Ludwig Güttler + Virtuosi Saxoniae – JS Bach Orchestral Suites (2014)

FrontCover1.jpgLudwig Güttler (born 13 June 1943) is an internationally known German virtuoso on the Baroque trumpet, the piccolo trumpet and the corno da caccia. As a conductor, he founded several ensembles including the chamber orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae. His name is sometimes written in English as Ludwig Guttler.

He received a number of awards including Discovery of the Year in 1983, and Frankfurt’s Musikpreis for extraordinary achievements in 1989. He was a founding member of the Rheingau Musik Festival and has appeared regularly since the first season in 1988.

As head of the society of the Dresdner Frauenkirche, Ludwig Güttler promoted the reconstruction of this famous Baroque church, which was destroyed during World War II and was rebuilt in 1994–2004. In recognition of these contributions, Queen Elizabeth II appointed him Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in November 2007.

Güttler was born in 1943 in Sosa, in the Ore Mountain region of Saxony. He studied at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik – Mendelssohn-Akademie in Leipzig with Armin Männel. From 1965 to 1969 he played in the orchestra of the Handel Festival in Halle and from 1969 to 1980 with the Dresden Philharmonic. He has been teaching the trumpet at the Hochschule für Musik Carl Maria von Weber in Dresden until 1990, and at the annual Güttler01International Music Seminar in Weimar from 1980 to 1990.

Since the mid-1970s, Güttler has been mainly active as a soloist and later as a conductor, at home and abroad, devoted mainly to the trumpet literature of the 18th century, especially the high-pitched piccolo trumpet. He was also involved in the development of a modern brass instrument to play parts designated for the historic corno da caccia. The instrument was made by Friedbert Syhre in Leipzig.

Güttler is also musical director of the festival “Sandstein und Musik” (Sandstone and Music) in Saxon Switzerland, founded in 1983 and of the festival Musikwoche Hitzacker in Hitzacker. Güttler is a member of the Sächsische Akademie der Künste (Saxon Academy of Arts).

Güttler founded the Leipziger Bach-Collegium in 1976, the Blechbläserensemble Ludwig Güttler in 1978, and in 1985 the chamber orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae.[3] The group of members of the Staatskapelle Dresden concentrates on performing music from the 18th century found in Dresden libraries, in the fields of opera, sacred music and chamber music.

He supported the Rheingau Musik Festival from the beginning in 1988, both as a performer and a curator. In 2011 he appeared with his Brass Ensemble.[5] In 2012, he conducted his orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae in Eberbach Abbey in works by Bach, Handel, Johann Friedrich Fasch, Christoph Förster, Telemann and Mozart, as part of the series “Companions along the way”.

Güttler03In 1983 he received a record prize of the Deutsche Phono-Akademie in Hamburg as “Discovery of the Year”. In 1988 he was the second recipient of the Georg-Philipp-Telemann-Preis of Magdeburg, in 1989 the Frankfurter Musikpreis. In both 1978 and 1985 he received the National Prize of East Germany, which he returned in 1989, asking that the money should be devoted to the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche.

After the German reunification, Ludwig Güttler became chairman of the society for promoting the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche Dresden and curator of the foundation Stiftung Frauenkirche. He regularly conducted “Wiederaufbaukonzerte” (concerts for the reconstruction).[9] For his involvement in the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche, he received several honours. President Horst Köhler awarded him in September 2007 the Great Cross of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany. Erich Iltgen awarded him the Sächsische Verfassungsmedaille on 26 May 2005. Queen Elizabeth II appointed him Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in November 2007 in recognition of his contributions to the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche and his significant contribution to the reconciliation of the two peoples by this project. (by wikipedia)

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Can one ever tire of the dancing inspiration that animates these four portmanteau collections which have delighted both serious and casual listeners ever since Bach compiled them for use in social occasions as the 30-something Kapellmeister at the briefly enlightened court of Prince Leopold of Cöthen, exulting in the multifarious influences which he had absorbed and could place at the service of a compositional mind of unequalled intellectual brilliance yet always conscious of his music’s need to entertain, to give delight as well as accompany the sober thoughts of his congregations?

