Buddy Guy Blues Band – Crystal Palace Bowl (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgGeorge “Buddy” Guy (born July 30, 1936) is an American blues guitarist and singer. He is an exponent of Chicago blues and has influenced eminent guitarists including Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jeff Beck, Gary Clark Jr. and John Mayer. In the 1960s, Guy played with Muddy Waters as a house guitarist at Chess Records and began a musical partnership with the harmonica player Junior Wells.

Guy was ranked 23rd in Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”. His song “Stone Crazy” was ranked 78th in the Rolling Stone list of the “100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time”. Clapton once described him as “the best guitar player alive”. In 1999, Guy wrote the book Damn Right I’ve Got the Blues, with Donald Wilcock. His autobiography, When I Left Home: My Story, was published in 2012.

BuddyGuy02Guy was born and raised in Lettsworth, Louisiana. His parents were sharecroppers and Guy as a child would pick cotton for $2.50 per 100 pounds. He began learning to play the guitar using a two-string diddley bow he made. Later he was given a Harmony acoustic guitar which, decades later in Guy’s lengthy career, was donated to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

In the early 1950s Guy began performing with bands in Baton Rouge. While living there, he worked as a custodian at Louisiana State University.

Soon after moving to Chicago on September 25, 1957, Guy fell under the influence of Muddy Waters. In 1958, a competition with West Side guitarists Magic Sam and Otis Rush gave Guy a record contract. Soon afterwards he recorded for Cobra Records. During his the Cobra sessions he teamed up with Ike Turner who helped him make his second record, “You Sure Can’t Do” / “This Is The End,” by backing him on guitar and composing the latter. After two releases from Cobra’s subsidiary, Artistic, Guy signed with Chess Records.

Guy’s early career was impeded by conservative business choices made by his record company, Chess Records, his label from 1959 to 1968, which refused to record Guy playing in the novel style of his live shows. Leonard Chess, Chess Records founder, denounced Guy’s playing as “just making noise.” In the early 1960s, Chess tried recording Guy as a solo artist with R&B ballads, jazz instrumentals, soul and novelty dance tunes, but none of these recordings were released as a single. Guy’s only Chess album, I Left My Blues in San Francisco, was released in 1967. Most of the songs belong stylistically to the era’s soul boom, with orchestrations by Gene Barge and Charlie Stepney. Chess used Guy mainly as a session guitarist to back Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson, Koko Taylor and others. As late as 1967, Guy worked as a tow truck driver while playing clubs at night.

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During his tenure with Chess, Guy recorded sessions with Junior Wells for Delmark Records under the pseudonym Friendly Chap in 1965 and 1966. In 1965, he participated in the European tour American Folk Blues Festival.

He appeared onstage at the March 1969 “Supershow” in Staines, England, which also included Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Jack Bruce, Stephen Stills, Buddy Miles, Glenn Campbell, Roland Kirk, Jon Hiseman, and the Misunderstood. In 1972, he established The Checkerboard Lounge, with partner L.C. Thurman.

Guy’s career was revived during the blues revival of the late 1980s and early 1990s. His resurgence was sparked by Clapton’s request that Guy be part of the “24 Nights” all-star blues guitar lineup at London’s Royal Albert Hall. Guy subsequently signed with Silvertone Records.

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Guy had a small role in the 2009 crime film In the Electric Mist as Sam “Hogman” Patin.

As of 2019, Guy still performs at least a hundred and thirty nights a year, including a month of shows each January at his Chicago blues club, Buddy Guy’s Legends.

In 2015, Alan Harper, a British blues fan, published the book Waiting for Buddy Guy: Chicago Blues at the Crossroads.

On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed Buddy Guy among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s an exciting and explosive concert, recorded live byt he BBC. Buddy Guy plays a lot of Blues, Rock & Soul classics … it´s one of these great shows by Buddy Guy …one of the findest blues musicians ever.

Buddy Guy at it´s best !

