Various Artists – Reading Rock – Volume One (1982)

lpfrontcover1The twenty second festival possibly had a more attractive lineup than 1981, at least if one was a heavy rock devotee. The inclusion of hard rock guitar stalwarts Gary Moore, Randy California, southern rockers Blackfoot and erstwhile pub rockers Dave Edmunds and Wilko Johnson gave the lineup spine that was missing from the previous year.

   The headliners were also a tad more prestigious. The Scorpions/UFO former lead guitarist Michael Schenker, whose repertoire veered into the sort of metal jazz/rock territory inhabited by Jeff Beck- as well as delivering more predictable hard rock fare -gave Sunday night a touch of class .
   Budgie and Iron Maiden were guaranteed to deliver an exciting hard rock show, regardless of whether one thought of them as innovators within the genre or not. Maiden’s credentials were reinforced by the presence of Bruce Dickinson , the erstwhile Samson lead vocalist , who had taken over the vocal spot from Paul Di’Anno .
   All three of these artists were recorded by the venerable BBC and broadcast on the Radio One Friday night rock show in 1983 .
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Iron Maiden
Once again, Reading delivered a mid range experience for the punters , no top end acts like Pink Floyd or the Stones which needed a mega crowd to return the organisers a profit, but a solid workmanlike bill that would leave the attendees satisfied in the main . This was what Reading was about at the time, but the formula was about to change , as 1983 would be the last Reading for several years, at long last , the never ending story was about to come to a ( temporary ) stop (by ukrockfestivals.com)
It is strange that Mean Records chose to include a couple of tracks that weren’t actually from the 82 Festival – Whitesnake’s recording was from the 79 Festival and UFO’s from 1980. Yet, they neglected to include tracks from bands that did perform like – Iron Maiden, Gary Moore and Tygers of Pan Tang. Below is the (almost) correct running order of the 1982 Reading Festival, taken from the official festival program. Perhaps they had intended to release a Volume Two (based on the name for this release – Volume One) but as far as I can gather this did not happen. (by Mr. AussieRock)
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Michael Schenker
I add ten more songs from this great Festival (thanks to rockonvinyl.blogspot.de)
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Tracklist:
01. Whitesnake:  Walking In The Shadows Of The Blues (Coverdale/Marsden) 4.40
02. Terraplane: I Want Your Body (Morley)  5.47
03. Marillion: He Knows You Know (Marillion) 4.46
04. Jackie Lynton: Slow Rider (Lynton/White) 4.46
05: Budgie: Superstar (Shelley/Thomas) 4.07
06. Bernie Marsden: S.O.S. (Marsden/Hawthorn) 4.42
07. Chinatown: I Wanna See You Tonight (Chinatown) 3.58
08. Randy California:  Come On Woman (California) 4.07
09. Stampede: There And Back (L.Archer/R.Archer/Bond) 5.44
10. Twisted Sister: Shoot ‘Em Down (Snider) 5.07
11. Michael Schenker: Attack Of The Mad Axeman  (Schenker/Barden) 4.31
12. Marillion: Three Boats Down From The Candy (Marrilion) 4.40
13. Terraplane: Turn Me Loose (Morley) 4.13
14. Just Good Friends: You Really Got Me (Davies) 4.27
15. UFO: Hot And Ready (Schenker/Mogg) 3.25
16. Budgie: Panzer Division Destroyed (Shelley/Thomas) 6.20
17. Grand Prix: Keep On Believin’ (Lanzon/O`Donoghue) 5.10
18. Spider: All The Time (Burrows/Harkness) 4.07
19. Chinatown: Caught On The Wrong Side (Chinatown) 4.24
20. Jackie Lynton; Hedgehog Song (Lynton) 4.57
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21. Gary Moore: Nuclear Attack (Moore) 5.27
22. Iron Maiden: Wrathchild (Harris) 3.32
23. Praying Mantis: Nightmares (C.Troy/Potts/Carroll/T.Troy) 3.01
24. Tygers Of Pan Tang: Blackjack (Tygers Of Pan Tan) 3.04
25. Y&T: Black Tiger (Kennemore/O´Conner/Rush/Haze/Alves/Meniketti) 4.14
26. Gary Moore: Parisean Walkways (Lynott/Moore) 5.25
27. Iron Maiden Tush (Beard/Gibbons/Hill) 6.05
28. Praying Mantis: Flirtin’ With Suicide (C.Troy/Potts/Carroll/T.Troy) 5.28
29. Tygers Of Pan Tang:
Slave To Freedom (Cox/Dick/Weir) 5.18
30. Y&T: Forever (Kennemore/O´Conner/Rush/Haze/Alves/Meniketti) 5.47
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Steve Miller Band – Live (1983) (VHS rip)

