in 1970, Hinze was awarded the Best Soloist prize at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In the 1970s, he formed his own ensemble, the Chris Hinze Combination, which included players such as Gerry Brown and John Lee, and which saw some success with arrangements of Baroque music in a jazz setting. He also founded the record label Keytone Records in the mid-1970s.

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In the 1980s, Hinze played for several years in a duo with Sigi Schwab and continued touring with a new version of his Combination. He began studying the music of Tibet and South Asia in the middle of the decade, forming a world music ensemble which shifted toward more New age and electronic music styles rather than jazz. (wikipedia)

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And here´one of his real beautiful albums:

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A wonderful album … music for mediation and relaxation !

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Personnel:
Chris Hinze (flute)
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Louis van Dijk (piano)
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The London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Dick Bakker
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Wanda Stellaard & Friends (background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Mirror Of Dreams Part I (Hinze/Bakker) 2.29
02. A Little Romance Part I (Delerue) 3.01
03. Largo Di Vivaldi (Hinze/Bakker) 3.03
04. A Little Romance Part II (Delerue) 3.42
05. Per Le Antiche Scale (Morricone) 3.25
06. Dressed To Kill (Donaggio) 5.18
07. Clair De Femme (Musy) 3.04
08. She’s Out Of My Life (Bahler) 3.45
09. Allemande De Bach (v.Dijk) 5.26
10. Allonsanfan (Morricone) 3.44
11. Close Enough For Love (Mandel) 3.53
12. Mirror Of Dreams Part II (Hinze/Bakker) 3.23

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The officials websites:
Website1

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Waylon Jennings & Willie Nelson – W W II (1982)

FrontCover1WWII is a duet album by Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson, released on RCA Victor in 1982.

By 1982, the outlaw country movement was past its peak but Jennings and Nelson, the movement’s primary artists, remained two of country music’s biggest superstars. Jennings had scored nine Top 5 solo albums in a row, with five going to #1, between 1974 and 1982. Nelson was also enjoying his commercial prime, with his 1982 album Always on My Mind not only topping the Billboard country albums chart but also peaking at #2 on the pop albums chart. By the early 1980s, Nelson’s appeal had transcended country music; his affable personae, as well as his increasing presence in films, had made him a crossover star. Jennings, who was struggling to rebuild his finances and in the throes of a crippling cocaine addiction, had seen his most recent album Black on Black receive lukewarm reviews, even though it had been produced by Chips Moman, who had also produced Nelson’s Always on My Mind.

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Jennings and Nelson had enjoyed some of their greatest success together. The 1976 compilation Wanted! The Outlaws became the first million selling country album and their 1978 album Waylon and Willie, released at the height of the outlaw country movement, produced the chart-topping hit “Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys.” By all accounts, Jennings and Nelson were kindred spirits and close friends, but their egos did clash occasionally; in his memoir Willie Nelson, biographer Joe Nick Patoski quotes Nelson’s ex-wife Connie: “They had such a mutual respect for each other and their music, it was like a brother bond, literally. There was always a little bit of – not jealousy – but Willie would make him [Jennings] feel inferior in some ways, and I think it was because of the cocaine.” Asleep at the Wheel pianist Floyd Domino, who played with Jennings’ band in 1983, also noticed the tension between the two legends, telling Patoski, “You could tell Waylon was bothered by Willie’s success, although he said he didn’t care. He’d tell audiences, ‘I don’t care if I’m not number one. I’ll be number two.’ The crowd didn’t even know what he was talking about. I saw Willie on some cooking show on TV and the host said Waylon was mad at him. Willie laughed and said, ‘What’s he mad about today?’ Waylon cared. Willie didn’t.”

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Although Chips Moman had produced both singers’ previous albums, the sessions that comprise WWII date from before those records; most are from December 1981. The songs were recorded at Moman’s Nashville studio and mastered at Woodland Studios with David Cherry serving as co-engineer with Moman. Whereas 1978’s Waylon and Willie contained several previously released backing tracks upon which Nelson had overdubbed his vocals, WWII bears all the hallmarks of Moman’s slick production. Despite being more of a “complete thought” than its predecessor, the vitality evident on Waylon and Willie is not as apparent on this LP; in his review of the album that can be found on AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine observes:

“In 1982, Waylon and Willie were still riding high on the country charts, but the quality of Jennings’ work was beginning to slip and his sales were responding accordingly, as 1982’s Black on Black reflected. Nelson had his biggest hit ever that year with Always on My Mind, but it also was his worst album to date, the first time he sounded like he couldn’t be bothered…even at its best, WWII is nowhere near as good as Waylon and Willie are at their best, since they’re coasting on reputation through most of this, a fact that’s only enhanced by Moman’s glossy showcase production.”

