Pentangle – So Early In The Spring (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgSo Early in the Spring is the ninth album by Pentangle.

Pentangle had become a bit like Steeleye Span by the 1990s, a legacy from which the key members, however high they might fly in their solo careers, would never entirely escape. Hence, Bert Jansch and Jacqui McShee cut this record with a new lineup featuring ex-Lindisfarne co-founder Rod Clements (electric guitar, mandolin), ex-Fairport Convention Gerry Conway (drums), and Nigel Portman-Smith (bass, keyboards). McShee’s voice has the purity, if not the power and range, that she displayed on the band’s classic sides, and Jansch and company can play as well as ever. And they still have an original approach to the folk repertory — “So Early In the Spring” is offered in a tempo that makes it lope along while McShee’s singing soars above it. The only drawback on the harder-rocking sides is Conway’s drumming, which is too prominent. McShee’s performance on “The Blacksmith” is laced with poignancy as well as virtuosity, and Jansch sings superbly on “Reynardine” — and when their voices join together on the last verse, the listener’s spine may tingle in pleasure.

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Clements takes a fine, rippling solo on “Bramble Briar”; the group shows off its acoustic side on the cautionary folk number “Lassie Gathering Nuts”; and “Gaea” presents a more modern, pop-jazz sound, which was very much a part of the original group’s orientation. It would be nice to report that the epic “The Baron of Brackley” ended the album well, but it lacks enough invention to sustain its eight-minute length. Tony Roberts guests on flute and whistle for several tracks, adding another sound to this welcome mix of folk-rock. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Rod Clements (mandolin, guitar)
Gerry Conway (drums, percussion)
Bert Jansch (guitar, vocals(
Jacqui McShee (vocals)
Nigel Portman Smith (keyboards, bass)

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Tracklist:
01. So Early In The Spring (Traditional) 5.40
02. The Blacksmith (Traditional) 3.23
03. Reynardine (Traditional) 4.21
04. Eminstra (Clements/Conway/Jansch/McShee/Portman-Smith) 3.58
05. Lucky Black Cat (Clements/Conway/Jansch/McShee/Portman-Smith) 3.17
06. Bramble Briar (Traditional) 5.54
07. Lassie Gathering Nuts (Traditional) 5.03
08. Gaea (Traditional) 4.47
09. The Baron O’ Brackley (Traditional) 7.45

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Pascal Rogé – After The Rain – The Soft Sound Of Eric Satie (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgPascal Rogé (born 6 April 1951) is a French pianist.

His playing includes the works of compatriot composers Saint-Saëns, Fauré, Debussy, Ravel, Satie, and Poulenc, among others. However, his repertoire also covers the German and Austrian masters Haydn, Mozart, Brahms, and Beethoven.

Rogé first appearance in public was in 1960 with a performance of Claude Debussy’s Préludes. He won the piano prize at the Paris Conservatory and worked for several years with Julius Katchen. At seventeen, he gave his first recitals in major European cities, landing an exclusive contract with Decca in the process. He has a particular affinity with French composers such as Claude Debussy, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Ravel and Francis Poulenc. He also performs chamber works, with the Pasquier Trio, and with musicians such as Pierre Amoyal or Michel Portal, with whom he recorded Poulenc and Tchaikovsky. He gives recitals worldwide, in all the major centres. A friend of conductor Charles Dutoit, he was regularly invited to Canada to work with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra while Dutoit was conductor there.

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In 2011 he and his wife Ami premiered the Concerto for Two Pianos by the Australian composer Matthew Hindson, which was commissioned to celebrate their recent wedding. (by wikipedia)

If you think the title After the Rain is silly, wait until you get to the subtitle: “The Soft Sounds of Erik Satie.” Oh, well, never mind titles and subtitles: it is ultimately the music and performance that make or break the disc and, in this case, the music and performances are both superb. Satie was, of course, the utterly unclassifiable composer who wrote pieces that are easy and hard, cold and hot, ironic and sentimental, ancient and modern, sublime and mundane. Pascal Rogé is, of course, the French pianist with a virtuoso technique (which, in a French pianist, is rare), a beautiful tone (which, in a French pianist, is typical), and superb taste (which, in a French pianist, is inevitable). In this set of Gymnopedies, Gnossiennnes, Nocturnes, and other short and improbably named works, Rogé shows that tone and taste triumph over technique, that is, that Rogé plays with precisely voluptuous tone and objectively subjective taste, but wholly without drawing attention to himself. The result is one of the best Satie recordings ever made. Decca’s ’90s digital sound was as warm and cool as the music itself. (by James Leonard)