frontcover1Steve Miller Band Live! is a 1983 live album by the Steve Miller Band. Recorded live at the Pine Knob Amphitheater, Clarkston, MI on September 25, 1982.

In 1982, just at the time of the release of »Abracadabra«, the Steve Miller Band played two shows at the Amphitheater in Detroit. Some tracks of the show of September 25th were then released in 1983 as »Steve Miller Live« with worlwide phenomenal success. It is still one of the best selling live albums ever, with worldwide chart entries.
Released in 1983 Steve Miller Band: Live! is culled from a concert, or several concerts, that SMB gave on the supporting tour for Abracadabra. They run through all the big hits — the most obscure this gets is “Mercury Blues,” from their most popular album, Fly Like an Eagle — in performances that pretty much stick to the record. There’s not much here that’s different and, accordingly, there are zero revelations, but this is pleasant and enjoyable. There’s no real reason to get the record, since it isn’t even infused with much live energy, but once it’s playing, it’s easy to get sucked into the greatest-hits set list. (By the way, the town where SMB performed is not listed in the liners, but the crowd does give a hearty cheer for “Detroit City” in “Rock ‘n Me,” so maybe that’s where it was cut.) (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

I can´t agree with Stephen Thomas Erlewine … this is a fucking good concert by The Steve Miller Band and the music is till today just fantastic !

This is a VHS rip from my collection of old VHS tapes.

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Personnel:
Byron Allred (keyboards)
Norton Buffalo (harmonica)
Gerald Johnson (bass)
Kenny Lee Lewis (guitar)
Gary Mallaber (drums, percussion, keyboards)
John Massaro (guitar)
Steve Miller (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Macho City (intro) (Miller)
02. Gangster Of Love (Watson)
03. Rock ‘N Me (Miller)
04. Living in the U.S.A.(Miller)
05. Fly Like An Eagle (Miller)
06. Jungle Love (Douglass/Turner)
07. The Joker (Curtis/Ertegun/Miller)
08. Mercury Blues (Douglas/Geddins)
09. Take The Money And Run (Miller)
10. Abracadabra (Miller)
11. Jet Airliner (Miller/Pena)
12. Buffalo´s Serenade (Miller/Buffalo)

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Charlie Byrd – The Christmas Album (1982)

frontcover1Charlie Byrd performs 14 Christmas songs on this set as quiet and generally introspective solo guitar recitals. The music is well played, as one would expect, but there is not much variety in mood; all of the renditions are under three minutes, and humor is absent in favor of reverence. Pleasant and sincere background music. (by Scott Yanow)

Charlie Byrd is best known for two things: his incorporation of classical acoustic guitar techniques and sensibility in his jazz playing – and – playing a major role along with Stan Getz and others in popularizing the bossa nova beyond the shores of Brazil in the 1960’s. This CD of all-time Christmas favourites focuses on the classical acoustic guitar techniques and sensibilities. If you are looking for jazz or bossa nova Christmas music, you need to look elsewhere.