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Personnel:
Buddy Guy (guitar vocals)
Scott Wenston Holt (guitar)
John Kattke (keyboards)
Greg Rzab (bass)
Kevin Johnston (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction 2.00

02. Medley 1 / 40.08
02.1. Mary Had A Little Lamb (Guy)
02.2. Sweet Little Angel (KingJosea/Taub/Bogan/Smith)
02.3. Crazy ‘Bout You (Brooks)
02.4. I Just Wanna Make Love To You (Dixon)
02.5. Walking By Myself (Rodgers)
02.6. Stormy Monday (Walker)
02.7. Someone Else Is Steppin’ in (Slippin’ Out, Slippin’ In) (LaSalle)
02.8. Sweet Home Chicago (Johnson)
02.9. Got My Eyes On You (Dixon/Guy)

03. Medley 2 / 21.09
03.1. Red House (Hendrix)
03.2. What’d I Say (Charles)
03.3. Strange Brew (Clapton/Pappalardi/Collins)
03.4. Cold Shot (Kindred/Clark)
03.5. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon)
03.6. Rock Me Baby/Got My Mojo Workin’

04. Medley 3 / 16.44
04.1. Mustang Sally (Rice)
04.2. Knock On Wood (Floyd/Cropper)
04.3. Jam

05. Outro 2.31

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Ludwig Güttler + Virtuosi Saxoniae – JS Bach Orchestral Suites (2014)

FrontCover1.jpgLudwig Güttler (born 13 June 1943) is an internationally known German virtuoso on the Baroque trumpet, the piccolo trumpet and the corno da caccia. As a conductor, he founded several ensembles including the chamber orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae. His name is sometimes written in English as Ludwig Guttler.

He received a number of awards including Discovery of the Year in 1983, and Frankfurt’s Musikpreis for extraordinary achievements in 1989. He was a founding member of the Rheingau Musik Festival and has appeared regularly since the first season in 1988.

As head of the society of the Dresdner Frauenkirche, Ludwig Güttler promoted the reconstruction of this famous Baroque church, which was destroyed during World War II and was rebuilt in 1994–2004. In recognition of these contributions, Queen Elizabeth II appointed him Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in November 2007.

Güttler was born in 1943 in Sosa, in the Ore Mountain region of Saxony. He studied at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik – Mendelssohn-Akademie in Leipzig with Armin Männel. From 1965 to 1969 he played in the orchestra of the Handel Festival in Halle and from 1969 to 1980 with the Dresden Philharmonic. He has been teaching the trumpet at the Hochschule für Musik Carl Maria von Weber in Dresden until 1990, and at the annual Güttler01International Music Seminar in Weimar from 1980 to 1990.

Since the mid-1970s, Güttler has been mainly active as a soloist and later as a conductor, at home and abroad, devoted mainly to the trumpet literature of the 18th century, especially the high-pitched piccolo trumpet. He was also involved in the development of a modern brass instrument to play parts designated for the historic corno da caccia. The instrument was made by Friedbert Syhre in Leipzig.

Güttler is also musical director of the festival “Sandstein und Musik” (Sandstone and Music) in Saxon Switzerland, founded in 1983 and of the festival Musikwoche Hitzacker in Hitzacker. Güttler is a member of the Sächsische Akademie der Künste (Saxon Academy of Arts).

Güttler founded the Leipziger Bach-Collegium in 1976, the Blechbläserensemble Ludwig Güttler in 1978, and in 1985 the chamber orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae.[3] The group of members of the Staatskapelle Dresden concentrates on performing music from the 18th century found in Dresden libraries, in the fields of opera, sacred music and chamber music.

He supported the Rheingau Musik Festival from the beginning in 1988, both as a performer and a curator. In 2011 he appeared with his Brass Ensemble.[5] In 2012, he conducted his orchestra Virtuosi Saxoniae in Eberbach Abbey in works by Bach, Handel, Johann Friedrich Fasch, Christoph Förster, Telemann and Mozart, as part of the series “Companions along the way”.

Güttler03In 1983 he received a record prize of the Deutsche Phono-Akademie in Hamburg as “Discovery of the Year”. In 1988 he was the second recipient of the Georg-Philipp-Telemann-Preis of Magdeburg, in 1989 the Frankfurter Musikpreis. In both 1978 and 1985 he received the National Prize of East Germany, which he returned in 1989, asking that the money should be devoted to the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche.