Pascal Roge02.jpgIf you do not like instrumental, piano, slow, acoustic, older-than-you, or non-beat driven music then you may not like this disc; but then you might (but probably not). Hidden in Satie’s “classical” music are hints of jazz, new age, and ambient. I am prejudiced toward ambient jazz and Satie may have been the first to give us a glimpse of its future almost a century before. This recording is consistently smoothe, well engineered, and flawlessly performed. Each note is given its own space and invites you to savor each individual tone. Some of the pieces have melody lines; others seem to be random, sometimes progressive, series of notes/tones (sonorous, in any event). On the easy listening scale between ponderable/contemplative and zoned-out/trance-inducing at the extremes this disc falls in the middle of the spectrum and roams freely over the relaxation and meditation spheres. I placed this disc within my top ten favorite listens, right up there with with Pachelbel’s Canon (Kolbialka’s extended version), Twin Peaks, Scheherezade, Leonard Cohen (More Best of), Chet Atkins (Master and his Music), Nightingale’s Light Dance, Windham Hill’s Impressionists sampler, Oystein Sevag’s Visual, and another take on Satie’s Gymnopedies (Kolbialka’s extended version). (byLarry Deemer)

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Eric Satie’s [1866-1926] music is all over the map regarding quality and appeal – from gregarious, borderline-annoying, player-piano-like music to his more famous, luminescent, nocturnal slow masterpieces featured on this CD (without the former). Personally, I have little ear for the burlesque-inspired music on other Satie collections, so this compilation has found a nice niche in my collection for frequent playing when quiet, meditative music is in order (yes, often to help get to sleep assisted by the soothing Gymnopedies).

The sound quality of this CD is very rich and vivid as is Pascal Roge’s playing, with beautiful, bell-like sustained notes from Roge’s Steinway. What I most appreciated is his well-conceived tempos of these pieces – which for some reason suffer from too-slow, dirge-like tempos in other recordinds that strip the music of much of its life and enriching effects (as I find in fellow Frenchman, Jean Yves Thibaudet’s Decca recording – fitting for a funeral – why so slow?!)

In contrast, Roge to me finds the sweet-spot tempo and infuses these works with a subtle vibrancy in his tempos and colorations that allow the pieces to maintain constant interest to the listener and effect their simple magic. The highest Satie collection recommendation. (by Alan Lekan)

Music for the quiet moments in life …

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Personnel:
Pascal Rogé (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Gymnopédie No. 1 3.08
02. Gymnopédie No. 2 2.30
03. Gymnopédie No. 3 2.31
04. Gnossienne No. 1 3.41
05. Gnossienne No. 2 2.30
06. Gnossienne No. 3 3.08
07. Gnossienne No. 4 3.29
08. Gnossienne No. 5 4.02
09. Gnossienne No. 6 1.51
10. Nocturne I 3.17
11. Nocturne II 2.04
12. Nocturne III 3.03
13. Nocturne IV 2.55
14. Nocturne V 1.54
15. Avant-Dernieres Pensées 3.42
15.1 I Idylle, À Debussy
15.2 II Aubade, À Paul Dukas
15.3 III Meditation, À Albert Roussel
16. Pieces Froides – Trois Airs À Fuir 8.58
17. Pieces Froides – Trois Danses De Travers 6.26
18. Deux Reveries Nocturnes 3.20
19. Prélude De La Porte Héroïque Du Ciel 4.30