Not, at any rate, in these performances from a virtuoso German ensemble hailing from Bach’s own part of the world and masterminded by a superb trumpeter-turned-conductor who well understands the exuberant, public character of these suites, their occasional purposes, for all that in such moments as the famous Air from the G major Suite, No.3, they appear to take on a more confiding aspect, drawing the listener in before dispelling the tension with another jolly minuet or charming sarabande.

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This generously filled CD presents the complete Orchestral Suites (Overtures) by J.S. Bach. Bach’s Suites count among his most popular and most frequently performed works, they are quintessential Bach: majestic, noble, tender and full of energy. They contain some of Bach’s evergreens: the Air from the 3rd Suite and the Badinerie from the 2nd Suite.

Played by the Virtuosi Saxoniae conducted by trumpeter-conductor Ludwig Güttler, modern instruments in Historically Informed Performance Practice, the best of both worlds. (press release)

Recordings: 1990-1992, Lukaskirche, Dresden/Germany

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Personnel:
Joachim Bischof (cello)
Ludwig Güttler (trumpet)
Eckart Haupt (flute)
Friedemann Jähnig (viola)
Thomas Käppler (timpani)
Günter Klier (bassoon)
Manfred Krause (oboe)
Andreas Lorenz (oboe)
Heinz-Dieter Richter (violin)
Roland Rudolph (trumpet)
Mathias Schmutzler (trumpet)
Roland Straumer (violin)
Guido Titze (oboe)
Werner Zeibig (bass)

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Tracklist:

Suite In C BWV 1066:
01. Ouverture 5.37
02. Courante 1.38
03. Gavotte I & II 2.27
04. Forlane 1.16
05. Menuet I & II 2.45
06. Bourrée I & II 2.25
07. Passepied I & II 3.02

Suite In B Minor BWV 1067:
08. Ouverture 6.25
09. Rondeau 1.39
10. Sarabande 2.52
11. Bourrée I & II 1.50
12. Polonaise I & II 2.59
13. Menuet 1.09
14. Badinerie 1.20

Suite In D BWV 1068:
15. Ouverture 6.35
16. Air 4.16
17. Gavotte I & II 3.11
18. Bourrée 1.15
19. Gigue 2.39

Suite In D BWV 1069:
20. Ouverture 6.49
21. Bourrée I & II 2.53
22. Gavotte 1.44
23. Menuet I & II 3.29
24. Réjouissance 2.17

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Cassell Webb – Conversations At Dawn (1990)

FrontCover1Cassell Webb is a British-American musician.

Texas-born Cassell Webb has enjoyed a career that carried her from late 1960s psychedelia to country music and latter-day folk-rock to modern folk songwriting, classical music production and moved her across an ocean in the process. Her voice can sound ethereal or mournful and crosses genres as easily as Webb’s career has over more than 30 years.

Born in San Antonio, Texas, in the late 1940s, Webb began playing guitar at 14 and later gravitated to the psychedelic scenes in San Antonio and Houston. She became a member of the Children, a psychedelic outfit that was part of Lelan Rodgers’ stable of artists, appearing on their 1968 Rebirth album and several singles. She later joined Saddlesore, a Texas combo whose core members, Mayo Thompson and Rick Barthelme, were survivors from the Red Krayola (another Rodgers-managed act). They stayed together long enough to record one single (“Old Tom Clark”) on the Texas Revolution label before disappearing in the early 1970s.