After the German reunification, Ludwig Güttler became chairman of the society for promoting the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche Dresden and curator of the foundation Stiftung Frauenkirche. He regularly conducted “Wiederaufbaukonzerte” (concerts for the reconstruction).[9] For his involvement in the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche, he received several honours. President Horst Köhler awarded him in September 2007 the Great Cross of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany. Erich Iltgen awarded him the Sächsische Verfassungsmedaille on 26 May 2005. Queen Elizabeth II appointed him Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in November 2007 in recognition of his contributions to the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche and his significant contribution to the reconciliation of the two peoples by this project. (by wikipedia)

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Can one ever tire of the dancing inspiration that animates these four portmanteau collections which have delighted both serious and casual listeners ever since Bach compiled them for use in social occasions as the 30-something Kapellmeister at the briefly enlightened court of Prince Leopold of Cöthen, exulting in the multifarious influences which he had absorbed and could place at the service of a compositional mind of unequalled intellectual brilliance yet always conscious of his music’s need to entertain, to give delight as well as accompany the sober thoughts of his congregations?

Not, at any rate, in these performances from a virtuoso German ensemble hailing from Bach’s own part of the world and masterminded by a superb trumpeter-turned-conductor who well understands the exuberant, public character of these suites, their occasional purposes, for all that in such moments as the famous Air from the G major Suite, No.3, they appear to take on a more confiding aspect, drawing the listener in before dispelling the tension with another jolly minuet or charming sarabande.

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This generously filled CD presents the complete Orchestral Suites (Overtures) by J.S. Bach. Bach’s Suites count among his most popular and most frequently performed works, they are quintessential Bach: majestic, noble, tender and full of energy. They contain some of Bach’s evergreens: the Air from the 3rd Suite and the Badinerie from the 2nd Suite.

Played by the Virtuosi Saxoniae conducted by trumpeter-conductor Ludwig Güttler, modern instruments in Historically Informed Performance Practice, the best of both worlds. (press release)

Recordings: 1990-1992, Lukaskirche, Dresden/Germany

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Personnel:
Joachim Bischof (cello)
Ludwig Güttler (trumpet)
Eckart Haupt (flute)
Friedemann Jähnig (viola)
Thomas Käppler (timpani)
Günter Klier (bassoon)
Manfred Krause (oboe)
Andreas Lorenz (oboe)
Heinz-Dieter Richter (violin)
Roland Rudolph (trumpet)
Mathias Schmutzler (trumpet)
Roland Straumer (violin)
Guido Titze (oboe)
Werner Zeibig (bass)

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Tracklist:

Suite In C BWV 1066:
01. Ouverture 5.37
02. Courante 1.38
03. Gavotte I & II 2.27
04. Forlane 1.16
05. Menuet I & II 2.45
06. Bourrée I & II 2.25
07. Passepied I & II 3.02

Suite In B Minor BWV 1067:
08. Ouverture 6.25
09. Rondeau 1.39
10. Sarabande 2.52
11. Bourrée I & II 1.50
12. Polonaise I & II 2.59
13. Menuet 1.09
14. Badinerie 1.20

Suite In D BWV 1068:
15. Ouverture 6.35
16. Air 4.16
17. Gavotte I & II 3.11
18. Bourrée 1.15
19. Gigue 2.39

Suite In D BWV 1069:
20. Ouverture 6.49
21. Bourrée I & II 2.53
22. Gavotte 1.44
23. Menuet I & II 3.29
24. Réjouissance 2.17

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Toy Caldwell – Can´t You See (live 1992) (1998)

FrontCover1.jpgToy Talmadge Caldwell Jr. (November 13, 1947 – February 25, 1993) was the lead guitarist, main songwriter and a founding member of the 1970s Southern Rock group The Marshall Tucker Band. He was a member of the band from its formation up until 1983. In addition to his guitarist role, he occasionally performed lead vocals for Marshall Tucker Band, including on one of the band’s best-known hits, “Can’t You See.”

Caldwell was born November 13, 1947, in Spartanburg, South Carolina, to Mr. and Mrs. Toy Talmadge Caldwell Sr. He began playing guitar before his teen years with his younger brother Tommy Caldwell. He developed a unique style of playing, playing the electric guitar using his thumb rather than a pick. Toy played basketball and football in high school with friends George McCorkle, Jerry Eubanks, and Doug Gray. While very involved in sports, the boys eventually became interested in music including jazz and blues. By the age of sixteen, Caldwell was passionate about music, sports, and his other obsession, motorcycles. He also enjoyed hunting and fishing.

ToyCaldwell03Caldwell decided to serve his country and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. In 1966, he reported for recruit training at Parris Island, South Carolina. After being wounded in Vietnam in September 1968, he was evacuated for two weeks, then returned for duty. Caldwell was discharged in 1969 and once again began playing music with his high school buddies. The Spartanburg chapter of the Marine Corps League is named the Hutchings-Caldwells Detachment in honor of Toy, his brother Tommy and another Marine.

