Adrian Snell – Song Of An Exile (1989)

FrontCover1Adrian Snell (born 1954) is an English pianist, keyboard player, singer and composer.

Classically trained at the Leeds College of Music and with a music diploma to his name (LGSM), Adrian’s musical career spans nearly four decades. During this time he has produced twenty-three original albums: seventeen solo albums and six major concept works. His major commissions include: ‘The Virgin’ from the BBC, ‘The Passion’, recorded with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and premièred on BBC Radio One, ‘The Cry: A Requiem for the Lost Child’, premièred at St Paul’s Cathedral in aid of Save the Children, and numerous Dutch commissions including HTV’s special musical documentary ‘Song of an Exile’ recorded at Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial, Jerusalem. He has performed extensively in the United Kingdom, Israel, the United States, Australia, and throughout Europe, and has had many TV and radio performances worldwide.

In the late 1990s Adrian semi-retired as a professional musician to train as a music therapist. This was a bold move by an artist whose albums and concerts attracted audiences across Europe. He completed the post graduate diploma in Music Therapy Adrian Snell 3(Dip. Mus. Th.) awarded by the University of Bristol through the Faculty of Medicine. Adrian now works as a Music Therapist and Arts Therapy Consultant for children with special needs at Three Ways School, Bath, and regularly visits a school in Korce, Albania.

June 1995 saw the premier release of Adrian’s major, two album concept work ‘City of Peace’. The work explores the Jewish roots of the Christian faith, drawing on poems written by Jewish authors spanning from six thousand years ago to the present day. City of Peace also comes as a climax to eleven years of searching and discovery that began with a journey into the lives of Jewish men, women, and children caught up in the Nazi Holocaust.

It is eleven years since I walked through the gates of Bergen Belsen. I shall never forget that day; it changed me in ways I couldn’t have imagined. Music is, in the end, the language of my heart, so not surprisingly much of my writing since then expresses the search for answers and meaning in all that the Holocaust and Jewish history opens up in us.

Through his work as a music therapist Adrian has drawn inspiration to record a new album, ‘Fierce Love’. The album draws inspiration both from the relationships he has formed, and the extraordinary range of instruments that are central to his work and now contribute to the unique soundscape of the album. ‘Fierce love’ has all the hallmarks of an Adrian Snell album: rich sound textures, haunting melodies, intelligent lyrics – and a remarkable ability to connect the listener with the subject of the songs at a profound level. ‘Fierce Love’ was released on 28 September 2013. You can purchase a copy from this website, iTunes and Amazon.

His daughter, Carla Jae, has followed in her father’s footsteps and is now an accomplished singer/songwriter with ‘The Carla Jae Band’ also featuring William Rutherford and Blain Weller. His son Jamie has also pursued a music career and is currently part of the London-based band ‘Bird of Prey’. (wikipedia)

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After Adrian’s ‘life changing’ experience in Bergen-Belsen, it was no surprise that his journey continued with this beautiful and moving exploration of Jewish Poetry. ‘Song of an Exile’ contains two interpretations of poems written by children who died in Auschwitz, and these form the beginning of a very significant chapter in Adrian’s work, as he seeks to give a voice to children who have lost their childhood. (press-release)

Bergen-Belsen

“Song of an exile” takes Jewish poetry through the centuries from Psalms to a poem by a girl trying to survive in the Warshaw ghetto during WO II and puts it to contemporary music. The result is an overwhelming journey through Jewish history, though rather through an emotional and spiritual perspective then a strictly historical.
“Song of an exile” shows a lot of empathy with a people which endured many struggles through the centuries.
Apart from that it is – in my opinion – a musical masterpiece. (J. vd Hoef)

I concur with J Vd Hoef. Some of the transitions between pieces are less than smooth, and Snell’s voice is more like a good musical actor than a great professional singer. The emotion he puts into singing these poems, though, is spot-on perfect. But the music–very well done and varied– provides the perfect space between some very powerful exile and labor-camp poems, and short pieces of Scripture. Prepare to be gripped. And, strangely, uplifted (I love collections that save the best for last!). This poetry needs to be remembered. (R. Miller)

I´m impressed, too  … a real important album !

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Personnel:
Paul Allen (bass)
Dave Bainbridge (guitar, keyboards, drum programming)
Debbie Bainbridge (oboe)
Paul Burgess (drums)
David Fitzgerald (ssaxophone, flute, flageolet, recorder)
Tim Hines (percussion)
Adrian Snell (keyboards, vocals)
Melanie Williams (vocals on 05. + 07.)
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background vocals:
Barrington Stewart – Vivienne Dixon – Melanie Williams

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Tracklist:
01. Roads To Zion 4.41
02. The Song Of An Exile (Shir Golah) 3.16
03. Lament For Jerusalem (How Deserted Lies The City) 6.10
04. Terezin 8.34
05. Fear
B2 Roads To Zion (Part 2)
B3 God’s Beloved
B4 If I Were

Music & lyrics by Adrian Snell

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LinerNotes

Neil Young – Live At Jones Beach Music Theater, Wantagh, NY (1989)

FrontCover1This is a real great Neil Young bootleg, a solo unplugged concert:

The Jones Beach concert is comes off rather lifeless and uninspired…the excellent production simply accentuates a lack of passion here. It’s Neil solo and you are missing Crazy Horse after awhile. I never thought I’d say that because just Neil with a guitar, harmonica & piano is a wonderful thing…usually. The highlight is the closing encore with Bruce Springsteen on “Down By The River”. The Boss’ presence gives Neil a little kick in the ass.

