Southern Lightning – Down The Road (1986)

FrontCover1.jpgI found only a few informations about this fantastic Blues-Rock band from Australia …

They was formed in die mid 80´s and play for two or three weeks … 2 albums and two singles.

The band was led by Dave Hogan, one of the finest Aussie blues singers.

After leaving Southern Lightning he was in another finde band, called “The Paramount Trio” … and he´s still active in Australia … .

Dave Hogan, still resident in Melbourne, blows a mean harp for pre-war blues style outfit The Paramount Trio, while also playing in Southern Lightning, and releasing records with both bands to acclaim in Australia. He recently formed Blues Hangover with original Pretty Things bass player John Stax. (by audioculture.co.nz)

But here we can hear him with one of his first bands … and if love and like this good damn ol´ fucking blues.rock … then you should listen …

This entry is dedicated ot all these more or less unknown groups, who played this music.

And you´ll find two sons of Robert Johnson. e should not forget, that these songs were written in 1936/1973 … and they are still alive and well … Unbelieveable !

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Personnel:
Louie Black (drums)
Nik Guselev (bass)
Dave Hogan (vocals, harmonica)
Manny Seddon (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. I Ain’t Superstitious (Dixon) 3.22
02. Down The Road  (Hogan/Guselev/Seddon) 4.43
03. Muddy Waters Blues (Barton/Hogan/Guselev/Seddon) 8.07
04. Shame Shame Shame (McCrackin/Geddins) 3.35
05. Stones In My Passway (Johnson)
06. Love Shock (Willis) 4.30
07. Blues For Breakfast (Harrington) 6.10
08. I Believe (Dust My Broom) (Robert Johnson) 4.52

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China Crisis – What Price Paradise (1986)

LPFrontCover1.JPGWhat Price Paradise is the fourth studio album by English new wave group China Crisis. It was released on CD, LP and Cassette in 1986. The CD version featured one bonus track: “Trading in Gold”, originally released on the B-side of the “Arizona Sky” single. (by wikipedia)

After making a bid to become the ’80s version of Steely Dan on the delightful Flaunt the Imperfection, China Crisis offered a fuller and more pop-oriented follow-up the next year. With the duo of Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley (replacing Walter Becker) sharing the producer’s chair, the songs on What Price Paradise feature warm, intricate arrangements and prominent brass and strings. But while more than one Langer/Winstanley offering of this era overwhelmed its subject with such treatment — Elvis Costello’s ill-fated Goodbye Cruel World is a good example — the sophisticated and melodic songs here prosper from the attention to detail.

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The Motown-ish bounce of “Worlds Apart” and “June Bride” is made even more infectious by punchy horn charts, while “Hampton Beach” offers sweeping melodrama, as Gary Daly’s delicate vocals are surrounded with just the right touches. Even the songs that hint at the previous album’s jazzy complexities, like disc opener “It’s Everything,” are more accessible and inviting here and, on “Arizona Sky,” China Crisis seemed to have the big American hit that singles like “King in a Catholic Style” didn’t quite deliver. Released at a time when many of the group’s U.K. new wave contemporaries were being flushed off the charts — most for good — What Price Paradise was yet another strong outing from this too-often underrated band. (by Dan LeRoy)

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Okay … this is another album from this series “not my kind of music”, but this blog should show all the different sides of music … many fantastic colorus, you know ?

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Personnel:
Gary Daly (vocals)
Gary “Gazza” Johnson (bass)
Eddie Lundon (guitar, vocals)
Brian McNeill (synthesizer, vocals)
Kevin Wilkinson (drums, percussion)
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Gary Barnacle (saxophone, flute)
Martin Ditcham (percussion)
Stuart Nisbet (guitar)
Pete Thoms (trombone)
Luke Tunney (trumpet, flugelhorn)
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background vocals:
Davie Dover – John Lewis
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David Bedford (string arrangements, conductor)