He later formed the Toy Caldwell Band and released an eponymous CD in 1992; the record was later renamed Son of the South by Southern country rocker and Caldwell’s personal friend, Charlie Daniels. The album was digitally re-released in 2009 through Hopesong Digital / GMV Nashville.

Caldwell died on February 25, 1993, at his home in Moore, South Carolina. The cause of death was reported as cardio-respiratory failure due to cocaine ingestion by Spartanburg County Coroner Jim Burnett.

Caldwell married his wife Abbie on September 12, 1969. The song “AB’s Song” from The Marshall Tucker Band’s debut album was written for her. He was also the father of two girls Cassady and Geneal Caldwell.

He was the older brother of co-founder and bass guitarist Tommy Caldwell, who was killed at age 30 in an automobile accident on April 28, 1980, and to Tim Caldwell, who on March 28, 1980, one month prior to Tommy’s death, was killed at age 25 in a collision with a Spartanburg County garbage truck on S.C. Highway 215. (by wikipedia)

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Toy Caldwell was best known as the lead guitarist and main songwriter in the Marshall Tucker Band. A unique personality as well as a formidable musician, he was a peer of both Dickey Betts and Charlie Daniels, and his best work crossed effortlessly between country, blues, and rock & roll. A few years after the breakup of the Marshall Tucker Band in the late ’80s, he re-emerged as leader of the Toy Caldwell Band, which played small-scale shows of the kind that the Marshall Tucker Band couldn’t do. He also recorded one solo album before his death in early 1993. Although most of his fame inevitably rests with the Marshall Tucker Band, Caldwell left behind a small but glorious body of solo material. (by Bruce Eder)

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First let me say I respect Abbie Caldwell and her belief that Toy would not have wanted this released. That said, me being a true blue TC fan I want anything and everything I can get a hold of from Toy. This album and his 1984 unreleased album with the song Cry Cry Cry are “must haves” to the real fan. This album may be some of the last we get from Toy and that’s a shame.
Yea the picture on the cover and sound quality aren’t the best but it’s Toy and his guitar, I could care less about the cover pic. I want to hear him play and man does he play!
It was Toy’s songwriting and the bands performances that first took a hold of me and many others back in early 70s and still today we thirst for anything from Toy. Adding this to your MTB, Toy Caldwell collection can’t be a bad thing. Buy it, sit back, crank it up and listen to some good ol boy chicken pickin. You wont be disappointed.
Toy was a US Marine / V Nam veteran and a gifted songwriter, awesome guitarist who is deeply missed.
Ride in Peace Tommy, Toy & George….. we miss you brothers. (by ‘J’ Willys)

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The Marshall Tucker Band was one of the more successful acts under the Allman Brother’s umbrella on Capricorn Records. I confess until the MTB band album “Where We All Belong” I didn’t know just how much the main reason I liked MTB was Toy Caldwell. That album was a eye-opener to the prowess of Toy’s “red-hot pickin'”! And boy could the man tear up the fretboard.

MTB, like the Allman Brothers had some hard-knocks and here we find Toy after MTB’s breakup doing what he does best without any cares. It’s a crack band (by all indications) supporting him, but here we really have the total “Toy Caldwell Show” and it is raw and rocking with infectious power! The focus is on the great songcraft melded to some of the absolutely tastiest guitar rips and the rawness only drives it home better.

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This is a highly recommended album if you, like me, found Toy’s guitar playing and song-writing to be the cornerstone of what made MTB memorable. Recently I saw MTB live of which Doug Gray is the only remaining original member. Maybe I saw them on an “off-night”, but it fell flat to these ears…This, on the other hand, brings excitement and joy as it underscores just what a fantastic picker Toy was. He was an amazing guitarist and quite a fine song-writer which this CD easily reveals in an electric way. For those who appreciate the man it is a must buy. One other thing I always knew is that the rhythm section of MTB was tight and in-sync totally with Toy (like Toy, brother Tommy’s bass-playing was also underated and Paul Riddle is a fantastic drummer), the rhythm section here is up to the task. Enough said! (John Werner)

