Kathy Mattea – Love Travels (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgKathleen Alice Mattea (born June 21, 1959) is an American country music and bluegrass singer. Active since 1984 as a recording artist, she has charted more than thirty singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including four that reached No. 1: “Goin’ Gone”, “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses”, “Come from the Heart”, and “Burnin’ Old Memories”, plus twelve more that charted within the top ten. She has released fourteen studio albums, two Christmas albums, and one greatest hits album. Most of her material was recorded for Universal Music Group Nashville’s Mercury Records Nashville division between 1984 and 2000, with later albums being issued on Narada Productions, her own Captain Potato label, and Sugar Hill Records. Among her albums, she has received five gold certifications and one platinum certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). She has collaborated with Dolly Parton, Michael McDonald, Tim O’Brien, and her husband, Jon Vezner. Mattea is also a two-time Grammy Award winner: in 1990 for “Where’ve You Been”, and in 1993 for her Christmas album Good News. Her style is defined by traditional country, bluegrass, folk, and Celtic music influences.

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Love Travels is the ninth studio album released by American country music singer Kathy Mattea. It was released in 1997 (see 1997 in country music) on Mercury Records, the label to which she had been signed since 1984. Three singles were released from it: “455 Rocket”, “I’m on Your Side”, and “Love Travels”. “455 Rocket” was the highest charting, reaching a peak of #21 on the Billboard country charts, while “Love Travels” was her final Top 40 country entry at #39. Suzy Bogguss sang background vocals on “Further and Further Away.” (by wikipedia)

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Mattea is a tasteful, thoughtful singer who uses country music as a means to an end. Her music is not so much rooted in the country tradition as it is a by-product of it. Mattea’s roots are more James Taylor than George Jones, and while steel guitars and 2/4 rhythms abound, LOVE TRAVELS is more an album of stylized Nashville folk-pop than neo-country.

To flesh out her introspective vision, Mattea reaches beyond the usual stable of Nashville songwriters to include songs by some honest-to-god singer-songwriter types. Gillian Welch contributes “Patiently Waiting” and “455 Rocket,” and they show Welch to be capable of writing outside her own trad-country performance style. Jim Lauderdale’s “I’m On Your Side,” an unsentimental oath of loyalty, is one of the album’s highlights. Janis Ian’s moody, minor-key “All Roads To The River” lends a dark side to LOVE TRAVELS. The clean but homey production of Mattea and Ben Wisch creates an atmosphere through which the subtle beauty of the songs can clearly be seen.

Recorded at Woodland Studios, Nashville, Tennessee

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Personnel:
Chris Carmichael (violin)
Lionel Cartwright (piano, background vocals)
Bill Cooley (guitar)
Jerry Douglas (dobro)
Stuart Duncan (mandolin)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel-guitar)
Bob Halligan, Jr. (guitar, piano)
James “Hutch” Hutchinson (bass)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Abe Laboriel, Jr, (drums, percussion)
Jim Lauderdale (guitar)
Steve Lauer (accordion, harmonium)
Tim Lauer (synthesizer)
Hunter Lee (whistle, bagpipes)
Duke Levine (guitar)
Kathy Mattea (vocals)
Edgar Meyer (bass)
Don Potter (guitar)
Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Kirby Shelstad (percussion)
Steve Sturm (pedal steel-guitar)
Ben Wisch (synthesizer, background vocals)
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background vocals:
Jonatha Brooke – Michael McDonald – Kim Richey

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Tracklist:
01. Love Travels (B.Halligan Jr./L.Halligan) 5.31
02. Sending Me Angels (Miller/Williams) 4.16
03. Patiently Waiting (Welch) 5.05
04. If That’s What You Call Love (Cartwright) 4.30
05. Further And Further Away (Wheeler) 4.32
06. 455 Rocket (Rawlings/Welch) 4.09
07. I’m On Your Side (Lauderdale) 3.10
08. The Bridge (Jim Pittman/Kimmel) 3.26
09. All Roads To The River (Ian/Vezner) 3.17
10. The End Of The Line (Fleming/Cawley/Kennedy) 4.29
11. Beautiful Fool (Henry) 4.52

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Still alive & well:

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The Verve – Urban Hymns (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgUrban Hymns is the third studio album by English alternative rock band The Verve, released on 29 September 1997 on Hut Records. It earned nearly unanimous critical praise upon its release, and went on to become the band’s best-selling release and one of the biggest selling albums of the year. As of 2015, Urban Hymns is ranked the 19th best-selling album in UK chart history and has sold over ten million copies worldwide.