Charlie plays 13 songs in a no-frills, straight forward style. Some are traditional carols, some are more modern secular Christmas songs, and a few are relatively obscure Christmas songs (such as ‘Lully, Lullaby’ and ‘Coventry Carol’). It is this mix of songs that makes this so enjoyable. The songs you played more or less how you have heard them a thousand times, which makes them perfect if you want to sing along. Indeed, the liner notes contain the lyrics to the songs so you can sing along. The thing that separates these recordings from being mere background music is the fact that Charlie has impeccable taste and outstanding technique. So if you are a guitarist, pay close attention because this man studied for a year under Andres Segovia. And let us not forget that ‘Silent Night’ was written by Franz Gruber to be played on guitar in 1818.
These recordings were made in 1982 and have great sound quality. Charlie made an earlier Christmas album, 1967’s Christmas Carols for Solo Guitar that is also worth exploring.(by D.R.L.)

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Personnel:
Charlie Byrd (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. O Come All Ye Faithful (Traditional) 2.15
02. Deck The Halls (Traditional) 1.52
03. Mistletoe And Holly (Stanford/Sinatra/Sanicola) 2.56
04. Lully, Lullay (Traditional) 1.09
05. What Child Is This? (Dix) 2.05
06. Hark! The Herald Angels Sing (Wesley/Mendelssohn) 2.27
07. The Christmas Song (Tormé/Wells) 2.45
08. In The Bleak Midwinter (Rossetti/Holst) 2.07
09. God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen (Traditional) 1.55
10. Oh Christmas Tree (O Tannenbaum) (Traditional) 1.58
11. White Christmas (Berlin) 2.19
12. Angels We Have Heard On High (Traditional) 2.24
13. The Holly And The Ivy (Traditional) 1.51
14. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (Martin/Blane) 2.59

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Eddie Hardin – Circumstantial Evidence (1982)

frontcover1Taken from the original liner notes of a reissue, published in 1998 by Angel Air Records:

In 1967, the successful R&B combo the Spencer Davis Group lost their key member Stevie Winwood who went on to form Traffic. He was replaced by the then completely unknown Eddie Hardin.

Straight out of school and only 18 years old Eddie was already showing signs of becoming a true master off mighty Hammond organ. He had a strong and bluesy voice, and he could also write good songs. A brief spell with the Mod group, The Wild Uncertainty, had produced the impressive single “Man With Money”. It seemed destined that Eddie Hardin would not only fill out the empty hole left by Winwood but also create a completely new image for Spencer Davis and his cohorts. Their first album featuring Eddie Hardin was titled “With Their New Face On”. There was also a string of brilliant and innovative singles such as ‘Mr. Second Class’ and ‘Time Seller’ which became huge hits, particularly on the Continent. Following, this, however, there were disagreements of various kinds and it wasn’t long before Eddie had left the group along with drummer Peter York.

They both embarked on a year or so of working separately as session musicians, playing in lesser known line-ups and for Eddie’s part, writing songs, before getting together again to form organ/drums duo Hardin & York – billed as “The World’s Smallest Big Band”.

Hardin & York were darlings with the press overnight. To those who refused to believe in the idea of an organ/drum duo the advice would quite simply be, “hearing is believing”. Perhaps the most incredible thing was that all this sound, though it obviously grew out of very high musicianship, was completely rid of empty flamboyance and the tendency to overstate.

Peter York was a jazz drummer, heavily into Buddy Rich. Eddie Hardin also had an affinity for jazz but furthermore had a background in classical music. Obviously, they complimented each other well.

From the outset, Hardin and York were destined to become press pets, a musicians’ act – and wildly popular on the Continent, where they scored a number of huge hits and toured large venues. During their brief but immensely successful career is a duo (1969-71), they recorded three magnificent studio albums: “Tomorrow Today”, “The World’s Smallest Big Band” and “For The World”. Since then a compact disc of live performances and unreleased demos has been released under the title, “Live in Europe”.