Jumping ahead to the SNL performances…the broadcast portion is common to us all but the rehearsals are really something! Neil is a possessed animal and there is the best version of “Rockin’ In The Free World” featured in this segment, hands down. This is Neil at his most passionate ever. I remember seeing the original broadcast and going “holy shit!”. I did the same thing again upon viewing this portion of the DVD. Great stuff!

The sound and video both are superb and makes this an easy purchase for Neil Young fans. (hotwacks.com)

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Personnel:
Ben Keith (dobro, keyboards, vocals)
Frank Sampedro (guitar. mandolin, vocals)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, hrmonica, piano)
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Bruce Springsteen (guitar, vocals on 20.)

Alternate frontcover:
AlternateFrontCover

Tracklist:
01. 1. My My, Hey Hey (Out Of The Blue) 3.57
02. Rockin’ In The Free World 5.12
03. Comes A Time 3.16
04. Sugar Mountain 6.10
05. Pocahontas 5.10
06. Helpless 5.41
07. Crime In the City (Sixty To Zero Part 1) 6,37
08. For The Turnstiles 5.49
09. This Old House 4.58
10. Roll Another Number 3.39
11. Too Far Gone 3.18
12. This Note’s For You 3,29
13. The Needle And The Damage Done 2.16
14. No More 5.13
15. After The Gold Rush 5.21
16. Heart Of Gold 3.25
17. Ohio 4.40
18. Rockin’ In The Free World 6.34
19. Powderfinger 5.51
20. Down By The River 9.35

All songs written by Neil Young

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More from Neil Young:
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Well I dreamed I saw the knights in armor comin’
Sayin’ something about a queen
There were peasants singin’ and drummers drummin’
And the archer split the tree
There was a fanfare blowin’ to the sun
That was floating on the breeze
Look at Mother Nature on the run
In the 1970s
Look at Mother Nature on the run
In the 1970s

I was lyin’ in a burned out basement
With the full moon in my eyes
I was hopin’ for replacement
When the sun burst though the sky
There was a band playin’ in my head
And I felt like getting high
I was thinkin’ about what a friend had said
I was hopin’ it was a lie
Thinkin’ about what a friend had said
I was hopin’ it was a lie

Well, I dreamed I saw the silver space ships flyin’
In the yellow haze of the sun
There were children cryin’ and colors flyin’
All around the chosen ones
All in a dream, all in a dream
The loadin’ had begun
Flying Mother Nature’s silver seed
To a new home in the sun
Flying Mother Nature’s silver seed
To a new home

Mick Taylor – Live At The Zeche, Bochum/Germany (1989)

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Michael Kevin Taylor (born 17 January 1949) is an English musician, best known as a former member of John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers (1967–69) and the Rolling Stones (1969–74). He has appeared on some of the Stones’ classic albums, including Let It Bleed (1969), Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert (1970), Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile on Main St. (1972).

Since leaving the Rolling Stones in December 1974, Taylor has worked with numerous other artists and released several solo albums. From November 2012 onwards he participated in the Stones’ 50th-Anniversary shows in London and Newark, and in the band’s 50 & Counting tour, which included North America, Glastonbury Festival and Hyde Park in 2013. The band decided to continue in 2014 with concerts in the UAE, Far East & Australia and Europe for the 14 On Fire tour. He was ranked 37th in Rolling Stone magazine’s 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time. Guns N’ Roses guitarist Slash states that Taylor had the biggest influence on him.

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Mick Taylor performed the lead guitar solo on the 1988 Joan Jett & the Blackhearts top-10 single, “I Hate Myself for Loving You.” Taylor guested with the Grateful Dead on 24 September 1988 at the last show of that year’s Madison Square Garden run in New York. Taylor lived in New York throughout the 1980s. He battled with addiction problems before getting back on track in the second half of the 1980s and moving to Los Angeles in 1990.[citation needed] During this time Taylor did session work and toured in Europe, America and Japan with a band including; [29] either Eric Parker or Bernard Purdie on drums Wilbur Bascomb on bass and Max Middleton (formerly of the Jeff Beck Group), Shane Fontayne, and Blondie Chaplin. In 1990, his CD Stranger in This Town was released by Maze Records, backed up by a mini-tour including the record release party at the Hard Rock Cafe as well as gigs at the Paradise Theater. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a superb and excellent audience tape from this period, another item from my audience tapes collection.

And we hear a great Mick Taylor with his beautiful blues guitar and a real good band … they set the place on fire .. includig a cover version of the ZZ Top song “Goin´ Down To Mexico” and a pretty good version of “Red House ”

And the last encore was a killer version of “Jumpin´ Jack Flash” …

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Personnel:
Wilbur Bascomb (bass)
Shayne Fontane (guitar)
Max Middleton
Eric Parker (drums)
Mick Taylor (leadguitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. I Wonder Why (You´re So Mean To Me) (Lyons) 5.51
02. Announcement 0.18
03. Laundromat Blues (King) 5.31
04. Leather Jacket (Taylor) 6.09
05. Goin´ Down To Mexico (Gibbons/Hill/Ham) 7.18
06. Redhouse (Hendrix) 10.18
07. Goin´South (Part 1) (Oden) 11.30
08. Goin´South (Part 2) (Oden) 6.19
09. Announcement 0.20
10. Blues In The Morning (King) 8.47
11. Little Red Rooster (Dixon) 5.52
12. Announcement 0.13
13. Boogie Man (King) 7.38
14. Stranger In Town (Taylor) 5.55
15. Jumpin´ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 6.12
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16. Live at the Zeche (uncut edition, Part 1) 47.20
17. Live at the Zeche (uncut edition, Part 2) 43.45

MC2A

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Scott McKenzie – San Francisco Remix `89 (1989)

FrontCover1Scott McKenzie (born Philip Wallach Blondheim III; January 10, 1939 – August 18, 2012) was an American singer and songwriter. He was best known for his 1967 hit single and generational anthem, “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”.