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Tracklist:
01. It’s Everything 5.09
02. Arizona Sky 5.25
03. Safe As Houses 4.26
04. Worlds Apart (Daly, Johnson, Lundon, McNeill, Wilkinson, Kevin Kelly) – 3:35
05. Hampton Beach 4.47
06. The Understudy 5.45
07. Best Kept Secret 4.08
08. We Do The Same 4.21
09. June Bride 3.50
10. A Day’s Work For The Dayo’s Done 4.17
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11. Trading In Gold 4.29

All songs written by Gary Daly – Gary Johnson – Eddie Lundon – Brian McNeill – Kevin Wilkinson

except 04, which was written by China Crisis with Kevin Kelly

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China Crisis

Wendy O. Williams – Kommander Of Kaos (1986)

FrontCover1Wendy Orlean Williams (28 May 1949 – 6 April 1998) was an American singer, songwriter, and actress. Born in Webster, New York, she came to prominence as the lead singer of the punk rock band Plasmatics. Her onstage theatrics included partial nudity, exploding equipment, firing a shotgun, and chainsawing guitars. Dubbed the “Queen of Shock Rock” and the “Metal Priestess”, Williams was considered the most controversial and radical female singer of her time. Performing her own stunts in videos, she often sported a mohawk hairstyle. In 1985, during the height of her popularity as a solo artist, she was nominated for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.

Leaving home at 16, Williams hitchhiked to Colorado, earning money by crocheting string bikinis. She travelled to Florida and Europe landing various jobs such as lifeguard, stripper, macrobiotic cook, and server at Dunkin’ Donuts. After arriving in New York City in 1976, she began performing in live sex shows, and in 1979 appeared in the porno WendyOWilliams01Candy Goes to Hollywood. That year manager Rod Swenson recruited her to the Plasmatics and the two became romantically involved. The band quickly became known on the local underground scene, performing at clubs such as CBGB.

Three albums with Plasmatics later, Williams embarked on a solo career and released her debut album, WOW, in 1984. Albums Kommander of Kaos (1986) and Deffest! and Baddest! (1988) followed, before her retirement from the music industry. Williams made her non-adult screen debut in Tom DeSimone’s film Reform School Girls (1986), for which she recorded the title song. She also appeared in the 1989 comedy Pucker Up and Bark Like a Dog, television series The New Adventures of Beans Baxter, and MacGyver. On 6 April 1998, Williams committed suicide near her home in Storrs, Connecticut by gunshot; she had attempted to kill herself twice in the years leading up to her death, allegedly she had also been struggling with deep depression.

Kommander of Kaos is the second solo studio album released by Wendy O. Williams after her group, the Plasmatics, went on hiatus. The album was recorded in 1984 but not released until 1986. A live version of the Gene Simmons-penned “Ain’t None of Your Business” appears on this album (the song previously appeared on her debut album).

The album has been re-released by several independent labels in recent years (such as WendyOWilliams02Plasmatics Media and Powerage). (by wikipedia)

Although best known as the death-defying leader of the Plasmatics, Wendy O. Williams issued several albums on her own during the 1980s. And while her earlier band was a certified punk outfit, by this stage of her career, Williams was zeroing in on the heavy metal audience — Gene Simmons had produced an earlier album, while the singer was spotted hosting a heavy metal video show on the USA cable channel. So by the time of 1986’s Kommander of Kaos, Williams was knee-deep in metal. Once more, Simmons’ name makes an appearance on a Williams record (not as a producer this time, but as a songwriter — “Ain’t None of Your Business”), while Williams covers Motörhead’s “Jailbait,” and the main riff of the album’s opening “Hey Hey (Live to Rock)” is quite reminiscent of Mötley Crüe’s “Live Wire.” While Kommander of Kaos was probably just as good as just about anything else that theatrical-minded metallists were putting out that year (W.A.S.P., Lizzy Borden, etc.), Williams was much more convincing as a Mohawk-ed punker. (by Greg Prato)