Webb spent time in California and New York working as a session singer and acquiring some knowledge of production as well and then returned to Texas, where she spent the next few years working with such country artists as Jerry Jeff Walker, Willie Nelson, Guy Clark, and B.W. Stevenson. It was around the time she began writing songs that she also began her long association with songwriter/producer Craig Leon. Webb went to Europe CassellWebb01in the early ’80s, first to Holland and then to England, where she remained permanently and began her solo recording career. Initially signed to the Virgin owned independent label Statik Records, for which she recorded her debut album, Llano, she later joined the roster of Venture Records, an avant grade offshoot of Richard Branson’s Virgin Records label, through which she recorded Thief of Sadness in 1987. Webb’s most representative and popular album was her third, Songs of a Stranger, which was derived from her concert repertory of other writers’ music, including Jimmy Webb (“P.F. Sloan”), Nick Drake (“Time Has Told Me”), Townes Van Zandt (“If I Needed You”), and Phil Ochs (“Jim Dean of Indiana”).

Her subsequent two albums Conversations at Dawn and House of Dreams continued her development as a songwriter. The former was again recorded for Virgin Venture and the latter released on China Records.

Webb remains based in England, where her work on such radio programs as Saturday Sequence, coupled with periodic album releases and projects, such as the dance score Klub Anima (co-written with Leon), and singing and production work with artists such as Marillion’s Steve Hogarth and back ground vocal work on Blondie (band)’s “No Exit album have sustained her career in pop music.

She has worked consistently on the productions of Craig Leon, which since 1998 have been primarily in the classical field. Webb has also been a production assistant to Leon on television projects such as the 2009 documentary Orbit: Journey to the Moon, which aired on the U.S. Discovery Channel, and Bell’aria which aired in 2010 on U.S. PBS. Webb is also a producer on the 2012 PBS broadcast Quest Beyond the Stars as well as the creator of the story concept.

Her poetry has also been published by Pen & Ink of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Webb’s version of the Rolling Stones classic “Tell Me,” from her 1990 album Conversations at Dawn (which also included her covers of Bruce Springsteen’s “Reason to Believe” and, in a nod to her own Texas psychedelic roots, the 13th Floor Elevators’ “Splash One”), has been included on the Connoisseur Collection’s Jagger/Richard Songbook CD.

More recent work has been appearances on the new re recording of Nommos and Visiting along with live appearances of those pieces in New York; Moogfest (Asheville, North Carolina); Saint Petersburg, Russia; Berlin, Germany; and Kraków, Poland from 2014 to date.

She has also co produced the album “George Martin: The Film Scores and Original Compositions” released in 2018 on Atlas Realisations/PIAS. (by wikipedia)

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Texas-born Cassell Webb has enjoyed a career that carried her from late-’60s psychedelia to country music and latter-day folk-rock to progressive rock/pop, and moved her across an ocean in the process. Her voice, which can sound ethereal or mournful and crosses genres as easily as Webb’s career has over more than 30 years. Born in Llano, TX, in the late ’40s, Webb began playing guitar at 14 and later gravitated to the psychedelic scene in San Antonio. She became a member of the Children, a psychedelic outfit that was part of Lelan Rodgers’ stable of artists, appearing on their 1968 Rebirth album and several singles. She later joined Saddlesore, a Texas combo whose core members, Mayo Thompson and Rick Barthelme, were survivors from the Red Krayola (another Rodgers-managed act). They stayed together long enough to record one single (“Old Tom Clark”) on the Texas Revolution label before disappearing in the early ’70s. Webb spent time in California and New York working as a session singer and acquiring some knowledge of production as well and then returned to Texas, where she spent the next few years working with such country artists as Jerry Jeff Walker, Guy Clark, and B.W. Stevenson. It was around the time she began writing songs that she also began her long association with songwriter/producer Craig Leon.