“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear [Some] Flowers in Your Hair)” is a psychedelic pop song, written by John Phillips (August 30, 1935 – March 18, 2001), and sung by Scott McKenzie. The song was produced and released in May 1967 by Phillips and Lou Adler, who used it to promote their Monterey International Pop Music Festival held in June of that year.

John Phillips played guitar on the recording and session musician Gary L. Coleman played orchestra bells and chimes. The bass guitar of the song was supplied by session musician Joe Osborn. Hal Blaine played drums. The song became one of the best-selling singles of the 1960s in the world, reaching the fourth position on the US charts and the number one spot on the UK charts. In Ireland, the song was number one for one week, in New Zealand the song spent five weeks at number one, and in Germany it was six weeks at number one.

Scott McKenzie

McKenzie’s version of the song has been called “the unofficial anthem of the counterculture movement of the 1960s, including the Hippie, Anti-Vietnam War and Flower power movements.”

According to Paul Ingles of NPR, “…local authorities in Monterey were starting to get cold feet over the prospect of their town being overrun by hippies. To smooth things over, Phillips wrote a song, “San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair).” Phillips reported writing the song in about 20 minutes.

The song, which tells the listeners, “If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair”, is credited with bringing thousands of young people to San Francisco, California, during the late 1960s.

Different issues of the recording use slightly different titles, including: “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”; “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Hair)”; and “San Francisco ‘Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair'”.

Released on May 13, 1967, the song was an instant hit. By the week ending July 1, 1967, it reached the number four spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, where it remained for four consecutive weeks. Meanwhile, the song rose to number one in the UK Singles Chart, and most of Europe. In July 1967, McKenzie’s previous record label, Capitol, claimed that the “follow-up” to this song was a re-release of his earlier single, “Look in Your Eyes.” The single is purported to have sold over seven million copies worldwide.In Central Europe, young people adopted “San Francisco” as an anthem, leading the song to be widely played during Czechoslovakia’s 1968 Prague Spring uprising.

John Phillips

The song has been featured in several films, including Frantic, The Rock, and Forrest Gump. It was also played occasionally by Led Zeppelin as part of the improvised section in the middle of “Dazed and Confused”. U2’s Bono also led the audience in singing this song during their PopMart performances in the San Francisco Bay Area on June 18 and 19, 1997. New Order covered the song on July 11, 2014, at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco. A cover of the song by Michael Marshall appears in the 2019 film The Last Black Man in San Francisco (wikipedia)

And CBS released a remix by Peter Slaghuis in 1989 :

Peter Slaghuis (21 August 1961 – 5 September 1991) was a Dutch DJ, producer and remixer, whose work was mostly released under the name Hithouse (a literal translation of his last name — slag, a hit, a beat; and huis, house).

Slaghuis was born in Rijswijk, Netherlands. He was a figure in the European dance music scene in the 1980s, producing popular remixes of various hits (most notably the “Long Vocal Dutch Mix” of “I Can’t Wait” by Nu Shooz). Slaghuis stated “I hated that song so much… I just had to put a hook over it.” With the arrival of house music in Europe, Slaghuis took up the pseudonym Hithouse and began using his sampling techniques in this field. His best known work, “Jack to the Sound of the Underground”, reached #14 on the UK Singles Chart in 1988. His next few works did not attain the same level of success, though “Jack to the Sound of the Underground” remained in public consciousness in the UK when used as the theme for both the radio and television versions of the BBC comedy show The Mary Whitehouse Experience.

Peter Slaghuis

He was part of the VideoKids group, which released the song “Woodpeckers from Space” in 1985, featuring Slaghuis in the video.

Slaghuis also delivered remixes to the Disco Mix Club which published them on their monthly and compilation CDs. One of his most famous mixes was Madonna’s “La Isla Bonita”. He also remixed Petula Clark’s “Downtown” as “Downtown ’88” which hit the British top 10 in December 1988.

Slaghuis’ career was cut short by his death, at the age of 30, in a car accident in 1991, when his car, traveling at a speed of 220 km/h (140 mph), crashed into an oncoming truck. (by wikipedia)

What a fucking and stupid cover version !

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Personnel:
Scott McKenzie
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some fucking overdubs

 

Tracklist:
01. San Franciasco Remix `89 (1) 4.46
02. San Franciasco Remix `89 (Original version) 2.55
03. San Franciasco Remix `89 (2) 3.00

Written by John Phillips

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Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe – Same (1989)

FrontCover1Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe were a progressive rock band active from 1988 to 1990 that comprised four past members of the English progressive rock band Yes. Singer Jon Anderson left Yes as he felt increasingly constrained by their commercial and pop-oriented direction in the 1980s. He began an album with other members from one of the band’s line-ups from the 1970s, namely guitarist Steve Howe, keyboardist Rick Wakeman, and drummer Bill Bruford, who invited Tony Levin to play bass.