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Although billed as a collaborative effort, WWII is more of a vehicle for Jennings; Willie sings on only five of the eleven tracks – all duets – while Waylon takes the lead on the remaining six songs. The album spawned one hit, a cover of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” which peaked at #13 on the country singles charts. Despite its modest success compared to some of the duo’s previous singles like “Good Hearted Woman” and “Mammas Don’t Let your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys,” the song is brilliantly interpreted and remains as good an example as any of the fellow Texans’ chemistry as artists. Another highlight is “Write Your Own Songs,” Nelson’s diatribe of the music business and music executives in particular (“We’re making you rich and you were already lazy/So lay on your asses and get richer or write your own songs”), whom he and Jennings had battled for years to gain control of their own records. Jennings had a hand in writing two songs: the inspirational “Roman Candles,” which he composed with Michael Smotherman, and the narration “The Old Mother’s Locket Trick,” written with fellow outlaw Guy Clark.

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The Chips Moman/Bobby Emmons composition “May I Borrow Some Sugar from You” had appeared on Jennings’ previous album Black on Black, while “The Last Cowboy Song” would resurface three years later on the first Highwaymen album. Jennings and Nelson also cover the Tom T. Hall classic story song “The Year Clayton Delaney Died.”

Ultimately, WWII failed to have as major an impact as Waylon & Willie, although it peaked at #3 on the Billboard country albums chart and #57 on the pop albums chart. (wikipedia)

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Personnel:
J. I. Allison (drums)
Jerry Bridges (bass)
Gene Chrisman (drums, percussion)
Johnny Christopher (guitar)
Bobby Emmons (keyboards)
Waylon Jennings (vocals, guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Chips Moman (guitar)
Willie Nelson (vocals, guitar)
Bobby Wood (piano)
Reggie Young (guitar)
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background vocals:
Johnny Christopher – Toni Wine,

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Tracklist:
01. Mr. Shuck And Jive (Waylon & Willie) (Webb) 3.46
02. Roman Candles (Waylon) (Smotherman) 3.01
03. (Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay (Waylon & Willie) (Redding/Cropper) 3.19
04. The Year That Clayton Delaney Died (Waylon & Willie) (Hall) 3.03
05. Lady In The Harbor (Waylon) (Gilmore/Allison/Curtis) 3.13
06. May I Borrow Some Sugar From You (Waylon) (Emmons/Moman) 3.16
07. Last Cowboy Song (Waylon) (Bruce/Peterson) 2.14
08. Heroes (Waylon & Willie) (Emmons/Moman) 2.43
09. The Teddy Bear Song (Waylon) (Earl/Nixon) 3.03
10. Write Your Own Songs (Waylon & Willie) (Nelson) 3.13
11. The Old Mother’s Locket Trick (Waylon) (Clark) 3.03

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More from Willie Nelson:
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Christmas 2021 (07): George Winston – December (1982)

FrontCover1George Winston (born December 26, 1949) is an American pianist. He was born in Michigan and raised mainly in Montana (Miles City and Billings), as well as Mississippi and Florida. He is best known for his solo piano recordings. Each of several of his albums from the early 1980s have sold millions of copies. He plays in three styles: the melodic approach he developed that he calls “rural folk piano”; stride piano, primarily inspired by Thomas “Fats” Waller and Teddy Wilson; and his primary interest, New Orleans R&B piano, influenced by James Booker, Professor Longhair, and Henry Butler.

December is the fourth solo piano album from George Winston. It was recorded during the fall of 1982 and was released at the end of the year. It is a Christmas album, and more generally a tribute to the winter season. The album is a follow up to Autumn.

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December is Winston’s highest-selling album, having been certified triple Platinum by the RIAA, signifying 3 million copies in shipment. The success of the album, along with several of Winston’s other albums from the early 1980s, enabled the record label, Windham Hill, to get international distribution and a higher profile. The album also spent 136 weeks on the Billboard 200, reaching a peak of No. 54 in January 1984, over a year after its original release. In 1987, five years after its release, it reached No. 2 on Billboard’s Top Holiday Albums chart.

A 20th Anniversary Edition of the album, with two bonus tracks, was released in 2001. The album was again reissued in 2013 by Valley Entertainment with Dancing Cat Records, Winston’s own label. This reissue was packaged in a Digipak and features revised cover art.

Amazon’s editorial staff noted “the album is a classic for a reason—few capture the soft, pensive nature of the season quite like Winston’s magnum opus.” (wikipedia)

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The mother of all solo istrumental albums, and with good reason. Mixing traditional carols with Pachelbel’s Canon and a few originals, Winston produces a solo piano album of unparalleled — and undeniable — beauty. How can music be simultaneously stirring and soothing, relaxed yet exalted? Millions have found the answer here, and an industry has spent decades trying to duplicate it. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
George Winston (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Thanksgiving (Winston) 4.03
02. Jesus, Jesus, Rest Your Head (Traditional) 2.34
03. Joy (Traditional) 3.11
04. Prelude (Winston) 1.17
05. Carol Of The Bells (Traditional) 3.52
06. Night: Part One – Snow (Winston) 1.51
07. Night: Part Two – Midnight (Winston) 1.22
08. Night: Part Three – Minstrels (Traditional) 2.33
09. Variations On The Kanon By Johann Pachelbel (Pachelbel) 5.19
10. The Holy And The Ivy (Traditional) 4.47
11. Some Children See Him (Burt) 3.43
12. Peace (Winston) 4.09