Music composed by Eric Satie

Tracks 1-9, 13 recorded in 1984.
Tracks 10-12, 14-19 recorded in 1989

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The Pasadena Roof Orchestra – Live – Steppin’ Out (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Pasadena Roof Orchestra was formed in Nov. 1969 by Johnny Arthy, a lover of 1920’s jazz who sought to lead a dance-oriented jazz-influenced big band specializing in music from the 1923-37 period. The British band gained its name because Arthy liked the obscure song “Pasadena.” The orchestra had its first gig in April 1970 and soon Arthy came across a windfall, 1, 500 original arrangements from the 1920’s practically given away by an elderly lady whose father had been musical director of a dance band in the twenties. The P.R.O. started out playing once a week but, after the success of their first album in 1974, they turned professional and began working much more often. A European tour in 1975 added to the group’s momentum and since then they have worked constantly and recorded fairly regularly (in the early days for Transatlantic and later on mostly for their own P.R.O. label). No famous soloists are among their alumni since the Pasadena Roof Orchestra is very much a dance band, but the group has long featured colorful ensembles, period vocals and brief individual spots, very much in the early pre-swing style which they treat with great respect. (by Scott Yanow)

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Somehow, there’s an added buzz to a live concert which is rarely captured in the recording studio, and so it is here. Recorded 30 years ago, and playing numbers from over 60 years earlier, this CD sounds more fresh and up-to-date than some of yesterday’s pop songs. The songs recall such artists as Al Bowlly, Don Redman, Duke Ellington, Billy Cotton, Frankie Trumbauer, Bunny Berigan, Bix Beiderbecke and Cab Calloway. Sound quality is excellent, and this is a great memento. (Barry McCanna)

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Personnel:
John Arthy (bass, sousaphone)
Robert Fowler (clarinet, saxophone)
Duncan Galloway (vocals)
Keith Gemmell (clarinet, saxophone, vocals)
Michael Henry (trumpet)
Michael Holmes (piano, vocals)
Andrew Pummell (clarinet, saxophone)
Stephen Shaw (trombone)
John Sutton (drums)
Enrico Tomasso (trumpet, vocals)
Peter Warren (banjo, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Who Walks in When I Walk Out? (Goodhart/Hoffman) 3.13
02. My Melancholy Baby (Burnett/Norton) 3.25
03. How’m I Doin’? (Hey, Hey!) (Fowler/Redman) 2.44
04. Creole Love Call (Ellington) 4.25
05. Sahara (Frederick) 3.31
06. Skirts (Roberts) 2.58
07. Pennies From Heaven (Burke/Johnston) 4.03
08. Latin From Manhattan (Dubin/Warren) 3.35
09. Business in F (Bleyer) 4.08
10. I Can’t Get Started (Duke/Gershwin) 5.04
11. Louisiana (Johnson/Razaf/Schafer) 3.42
12. Golden Wedding (Marie) 5.22
13. I Only Have Eyes for You (Dubin/Warren) 5.08
14. Minnie The Moocher (Calloway/Gaskill/Mills) 5.00
15. Steppin’ Out With My Baby (Berlin) 3.09
16. Pasadena (Clarke/Leslie/Warren) 1.54

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Lennie Niehaus – Plays The Blues (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgLenny Niehaus (born June 1, 1929) is an excellent altoist and jazz arranger in the 1950s (most notably for Stan Kenton), Lennie Niehaus in more recent times won fame for his work scoring the music for Clint Eastwood films. After graduating from college, Niehaus played alto and occasionally wrote for Kenton (1951-1952) before being drafted for the Army (1952-1954). Upon his discharge, Kenton welcomed Niehaus back and he worked for the bandleader on and off for the rest of the decade. Niehaus, who led and played alto on six albums between 1954-1957 (five for Contemporary), had a cool tone a bit reminiscent of Lee Konitz. By the 1960s, his playing had gone by the wayside as Niehaus concentrated on writing for films. Although he largely left jazz at that time, his work on Play Misty for Me, and particularly Bird for Clint Eastwood, allowed one to once again admire his jazz writing. (by Scott Yanow)

And here´s a very rare and very speical album by Lennie Niehaus:

These hip, swinging etudes in the swing/bop style are a great source for blues and bebop licks and fun to play! Lennie wrote these specifically to be played with the tracks from Jamey’s Vol.42 “”Blues In All Keys.”” There is one complete solo (etude) for each of the 12 keys and 12 tracks.