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Webb went to Europe in the early ’80s, first to Holland and then to England, where she remained permanently and began her solo recording career. Initially signed to the tiny independent label Statick Records, for which she recorded her debut album, Llano, she later joined the roster of Venture Records, an off-shoot of Richard Branson’s Virgin Records label, through which she recorded Thief of Sadness in 1987. Webb’s most representative and popular album was her third, Songs of a Stranger, which was derived from her concert repertory of other writers’ music, including Jimmy Webb (“P.F. Sloan”), Nick Drake (“Time Has Told Me”), Townes Van Zandt (“If I Needed You”), and Phil Ochs (“Jim Dean of Indiana”). Webb remains based in England, where her work on such radio programs as Saturday Sequence, coupled with periodic album releases and projects, such as the dance score “Klub Anima” (co-written with Leon), and singing and production work with artists such as Marillion’s Steve Hogarth have sustained her career in music. Her poetry has also been published by Pen & Ink of Ann Arbor, MI. Webb’s hauntingly lyrical version of the Rolling Stones classic “Tell Me,” from her 1990 album Conversations at Dawn (which also included her covers of Bruce Springsteen’s “Reason to Believe” and — in a nod to her own Texas psychedelic roots — the 13th Floor Elevators’ “Splash One”), has been included on the Connoisseur Collection’s Jagger/Richard Songbook CD, alongside recordings by the Flamin’ Groovies, the Who, Mary Coughlan, Naked Prey, Melanie, Marianne Faithfull, and Ike & Tina Turner. (by Bruce Eder)

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And here´s her fourth album …. and it´s a real beautiful one:

This album has the aura of a great musical landscape (like Loreena McKennitt but without the Irish bells & whistles (thank god for that).
The centerpiece is “Darkness, Darkness” (one of many covers…) (Lillebol)
Cassell Webb has an amazing country voice, yet made a few albums on Venture that nudged psychedelia (not surprisingly given her 13th Floor Elevators past) and Americana before the term was contrived by the music press. One of the most under-rated singers ever, in my opinion – check this album ! (pkrpmusic)

This woman can enchant you … believe me ! And another highlight is of course her soft and gentle version of The Rolling Stones classic “Tell Me” from the Sixties.

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Personnel:
Andy Duncan (drums, percussion)
Craig Leon (guitar, keyboards, bass)
Cassell Webb (vocals)
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B.J. Cole (pedal steel-guitar on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Tell Me (Jagger/Richards) 3.51
02. A Song For Sophie Jane (Webb/Leon) 4.34
03. River Run (Webb/Leon) 6.26
04. Freedom’s Legacy (Smotherman) 4.09
05. Darkness, Darkness (Young) 5.12
06. You Take A Heart (Kaz) 3.30
07. Splash One (Hall/Erickson) 4.01
08. I Love The Wind (Vandiver) 3.40
09. In The Light (Webb/Leon) 4.33
10. Reason To Believe (Springsteen) 5.00
11. Bones And The Lady (Webb/Leon) 2.24

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Roger Chapman – Hybrid And Lowdown (1990 – 2007)

FrontCover1.jpgIn 1979 Chapman began a solo career and recorded his first solo album Chappo. His backing band became known as The Shortlist at this time and he toured Europe extensively. Mike Oldfield’s song “Shadow on the Wall” from the album Crises (1983) featured Chapman on vocals and became a big hit. He appeared as a guest artist on the second Box of Frogs album Strange Land (1986) singing lead vocals on two songs. Chapman went on to record Walking the Cat (1989) and Hybrid and Low Down (1990). (by wikipedia)

And here´s is a more or less forgotten album by Roger Chapman … an maybe criminally underrated album, not only because all these very fine compositions, not only because this great gang of musicians in the studio (including Micky Moody on slide-guitar), but because of the wonderful voice of Roger Chapman.

At the end of the studios album you can hear a very unique version of the Everly Brothers Hit “Bye, Bye Love”

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On the bonus album we hear another hot live appearance by Roger Chapman and his band (recorded in Germany in November 1990) … oh yes this place was hot ! And you another chance to listen to Micky Moody and his magic slide guitar  on a tune called “Big River” (written by Johny Cash !)