Recorded live at Shooters, Spartanburg, SC, May 8 & 9, 1992

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Personnel:
Mark Burrell (drums)
Toy Caldwell (guitar, vocals)
Tony “Ray” Heatherly (bass, background vocals)
J. “Pic” Pickens (guitar, slide-guitar)
Kenny Smith (keyboards)

on 12.:
Tommy Cathey (bass)
Paul Hornsby (strings, tipani)
Robert Johnson (guitar)
Greg Morrow (drums)
Pete Pedersen (harmonica on 12.)

on 13.:

Tommy Cathey (bass)
Charlie Daniels (fiddle)
Paul Hornsby (keyboards)
Robert Johnson (guitar)
Greg Morrow (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. I Hear The South Calling Me (Bettis/Bannon) 4.21
02. Searchin’ For A Rainbow (Caldwell) 4.20
03. Heard It In A Love Song (Caldwell) 4.46
04. Long Hard Ride (Caldwell) 4.23
05. Mexico (Caldwell) 5.04
06. 24 Hours At A Time (Caldwell) 14.00
07. Milk Cow Blues (Kokomo) 9.39
08. Fly Eagle Fly (Caldwell) 5.40
09. Can’t You See (Caldwell) 6.23
10. Night Life (Bettis/Buskirk/Nelson) 3.58
11. Ab’s Song (Caldwell) 1.24
12. High Noon (Bonus Studio Track) (Tiomkin/Washington) 3.50
13. Trouble In Dixie (Bonus Studio Track) (Caldwell) 4.01

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Toy Talmadge Caldwell Jr. (November 13, 1947 – February 25, 1993)

Jesse Thomas – Blues Is A Feeling (1992)

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Jesse “Babyface” Thomas (February 3, 1911 – August 15, 1995) was an American Texas blues guitarist and singer.Known at different times as “Baby Face” or “Mule”, and occasionally billed as “The Blues Troubadour”, his career performing blues music extended eight decades.

Born in Logansport, Louisiana, United States, Thomas is best known for the song “Blue Goose Blues”, which he recorded for Victor in 1929. He recorded and performed throughout the 1940s and 1950s, based in the Los Angeles area. He recorded for Specialty Records in 1953.

His career spanned over 60 years – in 1994 he appeared at the Long Beach Blues Festival. The Texas bluesman, Ramblin’ Thomas, was his brother, and fellow Louisiana blues guitar player, Lafayette Thomas, was his nephew.

A longtime resident of the Lakeside neighborhood of Shreveport, Louisiana, Thomas died there on August 15, 1995 at the age of 84 (by wikipedia)

Jesse “Baby Face” Thomas never received as much attention as he deserved to, the country bluesman continued to perform and record during the final years of his life. Thomas was 81 when he recorded Blues Is a Feeling, a 1992 session that wasn’t actually Jesse Thomas02released until 2001. This CD was recorded three years before his death, and it was also recorded during a visit to Chicago in June 1992 (when he was in town to perform at the Chicago Blues Festival). At 81, Thomas didn’t have the vocal power he once did — his voice had grown frail, withered, and thin. But, despite those limitations, Thomas still had charisma, and he was still capable of providing a meaningful album. Blues Is a Feeling isn’t in a class with his best work, although it is a decent effort that thrives on simplicity and rawness. Nothing elaborate is heard on this CD; the performances have a loose, informal quality, and the singer/acoustic guitarist’s only accompaniment consists of fellow guitarist John Primer and acoustic pianist Jodie Christian. There are no drums or bass, which turns out to be a good thing, as Thomas is well served by minimalism. Those who are familiar with Christian’s background will tell you that he is primarily a jazz improviser, not a blues artist. But he has no problem rising to the occasion on this CD. In fact, Christian fits right in because Thomas had a slightly jazz-influenced approach to country-blues — that was one of the things he had in common with Lonnie Johnson. Blues Is a Feeling isn’t among Thomas’ essential releases, but it’s a CD that his hardcore fans will enjoy. (by Alex Henderson)

Listen to this album and you´ll why I love the Blues !