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This book of solos is also great jazz sight reading material, since it contains all of the most-used jazz rhythms and syncopation you’ll ever encounter. Perfect for Learning your way around The Blues – even in the tough keys! Students and teachers alike will enjoy playing these musical, lyrical jazz solos with or without the exhilarating accompaniment of the Vol. 42 Play-A-Long. The CD incudes complete performances of each solo by Lennie with a piano, bass, drum rhythm section (from the Volume 42 “”Blues In All Keys”” Play-a-long)so that you can absorb and internalize proper jazz sound and feel. (by abebooks.co.uk)

Unfortunately I don´t have the book … but the CD … and if you like the bluesy sound of a saxophone (like I do) … you´ll find on this album excellent music, recorded by a master of his own !

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Personnel:
Bob Cranshaw (bass)
Lennie Niehaus (saxophone)
Mickey Roker (drums)
James Williams (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Tuning notes 0.55
02. B♭ blues : Blues ‘n Bossa 3.52
03. B blues : Blue funk 4.27
04. C blues : By The Book 4.18
05. D♭ blues : Blue blood 3.35
06. D blues : Head Over Heels 4.09
07. E♭ blues : True Blue 3.53
08. E blues : Sixth Sense 4.46
09. F blues : The Time Of Your Life 3.59
10. F♯ blues : Nouveau nova 3.51
11. G blues : Well And Good 4.07
12. A♭ blues : Easy Come, Easy Go 3.55
13. A blues : Slow But Sure 3.28

Music composed by Lennie Niehaus

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Billy Joel – Storm Front (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgStorm Front is the eleventh studio album by American singer-songwriter Billy Joel, released on October 17, 1989. It features one of Joel’s three No. 1 hits, “We Didn’t Start the Fire”, a fast-paced song that cataloged a list of historical events, trends, and cultural icons from after World War II (when Joel was born) until 1989, and “Leningrad”, a story-song about a friendship between an American and a Russian during the final years of the Cold War.

“I Go to Extremes”, a song describing the ups and downs of his emotional life, placed at No. 6. Other songs that placed in the top 100 were “And So It Goes” (No. 37), “The Downeaster ‘Alexa” (No. 57), and “That’s Not Her Style” (No. 77). The cover depicts the maritime storm warning flag indicating wind forces 10-12, the highest intensity on the Beaufort scale.

Storm Front marked a radical change in Joel’s backing band. Since his last studio album (The Bridge), both Russell Javors and Doug Stegmeyer, long-time members of Joel’s band, were discharged from their respective duties as rhythm guitarist and bass guitarist. Javors was replaced with Joey Hunting for the record and by Tommy Byrnes on tour while Stegmeyer was replaced by Schuyler Deale. Band regulars Liberty DeVitto, David Brown and Mark Rivera were retained. Joel also hired the percussionist and multi-instrumentalist Crystal Taliefero beginning with this album.

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In 1991, Garth Brooks recorded “Shameless” on his album Ropin’ the Wind. Brooks’ cover version was also released as a single and reached the top of the US country charts, and also entered the UK Singles Chart.
Paul Anka covered “I Go to Extremes” on his 2007 album Classic Songs, My Way.
Jennifer Warnes covered “And So It Goes” for her 2001 album The Well. (by wikipedia)