Both Eddie and Pete embarked on solo projects during 1971. Eddie Hardin released a solo album in 1972, “Home Is Where You Find It”, but they were soon seen working together again in the reformed Spencer Davis Group. After that lineup folded, Pete York was particularly active and successful as a studio musician. He moved to the Continent and worked several years for German television as a creative manager.

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Eddie Hardin got involved with ex-Deep Purple bass player Roger Glover and his “Butterfly Ball” project. Eddie co-wrote “Love is all”, the beautiful song which went hand in hand with an equally charming cartoon and became a huge hit all over the world. At one time it was the best-selling record in Holland ever, and went recently re-released it became a huge hit in France. The song is presented here in the form of a rare demo!

Eddie also wrote and produced the first “Wizards Convention” album and worked as a producer for Iris Williams and Mike D’Abo. A number of highly successful solo albums in the New Age genre established his name in Japan during the 1980s, where he also released the “Wizards Convention 2” album in 1995 (now available in the rest of the world as SJPCD009). He currently lives in France. Still active is a composer, keyboard player and singer he has written a musical score for “The Wind In The Willows”, which was broadcast by German television in the ’80s.

This current release, recorded in 1982, is Eddie Hardin’s second solo album. Eddie chose to make an album in perhaps the most difficult of styles. Like some of Paul McCartney’s solo efforts (and there is certainly a McCartney inspiration here) this is in album with the words “recorded at home” written all over it. Luckily Eddie was more or less living in a recording studio at the time, so the sound quality is perfect. However, there’s an intense “living room” atmosphere about this record which – along with its highly demanding “less is more” attitude, its precision in playing and arranging – makes it stand out.

Paul McCartney started the ball rolling in this department and there certainly are lots of fine gems to be found hiding on his solo records. However, none of his albums are as consistent and artistically successful as Eddie Hardin’s “Circumstantial Evidence”. No wonder this is Eddie’s own favourite among all the LPs he has made! (by Claes Johansen)

A very laid-back album by one of my favourite keyboards players …

And … the wonderful frontcover was drawn by the daughter of Eddie Hardin, Emma Elizabeth Hardin at the the age of three !

Recorded at Herne Place Studios 1981/82
All bonus tracks were recorded prior to Circumstantial Evidence
Produced by Eddie Hardin, Roger Glover & John Acock

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Eddie Hardin (19 February 1949 – 22 July 2015)

Personnel:
Bimbo Acock (saxophone)
Ray Fenwick (guitar,vocals)
Mo Foster (bass)
Roger Glover (guitar,bass,keyboards,vocals)
Kim Goody (vocals)
Eddie Hardin (keyboards,bass,vocals(
Michael O’Donnell (bass)
Mickey Lee Soule (vocals)
Rob Townsend (drums)
Pete York (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Little Teaser (Gosling/Hardin) 3.28
02. Mine Tonight (Hardin) 3.06
03. Maybe I’m Amazed (McCartney) 4.21
04. That’s What The Lady Said (Hardin) 2.51
05. Long Tall Sally (Blackwell/Johnson/Penniman) 3.35
06. California (Hardin) 3.33
07. It Won’t Be Long (Lennon/McCartney) 3.46
08. Universal Dream (Fenwick/Hardin) 4.07
09. Maybe Baby (Fenwick) 3.53
10. Mess Of Blues (Pomus/Shuman) 3.15
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11. Accidental Instrumental (Glover/Hardin) 3.03
12. Strawberry Fields Forever (Lennon/McCartney) 3.58
13. Isolated Lady (Glover/Hardin) 2.58
14. Love Is All (demo version) (Glover/Hardin) 3.06
15. Move In The Right Place (Hardin) 3.11
16. Resurrection Shuffle (Ashton) 3.21
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Herne Place Studios, Sunningdale, Berkshire, England

 

David Bowie – Let´s Dance (1983)

FrontCover1Let’s Dance is the fifteenth studio album by David Bowie. Co-produced by Chic’s Nile Rodgers, the album contained three of his most successful singles; the title track, “Let’s Dance”, which reached No. 1 in the UK, US and various other countries, as well as “Modern Love” and “China Girl”, which both reached No. 2 in the UK. “China Girl” was a new version of a song which Bowie had co-written with Iggy Pop for the latter’s 1977 album The Idiot. It also contains a re-recorded version of the song “Cat People (Putting Out Fire)”, which had been a minor hit for Bowie a year earlier.