The group released their sole studio album, Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe, in June 1989 which reached number 14 in the UK and number 30 in the US. Their 1989–90 world tour was well-received and spawned two live albums, An Evening of Yes Music Plus (1993) and Live at the NEC – Oct 24th 1989 (2012). In 1990, tracks for a second studio album were included with songs recorded by Yes to make the thirteenth Yes album, Union (1991). This marked the end of Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe and the start of the eight-member Yes formation until 1992, comprising Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe and Yes musicians Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Tony Kaye, and Alan White.

And “Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe” is the only studio album by the English progressive rock band Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe, released in June 1989 on Arista Records.

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The project began in 1988. At that time vocalist Jon Anderson had felt artistically constrained within Yes’s current format, where the songwriting of Trevor Rabin had taken the band in a commercially very successful but musically and lyrically different direction. Anderson regrouped with Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman and Bill Bruford. Bruford, who had at various times been a member of King Crimson, recruited his Crimson band mate Tony Levin as their bassist. The group was unable to use the name Yes for legal reasons. However, the group did have Arista assign the catalog number of 90126 to the original releases of the CD and cassette. This was a subtle way of stamping this as the next Yes album after 90125 (1983).

Pre-production recording took place at La Frette Studios near Paris with Anderson putting down an outline of much of the album’s songs with guitarist Milton McDonald. Anderson notably built on several demos provided by Howe, some of which Howe released on his solo album Homebrew (1996) and subsequent releases. Recording then relocated at AIR Studios on the island of Montserrat with Wakeman, Bruford and Levin. Most of the album was recorded using C-Lab’s Notator software.[2] Howe recorded his guitar parts separately at SARM West Studios in London. Mixing took place at Bearsville Studios in Bearsville, New York.

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The final section of “Brother of Mine” draws on an unrecorded Asia track “Long Lost Brother of Mine” written by Howe and Geoff Downes.

The song “Birthright” concerns the British nuclear tests at Maralinga and incorporates some material originally written by Howe and Max Bacon for their post-GTR band Nerotrend.

The song “Quartet” contains lyrical references to several classic Yes songs, such as “Long Distance Runaround”, “Roundabout” and others.

“Let’s Pretend” was originally composed by Anderson and Vangelis in 1986 for their Jon and Vangelis project and rearranged as a voice and guitar duet for Anderson and Howe.

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The artwork for the album was created by artist Roger Dean, known for designing album covers for Yes in the 1970s. It features two paintings, the front titled “Blue Desert” and the back titled “Red Desert”. Most releases of this album represent only a truncated version of “Blue Desert”. There was, however, a special release with a gatefold cover, though “Blue Desert” was horizontally inverted in that version.

The album was released on 20 June 1989. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe peaked at number 14 on the UK Album Chart and number 30 in the US. It went on to reach the top 30 in Canada, Switzerland, Germany, France, Norway, and Sweden. On August 30, 1989, the album was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for selling 500,000 copies in the US. Yes biographer Chris Welch wrote the album sold approximately 750,000 copies. “Brother of Mine” released as an edited single and peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. Its music video was directed by Storm Thorgerson.

Singles

The album was re-released in a remastered limited edition by Gonzo Multimedia on 18 March 2011, with a bonus CD with extra tracks, including alternate edits and live versions of tracks on the main album, as well as “Vultures in the City” (originally titled “Vultures” and previously available only as the b-side to the “Brother of Mine” 7-inch vinyl and CD single). This edition was initially only available only from Gonzo …  (by wikipedia)

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File under “Yes.” When this version of the band couldn’t obtain rights to the name, they put their album out under their combined names, but it’s still Yes by any other name. Jon Anderson’s tenor wails through spacy lyrics, Rick Wakeman constructs cathedrals of synthesized sound, Steve Howe rips high-pitched guitar leads, and Bill Bruford makes his drums sound like timpani. For all that, it’s a pedestrian effort for these veterans, not as bombastic as some of their stuff, not as inspired as others, but it definitely has the “Yes” sound. “She Gives Me Love” even refers to “Long Distance Runaround.” (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Jon Anderson (vocals)
Bill Bruford (drums, percussion)
Steve Howe (guitar)
Rick Wakeman (keyboards)
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Matt Clifford (keyboards, programming, orchestration, vocals)
Tony Levin (bass, chapman stick, vocals)
Milton McDonald (guitar)
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background vocals:
The Oxford Circus Singers:
Deborah Anderson – Tessa Niles – Carol Kenyon – Frank Dunnery

J.M.C. Singers:
Jon – Matt – Chris

Emerald Isle Community Singers + In Seine Singers

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Themes 5.58
01.1. Sound (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
01.2.Second Attention (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
01.3. Soul Warrior

02. Fist Of Fire (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 3.32

03. Brother Of Mine 10.24
03.1. The Big Dream (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
03.2. Nothing Can Come Between Us (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
03.3. Long Lost Brother Of Mine (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Downes)

04. Birthright (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Bacon) 6.07
05. The Meeting (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 4.26

06. Quartet 9.25
06.1. I Wanna Learn (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
06.2. She Gives Me Love (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Dowling)
06.3. Who Was the First (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
06.4. I’m Alive (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)