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Personnel:
Roger Chapman (vocals, harmonica)
Dave Courtney (drums on 08.)
Simon Edwards (accordion on 03.)
Chris Fletcher (percussion on 01., 04., 06.
Ian Gibbons (keyboards on 06.
John Lingwood (drums on 01., 02., 06., 07., 08.. 09., 10.
Mick Moody (guitar on 01., 04., 08. -10. mandolin, background vocals on 01., slide guitar on 02., 06.
Nick Pentelow (saxophone on 06.
Steve Simpson (guitar on 03., 06., 07.
Philip Spalding (bass on 04., 10.
Henry Spinetti (drums on 04.
Peter Stroud (bass on 01., 02., 06., 08.
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background vocals:
Steve Simpson – Bob Tench – Zeitia Massieh – Sonny Spider

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Tracklist:
01. Hot Night To Rhumba (Simpson/Hinkley) 5.25
02. Holding On (Chapman) 4.31
03. Hideaway (Chapman/Simpson) 3.54
04. Beautifully Indecent (Chapman) 4.42
05. Sushi Roll (Chapman) 4.22
06. Someone Else’s Clothes (Chapman) 4.17
07. Chicken Fingers (Chapman/Simpson) 2.55
08. House Behind The Sun (Chapman/Simpson) 5.06
09. Sushi Rock (Chapman) 2.34
10. Is There Anybody Out Here ? (Chapman/Tench) 4.56
11. Cops In Shades (Chapman/Tench) 3.55
12. Bye Bye Love (F.Bryant/B.Bryant) 5.02
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13. Beautifully Indecent (Chapman) 5.53
14. Sushi Roll / Sushi Rock (Chapman) 8.44
15. Someone Else’s Clothes (Chapman) 6.22
16. Moody’s Jump (Moody) / Big River (Cash) 7.04
15. Chicken Fingers (Chapman/Simpson) 8.44

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Inspiral Carpets – Life (1990)

FrontCover1.jpgLife is the debut studio album by the British indie rock band Inspiral Carpets. It was released on 23 April 1990 on Cow Records, through Mute Records, during the period dubbed Madchester by the British media. The group released three singles from this album: “Move”, “This Is How It Feels” and “She Comes in the Fall”, with the latter two in different versions from those found on the album.

It was reissued in 2013 with the PlaneCrash and TrainSurfing EPs and an unreleased John Peel session as bonus tracks, plus the 21790 live video on a bonus DVD. The 2013 reissue is based on the original UK CD release.

A slightly modified version of Life was released in North America. It dropped the track “Besides Me” and added “Commercial Rain” (a re-recorded version of a B-side to the “Joe” single) and three tracks from their then-forthcoming Island Head EP. (by wikipedia)

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Inspiral Carpets had been honing their skills in their native Manchester, England, when the replacement of their original singer with Too Much Texas’s Tom Hingley–and an increased reliance on the Farfisa organ–soon put them at the forefront of that northern city’s burgeoning Madchester scene. Their debut album, LIFE, finds the group expanding their sound beyond the poignant hit “This Is How It Feels,” which is included here. The Elektra-released U.S. edition of LIFE adds tracks from their ISLAND HEAD EP, released contemporaneously with the album. (by Daniel Fetherston)

In today’s synthesizer era, the cheesy wheedle of an electric organ immediately locks a band into rock nostalgia (remember ”96 Tears”?). As one of the psychedelic retro-pop groups currently dominating British charts, Inspiral Carpets features great big organ chords to distinguish itself from such momentary superstars of the Manchester explosion as Stone Roses and Happy Mondays. But that very act of nonconformity marries the quintet to groups of the past.