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More from George Winston:
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Freddie Salem & The Wildcats – Cat Dance (1982)

FrontCover1Freddie Salem has been a touring & recording artist, session musician and producer for over 30 years! Freddie started performing professionally at the age of 16 as he played with various bands from the Midwest before joining The Chambers Brothers Band as their lead guitar player.In 1977, Freddie joined the popular southern rock-n-roll band, The Outlaws. For six years Freddie played lead guitar for ‘The Florida Guitar Army’ and wrote many songs on their albums which sold over 10 million copies worldwide, earning Freddie platinum and gold albums with Arista Records. The incredible guitar work and producer credits of Freddie Salem can also be heard on recordings with The Godz, The Zippers, Raging Slab, Snatches Of Pink, Michael Rank and more!His latest album, Freddie Salem & Lonewolf; “Black Cloud Rising”, will soon be released as Freddie continues to be one of today’s strongest and hardest working guitarists!

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This is Freddie Salem & The Wildcats first and last album ”Cat Dance” from 1982. While Freddie Salem is most famous for replacing Henry Paul in The Outlaws in 1977 and being part of metal icons The Godz, the man is one of the most impressive American rock guitarists to have emerged in the late ’70s / early ’80s, and should have been a contender for ‘arena guitar hero’ alongside the Ted Nugent, Joe Walsh, Todd Rundgren, etc.Signed by major label Epic, in 1982 Salem got a chance to record his own album and the result is a really good mix of classic rock, melodic hard rock, and southern fried rock stadium-ready rock n’ roll. Salem rips some awesome solos, it’s a solid vocalist, and his band it top notch.A pretty unknown album, but you’ll surprised by its quality.As a member of The Outlaws, Freddie injected feisty guitar pyrotechnics into the band’s most commercially successful albums like ‘Ghost Riders’ and ‘Los Hombres Malos’, before cutting loose to record a solo album.This was his debut, and so far only, solo album. Produced by himself it showcased Freddie in valedictory mood, looking to spread his wings with various shades of guitar-fueled mayhem.

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Recorded in New York City, the album captured a healthy mixture of Manhattan’s manic pace whilst still boasting a Southern rock tinge, proving that you can take the man out of the country but you can’t take the country out of the man. ‘Cat Dance’ is a fine album indeed, boasting a healthy selection of solid and memorable hard rock tracks and blessed with lashings of Freddie’s blistering guitar work, including hip thrusting riffs and lightning fast solos.Freddie had the goods to make it big, but unfortunately at time of the album’s release Epic was under re-structure and didn’t deliver promotion as hoped and was left to find its own audience. (metal-jukebox.net)

In other words: The heavy side of Southern Rock !

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Personnel:
Myron Grombacher (drums)
David Jackson (piano, synthesizer, vocals)
Freddie Salem (guitar, vocals)
Fernando Saunders (bass, background vocals)
Peter Wood (organ, synthesizer)
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John Peltz (vocals on 05.)
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Tracklist:
01. Dark Horizon (Jackson/Salem) (1.30) / London Town (Rundgren) (6.53) 8.19
02. Open My Eyes (Salem) 3.32
03. Long Gone (Salem) 3.42
04. Sunset (Second Chance) (Salem) 4.02
05. Got The Feelin’ (Salem) 4.12
06. Evil For Evil (Salem) 4.25
07. Rock ‘N’ Roll Woman (Stills) 4.37
08. Monica (Saunders/Salem/Grombacher/Wood) 3.45

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LinerNotes

Screaming Lord Sutch – Rock And Horror (1982)

FrontCover1David Edward Sutch (10 November 1940 – 16 June 1999), also known as 3rd Earl of Harrow, or Screaming Lord Sutch, was an English musician and serial parliamentary candidate. He was the founder of the Official Monster Raving Loony Party and served as its leader from 1983 to 1999, during which time he stood in numerous parliamentary elections. He holds the record for losing more than 40 elections in which he stood from 1963 to 1997. As a singer he variously worked with Keith Moon, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Ritchie Blackmore, Charlie Watts and Nicky Hopkins.

Sutch was born at New End Hospital, Hampstead, London. In the 1960s, inspired by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, he changed his stage name to “Screaming Lord Sutch, 3rd Earl of Harrow”, despite having no connection with the peerage. His legal name remained David Edward Sutch.

After his career as an early 1960s rock and roll attraction, it became customary for the UK press to refer to him as “Screaming Lord Sutch”, or simply “Lord Sutch”. Early works included recordings produced by audio pioneer Joe Meek.