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When he went for a masterpiece on The Nylon Curtain, Billy Joel worked with his band and producer Phil Ramone, crafting a Beatlesque song suite that was perfectly in step with Turnstiles. For Storm Front, he decided it was time to change things. He fired Ramone. He fired everyone in his band, save longtime drummer Liberty DeVito. He hired Mick Jones, the architect behind Foreigner’s big AOR sound, to man the boards. He wrote a set of sober, somber songs, save “That’s Not Her Style,” a weirdly defensive song about his model wife, Christie Brinkley. He was left with an album that is singularly joyless. Joel makes no bones about his ambitions for Storm Front — when you lead with a history lesson as your first single (the monotonous chant “We Didn’t Start the Fire”), it’s clear that you’re not interested in fun. That wouldn’t have been a problem if his melodic skills weren’t in decline. Joel packed all the strongest numbers into the first half of Storm Front, from the rocking “That’s Not Her Style” and “I Go to Extremes” to the fisherman’s plight “The Downeaster ‘Alexa'” and the power ballad “Shameless,” which Garth Brooks later made a standard. Compared to the murky second side, which perks up only mildly with “Leningrad” and “And So It Goes,” it’s upbeat, varied, melodic, and effective, but when it’s compared to his catalog — not only such high-water marks as The Stranger or Glass Houses, but with a record as uneven as The Bridge — it pales musically and lyrically. The five singles (“Fire,” “Style,” “Extremes,” “‘Alexa’,” “Goes”) were catchy enough on the radio to propel the album to multi-platinum status, but in retrospect, Storm Front sounds like the beginning of the end. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
David Brown (lead guitar)
Schuyler Deale (bass)
Joey Hunting (guitar)
Jeff Jacobs (synthesizer, background vocals)
Billy Joel (vocals, keyboards, harpsichord, synthesizer, guitar, percussion)
Crystal Taliefero (percussion, background vocals)
Liberty DeVitto (drums, percussion)
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Don Brooks (harmonica on 01.)
Dominic Cortese (accordion on 07.)
Kevin Jones (keyboard programming on 02.)
Mick Jones (guitar on 06. + 08. background vocals on 01., 04., + 08.)
John Mahoney (keyboards on 02., keyboard programming on 07.)
Sammy Merendino (percussion on 02.)
Itzhak Perlman (violin on 03.)
Lenny Pickett (saxophone on 06. + 09.)
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background vocals:
Curtis King – Brenda White King – Ian Lloyd – Joe Lynn Turner – Brian Ruggles – Frank Floyd – Patricia Darcy-Jones – Richard Marx
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Hicksville High School Chorus conducted by Chuck Arnold
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The Memphis Horns on 06.:
Andrew Love – Wayne Jackson

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Tracklist:
01. That’s Not Her Style 5.10
02. We Didn’t Start The Fire 4.50
03. The Downeaster ‘Alexa’ 3.44
04. I Go To Extremes 4.23
05. Shameless 4.26
06. Storm Front 5.17
07. Leningrad 4.06
08. State Of Grace 4.30
09. When In Rome 4.44
10. And So It Goes 3.38

All songs written by Billy Joel

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Hank Jones – Lazy Afternoon (1989)

FrontCover1.jpgHenry Jones Jr. (July 31, 1918 – May 16, 2010), best known as Hank Jones, was an American jazz pianist, bandleader, arranger, and composer. Critics and musicians described Jones as eloquent, lyrical, and impeccable. In 1989, The National Endowment for the Arts honored him with the NEA Jazz Masters Award. He was also honored in 2003 with the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) Jazz Living Legend Award. In 2008, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. On April 13, 2009, the University of Hartford presented Jones with an honorary Doctorate of Music for his musical accomplishments.

Jones recorded more than 60 albums under his own name, and countless others as a sideman,[6] including Cannonball Adderley’s celebrated album Somethin’ Else. On May 19, 1962, he played piano as actress Marilyn Monroe sang her famous “Happy Birthday, Mr. President” song to then U.S. president John F. Kennedy.

Born in Vicksburg, Mississippi, Henry “Hank” Jones moved to Pontiac, Michigan, where his father, Henry Jones Sr. a Baptist deacon and lumber inspector, bought a three-story brick home. One of seven children, Jones was raised in a musical family. His mother Olivia Jones sang; his two older sisters studied piano; and his two younger brothers—Thad, a trumpeter, and Elvin, a drummer—also became prominent jazz musicians.[8] He studied piano at an early age and came under the influence of Earl Hines, Fats Waller, Teddy Wilson, and Art Tatum. By the age of 13 Jones was performing locally in Michigan and Ohio. While playing with territory bands in Grand Rapids and Lansing in 1944 he met Lucky Thompson, who invited Jones to work in New York City at the Onyx Club with Hot Lips Page.

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In New York City, Jones regularly listened to leading bop musicians, and was inspired to master the new style. While practicing and studying the music he worked with John Kirby, Howard McGhee, Coleman Hawkins, Andy Kirk, and Billy Eckstine.[10] In autumn 1947, he began touring in Norman Granz’s Jazz at the Philharmonic package,[10] and from 1948 to 1953 he was accompanist for Ella Fitzgerald, and accompanying her in England in the Fall of 1948, developed a harmonic facility of extraordinary taste and sophistication. During this period he also made several historically important recordings with Charlie Parker, which included “The Song Is You”, from the Now’s the Time album, recorded in December 1952, with Teddy Kotick on bass and Max Roach on drums.