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Life straddles the post-punk present and the psychedelic ’60s with hook-filled songs that liberally quote specific chapters of rock history amid a dense wall of keyboards and guitars. ”Directing Traffic,” for one, mimics the Doors’ sound and lifts a melody from the Electric Prunes’ ”I Had Too Much to Dream (Last Night)”; ”I’ll Keep It in Mind” stresses folky vocal harmonies and inserts an organ solo straight out of a skating rink. (by Ira Robbins)

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Personnel:
Clint Boon (keyboards, vocals)
Craig Gill (drums)
Tom Hingley (vocals)
Graham Lambert (guitar)
Martyn Walsh (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Real Thing 3.09
02. Song For A Family 3.04
03. This Is How It Feels 3.05
04. Directing Traffic 3.55
05. Besides Me 2.24
06. Many Happy Returns 3.08
07. Memories Of You 2.15
08. She Comes In The Fall 4.41
09. Monkey On My Back 2.00
10. Sun Don’t Shine 3.35
11. Inside My Head 2:01
12. Move 3.36
12. Sackville 6.43

All songs written by Clint Boon – Craig Gill – Tom Hingley – Graham Lambert – Martyn Walsh

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R.E.M – Out Of Time (1991)

FrontCover1.jpgOut of Time is the seventh studio album by American alternative rock band R.E.M., released on March 8, 1991 by Warner Bros. Records. With Out of Time, R.E.M.’s status grew from that of a cult band to a massive international act. The record topped the album sales charts in both the U.S. and the United Kingdom, spending 109 weeks on American album charts and enjoying two separate spells at the summit, and spending 183 weeks on the British charts and a single week at the top. The album has sold over four and a half million copies in the U.S. and over 18 million copies worldwide. The album won three Grammy Awards in 1992: one as Best Alternative Music Album, and two for the first single, “Losing My Religion.”

Out of Time combines elements of pop, folk and classical music heard on their previous album Green, with a new concentration on country elements that would continue on 1992’s Automatic for the People.

Preceded by the release of “Losing My Religion”, which became R.E.M.’s biggest U.S. hit, Out of Time gave them their first U.S. and UK No. 1 album. The band did not tour to support the release. In Germany, it is the band’s best-selling album, selling more than 1,250,000 copies, reaching 5×gold.

The album was featured in Time magazine’s unranked list of The All-Time 100 Albums.

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In July 2014, radio show 99% Invisible said that because of this packaging, Out of Time is “the most politically significant album in the history of the United States.”[7] They said that three weeks after the album’s release, “they had received 10,000 petitions, 100 per senator, and they just kept coming in droves,”[7] and a month following its release, the campaign’s political director and members of KMD “wheeled a shopping cart full of the first 10,000 petitions into a senate hearing.” The bill was eventually passed in 1995 by Bill Clinton; one commentary later said this happened “in no small part because of R.E.M.’s lobbying.” (by wikipedia)

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Hiding political tics behind faux-formalist boilerplate, pop aesthetes accused them of imposing Solidarity and Agent Orange on their musical material, but in fact such subjects signaled an other-directedness as healthy as Michael Stipe’s newfound elocution. Admittedly, with this one beginning “The world is collapsing around our ears,” I wondered briefly whether “Losing My Religion” was about music itself, but when Stipe says they thought about calling it Love Songs, he’s not just mumbling “Dixie.” Being R.E.M., they mean to capture moods or limn relationships rather than describe feelings or, God knows, incidents, and while some will find the music too pleasing, it matches the words hurt for hurt and surge for surge. The Kate Pierson cameos, the cellos, and Mark Bingham’s organic string arrangements are Murmur without walls–beauty worthy of DeBarge, of the sweetest soukous, of a massed choir singing “I Want To Know What Love Is.” (by Robert Christgau)