07. Teakbois (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 7.44

08. Order Of The Universe 9.02
08.1. Order Theme (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
08.2. Rock Gives Courage (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Lawrence)
08.3. It’s So Hard To Grow (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)
08.4. The Universe (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford)

09. Let’s Pretend (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Vangelis) 2.56

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CD 2:
01. Rick Wakeman Intro’s (Wakeman) 2.52
02. Brother Of Mine (Edit) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Downes) 6.32
03. Brother Of Mine (Radio Edit) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 3.24
04. Vultures In The City (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 5.55
05. Order Of The Universe (Edit) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Lawrence) 4.53
06. Order Of The Universe (Long Edit) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Lawrence) 6.03
07. Quartet (I’m Alive) (Single Edit) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 3.18
08. Brother Of Mine (Live) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Downes) 10.52
09. And You And I (Live) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 10.34
10. Order Of The Universe (Live) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford/Lawrence) 9.42
11. Children Of Light (Bonus track) (Anderson/Howe/Wakeman/Bruford) 5.00

CD1+2

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Brendan Croker And The 5 O´Clock Shadows – Same (1989)

FrontCover1Born. 15 August 1953, Bradford, Yorkshire, England. Croker studied sculpture at art school before becoming a British Rail guard, a refuse collector, and a theatre set designer. It was while toiling away at the last job that he met fellow guitarist Steve Phillips, with whom he formed the duo Nev And Norris. During the early 80s, when Phillips temporarily retired from music to concentrate on his own art career, Croker set about assembling his own band, the 5 O’Clock Shadows, comprising Croker, Marcus Cliffe (bass), and Mark Cresswell (guitar). Cresswell also played alongside Tanita Tikaram. The 5 O’Clock Shadow’s debut, A Close Shave, emerged on the Leeds independent label Unamerican Activities, and was promoted with the single ‘That’s The Way All My Money Goes’ in 1986. They moved to Red Rhino but released an album and single before that company ceased trading. Croker gained a high profile for his work with Mark Knopfler, Guy Fletcher and Steve Phillips as the Notting Hillbillies and was signed to Andrew Lauder’s Silvertone label. In 1989, the Notting Hillbillies released a self-titled album, with guest appearances by Tikaram, Eric Clapton, Steve Goulding and Katie Kissoon (of Mac And Katie Kissoon) amongst others. Croker and Cresswell also guested on Tikaram’s Ancient Heart. Croker enjoyed some success in Nashville as a songwriter during the 90s, writing ‘What It Takes’ for Wynonna’s debut album. His solo career, meanwhile, has continued to follow an eccentric path.

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For his major-label debut, Silvertone Records threw a lot of resources at Brendan Croker, including a hefty production budget that allowed Brendan Croker & the Five O’Clock Shadows to feature a gaggle of session musicians. This turns out to be a bit of a mixed blessing — the opening number, “No Money at All,” is so dominated by the guitar of Mark Knopfler that it sounds like a lost Dire Straits track rather than the work of a new artist. Fortunately, after that Croker is allowed to bring more of his own sound to the fore, and while the gentle picking of Dire Straits is certainly one reference point to that sound, there are many others throughout this album. Obvious influences range from Woody BrendanCroker02Guthrie to John Hartford or Pete Seeger in terms of lyrical content, and from Northern soul to American country to Yorkshire folk in terms of music. Being a Brit who writes largely about social injustice has also earned Croker a number of comparisons to Billy Bragg, although musically Croker has a much wider-ranging palette. He gets to show this off to good effect on Brendan Croker & the Five O’Clock Shadows, jumping between bluesy numbers (“This Kind of Life,” “That’s Why I’m Leaving Here”) and mellow country tunes (“Just an Old Waltz”), as well as rearranging a traditional folk song (“All Mixed Up”) into a smoldering soul workout. While the production by John Porter may be a little too slick for longtime Croker fans who are used to a rawer mix, this well-written, eclectic album will serve as an excellent introduction for anyone who has heard Croker as a member of the Notting Hillbillies and wants to further explore the genesis of that band’s polished-but-rootsy sound. (by K.A. Scott)

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Personnel:
Mark Cresswell (guitar)
Brendan Croker (guitar, vocals, banjo on 12., slide-guitar)
Marcus Cliffe (bass)
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Eric Clapton (vocals on 08.)
Alan Clark (organ)
Martin Drover (trumpet)
Molly Duncan (saxophone)
Guy Fletcher (piano on 05., bass on 01., keyboards, bass on 01., drums on 11., strings on 06., 10. + 11.)
Steve Goulding (drums)
Preston Heyman (percussion)
Mark Knopfler (guitar on 01.)
Rob Mason (harmonica on 07.)
Steve Phillips (vocals on 11.)
John Porter (guitar on 09., slide guitar on 03., programming on 07. + 12., drums on 13.)
Neil Sidwell (trombone)
Tanita Tikaram (harmony vocals on 06.)
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background vocals on 03.:
Katie Kissoon – Tessa Niles

Inlet02A.jpgTracklist:
01. No Money At All 3.37
02. You Don’t Need Me Here 3.25
03. Shine On 4.25
04. This Man 3.10
05. Wrong Decision 3.56
06. That’s Why I’m Leaving Here 2.23
07. All Mixed Up 3.36
08. This Kind Of Life 3.17
09. My Government 3.10
10. Ain’t Gonna Smile 3.10
11. Just An Old Waltz 2.57
12. Mister 4.15

All songs written by Brendan Croker except 07, which was a Traditional

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I got this wonderful from album from the greygoose … Thank you very much !