Let’s Dance was nominated for the Album of the Year Grammy Award in 1984 but lost to Michael Jackson’s Thriller. It has sold 10.7 million copies worldwide, making it Bowie’s best-selling album. It is Bowie’s eighteenth official album release since his debut in 1967, including two live albums, one covers album (Pin Ups, 1973), and a collaboration with the Philadelphia Orchestra (1977). At one point Bowie described the album as “a rediscovery of white-English-ex-art-school-student-meets-black-American-funk, a refocusing of Young Americans”. Let’s Dance was also a stepping stone for the career of the Texas blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan, who played on it. The album was released as a limited edition picture disc in 1983.

Bowie02The success of the album surprised Bowie, who felt he had to continue to pander to the new pop audience he acquired with the album. This led to Bowie releasing two further solo albums in 1984 and 1987 that, despite their relative commercial success, did not sell as well as Let’s Dance, were poorly received by critics at the time and subsequently dismissed by Bowie himself as his “Phil Collins years”.[8] Bowie would form the hard rock and grunge-predecessor band Tin Machine in 1989 in an effort to rejuvenate himself artistically.

David Bowie had planned to use producer Tony Visconti on the album, as the two had worked together on Bowie’s previous four studio albums. However, he chose Nile Rodgers for the project, a move that came as a surprise to Visconti, who had set time aside to work on Let’s Dance. Visconti called [Bowie’s personal assistant] Coco and she said: “Well, you might as well know – he’s been in the studio for the past two weeks with someone else. It’s working out well and we won’t be needing you. He’s very sorry.” The move damaged the two men’s relationship and Visconti did not work with Bowie again for nearly 20 years (until 2002’s Heathen). Rodgers later recalled that Bowie approached him to produce his album so that Bowie could have hit singles. Rodgers reported that Bowie came into his apartment one day and showed him a photograph of Little Richard in a red suit getting into a bright red Cadillac, saying “Nile, darling, that’s what I want my album to sound like.”

Bowie, having left RCA Records, had just signed with EMI Records for a reported $17.5 million and was working with Rodgers to release a “commercially buoyant” album that was described as “original party-funk cum big bass drum sound greater than the sum of its influences.” The album’s influences were described as Louis Jordan, the Asbury Jukes horn section, Bill Doggett, Earl Bostic and James Brown. Bowie spent three days making demos for the album in New York before cutting the album, a rarity for Bowie who, for the previous few albums, usually showed up with little more than “a few ideas.” Despite this, the album “was recorded, start to finish, including mixing, in 17 days,” according to Rodgers.

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Singles from the album “Let´s Dance”

Stevie Ray Vaughan met Bowie at the 1982 Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland. After Vaughan’s performance, Bowie was so impressed with the guitarist he later said “[he] completely floored me. I probably hadn’t been so gung-ho about a guitar player since seeing Jeff Beck with his band the Tridents.” Of Bowie, Vaughan said, “to tell you the truth, I was not very familiar with David’s music when he asked me to play on the sessions. … David and I talked for hours and hours about our music, about funky Texas blues and its roots – I was amazed at how interested he was. At Montreux, he said something about being in touch and then tracked me down in California, months and months later.” In a contemporary interview, Vaughan described the recording sessions for the album:

David Bowie is real easy to work with. He knows what he’s doing in the studio and he doesn’t mess around. He comes right in and goes to work. Most of the time, David did the vocals and then I played my parts. A lot of the time, he just wanted me to cut loose. He’d give his opinion on the stuff he liked and the stuff that needed work. Almost everything was cut in one or two takes. I think there was only one thing that needed three takes.[14]

Unusually, Bowie played no instruments on the album. “I don’t play a damned thing. This was a singer’s album.”