Engagements with Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman followed, and recordings with artists HankJones01such as Lester Young, Cannonball Adderley, and Wes Montgomery, in addition to being for a time, ‘house pianist’ on the Savoy label. From 1959 through 1975 Jones was staff pianist for CBS studios. This included backing guests such as Frank Sinatra on The Ed Sullivan Show. He played the piano accompaniment to Marilyn Monroe as she sang “Happy Birthday Mr. President” to John F. Kennedy on May 19, 1962.[1] By the late 1970s, his involvement as pianist and conductor with the Broadway musical Ain’t Misbehavin’ (based on the music of Fats Waller) had informed a wider audience of his unique qualities as a musician.

During the late 1970s and the 1980s, Jones continued to record prolifically, as an unaccompanied soloist, in duos with other pianists (including John Lewis and Tommy Flanagan), and with various small ensembles, most notably the Great Jazz Trio. The group took this name in 1976, by which time Jones had already begun working at the Village Vanguard with its original members, Ron Carter and Tony Williams (it was Buster Williams rather than Carter, however, who took part in the trio’s first recording session in 1976); by 1980 Jones’ sidemen were Eddie Gómez and Al Foster, and in 1982 Jimmy Cobb replaced Foster. The trio also recorded with other all-star personnel, such as Art Farmer, Benny Golson, and Nancy Wilson. In the early 1980s Jones held a residency as a solo pianist at the Cafe Ziegfeld and made a tour of Japan, where he performed and recorded with George Duvivier and Sonny Stitt. Jones’ versatility was more in evidence with the passage of time. He collaborated on recordings of Afro-pop with an ensemble from Mali and on an album of spirituals, hymns and folksongs with Charlie Haden called Steal Away (1995).

American pianist Hank Jones

Some of his later recordings are For My Father (2005) with bassist George Mraz and drummer Dennis Mackrel, a solo piano recording issued in Japan under the title Round Midnight (2006), and as a side man on Joe Lovano’s Joyous Encounter (2005). Jones made his debut on Lineage Records, recording with Frank Wess and with the guitarist Eddie Diehl, but also appeared on West of 5th (2006) with Jimmy Cobb and Christian McBride on Chesky Records. He also accompanied Diana Krall for “Dream a Little Dream of Me” on the album compilation, We all Love Ella (Verve 2007). He is one of the musicians who test and talk about the piano in the documentary Note by Note: The Making of Steinway L1037, released in November 2007.

In early 2000, the Hank Jones Quartet accompanied jazz singer Salena Jones at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in Idaho, and in 2006 at the Monterey Jazz Festival with both jazz singer Roberta Gambarini and the Oscar Peterson Trio.

In June 2005, Jones was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Berklee College of Music at 20th anniversary of jazz education at the Umbria Jazz Festival, in Perugia, Italy.

Hank Jones lived in Cresskill NJ, upstate New York and in Manhattan. He died at a Calvary Hospital Hospice in The Bronx, New York, on May 16, 2010, survived by his wife Theodosia (by wikipedia)

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And here´s one of his countless solo albums:

Hank Jones, the father of Detroit’s piano legacy (preceding Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris and Roland Hanna) is teamed on this Concord CD with the typically superb bass of Dave Holland, the supportive drumming of Keith Copeland and (on half the songs) Ken Peplowski’s alto (with just a touch of his clarinet). Jones performs a diverse yet unified set of standards and originals. His use of celeste on a moody “Lazy Afternoon,” his Monkish “Intimidation” and a trio romp on “Speak Low” are among the highpoints of the excellent release by an ageless master. (by Scott Yanow)

In other words: Another superb album by one of the greatest piano player in the world of Jazz … and he was accompanied by three wonderful musicians !