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Personnel:
Jodie Christian (piano)
John Primer (guitar)
Jesse Thomas (vocals, guitar)

BackCover1.jpgTracklist:
01 Blues Is A Feelin’ (Thomas) 5.19
02. Married Woman Blues (Thomas) 3.50
03 Boogie Everywhere (Thomas) 2:15
04 Please Believe Me (Thomas) 4:48
05 She Throwed My Clothes Outdoor (Thomas) 2:05
06. Rain Sleet Or Snow (Bacote/Thomas) 3.57
07 Jesse, John & Jodie Jam v 4:01
08 Stop Crying On My Shoulder (Thomas) 4:25
09 Sad Old World (Thomas) 5:18
10 Change Your Attitude (Thomas) 2:40
11 Santa Claus (Thomas) 4:20
12 When I Left My Baby (Thomas) 4:36

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Jesse “Babyface” Thomas (February 3, 1911 – August 15, 1995)

Larry Carlton – Kid Gloves (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgLarry Eugene Carlton (born March 2, 1948) is an American guitarist who built his career as a studio musician in the 1970s and ’80s for acts such as Steely Dan and Joni Mitchell. He has participated in thousands of recording sessions, recorded on hundreds of albums in many genres, for television and movies, and on more than 100 gold records. He has been a member of the jazz fusion group The Crusaders and smooth jazz band Fourplay and has maintained a long solo career.

Carlton was born in Torrance, California in 1948 and at the age of six began guitar lessons. His interest in jazz came from hearing guitarist Joe Pass on the radio. From Pass he moved on to jazz guitarists Barney Kessel and Wes Montgomery and blues guitarist B.B. King. He went to junior college and Long Beach State College while playing professionally at clubs in Los Angeles.

During the 1970s, he found steady work as a studio musician on electric and acoustic guitar in a variety of genres: pop, jazz pop, rock, rhythm and blues, soul and country. Carlton appeared on hundreds of recording sessions with Steely Dan, Joni Mitchell, Linda Ronstadt, Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones, Bobby Bland, Sammy Davis, Jr., Paulinho Da Costa, the Fifth Dimension, Herb Alpert, Christopher Cross, Dolly Parton, Andy Williams, and the Partridge Family. Carlton performed on Mike Post’s 1981 “Theme from Hill Street Blues”.[citation needed] In 1982 he appeared on The Nightfly by Donald Fagen, lead singer for Steely Dan.

Larry Carlton 1979His guitar work on Steely Dan’s “Kid Charlemagne” from their 1976 LP The Royal Scam was ranked No. 80 on a list of the best guitar songs by Rolling Stone magazine.

Carlton recorded his debut solo album, With a Little Help from My Friends, in 1968. In the mid-’70s he built a home studio and called it Room 335 after the Gibson ES-335, an electric guitar he often played. He has recorded most of his albums at Room 335. In 1988, with his solo career in ascent, he was shot in the throat by a teenager outside Room 335 and suffered nerve and vocal cord damage, which delayed completion of the album he was working on at the time, On Solid Ground. His left arm was paralyzed and for six months he was unable to play more than a few notes.

Carlton produced six albums from 1978 to 1984. His version of “Sleepwalk” by Santo Farina climbed the pop and adult contemporary charts. From 1985-1990 he did various solo projects, including the live album Last Nite.

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Carlton was commissioned to compose music for the king of Thailand, Bhumibol Adulyadej, in honor of the king’s birthday. He recorded The Jazz King (Sony BMG, 2008) with a jazz orchestra that included Tom Scott, Nathan East, and Earl Klugh. (by wikipedia)

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From the opening melody of “Kid Gloves,” it is obvious that Carlton’s commercial direction wasn’t about to change here. It is too easy to dismiss most of this session’s output as insipid fluff; however, a closer listen to the “The Preacher” finds an intense Carlton playing a very George Benson-like melody. There is also a bit of an edge to his playing in “Where Be Mosada?” There are of course the standard “lite” songs geared for radio airplay, such as “Oui Oui” and “Terry T.” The session’s best performance is Carlton’s solo rendition of “If I Could I Would,” a beautiful chordal solo. Another solid recording which can be appreciated by commercial jazz fans and guitarists. (by Robert Taylor)

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Personnel:
Alex Acuña (percussion)
Larry Carlton (guitar)
John Ferraro (drums)
Michael Fisher (percussion)
Abraham Laboriel (bass)
Eric Pershing (drum programming)
Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Kirk Whalum (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Kid Gloves (Carlton) 4.05
02. The Preacher (Carlton) 5.49
03. Michele’s Whistle (Carlton) 4.45
04. Oui Oui Si (Carlton/Rollings) 6.14
05. Heart To Heart (Carlton)
06. Just My Imagination (Strong/Whitfield) 5.30
07. Where Be Mosada (Carlton) 5.59
08. Farm Jazz (Carlton) 4.39
09. Terry T (Carlton) 5.11
10. If I Could I Would (Carlton) 2.16

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More Larry Carlton:

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Arc Angels – Same (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgArc Angels were a blues rock band formed in Austin, Texas in the early 1990s. The band was composed of guitarist and singers Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton and two former members of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s band Double Trouble, drummer Chris Layton and bassist Tommy Shannon. The ‘Arc’ in the band’s name came from the Austin Rehearsal Complex where the band first started jamming.