A few years later, Bowie discussed his feelings on the track “Ricochet” (which Musician magazine called an “incendiary ballroom raveup”) from this album:

I thought it was a great song, and the beat wasn’t quite right. It didn’t roll the way it should have, the syncopation was wrong. It had an ungainly gait; it should have flowed. … Nile [Rodgers] did his own thing to it, but it wasn’t quite what I’d had in mind when I wrote the thing.

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Bowie later described the title track the same way: the original demo was “totally different” from the way that Nile arranged it. Bowie played an early demo of the song for Nile Rodgers on a 12-string guitar with only 6 strings strung, and said to Nile, “Nile darling, I think I have a song which feels like it’s a hit.”[10] Nile then took the chords (which he said “felt folksy”) and helped craft them into the version used in the final production of the song.

Long-time collaborator Carlos Alomar, who had worked with Bowie since the mid-1970s and would continue to work with Bowie into the mid-’90s, has claimed was offered an “embarrassing” fee to play on the album and refused to do so. He also said (when working on Bowie’s follow-up album, Tonight) that he didn’t play on Let’s Dance because Bowie only gave him two weeks’ notice and he was already booked with other work; however, Alomar did play on the accompanying tour.

The album was seen as commercial and professional by critics, though opinions varied on the artistic content; while one reviewer called it “Bowie at his best”, another felt it “perfunctory” and “pointless”. In a piece on Bowie for Time in July 1983, Jay Cocks described the album as “unabashedly commercial, melodically alliterative and lyrically smart at the same time”. Robert Christgau felt that it had a “perfunctory professional surface”, and that other than “Modern Love”, which was “interesting”, the album was “pleasantly pointless”. Ken Tucker, in a review for Rolling Stone, felt the album sounded great, with an intelligent simplicity and a “surface beauty”, but that the album as a whole was “thin and niggling”, other than “Modern Love,” “Without You” and “Shake It”, which offered “some of the most daring songwriting of Bowie’s career”.

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In a retrospective review for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine felt that the album’s three hit singles were catchy yet distinctive pop songs, while the rest of the album was “unremarkable plastic soul” indicative of Bowie “entering a songwriting slump”. Alexis Petridis of The Guardian considered that Let’s Dance “had its moments”, unlike its successor, Tonight. Ed Power of the Irish Examiner wrote that Bowie “pleaded shamelessly for the love of the mass market” with the album. He continued “…the title track was a decent chunk of funk-rock and Bowie did not embarrass himself on the single ‘China Girl’. Otherwise, the record had a great deal in common with Wham! and Phil Collins. “The BBC’s David Quantick praised the “perfect” combination of Bowie and Rodgers on the title track, the “sweet, romantic” rendition of “China Girl” and highlighted “Criminal World” as “one of the best songs”. He stated “Let’s Dance may have had a ground-breaking sound and a popularity that Bowie clearly ached for, but it’s often a mundane album, as songs like ‘Ricochet’ and ‘Shake It’ mark time”. He said the album was “literally the template for 80s Bowie – blonde, suited and smiling”.

In 2013, NME ranked Let’s Dance at number 296 in its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

The success of the album surprised Bowie. In 1997, he said “at the time, Let’s Dance was not mainstream. It was virtually a new kind of hybrid, using blues-rock guitar against a dance format. There wasn’t anything else that really quite sounded like that at the time. So it only seems commercial in hindsight because it sold so many [copies]. It was great in its way, but it put me in a real corner in that it fucked with my integrity.” Bowie recalled, “[It] was a good record, but it was only meant as a one-off project. I had every intention of continuing to do some unusual material after that. But the success of that record really forced me, in a way, to continue the beast. It was my own doing, of course, but I felt, after a few years, that I had gotten stuck.”