Sinéad O’Connor – I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got (1990)

FrontCover1.jpgI Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got is the second album by Irish singer Sinéad O’Connor, released in March 1990 on Ensign/Chrysalis Records. It contains O’Connor’s version of the Prince song “Nothing Compares 2 U”, which was released as a single and reached number one in multiple countries. The album was nominated for four Grammy Awards in 1991, including Record of the Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, and Best Music Video, Short Form for “Nothing Compares 2 U”, winning the award for Best Alternative Music Performance. However, O’Connor refused to accept the nominations and award.

The critically acclaimed album contains O’Connor’s most famous single, “Nothing Compares 2 U”, which was one of the best selling singles in the world in 1990, topping the charts in many countries including the United States, United Kingdom and Canada. This rendition of the Prince song reflected on O’Connor’s mother who lost her life in an auto accident five years earlier.[5][6] The single “Emperor’s New Clothes” found more moderate success, although it did top the Modern Rock Tracks chart in the US.

The album includes O’Connor’s rendition of “I Am Stretched on Your Grave”, an anonymous 17th century poem, originally written in Irish and translated into English by Frank O’Connor and composed by musician Philip King in 1979.[7][8] The first song on the album, “Feel So Different”, starts with The Serenity Prayer by Reinhold Niebuhr.

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The inner sleeve notes acknowledge Kabbalah teacher, Warren Kenton: “Special thanks to Selina Marshall + Warren Kenton for showing me that all I’d need was inside me.”

I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got received critical acclaim. In 2003, the album was ranked number 406 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.(by wikipedia)

I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got became Sinéad O’Connor’s popular breakthrough on the strength of the stunning Prince cover “Nothing Compares 2 U,” which topped the pop charts for a month. But even its remarkable intimacy wasn’t adequate preparation for the harrowing confessionals that composed the majority of the album. Informed by her stormy relationship with drummer John Reynolds, who fathered O’Connor’s first child before the couple broke up, I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got lays the singer’s psyche startlingly and sometimes uncomfortably bare.

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The songs mostly address relationships with parents, children, and (especially) lovers, through which O’Connor weaves a stubborn refusal to be defined by anyone but herself. In fact, the album is almost too personal and cathartic to draw the listener in close, since O’Connor projects such turmoil and offers such specific detail. Her confrontational openness makes it easy to overlook O’Connor’s musical versatility. Granted, not all of the music is as brilliantly audacious as “I Am Stretched on Your Grave,” which marries a Frank O’Connor poem to eerie Celtic melodies and a James Brown “Funky Drummer” sample. But the album plays like a tour de force in its demonstration of everything O’Connor can do: dramatic orchestral ballads, intimate confessionals, catchy pop/rock, driving guitar rock, and protest folk, not to mention the nearly six-minute a cappella title track. What’s consistent throughout is the frighteningly strong emotion O’Connor brings to bear on the material, while remaining sensitive to each piece’s individual demands. Aside from being a brilliant album in its own right, I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got foreshadowed the rise of deeply introspective female singer/songwriters like Tori Amos and Sarah McLachlan, who were more traditionally feminine and connected with a wider audience. Which takes nothing away from anyone; if anything, it’s evidence that, when on top of her game, O’Connor was a singular talent. (by Steve Huey)

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Personnel:
David Munday (guitar, piano)
Philip King (background vocals)
Sinéad O’Connor (vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion, programming)
Marco Pirroni (guitar)
John Reynolds (drums)
Andy Rourke (guitar, bass)
Steve Wickham (fiddle)
Jah Wobble (bass)
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unknown orchestra conducted by Nick Ingman

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Tracklist:
01. Feel So Different (O’Connor) 6.48
02. I Am Stretched On Your Grave (Anonymous/King) 5.33
03. Three Babies (O’Connor) 4.47
04. The Emperor’s New Clothes (O’Connor) 5.16
05. Black Boys On Mopeds (O’Connor) 3.53
06. Nothing Compares 2 U (Prince) 5.11
07. Jump In The River (O’Connor/Pirroni) 4.13
08. You Cause As Much Sorrow (O’Connor) 5.05
09. The Last Day Of Our Acquaintance (O’Connor) 4.40
10. I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got (O’Connor) 5.47

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Cliff Richard – Stronger (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgStronger is the twenty-sixth studio album by British singer Cliff Richard, released in October 1989. The album was produced by Alan Tarney and includes the singles “The Best of Me”(UK #2), “I Just Don’t Have the Heart” (UK #3), “Lean On You” (UK #17) and “Stronger Than That” (UK #14). The album reached Platinum,[3] peaking at number 7 in the UK Albums Chart. (by wikipedia)

The 30th anniversary of Cliff Richard’s entry into the music industry was marked in 1988, and the year fittingly found him experiencing one of his most successful spells ever. “Mistletoe and Ivory” became the biggest-selling single of the year, while the follow-up, the number two hit “The Best of Me,” established him as the first British artist to release 100 singles. The Private Collection 1979-1988, a compilation of a decade’s worth of hits, topped the chart, and Stronger, the first new album of his fourth decade, was to spin off no less than four hit singles, including “Just Don’t Have the Heart,” a dynamic collaboration with producers Stock, Aitken & Waterman. The album itself represents one of the most eclectic of Richard’s entire career, a fact signposted by his union with British reggae band Aswad for the wonderful “Share a Dream.”