Their 1992 debut album, Arc Angels, met with critical approval and reached No. 127 on the Billboard chart. Arc Angels made their network television debut on the NBC show Late Night with David Letterman on June 9, 1992, performing “Living In A Dream”. They performed on the show again on January 6, 1993, this time playing “Too Many Ways to Fall”.

Bramhall’s heroin addiction and internal friction caused the breakup of the band in 1993. The Arc Angels broke up in October of that year, concluding their run with a series of farewell concerts at Austin’s Backyard outdoor venue. Beginning in 2002, the Arc Angels reunited for occasional live performances.

In recent years, Bramhall has played guitar in Eric Clapton’s band and toured with Roger Waters. Charlie Sexton has toured with Bob Dylan. Meanwhile, Layton and Shannon have recorded three albums with the Texas soul quintet Storyville. They have also backed such artists as Buddy Guy, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and John Mayer.

ArcAngels.jpgIn March 2009, the members of Arc Angels, minus Shannon, announced that they would be reuniting, releasing a live album and DVD of concert footage/audio taken during 2005, touring extensively and beginning work on their second album. The album/DVD “Living in a Dream” was released in 2009, containing live renditions of previously released Arc Angels songs, new songs performed live and three new studio tracks. The launch of their tour was at Austin’s annual South by Southwest Festival. Although the band never officially broke up again, members pursued solo projects and there have been no talks about future Arc Angels releases or concerts to this date. In 2014 while on stage Bramhall referred to the Arc Angels as “this band I was in”[5] further cementing their demise.

Arc Angels is the self-titled debut album by Arc Angels, released in 1992. (by wikipedia)

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There are one-hit wonders throughout the history of music, but very few one-album wonders like the Arc Angels. After the death of blues-rock guitar hero Stevie Ray Vaughan, fellow singing guitarists, Texans, and Vaughan devotees Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton formed the quartet with Vaughan’s rhythm section of bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton.

Their 1992 debut release would also be their swan song, but the self-titled album would prove to be one of the best rock/pop/blues recordings of the decade as well. The opening “Living in a Dream” is the only tune Sexton and Bramhall II co-composed, and is perhaps the closest that the Arc Angels come to re-creating Vaughan’s signature sound. “Paradise Cafe” is one of a handful of tracks Sexton co-wrote with pop composer Tonio K., but he and Bramhall II engage in some ZZ Top-like call-and-response vocals, and Bramhall II’s Vaughan dedication, “Sent by Angels,” features some of the album’s most impassioned singing. Funky tunes like “Sweet Nadine,” “Good Time,” and “Carry Me On” lighten the mood, and Shannon, Layton, and guest keyboardist Ian McLagan play brilliantly throughout in setting up the singing guitarists.

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The spirit of Vaughan permeates the recording, from the production of Little Steven to the liner notes (“Dedicated to our friend, Stevie Ray Vaughan. We miss you”), yet never sounds forced, purposeful, or contrived. Alas, the final two songs — the rocking “Shape I’m In” and epic “Too Many Ways to Fall” — sport titles that point toward the Arc Angels being a Vaughan-like comet rather than a future veteran group. Sexton’s solo recording career had started as a teenager; Bramhall II and his father Doyle Bramhall were friends of Vaughan’s (the elder Bramhall even composing and co-composing tunes with the guitar giant). But the two frontmen who complemented each other so well nonetheless couldn’t blend their egos as easily. Arc Angels stands as testimony that a band needn’t have a long career to have a lasting legacy. (by Bill Meredith)