During the 1960s Screaming Lord Sutch was known for his horror-themed stage show, dressing as Jack the Ripper, pre-dating the shock rock antics of Alice Cooper. Accompanied by his band, the Savages, he started by coming out of a black coffin (once being trapped inside of it, an incident parodied in the film Slade in Flame). Other props included knives and daggers, skulls and “bodies”. Sutch booked themed tours, such as ‘Sutch and the Roman Empire’, where Sutch and the band members would be dressed up as Roman soldiers.

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Despite a self-confessed lack of vocal talent, he released horror-themed singles during the early to mid 1960s, the most popular “Jack the Ripper”, covered live and on record by garage rock bands including the White Stripes, the Gruesomes, the Black Lips and the Horrors, the latter for their debut album.

In 1963 Sutch and his manager, Reginald Calvert, took over Shivering Sands Army Fort, a Maunsell Fort off Southend, and in 1964 started Radio Sutch, intending to compete with other pirate radio stations such as Radio Caroline. Broadcasts consisted of music and Mandy Rice-Davies reading Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Sutch tired of the station, and sold it to Calvert, after which it was renamed Radio City, and lasted until 1967. In 1966 Calvert was shot dead by Oliver Smedley over a financial dispute. Smedley was acquitted on grounds of self-defence. About this time Ritchie Blackmore left the band. Roger Warwick left to set up an R&B big band for Freddie Mack.

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Sutch’s album Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends was named in a 1998 BBC poll as the worst album of all time, a status it also held in Colin Larkin’s book The Top 1000 Albums of All Time,[citation needed] despite the fact that Jimmy Page, John Bonham, Jeff Beck, Noel Redding and Nicky Hopkins performed on it and helped write it. On the other hand, for fans of the musicians involved, their work is considered well-worth listening to the album, and especially for the recently formed New Yardbirds/Led Zeppelin, offers a first take of the rolling funk-blues riffs and grooves that would define the classic Led Zeppelin sound.

For his follow-up, Hands of Jack the Ripper, Sutch assembled British rock celebrities for a concert at the Carshalton Park Rock ‘n’ Roll Festival. The show was recorded (though only Sutch knew), and it was released to the surprise of the musicians. Musicians on the record included Ritchie Blackmore (guitar); Matthew Fisher (keyboard); Carlo Little (drums); Keith Moon (drums); Noel Redding (bass) and Nick Simper (bass).

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In 2017 his song “Flashing Lights” was featured in Logan Lucky, directed by Steven Soderbergh.

In the 1960s Sutch stood in parliamentary elections, often as representative of the National Teenage Party. His first was in 1963, when he contested the by-election in Stratford-upon-Avon caused by the resignation of John Profumo. He gained 208 votes. His next was at the 1966 general election when he stood in Harold Wilson’s Huyton constituency. Here he received 585 votes.

He founded the Official Monster Raving Loony Party in 1983 and fought the Bermondsey by-election. In his career he contested over 40 elections. He was recognisable at election counts by his flamboyant clothes and top hat. In 1968 he officially added “lord” to his name by deed poll.[4] In the mid 1980s, the deposit paid by candidates was raised from £150 to £500. This did little to deter Sutch, who increased the number of concerts he performed to pay for campaigns. He achieved his highest poll and vote share at Rotherham in 1994 with 1,114 votes and a 4.2 per cent vote share.

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At the Bootle by-election in May 1990, he secured more votes than the candidate of the Continuing Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by former Foreign Secretary David Owen. Within days the SDP dissolved itself. In 1993, when the British National Party gained its first local councillor, Derek Beackon, Sutch pointed out that the Official Monster Raving Loony Party already had six. He holds the record for losing more than 40 elections in which he stood.

He appeared as himself in the first episode of ITV comedy The New Statesman, coming second ahead of the Labour and SDP, in the 1987 election which saw Alan B’Stard elected to Parliament.

Adverts in the 1990s for Heineken Pilsener boasted that “Only Heineken can do this”. One had Sutch at 10 Downing Street after becoming Prime Minister.

In 1999 Sutch starred in a Coco Pops advert as a returning officer announcing the results of its renaming competition.

Sutch was friends with, and at one time lived at the house of, Cynthia Payne.

Screaming Lord Sutch,Cynthia Payne & Jayne County.The Plough Kenton UK. 20/10/89:
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He had a history of depression, and killed himself by hanging on 16 June 1999, at his mother’s house. At the inquest, his fiancée Yvonne Elwood said he had “manic depression”.

Sutch is buried beside his mother, who died on 30 April 1997, in the cemetery in Pinner, Middlesex. He was survived by a son, Tristan Lord Gwynne Sutch, born in 1975 to American model Thann Rendessy.