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The aforementioned “The Best of Me” stands as one of the loveliest ballads he’d cut in years, and if Stronger has any serious shortcomings, it’s the reliance on machines, not men, for the drum sounds. Even at his weakest, Richard’s records had rarely lacked for emotion, but the robotic percussion saps the soul from far too much of the music. Indeed, if the selection of songs had been any weaker, Stronger might well have collapsed altogether. Instead, the likes of “Everybody Knows,” “Better Day,” and “Lean on You” conspire to raise it so high that many fans regard Stronger as one of the strongest of all Richard’s post-Shadows albums. (Dave Thompson)

Okay … But now … I need something that really rocks !

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Personnel:
John Clark (guitar)
Mark Griffiths (bass)
Paul Moessl (synthesizer on 17., drum programming)
Cliff Richard (vocals)
Alan Tarney (guitar, keyboards, drums)
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Keith Bessey (drum programming on 03., 08. + 13.)
Dave Bishop (saxophone)
Steve Laurie (guitar on 17.)
Alan Park (piano on 17.)
Henry Spinetti (drums on 17.)
Mike Stock (keyboards, drum programming on 07. + 14.)
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background vocals:
Keith Murrell – Mae McKenna – Mick Mullins – Miriam Stockley – Peter Howarth – Sonia Morgan
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Aswas (all instruments on 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Stronger Than That (Tarney) 4.42
02. Who’s In Love (Tarney) 4.32
03. The Best Of Me (Foster/Lubbock/Marx) 4.11
04. Clear Blue Skies (Cooke/Turner) 2.54
05. Lean On You (Tarney) 5.00
06. Keep Me Warm (Tarney) 4.26
07. I Just Don’t Have The Heart (Stock/Aitken/Waterman) 3.27
08. Joanna (Eaton) 3.53
09. Everybody Knows (Tarney) 3.47
10. Forever You Will Be Mine (Tarney) 4.22
11. Better Day (Tarney) 4.50
12. Share A Dream (Trott/Sweet/Osborne) 4.30
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13. Wide Open Space (Walmesley/Abbot) 4.38
14. I Just Don’t Have the Heart (instrumental version) (Stock/Aitken/Waterman) 4.01
15. Hey Mister (Tarney) 3.56
16. Lindsay Jane (Richard) 4.44
17. Marmaduke (Spencer/Tarney) 5.28

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Pentangle – So Early In The Spring (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgSo Early in the Spring is the ninth album by Pentangle.

Pentangle had become a bit like Steeleye Span by the 1990s, a legacy from which the key members, however high they might fly in their solo careers, would never entirely escape. Hence, Bert Jansch and Jacqui McShee cut this record with a new lineup featuring ex-Lindisfarne co-founder Rod Clements (electric guitar, mandolin), ex-Fairport Convention Gerry Conway (drums), and Nigel Portman-Smith (bass, keyboards). McShee’s voice has the purity, if not the power and range, that she displayed on the band’s classic sides, and Jansch and company can play as well as ever. And they still have an original approach to the folk repertory — “So Early In the Spring” is offered in a tempo that makes it lope along while McShee’s singing soars above it. The only drawback on the harder-rocking sides is Conway’s drumming, which is too prominent. McShee’s performance on “The Blacksmith” is laced with poignancy as well as virtuosity, and Jansch sings superbly on “Reynardine” — and when their voices join together on the last verse, the listener’s spine may tingle in pleasure.

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Clements takes a fine, rippling solo on “Bramble Briar”; the group shows off its acoustic side on the cautionary folk number “Lassie Gathering Nuts”; and “Gaea” presents a more modern, pop-jazz sound, which was very much a part of the original group’s orientation. It would be nice to report that the epic “The Baron of Brackley” ended the album well, but it lacks enough invention to sustain its eight-minute length. Tony Roberts guests on flute and whistle for several tracks, adding another sound to this welcome mix of folk-rock. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Rod Clements (mandolin, guitar)
Gerry Conway (drums, percussion)
Bert Jansch (guitar, vocals(
Jacqui McShee (vocals)
Nigel Portman Smith (keyboards, bass)

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Tracklist:
01. So Early In The Spring (Traditional) 5.40
02. The Blacksmith (Traditional) 3.23
03. Reynardine (Traditional) 4.21
04. Eminstra (Clements/Conway/Jansch/McShee/Portman-Smith) 3.58
05. Lucky Black Cat (Clements/Conway/Jansch/McShee/Portman-Smith) 3.17
06. Bramble Briar (Traditional) 5.54
07. Lassie Gathering Nuts (Traditional) 5.03
08. Gaea (Traditional) 4.47
09. The Baron O’ Brackley (Traditional) 7.45

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Pascal Rogé – After The Rain – The Soft Sound Of Eric Satie (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgPascal Rogé (born 6 April 1951) is a French pianist.

His playing includes the works of compatriot composers Saint-Saëns, Fauré, Debussy, Ravel, Satie, and Poulenc, among others. However, his repertoire also covers the German and Austrian masters Haydn, Mozart, Brahms, and Beethoven.