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Personnel:
Wes Beech (guitar)
Michael Ray (guitar, background vocals)
Greg Smith (bass, background vocals)
T.C. Tolliver (drums)
Wendy O. Williams (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Hoy Hey (Live To Rock) (Ray/Swenson) 3.47
02. Pedal To The Metal (Ray/Smith/Swenson) 3.29
03. Goin’ Wild (Ray/Swenson) 4.13
04. Ain’t None Of Your Business (live) (Simmons/Carr/Vincent) 5.36
05. Party (Beech/Swenson) 3.38
06. Jailbait (Kilmister/Taylor/Clarke) 3.25
07. Bad Girl (Bunyard/Beech/Swenson) 3.36
08. Fight For The Right (Ray/Swenson) 3.11
09. (Work That Muscle) F*ck That Booty (Ray/Swenson) 3.31

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Wendy Orlean Williams (28 May 1949 – 6 April 1998)

Cause of death‎: ‎Suicide by gunshot

Her suicide note regarding her decision:

I don’t believe that people should take their own lives without deep and thoughtful reflection over a considerable period of time. I do believe strongly, however, that the right to do so is one of the most fundamental rights that anyone in a free society should have. For me, much of the world makes no sense, but my feelings about what I am doing ring loud and clear to an inner ear and a place where there is no self, only calm.

Dr Feelgood – Mad Man Blues (1986)

FrontCover1.JPGDr. Feelgood are an English pub rock band formed in 1971. Hailing from Canvey Island, Essex, the group are best known for early singles such as “She Does It Right”, “Roxette”, “Back in the Night” and “Milk and Alcohol” . The group’s original distinctively British R&B sound was centred on Wilko Johnson’s choppy guitar style. Along with Johnson, the original band line-up included singer Lee Brilleaux and the rhythm section of John B. Sparks, known as “Sparko”, on bass guitar and John Martin, known as “The Big Figure”, on drums. Although their most commercially productive years were the early to mid-1970s, and in spite of Brilleaux’s death in 1994 of lymphoma, a version of the band (featuring none of the original members) continues to tour and record to this day. (by wikipedia)

1985 was bringing in some musical surprises, some of them good, some not so, but with the advent of the musical video, things were all about the “forward look,” so it goes without saying that many great rock n’ roll bands, bands who should have been receiving countless amounts of air time, saw none. You can count Dr. Feelgood in that category of “none,” and that’s a loss this world will never bounce back from.

There are people out there who are gonna tell you that Dr. Feelgood was a working man’s R&B, Rockin’ Blues band, and while that’s sort of true, it’s like saying that Gram Parsons was a working man. Gram wasn’t any more a working man then Dr. Feelgood, the Doctor [or should I say Doctors] had no choice, the music was in them, and if it didn’t get out, they were gonna explode … which is pretty much what happened whenever the took the stage. You need to feel this music, you need to turn the speakers up loud … that “Blown Away Guy” sitting in the Le Corbusier armed chair facing a JBL L100 speaker for the Maxell tape ad back in the 70’s, well hands down he was listin’ to Dr. Feelgood for sure.

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Go ahead, dismiss this album if you wish, wave off this review if you must … but just for one minute, open any window in your house and take a listen to what’s blasting from mine, and you might just change your thinking. And that’s a fact, Jack! (streetmouse)

Lee Brilleaux and Dr. Feelgood sound positively revitalized on Mad Man Blues, a collection of raw versions of blues standards that is their best album since 1977’s Be Seeing You. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Lee Brilleaux (guitar, harmonica, slide-guitar, vocals)
Phil H. Mitchell (bass, vocals)
Kevin Morris (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Gordon Russell (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Dust My Broom (James) 2.57
02. Something You Got (Cropper/Floyd) 2.40
03. Dimples (Hooker) 2.59
04. Living On The Highway (Nix/Russell) 3.37
05. Tore Down (King) 2.41
06. Mad Man Blues (Hooker) 2.25
07. I’ve Got News For You (Brilleaux/Morris/Russell/Vernon) 3.57
08. My Babe (Dixon) 2.23
09. Can’t Find The Lady (Wallis) 3.31
10. Rock Me Baby (Bihari/King) 4.30