In 1991 his autobiography, Life as Sutch: The Official Autobiography of a Raving Loony (written with Peter Chippindale), was published. In 2005 Graham Sharpe, who had known him since the late 1960s, wrote the first biography, The Man Who Was Screaming Lord Sutch. (by wikipedia)

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Taking a break from electioneering, his Screaming Lordship, or Dave to his friends, let loose on these early 80s recordings in his own genteel style. A who’s who of the UK rockin’ scene from the 60s back up Sutch on this ghoulish goulash of hair raising monster rockers, like ‘Screem, Screem’, ‘Murder In The Graveyard’, ‘Loonabilly’ and the inevitable ‘Jack The Ripper’. The leopardskin-clad Sutch recorded with the legendary cult producer of the 60s, Joe Meek and is the UK’s most eccentric rocker, king of bad taste and horror. He regrettably never realised his ambition to be prime minister with his Monster Raving Loony Party as he took his own life in 1999 – a great eccentric that will be gravely missed. (Promo text)

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I’m not sure if this is the definitive Sutch CD, but it will certainly tell you what he was all about ! I gave it four stars because it really is a lot of fun to listen to–although I’m not sure if all the laughs are intentional !
First, the problem–sorry, but as a vocalist, Sutch was pretty bad–studio tricks and good musicians can’t hide the fact that this guy was no singer.
On the other hand, his energy and enthusiasm won me over. I bet if you had a party–and waited until everyone was “feeling no pain”–playing this disc at full volume would be a blast !
There are twelve tracks–the first six have a horror theme with “Jack the Ripper” and “Murder in the Graveyard” delivering the goods–the remaining songs are more conventional rockers, taken at a frantic pace. Warning–if you like deep, meaningful lyrics, forget about it ! This is not Bob Dylan !
Lord Sutch is no longer with us. Apparently, he was a great showman, and many big UK musicians got their start as one of his “Savages”. People who saw him in concert say that the world became a duller place when he left.
Dear Reader–I don’t know if you will like this CD, or hate it, but one thing for sure–like Sutch himself, it is not dull ! ! (by peterfromkanata)

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Personnel:
Anji Antanori (guitar on 07., 10.)
Rod de’Ath (drums on 02., 03.
Bob Burgos (drums on 01., 04. – 06., 08., 09.,11., 12.)
Terry Clempson (guitar on 02., 03.
Tony Dangerfield (bass on 07., 10.)
Keith Evans (bass on 02., 03.)
Matthew Fisher (piano on 12.)
Tony Hall (saxophone on 02., 03., 07., 10.
Richard Hogan (piano on 08., 09., 11.
Brian Juniper (saxophone on 02., 03.
Darnell Kellerman (saxophone on 08., 09., 11.
Freddie “Fingers” Lee (piano on 01., 04.. 06.
Lou Martin (piano on 02., 03.
Rob Murly (bass on 01., 04., 05., 08., 09., 11., 12.)
Ray Neale (guitar on 01., 04. – 06., 08., 09., 11., 12.)
Sid Phillips (saxophone on 02., 03., 07.
Mac Poole (drums on 07., 10.)
Screaming Lord Sutch (vocals)
Ian Terry (leadguitar on 01., 04. – 06., 12.
Pete Thomas (saxophone on 01., 04. – 06.

Booklet

Tracklist:

Horror Side:
01. Screem & Screem (Sutch) 1.54
02. All Black & Hairy (Sutch) 2.32
03. Jack The Ripper (Stacey/Simmonds/Haggin) 3.11
04. Monster Rock (Sutch) 2.24
05. Rock & Shock (Sutch) 2.01
06. Murder In The Graveyard (Surtch) 3.01

Rock Side:
07. London Rocker (Sutch) 2.16
08. Penny Penny (Sutch) 3.04
09. Rockabilly Madman (Sutch) 3.32
10. Oh Well (Sutch) 1.55
11. Loonabilly (Burgos/Neal/Sutch) 1.51
12. Go-Berry-Go (Sutch) 2.32

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David Edward Sutch (10 November 1940 – 16 June 1999)

Mose Allison – Lessons In Living (1983)

FrontCover1Mose John Allison Jr. (November 11, 1927 – November 15, 2016) was an American jazz and blues pianist, singer, and songwriter. He became notable for playing a unique mix of blues and modern jazz, both singing and playing piano. After moving to New York in 1956, he worked primarily in jazz settings, playing with jazz musicians like Stan Getz, Al Cohn, and Zoot Sims, along with producing numerous recordings.

He is described as having been “one of the finest songwriters in 20th-century blues.” His songs were strongly dependent on evoking moods, with his individualistic, “quirky”, and subtle ironic humor. His writing influence on R&B had well-known fans recording his songs, among them Pete Townshend, who recorded his “Young Man Blues” for the Who’s Live At Leeds album in 1970. John Mayall was one of dozens who recorded his classic, “Parchman Farm”, and Georgie Fame used many of Allison’s songs. Others who recorded his songs included Leon Russell (“I’m Smashed”) and Bonnie Raitt (“Everybody’s Crying’ Mercy”).