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Personnel:
Bill Berry (drums, percussion, bass, piano, background vocals)
Peter Buck (guitar, mandolin)
Mike Mills (bass, keyboards)
Michael Stipe (vocals, melodica)
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Peter Holsapple (bass guitar on 01., + 03., guitar on 02., 06., 07. + 09.)
Ralph Jones (bass on 01., 03.- 06., 08. + 09.)
Kidd Jordan (saxophone)
John Keane (pedal steel guitar on 09. + 10.)
Kate Pierson (vocals on 04., 06. + 11.)
Cecil Welch (flugelhorn on 05.)
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violin:
David Arenz – Ellie Arenz – David Braitberg – Dave Kempers
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cello:
Andrew Cox – Elizabeth Murphy
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viola:
Reid Harris – Paul Murphy
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KRS-One – rapping on 01.)
Scott Litt (echo-loop feed on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. Radio Song (featuring KRS-One) 4.16
02. Losing My Religion 4.29
03. Low 4.56
04. Near Wild Heaven 3.20
05. Endgame 3.50
06. Shiny Happy People 3.46
07. Belong 4.07
08. Half A World Away 3.28
09. Texarkana 3.40
10. Country Feedback 4.09
11. Me In Honey 4.06

All songs written by Bill Berry, Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Michael Stipe

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Oh, life is bigger
It’s bigger than you and you are not me
The lengths that I will go to the distance in your eyes
Oh no, I’ve said too much, I set it up
That’s me in the corner, that’s me in the spotlight
Losing my religion
Trying to keep up with you and I don’t know if I can do it
Oh no, I’ve said too much, I haven’t said enough

I thought that I heard you laughing
I thought that I heard you sing
I think I thought I saw you try

Every whisper of every waking hour I’m choosing my confessions
Trying to keep an eye on you
Like a hurt lost and blinded fool, fool
Oh no, I’ve said too much, I set it up
Consider this, consider this, the hint of the century
Consider this the slip that brought me to my knees, failed
What if all these fantasies come flailing around?
Now I’ve said too much

But that was just a dream
That was just a dream

[Pre-Chorus]
That’s me in the corner, that’s me in the spotlight
Losing my religion
Trying to keep up with you and I don’t know if I can do it
Oh no, I’ve said too much, I haven’t said enough

But that was just a dream
Try, cry, why try?
That was just a dream, just a dream
Just a dream, dream

Nils Lofgren – Keith Don’t Go (2013)

FrontCover1.jpgGiven his high profile status as a pianist and guitarist for both Neil Young and Bruce Springsteen, it’s sometime forgotten that Nils Lofgren enjoyed a 4 year span with Grin, before embarking on his on-going solo career in 1975. ‘Keith Don’t Go – Live at the Town & Country Club, London 1990’ dips back into his early career, for an acoustic to eclectic sweep of his formative years.

Best known as flamboyant guitarist occasionally given to trampolining – hence the album title of his last big label album ‘Flip’ – Lofgren is also a consistent song writer with a penchant for ballads and melodic pop rock as well as firebrand rocking.

And while this live set might disappoint some fans, especially as its light on material from his best studio albums ‘Cry Tough’ and ‘I Came To Dance’, he does a good job of reinvigorating some early career gems. The acoustic ‘Secrets In The Street’ and ‘Keith Don’t Go’ are given new spark while the autobiographical melodic pop-rock of ‘The Sun Hasn’t Set (On This Boy Yet)’ comes from his early Grin era.

The equally old ‘See What Love Can Do’ puts the accent more on a reggae/funk feel with a fiery vocal performance and inspired ensemble playing.

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Given this live album represents 50 odd minutes of a full show, there’s still an integral dynamic to a set that builds incrementally. The band smoulders on ‘Rock And Roll Crook’ – one of the few songs that doesn’t sound much better with the passing of time – before igniting on the up tempo rocking of ‘Moon Tears’.

The song originally received its greatest exposure on the ‘I Came To Dance’, but goes back to the first Grin album, and is a riff driven gem with jangling, unison guitars and sparkling band interplay.

Inevitably there’s room for some lyric driven ballads such as ‘No Mercy’ and the love song ‘Shine Silently’ before Nils climaxes the show with the guitar driven ‘I Came To Dance’. The audience response suggests it’s that facet of his music that his fans love best.

This album is a decent snap shot of an in demand session musician with a rich solo career of his own. (by petefeenstra)

Or, just simple: An excellent album !