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Personnel:
Doyle Bramhall II (guitar, vocals)
Chris Layton (drums)
Charlie Sexton (guitar, vocals)
Tommy Shannon (bass)
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Ian McLagan (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Living In A Dream (Bramhall II/Sexton) 4.53
02. Paradise Cafe (Sexton/Tonio K) 5.14
03. Sent By Angels (Bramhall II) 5.44
04. Sweet Nadine (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
05. Good Time (Bramhall II/Piazza) 4.47
06. See What Tomorrow Brings (Bramhall II) 6.27
07. Always Believed In You (Sexton/(Tonio K) 4.54
08. The Famous Jane (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
09. Spanish Moon (Bramhall II/Sexton/Layton) 5.48
10. Carry Me On (Doyle Bramhall II) 4.08
11. Shape I’m In (Bramhall II/Sexton/Benno) 4.07
12. Too Many Ways To Fall (Layton/Shannon/Sexton/Tonio K) 5.52

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A screenshot from their website:

Website

Sara K. – Closer Than They Appear (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgFrom the time she first performed in front of an audience when she was 17 years old, singer/songwriter Sara K. knew she wanted to live her life making music. She followed her dream and stayed true to her desire, despite the fact that demand for acoustic solo performers was falling off as the end of the ’70s approached. Several avenues remained open to her, including fronting her own band, studio work, and backing country music artists, which she did in her hometown of Dallas, TX. She also found work locally singing jingles. From her childhood years on, music played an important part in her life. Her mother belonged to a choir at church, while her father sang bass as part of a barbershop quartet. She first took up the guitar at the age of 15, although her instrument wasn’t the standard one on which most youths begin. She started with a basic flamenco guitar and added four strings meant for a bass. The resulting hybrid didn’t produce notes as low as those normally produced by a bass, yet they were definitely lower than those made by a guitar.

After the early years in Texas, she took her band, Sara K. and the Boys Without Sleep, to Los Angeles and New Mexico. Beginning in 1973, she led the band for about ten years and she followed that up by spending more than two years on tour with country singerGary Nunn. The experience was a good one, but she longed to concentrate on crafting songs and performing her own compositions. She settled down in Santa Fe to work on her songs, putting together an album that eventually became Gypsy Alley and was released by Mesa/Bluemoon Records in 1982. The New Mexico Music Industry Coalition honored the release with an award for Best Album. Chesky Records signed her to a contract, and Sara K. went on to release four well-received albums: Hobo, Tell Me I’m Not Dreamin’, Play on Words, and Closer Than They Appear. The singer/songwriter toured Germany in 1997 with Hui Cox, an arranger and guitar player. That same year, she also contributed to the soundtrack for The Postman. Two years later, No Cover was issued featuring Chuck Mangione on one of the tracks. The live album was recorded in New York City inside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, making the most of the soaring interior’s dynamite acoustics. What Matters followed in 2001. (by Linda Seida)

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Sara stands in a class by herself. I know of no one to whom to compare her. The custom four-string guitar leaves something unspoken in the harmony, allowing Sara’s voice to weave a tapestry in and out of the spaces left for it. Her lyrics in these songs are heart-to-heart; she is as open, honest, and observant as Joni Mitchell, but as different from her musically as night and day. And she has plenty of sass and tongue-in-cheek cleverness at her disposal. Her solitary cover on this album is Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”. Hearing her cover is like really hearing it for the first time. (by Wayne Scott)

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What more could you ask-lovely lyrics that improve with each listen, great sound, and a unique, heartfelt voice. This is perhaps my favorite of her recordings, although the later Stockfish records may get the voice a little better. I don’t understand why she seems to have disappeared from audiophile reviews. (by Stephen A. Degray)

Sara K. has been in my CD collection since early 1993. I never tire of her breathy cadillac intonations. Sara K. is like a fine single-malt under an air condtioner on a blistering July afternoon in the midwest, with depth second only to few in her genre. (by Sharky Green)

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Personnel:
Billy Drewes (saxophone)
Bruce Dunlap (guitar)
David Finck (bass)
Jamey Haddad (drums)
Sara K. (ocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Miles Away 2.51
02. Trust Somebody 3:41
03. Hidden From View 3:28
04. Make Believe 2:34
05. What’s A Little More Rain 4:52
06. If You Close That Door 3.54
07. Jasmine 3.56
08. Wanna Spend More Time 4.05
09. Tecolote-Eyes 3.54
10. Alejaté 3.26
11. Something Borrowed 1.12
12. When I Didn’t Care 4.43
13. Steam Rises 3.06
14. Like A Rolling Stone 6.59

All songs was written by Sara K.
except 14, which was written by Bob Dylan

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More from Sara K.:

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And this is her website:

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