The 1980s saw an increase in his popularity with new fans drawn to his unique blend of modern jazz. In the 1990s he began recording more consistently. Van Morrison, Georgie Fame and Ben Sidran collaborated with him on a tribute album, Tell Me Something: The Songs of Mose Allison. The Pixies wrote the song “Allison” as a tribute.

Allison’s music had an important influence on other artists, such as Jimi Hendrix, J. J. Cale, the Yardbirds, the Rolling Stones, Tom Waits, and Pete Townshend. He was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame in 2006. (by wikipedia)

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Though ever-busy as a live performer, Mose Allison rarely ventured into the recording studio during the late ’70s and early ’80s, making this fine concert set all the more valuable. LESSONS IN LIVING was cut at the Montreux Jazz Festival with a stellar backing band including Jack Bruce (bass), Billy Cobham (drums), Eric Gale (guitar) and Lou Donaldson (saxophone), all of whom get a chance to shine on these nine tracks. Allison’s voice and piano playing are in peak form as well, and the man’s understated cool comes through perfectly on a mix of classics (“Your Mind Is On Vacation”), recent songs (“Middle Class White Boy”) and re-imagined standards (“You Are My Sunshine”). LESSONS IN LIVING now celebrates its 35th anniversary, and it still qualifies as a master class in blues-oriented jazz. (Press release)

Recorded in a live setting in 1982 – the same year as his Middle Class White Boy album – Lessons in Living is a mixed bag. The material is terrific, and Mose Allison is in typically fine form. The issue lies more with the “all-star” band assembled for the date: bassist Jack Bruce, drummer Billy Cobham, and soloists Eric Gale (guitarist) and Lou Donaldson ( alto saxophonist). For starters, Allison didn’t need a large band –or any band, really – to shine. Though he had been absent from the recording scene for six years until that point, he had continued to perform live and his chops as both a pianist and a singer are stellar.

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These players, fine as they are, don’t seem to understand the subtler kind of magic that Allison puts across in a club setting, and don’t know how to lay back enough – this is particularly the case with Cobham, who is overly busy throughout the date, double-timing already fast tunes like “Wild Man in the Street.” Bruce, playing electric bass, has a wonderful facility to move and shift gears with the pianist, but still feels a shade behind Cobham’s fast and furious beat – the overdriven “Your Mind Is on Vacation” is a case in point. That said, Allison feels like he is having the time of his life. Donaldson’s solo on “You Are My Sunshine” is stirring and raw, something that feels jarring at first with the wonderfully relaxed groove of Allison’s arrangement, but fits like a glove after a chorus. The stomping pace of Willie Dixon’s “Seventh Son” is a highlight on the set with Cobham lightening his touch a bit and Allison’s vocal is swaggering and tough. The laid-back blues of “Everybody Is Crying Mercy” is another gem, with the band holding Allison’s blues loose and easy. Lessons in Living is basically for Allison devotees, but it has fantastic moments. Ironically, Allison didn’t return to recording again for another three years in 1986 after this set was issued. (unknown author)

What a line-up !

Recorded live at the Montreux Jazz Festival, July 1982

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Personnel:
Mose Allison (piano, vocals)
Jack Bruce (bass)
Billy Cobham (drums)
Lou Donaldson (saxophone)
Eric Gale (guitar)

FestivalPosterTracklist:
01. Lost Mind (Mayfield) 2.49
02. Wild Man On The Loose (Allison) 2.23
03. Your Mind Is On Vacation (Allison) 3.16
04. You Are My Sunshine (Mitchell/Davis) 4.54
05. Seventh Son (Dixon) 4.48
06. Everybody Is Cryin’ Mercy (Allison) 3.18
07. Middle Class White Boy (Allison) 3.48
08. I Don’t Worry About A Thing (Allison) 5.52
09. Night Club (Allison) 6.18

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Philip Catherine – End Of August (1982)

FrontCover1Philip Catherine (born 27 October 1942) is a Belgian jazz guitarist.

Philip Catherine was born in London to an English mother and Belgian father and was raised in Brussels. His grandfather played violin in the London Symphony Orchestra. Catherine started on guitar in his teens, and by seventeen he was performing professionally at local venues.

He released his debut album, Stream, in 1972. During the next few years, he studied at Berklee College of Music in Boston and with Mick Goodrick and George Russell. In 1976, he and guitarist Larry Coryell recorded and toured as an acoustic duo. The following year he recorded with Charles Mingus, who dubbed him “Young Django”. In the early 1980s, he toured briefly with Benny Goodman. He was in PhilipCatherine01trio with Didier Lockwood and Christian Escoudé, then in a trio with Chet Baker. During the 1990s, he recorded three albums with trumpeter Tom Harrell.