Recorded live at The Town & Country Club, London 1990
Digitally remastered from the original British television recording.

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Personnel:
Larry Cragg (guitar, organ)
Nils Lofgren (guitar, vocals)
Tommy Lofgren (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Ronnie Newmyer (bass)
Max M. Weinberg (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Secrets In The Street (N.Lofgren) 4.00
02. Keith Don’t Go (N.Lofgren) 5.41
03. Goin’ Back (Goffin/King) 4.11
04. Rock And Roll Crook (N.Lofgren) 3.05
05. Moon Tears (N.Lofgren) 3.57
06. The Sun Hasn’t Set (On This Boy Yet) (N.Lofgren) 2.57
07. Anytime At All (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
08. No Mercy (N.Lofgren) 4.21
09. Shine Silently (Wagner/N.Lofgren) 7.30
10. See What Love Can Do? (N.Lofgren) 6.46
11. I Came To Dance (N.Lofgren) 7.33

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The neons are hot tonight baby
Light me up, take me in your arms
There’s so much we ought to learn baby
That ain’t in books or schools of charm
Ain’t in any university standin’ right atop the law’s long arm
Out in the streets you can get a real view and hope is the charm

The secrets in the street are waiting to remind you
Secrets in the street, high hopes will never blind you
Secrets in the street, they’ll teach you about survival
Secrets in the street and not the self denial we’ve been sold

Been so uninspired and lonely
Been studying hard
The values of pain bottomed out, went waikin’ at midnight
The streets breathed life
I danced with the rain
Gotta move my mind and heart from the celler
Out in the street where you get a real view
In the street where you find the real dreams
Know that some do come true

Ernestine Anderson – Live At The Concord Jazz Festival Third Set (1990)

FrontCover1.jpgAlthough there is no official leader on the CD, this is really an Ernestine Anderson date. Pianist Gene Harris and his quartet (with guitarist Ed Bickert, bassist Lynn Seaton and drummer Harold Jones) romp through Oscar Pettiford’s “Blues in the Closet” and then the singer takes over for the final six numbers; Frank Wess guests on tenor during “I Should Care” and altoist Marshall Royal is heard from on “Skylark.” Ernestine Anderson is in top form during her well-rounded set with highlights including the lengthy “I Should Care,” a swinging “There Is No Greater Love,” “On My Own” and a definitive 15-minute version of “Never Make Your Move Too Soon.” (by Scott Yanow)

One thing Concord Jazz cannot be accused of is failing to document Ernestine Anderson’s live performances. When the veteran jazz singer was recording for Concord in the late ’70s, ’80s, and early ’90s, the label put out several live albums that featured her extensively. Here’s the thing: Not all of those albums were released under Anderson’s own name — she was employed as a featured vocalist for pianist George Shearing, the Frank Capp/Nat Pierce Juggernaut, and a band that was billed as the Concord All Stars. Anderson’s live performances of 1987-1990 are the focus of this excellent two-CD set, which Concord assembled in 2002 — and none of the recordings are from the singer’s own albums. The all-star release Live at the 1990 Concord Jazz Festival (Third Set) is heard in its entirety. (barnesandnoble.com)

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Personnel:
Ernestine Anderson (vocals)
Ed Bickert (guitar)
Gene Harris (piano)
Harold Jones (drums)
Lynn Seaton (bass)
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Marshall Royal (saxophone on 05.)
Frank Wess (saxophone on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Blues In The Closet (Pettiford) 7.32
02. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart (Ellington/Mills/Nemo/Redmond 4.42
03. I Should Care (Stordahl/Weston/Cahn) 10.22
04. There Is No Greater Love (Jones/Symes) 5.23
05. Skylark (Mercer/Carmichael) 7.14
06. On My Own (Sager/Bacharach) 4.58
07. Never Make Your Move Toon Soon (Hooper/Jennings) 15.15

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Ernestine Anderson (November 11, 1928 – March 10, 2016)