Bowie would later state that the success of the album caused him to hit a creative low point in his career which lasted the next few years. “I remember looking out over these waves of people [who were coming to hear this record played live] and thinking, ‘I wonder how many Velvet Underground albums these people have in their record collections?’ I suddenly felt very apart from my audience. And it was depressing, because I didn’t know what they wanted.” After his follow-up albums Tonight (1984) and Never Let Me Down (1987) were critically dismissed, Bowie formed the grunge-precursor band Tin Machine in an effort to regain his artistic vision. (by wikipedia)

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David Bowie with Stevie Ray Vaughan and Nile Rodgers

Personnel:
Robert Aaron (saxophone)
David Bowie vocals)
Steve Elson (saxophone, flute)
Sammy Figueroa (percussion)
Mac Gollehon (trumpet)
Omar Hakim (drums)
Stan Harrison (saxophone, flute)
Nile Rodgers (guitar)
Carmine Rojas (bass)
Rob Sabino (keyboards)
Tony Thompson (drums)
Stevie Ray Vaughan (guitar)
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Background vocals:
Frank Simms – George Simms – David Spinner
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Bernard Edwards (bass on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Modern Love (Bowie) 4.46
02. China Girl (Bowie/Pop) 5.32
03. Let’s Dance (Bowie) 7.37
04. Without You (Bowie)  3.08
05. Ricochet (Bowie) 5.14
06. Criminal World (Godwin/Browne/Lyons) 4.25
07. Cat People (Putting Out Fire) (Bowie/Moroder 5.09
08. Shake It (Bowie) 3.49

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David Robert Jones (8 January 1947 – 10 January 2016), known as David Bowie

Urszula Dudziak – Ulla (1982)

FrontCover1The former wife of Polish jazz violinist Michal Urbaniak, Urszula Dudziak has established her own legacy as a vocalist. Gifted with a four-and-a-half octave voice, she was dubbed “jazz singer of the year” by the Los Angeles Times in 1979. A frequent collaborator of the late Gil Evans in the 1980s, Dudziak’s singing was featured on Evans’ albums Live at Umbria Jazz ’87, recorded at the Italian music festival, and Last Session, recorded with Sting. A featured vocalist for Archie Shepp, Lester Bowie, and Bobby McFerrin in the 1980s, she performed with the Vocal Summit Group along with Jay Clayton, Jeanne Lee, Bobby McFerrin, Norma Winstone, Michele Hendricks, and Lauren Newton in the early ’90s. She was a featured soloist for the Vienna Art Orchestra’s performance of “Artistry in Rhythm — A European Suite” in 2000. Dudziak’s seven-year-long collaboration with Krzysztof Zawadzki’s band, Walk Away, yielded four albums between 1987 and 1994. Working with Koledy Ur and Dudziak01Grazyna Auguscik in 1996, she recorded an album of jazz interpretations of classic Christmas carols.

Studying piano and singing in her homeland since the late ’50s, Dudziak became fascinated with jazz after hearing a radio broadcast featuring Ella Fitzgerald in 1959. Meeting Urbaniak in a short-lived jazz band in 1965, she continued to work with the violinist in an electric jazz band the following year. Performing in Scandinavia from 1965 until 1969, they made New York their home in 1974. Incorporating Polish folk, rock, and classical influences into her musical vocabulary since 1967, Dudziak has become known for her unique “wordless” singing style.(Craig Harris)

And this is one of her typical and beautiful jazz-fusion-rock recordings from the 80´s featuring great musicians like Chris Hinze and Omar Hakim. Enjoy this brilliant voice !