Catherine has also worked with Lou Bennett, Kenny Drew, Dexter Gordon, Stéphane Grappelli, Karin Krog, Paul Kuhn, Sylvain Luc, Michael Mantler, Charlie Mariano, Palle Mikkelborg, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, Enrico Rava, Toots Thielemans, and Miroslav Vitous. (by wikipedia)

“He is one of the most accomplished and rewarding guitarists now playing jazz. (Downbeat)

“Philip Catherine is one of the last ‘romantics’ in jazz. Philip Catherine doesn’t play music: he ís music. A lyricism that hits the unconscience. Music, music, sometimes with an air of simplicity that makes you believe nothing is easier than observe a photon in it’s course. Great art.” (Francis Marmande. Le Monde)

Listen to this album and you´ll know why he is one the most important jezz guitar player from Europe.

On this album you an also hear another giant of Jazz … Charlie Mariano on saxophone !

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Personnel:
Philip Catherine (guitar)
Nicolas Fiszman (guitar, bass)
Trilok Gurtu (percussion, cymbals, tabla)
Charlie Mariano (saxophone, bamboo flute)
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Toots Thielemans (harmonica on 05. + 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Petit Nicolas (Catherine) 5.08
02. Grand Nicolas (Catherine) 5.06
03. Janet (Catherine) 9.17
04. September Start (Catherine) 6.14
05. Goodbye (Jenkins) 4.52
06. Birth Of August (Catherine) 2.47
07. End Of August (Catherine) 3.11
08. Presque (Thielemans/Catherine) 0.47

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Larry Davis – Funny Stuff (1982)

FrontCover1.jpgLarry Davis (December 4, 1936 – April 19, 1994) was an American electric Texas blues and soul blues musician. He is best known for co-writing the song “Texas Flood”, later recorded to greater commercial success by Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Davis was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and was raised in England, Arkansas, and Little Rock, Arkansas. He swapped playing the drums to learn to play the bass guitar. In the mid-1950s, he had a working partnership with Fenton Robinson, and following the recommendation of Bobby Bland was given a recording contract by Duke Records. Davis had three singles released, which included “Texas Flood” and “Angels in Houston”. Thereafter, he had limited opportunity in the recording studio. He resided in St. Louis, Missouri, for a while, and played bass in Albert King’s group. He also learned to play the guitar at this time; the guitar on Davis’s recording of “Texas Flood” was by played by Robinson.

Several single releases on the Virgo and Kent labels followed, but in 1972 a motorcycle accident temporarily paralyzed Davis’s left side. He returned a decade later with an album released by Rooster Blues, Funny Stuff, produced by Oliver Sain. He won four W. C. Handy Awards in 1982, but a decade later he was known only to blues specialists.[3] His 1987 Pulsar LP, I Ain’t Beggin’ Nobody, was difficult even for blues enthusiasts to locate.

LarryDavis01In 1992, Bullseye Blues issued another album, Sooner or Later, highlighting his booming vocals and guitar playing influenced by Albert King.

Davis died of cancer in April 1994, at the age of 57. (by wikipedia)

 

Larry Davis didn’t record all that often, but when he did, he certainly made it count. That’s the case with this fine St. Louis recording. Produced by Oliver Sain (who handled all sax work) and featuring Billy Gayles on drums and pianist Johnnie Johnson, the set is a ringing endorsement of Davis’s slashing, tremolo-enriched guitar and booming vocals. (Bill Dahl)

Larry Davis grew up in Arkansas, working with Fenton Robinson in the mid-50s. He started recording for Duke in 1958 with “Texas Flood” (the original version by the way – and likely still the best.) He signed to Duke at the recommendation of Bobby Bland. Larry LarryDavis02recorded sporadically over the years and passed away in 1994.

Davis was an extraordinary talent. He had a tremendous voice, with a soft vibrato. He sang in the B.B. King, Little Joe Blue, Bobby Bland style. His biting single-not guitar work could be placed somewhere between the sounds of B.B. King and Son Seals. He had more edge in his playing than King, but it wasn’t as harsh as Seals. “Funny Stuff” was originally released in 1982, and was re-released on CD by Rooster Blues in 2001. This review is based on the 2001 version of the album. “Funny Stuff” is basically Larry Davis’ St. Louis album. All of the musicians on the album were St. Louis stalwarts. The cast of characters was: Oliver Sain on piano, organ and all saxes; Phil Westmoreland on guitar; Johnnie Johnson on piano; Billy Gayles on drums; Jimmy Hinds on bass and drums; Eugene Johnson on bass; and Don Smith on drums. The album has all the features of the St. Louis blues sounds, with a combination of raw emotion mixed with Uptown sensibilities. (East Side Slim, stlblues.net)

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Personnel:
Larry Davis (guitar, vocals)
Billy Gayles (drums on 03., 05., 09. + 10.)
Jimmy Hint (bass on 03., 05., 08. – 10., drums on 01., 06. – 08.)
Eugene Johnson (bass on 02. + 07.)
Johnnie Johnson (piano on 02., 04., 07. + 10.)
Oliver Sain (saxophone on 02. – 04., 07. – 09., organ, piano)
Don Smith (drums on 02.)
Phil Westmoreland (guitar, bass on 01., 04. + 06.)