Rogé first appearance in public was in 1960 with a performance of Claude Debussy’s Préludes. He won the piano prize at the Paris Conservatory and worked for several years with Julius Katchen. At seventeen, he gave his first recitals in major European cities, landing an exclusive contract with Decca in the process. He has a particular affinity with French composers such as Claude Debussy, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Ravel and Francis Poulenc. He also performs chamber works, with the Pasquier Trio, and with musicians such as Pierre Amoyal or Michel Portal, with whom he recorded Poulenc and Tchaikovsky. He gives recitals worldwide, in all the major centres. A friend of conductor Charles Dutoit, he was regularly invited to Canada to work with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra while Dutoit was conductor there.

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In 2011 he and his wife Ami premiered the Concerto for Two Pianos by the Australian composer Matthew Hindson, which was commissioned to celebrate their recent wedding. (by wikipedia)

If you think the title After the Rain is silly, wait until you get to the subtitle: “The Soft Sounds of Erik Satie.” Oh, well, never mind titles and subtitles: it is ultimately the music and performance that make or break the disc and, in this case, the music and performances are both superb. Satie was, of course, the utterly unclassifiable composer who wrote pieces that are easy and hard, cold and hot, ironic and sentimental, ancient and modern, sublime and mundane. Pascal Rogé is, of course, the French pianist with a virtuoso technique (which, in a French pianist, is rare), a beautiful tone (which, in a French pianist, is typical), and superb taste (which, in a French pianist, is inevitable). In this set of Gymnopedies, Gnossiennnes, Nocturnes, and other short and improbably named works, Rogé shows that tone and taste triumph over technique, that is, that Rogé plays with precisely voluptuous tone and objectively subjective taste, but wholly without drawing attention to himself. The result is one of the best Satie recordings ever made. Decca’s ’90s digital sound was as warm and cool as the music itself. (by James Leonard)

Pascal Roge02.jpgIf you do not like instrumental, piano, slow, acoustic, older-than-you, or non-beat driven music then you may not like this disc; but then you might (but probably not). Hidden in Satie’s “classical” music are hints of jazz, new age, and ambient. I am prejudiced toward ambient jazz and Satie may have been the first to give us a glimpse of its future almost a century before. This recording is consistently smoothe, well engineered, and flawlessly performed. Each note is given its own space and invites you to savor each individual tone. Some of the pieces have melody lines; others seem to be random, sometimes progressive, series of notes/tones (sonorous, in any event). On the easy listening scale between ponderable/contemplative and zoned-out/trance-inducing at the extremes this disc falls in the middle of the spectrum and roams freely over the relaxation and meditation spheres. I placed this disc within my top ten favorite listens, right up there with with Pachelbel’s Canon (Kolbialka’s extended version), Twin Peaks, Scheherezade, Leonard Cohen (More Best of), Chet Atkins (Master and his Music), Nightingale’s Light Dance, Windham Hill’s Impressionists sampler, Oystein Sevag’s Visual, and another take on Satie’s Gymnopedies (Kolbialka’s extended version). (byLarry Deemer)

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Eric Satie’s [1866-1926] music is all over the map regarding quality and appeal – from gregarious, borderline-annoying, player-piano-like music to his more famous, luminescent, nocturnal slow masterpieces featured on this CD (without the former). Personally, I have little ear for the burlesque-inspired music on other Satie collections, so this compilation has found a nice niche in my collection for frequent playing when quiet, meditative music is in order (yes, often to help get to sleep assisted by the soothing Gymnopedies).

The sound quality of this CD is very rich and vivid as is Pascal Roge’s playing, with beautiful, bell-like sustained notes from Roge’s Steinway. What I most appreciated is his well-conceived tempos of these pieces – which for some reason suffer from too-slow, dirge-like tempos in other recordinds that strip the music of much of its life and enriching effects (as I find in fellow Frenchman, Jean Yves Thibaudet’s Decca recording – fitting for a funeral – why so slow?!)

In contrast, Roge to me finds the sweet-spot tempo and infuses these works with a subtle vibrancy in his tempos and colorations that allow the pieces to maintain constant interest to the listener and effect their simple magic. The highest Satie collection recommendation. (by Alan Lekan)

Music for the quiet moments in life …

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Personnel:
Pascal Rogé (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Gymnopédie No. 1 3.08
02. Gymnopédie No. 2 2.30
03. Gymnopédie No. 3 2.31
04. Gnossienne No. 1 3.41
05. Gnossienne No. 2 2.30
06. Gnossienne No. 3 3.08
07. Gnossienne No. 4 3.29
08. Gnossienne No. 5 4.02
09. Gnossienne No. 6 1.51
10. Nocturne I 3.17
11. Nocturne II 2.04
12. Nocturne III 3.03
13. Nocturne IV 2.55
14. Nocturne V 1.54
15. Avant-Dernieres Pensées 3.42
15.1 I Idylle, À Debussy
15.2 II Aubade, À Paul Dukas
15.3 III Meditation, À Albert Roussel
16. Pieces Froides – Trois Airs À Fuir 8.58
17. Pieces Froides – Trois Danses De Travers 6.26
18. Deux Reveries Nocturnes 3.20
19. Prélude De La Porte Héroïque Du Ciel 4.30

Music composed by Eric Satie

Tracks 1-9, 13 recorded in 1984.
Tracks 10-12, 14-19 recorded in 1989

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