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Lee Brilleaux

Lee Brilleaux (born Lee John Collinson, 10 May 1952 – 7 April 1994)

Larry Carlton – Alone/But Never Alone (1986)

FrontCover1.jpgLarry Eugene Carlton (born March 2, 1948) is an American guitarist who built his career as a studio musician in the 1970s and ’80s for acts such as Steely Dan and Joni Mitchell. He has participated in thousands of recording sessions, recorded on hundreds of albums in many genres, for television and movies, and on more than 100 gold records. He has been a member of the jazz fusion groups The Crusaders and Fourplay and has maintained a long solo career. (by wikipedia)

One of the few smooth jazz artists of the ’80s to make music that’s simultaneously melodically substantial and sonically contemplative, Larry Carlton hit a career high on 1986’s Alone/But Never Alone. Playing only acoustic guitar (with electric bass, drums, and synthesizers on most tracks), Carlton neatly sidesteps the twin pitfalls of new age mush and smooth jazz showboating, playing neatly phrased, well-thought solo lines against a variety of melodic and rhythmic backgrounds.

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The acoustic focus gives the album a timeless quality, even though a few tracks feature synthesizer lines that betray their mid-’80s origins, and the obviously spiritual quality of the music (song titles include not only the higher-power-oriented title track, but “Smiles and Smiles to Go” and “Perfect Peace,” and the centerpiece track is an instrumental setting of a common tune for “The Lord’s Prayer”) is becalming without being drippy or pillow-soft. This is not an album that will change the mind of those dead-set against smooth jazz, but it’s a small masterpiece of the genre. (by Stewart Mason)

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Personnel:
Larry Carlton (guitar, bass, keyboards)
Michael Fisher (percussion)
Abraham Laboriel (bass on 01., 05. + 07.)
Rick Marotta (drums)
Terry Trotter (keyboards on 05. + 08., synthesizer on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. Smiles And Smiles To Go (Carlton) 5.48
02. Perfect Peace (Carlton) 4.28
03. Carrying You (Carlton) 4.00
04. The Lord’s Prayer (Malotte) 5.10
05. High Steppin’ (Carlton) 5.44
06. Whatever Happens (Withers/Carlton) 4.28
07. Pure Delight (Carlton) 5.33
08. Alone/But Never Alone (Carlton) 3.34

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Marc Johnson – Bass Desires (1986)

LPFrontCover1Bass Desires is a 1985 studio album by jazz bassist Marc Johnson released on the ECM label.

The pairing of electric guitarists Bill Frisell and John Scofield had to be one of the most auspicious since John McLaughlin and Carlos Santana. Acoustic bassist Marc Johnson’s stroke of genius in bringing the two together on Bass Desires resulted in a sound that demonstrated both compatibility between the guitarists and the distinctiveness of the two when heard in combination. Add drummer Peter Erskine and you had a bona fide supergroup, albeit in retrospect a short-lived one, before Frisell and Scofield would establish their own substantial careers as leaders. The guitarists revealed symmetry, spaciousness, and a soaring stance, buoyed by the simplicity of their rhythm mates. This is immediately achieved on the introductory track, “Samurai Hee-Haw,” as hummable, head-swimming, and memorable a melody as there ever has been, and a definite signature sound. A perfect country & eastern fusion, the guitarists lope along on wafting white clouds of resonant twang, singing to themselves while also playing stinging notes, supported by the insistent two-note funk of Johnson and the rolling thunder of Erskine.