on 05:
Johnny Johnson (piano on right channel)
Oliver Sain (piano – left channel)

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Tracklist:
01. Funny Stuff (Sain) 3.40
02. Teardrops (Davis) 6.25
03. Next Time You See Me (Forest/Harvey) 3.36
04. Worried Dream (B.B.King) 5.02
05. Totsy (Davis) 3.07
06. Since I Been Loving You (Sain) 3.40
07. That Will Never Do (Campbell/Lyons) 3.06
08. Walk Out Like A Lady (Smith) 4.01
09. Find ‘Em, Fool ‘Em & Forget ‘Em (Jackson) 4.07
10. Got To Be Some Changes Made (A.King) 4.12

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Jimmy Goings & Santa Esmeralda – Green Talisman (1982)

OriginalFrontCover1The original concept of “Santa Esmeralda” was formed as a production project in 1976 by Jeanne- Manuel de Scarano and Nicholas Skorsky in Paris, France. Santa Esmeralda was inspired by the heroine of the same name from the Victor Hugo Classic “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”. American musician/vocalist Jimmy Goings recorded six of the group’s seven studio albums, permanently replacing American singer/saxophone player Leroy Gomez, who was used as lead vocalist for the first album titled “Santa Esmeralda”. That album featured the projects first international hit “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”, and the popular ballad, “You’re My Everything”. Creative differences lead to Gomez’s departure in late 1977. Goings joined the project in December of that year, recording lead vocals for the already complete follow up album “The House of the Rising Sun”, which garnered the projects second international hit with the title song. Showcasing a wonderful collaboration of French arranger Jean Claude Petit, brilliant Page 2 of 4 Flamenco/electric guitarist Jose Souc, and French studio guitarist Slim Pezin, the song’s Gypsy infused Flamenco style soon became a Latin disco innovation around the world. Goings was granted the rights to tour the concept and created his first touring band in January of 1978. The group hit the road immediately, touring with disco legend Barry White, and joining the resurgent tour of Carlos Santana. Santa Esmeralda quickly became international headliners, embarking on a world tour that included Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Brazil, Canada, and the United States.

Jimmy Goings

Goings went on to record two more albums for the Skorksy/de Scarano team: “Another Cha Cha” which was a completely original collection of songs with Goings making his first co-writing contributions on all tracks. The title song went on to become another world wide disco hit. The album also contained the popular songs, “Generation”, “Answer”, and “Back to the Beginning”. The final album recorded with the team was C’est Magnifique” also titled “Don’t Be Shy Tonight”, which contained the follow up hit “C’est Magnifique”, and the radio hit “Don’t Be Shy Tonight”, again with Goings contributing to the song writing, providing the lyrics for five of the albums six tunes. Skorsky and de Scarano spilt up in 1980, and Goings continued his collaboration with Skorsky on the next two albums. The group reprised its original sound, on the cover version of another popular 60’s hit, “Hush”. On this album Goings also collaborated again with Jose Souc on “Welcome to the World” and “What I Wanna Do With Your Love”, and provided original arrangements for the cover songs “No Reply” and “Street Fighting Man” which were then transcribed and orchestrated by Souc. The final album of the collaboration came in 1982 with Jimmy Going and Santa Esmeralda “The Green Talisman”. This collection returned to the concept album genre and produced the striking title tune “The Green Talisman” as well as covers of “Siboney” and “Children of Sanchez”, and the lush ballads “Sweet Fusion” and “Eternal Light”. Goings continued to tour through 1982 and the group disbanded officially in 1983 While many greatest hits compilations followed, Goings put his touring aside to raise his daughter, Genevieve, and son Jesse. He was reunited with his first son Dominic in 1989. He continues working in the entertainment field as a music producer, talent agent, and event coordinator through his entertainment company, GFI ENTERTAINMENT, located in the San Francisco Bay Area. (associatedentertainment.com)

Okay … this is disco music ! Not my kind of music, of course.

And this album was even released in Russia:

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Personnel:
Jimmy Goings (vocals)
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Celmar Engel (synthesizer)
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Unknown Orchestra conducted by Jose Souc (on 02. + 05. + 07.) and Slim Pezin (on 01. + 06.)

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Tracklist:
01. The Green Talisman (Skorsky/Carmone/Goings) 9.41
02. Sweet Fusion (Skorsky/Ellis) 3.45
03. Children Of Sanchez (Mangione) 3.29
04. Siboney (Lecuona) 4,28
05. Fortune Teller (Skorsky/Goings) 3.44
06. Eye Of The Cat (Skorsky/Ellis/Goings) 4.10
07. Eternal Light (Skorsky/Ellis/Goings) 3.56

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