Dudziak02Personnel:
Victor Bailey (bass)
Barry Eastmond (piano, synthesizer)
Urszula Dudziak (vocals)
Omar Hakim (drums)
Chris Hinze (flute)
Vladimir Horunzhy (piano)
Bob Malach (saxophone)
W. Doc Powell (guitar)
Carol Steele (percussion)
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Michael Chung (guitar, piano on 06.)
Antony Cox (percussion on 06.)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Eleanor Rigby (Lennon/McCartney) 3.50
02. Papaya (Urbaniak/Dudziak) 3.48
03. Wonderlove (Urbaniak/Allen) 3.52
04. Samba Ulla (Urbaniak) 4.36
05. Space Lady (Urbaniak) 6.22
06. Long Island Expressway (L.I.E.) (Horunzhy) 3.45
07. Headwind (Horunzhy) 6.17
08. All About You (Horunzhy) 7.10
09. Too Many Nights (Powell/Urbaniak/Allen) 6.21

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Andreas Vollenweider – Behind the Gardens-Behind the Wall-Under the Tree (1982)

FrontCover1Behind the Gardens is a studio album by New Age artist Andreas Vollenweider, released in 1981. It is almost entirely instrumental, and centers on Vollenweider on harp.

While not literally Vollenweider’s first album, Behind the Gardens is widely regarded as such because it was his breakthrough album, gaining him wide recognition. The earlier and more obscure Eine Art Suite in XIII Teilen (A sort of Suite in 13 Parts), 1979, remains available chiefly online, while Behind the Gardens can still be readily found in music stores worldwide.

The contemplative and moving second track, “Pyramid,” is a favorite of fans and has become a concert staple, always garnering applause when the first harp notes are played.

Vollenweider01While the album originally stood on its own, in 1990 it and the two following albums (Caverna Magica and White Winds) were re-released as a two-CD set entitled “Trilogy,” suggesting they collectively constituted a single musical entity.

The full titles of the first two albums lend credence to the suggestion that the three albums are thematically connected. The full title of the first album is “Behind the Gardens-Behind the Wall-Under the Tree…” The ellipsis at the end suggests a continuation. The full title of the next album is “Caverna Magica (…Under the Tree – In the Cave…)” The first ellipsis, followed by the repetition of “Under the Tree” from the first album title, clearly indicates a continuation. The second ellipsis suggests another continuation, which would turn out to be “White Winds (Seeker’s Journey).” The last track on the White Winds album is entitled “Trilogy (At The White Magic Gardens) & The White Winds”.

The title of the first album “is like giving someone directions: “You will find us behind The Garden, behind The Wall, under The Tree…”, Vollenweider is quoted as saying on his official web site.

The title of the second album apparently indicates a continuation of those directions: Under the tree you’ll find a magic cavern. This magic cavern could be a metaphor for the recording site. This is borne out by the rest of the Vollenweider quote: “Recording this album we worked completely cut off from the world, in the cellars of the Sinus Studios in Bern (capital of Vollenweider’s native Switzerland), which are more than 300 years old. In the shelter of this creative “womb”, it was easy to lose track of time and space.” (by wikipedia)

Vollenweider02His instrument enables him to counteract the meditative properties of the harp with a strong rhythmic pulse. The results are very low-frequency bass tones in the harp, coupled with an almost orchestral sense of harmony. This very popular album is upbeat, centering and a real delight.(allmusic)

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate promo frontcover

Personnel:
Pedro Haldemann (percussion)
Walter Keiser (drums)
Jon Otis (percussion)
Andreas Vollenweider (harp, guitar, saxophone, synthesizer, accordion, vocals)
BackCoverTracklist:
01. Behind The Gardens-Behind The Wall-Under The Tree 7.19
02. Pyramid-In The Wood-In The Bright Light 7.52
03. Micro-Macro 2.48
04. Skin And Skin 3.22
05. Moonlight, Wrapped Around Us 1.05
06. Lion And Sheep 2.55
07. Sunday 1.58
08. Afternoon 0.47
09. Hands And Clouds 2.24

Music composed by Andreas Vollenweider

LabelB1*
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