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Personnel:
Keith Copeland (drums)
Dave Holland (bass)
Hank Jones (piano)
Ken Peplowski (saxophone, clarinet)

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Tracklist:
01. Speak Low (Weill/Nash) 4.13
02. Peedlum (Jones) 5.05
03. Lazy Afternoon (Moross/Latouche) 7.45
04. Work Song (Adderley/Brown Jr.) 4.20
05. Intimidation (Jones) 4.46
06. Lament (Johnson) 6.09
07. Comin’ Home Baby (Tucker/Dorough) 5.05
08. Passing Time (Jones) 5.06
09. Sublime (Jones) 5.16
10. Arrival (Parlan/Simmonds) 4.56
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Margaret Becker – Immigrant´s Daughter (1989)

FrontCover1.JPGMargaret Becker (born July 17, 1959) is an American Christian rock singer, guitarist, and songwriter. She has had twenty-one No. 1 Christian radio hits, won four Dove Awards, and been nominated for four Grammy Awards.

Becker was born in Bay Shore, New York, raised in East Islip, New York, and began playing in coffeehouses while teaching music and taking opera lessons. Having graduated from James Madison University with a degree in communication, she moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 1985, and signed to Sparrow Records as a songwriter; soon after she toured with Rick Cua as a backup singer and sang on Steve Camp’s 1986 album One on One. The next year she landed a contract as a solo artist, and released her debut album, Never for Nothing. The single “Fight for God” was her first hit, and her second LP, The Reckoning, followed with two more hits, “Light in the Darkness” and “Find Me”.

Becker began working with producer Charlie Peacock starting with 1989’s Immigrant’s Daughter, and a string of successful albums followed, including a Spanish language LP. She won two Dove Awards in 1992, for Rock Album (Simple House) and Rock Song (“Simple House”). However, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Becker occasionally MargaretBecker01encountered controversy in the world of Contemporary Christian music because she is a Roman Catholic; some Christian stores refused to carry her album, and her concert appearances were sometimes picketed. Although she was raised in Catholicism, Margaret currently attends a non-denominational church in Nashville, TN. After 1995’s Grace, Becker decided to take a sabbatical from the music industry; during this time she wrote a book entitled With New Eyes and wrote editorials for Campus Life magazine.

She left Sparrow Records in 2002 but has continued to record since then, both her own albums and for compilation albums. She appears on the albums Sisters (Warner Bros. Records, 1994), Listen to Our Hearts (Sparrow, 1998), Heaven and Earth (Sparrow, 1999), and the New Irish Hymns series (Kingsway Music), and is one of the members of the 1994 collaboration Ashton, Becker, and Denté. She co-wrote Bob Carlisle’s “Bridge Between Two Hearts”. Her second book, Growing Up Together, appeared in 2000; her third, With New Eyes, came out in 2004, and a fourth, Coming Up for Air, was published in 2006. In late 2007, Becker’s latest album, Air, was released.

Becker gives teaching seminars across the United States. She also produces records for other singers, and in 2006 she wrote a series of columns for CCM Magazine. Becker has also been active in supporting charities such as Habitat for Humanity, Compassion International, and World Vision.

Becker has been single for her entire life and currently lives in Nashville, Tennessee. (by wikipedia)

This was her first album with producer and keyboard player Charlie Peacock and it´s a real good opo album and hervoice is extremly strong ..  but … all these lyrics … influenced by various segments from the bible.

And because I don´t believe in God … all the lyrics have nothing to do with me … sorry folks !

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Personnel:
Jimmy A (guitar)
Margaret Becker (guitar, vocals)
Charlie Peacock (keyboards, background vocals)
Roger Smith (organ)
Larry Tagg (bass)
Mike Urbano (drums)
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background vocals:
Annie Stocking – Brent Bourgeois – Jeanie Tracy – Vince Ebo

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Tracklist:
01. Immigrant’s Daughter (Becker/Peacock) 4.24
02. This Is My Passion (Becker) 4.10
03. Stay Close To Me (Becker/Peacock) 3.15
04. The Hunger Stays (Becker/Peacock) 4.15
05. Just Come In (Becker) 4.32
06. Honesty (Becker/Ahlstrom/Demus) 3.47
07. Solomon’s Shoes (Becker/Peacock) 3.16
08. Laugh A Little (Becker/Peacock) 3.46
09. People Get Ready (Mayfield) 3.44

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