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The title track is a one-note ostinato from the bassist with a popping, driven drum rhythm and the guitars more unified in their lines, but broadening their individualistic voices. The light reggae funk of “Mojo Highway” sounds more conversational and jam-like, while “Thanks Again” is a relaxed, unforced waltz, again eschewing Asian-Missouri folkloric alchemy fired by Frisell’s wah-wah and Scofield’s stairstep strums. Ethereal and effusive sky church inflections lead to loose associations, especially from Frisell’s moon-walking guitar synthesizer on “A Wishing Doll.” There are three covers: a take on Elmer Bernstein’s “A Wishing Doll;” “Resolution,” the second movement from John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme suite, with a more spiky bass and spacy lead melody played only once; and the standard “Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair,” floating and eerie, held together by silk and lace threads. One of two Bass Desires albums, this debut has stood the test of time — it is priceless, timeless, and still far from being dated. (by Michael G. Nastos)

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Personnel:
Peter Erskine (drums)
Bill Frisell (guitar, guitar synthesizer)
Marc Johnson (bass)
John Scofield (guitar)

Tracklist:
01. Samurai Hee-Haw (Johnson) 7.45
02. Resolution (Coltrane) 10.31
03. Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair (Traditional) 7.10
04. Bass Desires (Erskine) 6.12
05. A Wishing Doll (Bernstein/David) 6.17
“Mojo Highway” (Johnson) – 8:44
“Thanks Again” (Scofield) – 7:15

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Sting – Bring On The Night (1986)

FrontCover1.jpgBring on the Night is a 1986 live album by Sting recorded over the course of several live shows in 1985 and released in 1986. The title is taken from a song by The Police from their 1979 album Reggatta de Blanc. The songs performed include Sting’s early solo material from the studio album The Dream of the Blue Turtles, and from his time with The Police, with a few of the performances played as medleys of the two. The touring band features the prominent jazz musicians Branford Marsalis, Darryl Jones, Kenny Kirkland, and Omar Hakim.

Despite not featuring any hit singles, the album reached number 16 on the UK Album Charts[3] and won Sting a Grammy Award in 1988 for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male.

Bring on the Night is also a 1985 documentary directed by Michael Apted covering the formative stages of Sting’s solo career—released as DVD in 2005. (by wikipedia)

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Sting really got carried away with the idea that his supporting crew for Dream of the Blue Turtles was a real jazz band, and technically, he was kind of right. He did pluck them straight out of Wynton Marsalis’ backing band (thereby angering Wynton and emboldening his anti-rock stance, while flaring up a sibling rivalry between the trumpeter and his saxophonist brother Branford — a veritable hat trick, that), and since he was initially a jazz bassist, it seemed like a good fit. At the very least, it seemed like a monumental occasion because he documented the entire development of the band and making of Dream with a documentary called Bring on the Night, releasing a double live album as its soundtrack just a year after the debut hit the stores. This could be called hubris (and it will be called that here), especially because the appearance of the live album feels like a way of showcasing Sting’s jazz band and jazz chops. Most of the songs run around five minutes long and there are no less than three medleys, two of which marry an old Police number with a tune from Dream. Arriving as a second solo album, it can’t help but feel a little unnecessary, even if the loose, rather infectious performances show what Sting was trying to achieve with his debut. Even so, this is a record for the cult, and while it will satisfy them, to others it will seem like, well, hubris. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Omar Hakim (drums, background vocals, electronic percussion)
Darryl Jones (bass)
Kenny Kirkland (keyboards)
Branford Marsalis (saxophone, clarinet, rap, percussion)
Sting (bass, guitar, vocals, keyboards)
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background vocals:
Janice Pendarvis – Dolette McDonald

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Bring On the Night/When the World Is Running Down, You Make the Best of What’s Still Around (Sting) 11.46
02. Consider Me Gone (Sting) 4.52
03. Low Life (Sting) 4.07
04. We Work The Black Seam (Sting) 7.01
05. Driven To Tears (Sting) 6.59
06. Dream Of The Blue Turtles/Demolition Man (Sting) 5.55

CD 2:
01. One World (Not Three)/Love Is The Seventh Wave (Sting)  11.13
02. Moon Over Bourbon Street (Sting)  4.25
03. I Burn For You (Sting) 5.26
04. Another Day (Sting) 4.45
05. Children’s Crusade (Sting) 5.30
06. Down So Long (Atkins/Lenoir) 4.37
07. Tea In The Sahara (Sting) 6.26

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