The album features the hit singles “Bitter Sweet Symphony”, “Lucky Man” and UK number one “The Drugs Don’t Work”. The critical and commercial success of the album saw the band win two Brit Awards in 1998, including Best British Group, and appear on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine in April 1998. “Bitter Sweet Symphony” was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Rock Song.

The Verve had previously released two albums, A Storm in Heaven in 1993 and A Northern Soul in 1995. The band had only achieved moderate commercial success up to that point, and the band split shortly after their second album due to internal conflicts. Vocalist Richard Ashcroft quickly reformed the group, with Simon Tong, an old friend of the band on guitar, however Ashcroft realised Nick McCabe’s unique guitar style was required to complete the true Verve unit and later asked him to return. Tong also remained adding more guitar and keyboard/organ textures, making them a five-piece band and expanding their sound.

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The four-piece had already recorded several tracks for the album with Youth as producer, but once McCabe returned they re-recorded several tracks and changed producers to Chris Potter. McCabe said that in the next seven months of work, “… the key tracks were recorded from scratch, but some of them were already there.”

The cover photo was taken in Richmond Park, London.

The Verve were known for their music’s complex, immersive sonic textures. “Bitter Sweet Symphony” was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, and remains the band’s most well-known song. “The Drugs Don’t Work”, the band’s only number one single in the UK, became a concert staple for jam bands and other groups.

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The singles

The rest of the album alternated between wistful ballads like “Sonnet” and “Space and Time” (written by Richard Ashcroft), spacey grooves like “Catching the Butterfly” and “The Rolling People”, all-out rockers like the pounding “Come On” (which existed in demo from the “Northern Soul” era) and psychedelic driven songs like “Neon Wilderness”. The hidden track “Deep Freeze” features distorted guitars and a baby’s cry sound. It has strong ambient influences that set it apart from the rest of the tracks in terms of composition and overall mood.

Urban Hymns spent 12 weeks at the top of the UK Albums Chart, with a total of 124 weeks on the chart. It also became The Verve’s first charting album in the United States, where it debuted at number 63 on the Billboard 200, giving the band their first commercial success in the country. Urban Hymns ultimately peaked at number 23 on the chart and was certified Platinum by the RIAA on 4 April 1998;[27] it remains the group’s best-selling album in the United States to date, with over 1.3 million copies sold as of 2009. (by wikipedia)

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Not long after the release of A Northern Soul, the Verve imploded due to friction between vocalist Richard Ashcroft and guitarist Nick McCabe. It looked like the band had ended before reaching its full potential, which is part of the reason why their third album, Urban Hymns — recorded after the pair patched things up in late 1996 — is so remarkable. Much of the record consists of songs Ashcroft had intended for a solo project or a new group, yet Urban Hymns unmistakably sounds like the work of a full band, with its sweeping, grandiose soundscapes and sense of purpose. The Verve have toned down their trancy, psychedelic excursions, yet haven’t abandoned them — if anything, they sound more muscular than before, whether it’s the trippy “Catching the Butterfly” or the pounding “Come On.”

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These powerful, guitar-drenched rockers provide the context for Ashcroft’s affecting, string-laden ballads, which give Urban Hymns its hurt. The majestic “Bitter Sweet Symphony” and the heartbreaking, country-tinged “The Drugs Don’t Work” are an astonishing pair, two anthemic ballads that make the personal universal, thereby sounding like instant classics. They just are the tip of the iceberg — “Sonnet” is a lovely, surprisingly understated ballad, “The Rolling People” has a measured, electric power, and many others match their quality. Although it may run a bit too long for some tastes, Urban Hymns is a rich album that revitalizes rock traditions without ever seeming less than contemporary. It is the album the Verve have been striving to make since their formation, and it turns out to be worth all the wait. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Richard Ashcroft (vocals, guitar)
Simon Jones (bass)
Nick McCabe (guitar)
Peter Salisbury (drums)
Simon Tong (guitar, keyboards)
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Liam Gallagher (background vocals on 13.) (“Come On”), hand claps (“Space and Time”[

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All songs written by Richard Ashcroft, except where noted.

Tracklist:
01. Bitter Sweet Symphony (Jager/Richards/Ashcroft) 5.58
02. Sonnet (Ashcroft) 4.21
03. The Rolling People (Ashcroft/McCabe/Salisbury/Tong) 7.02
04. The Drugs Don’t Work (Ashcroft) 5.05
05. Catching The Butterfly (Ashcroft/McCabe/Salisbury/Tong) 6.26
06. Neon Wilderness (Ashcroft/McCabe/Salisbury/Tong/McCabe) 2.38
07. Space And Time (Ashcroft) 5:36
08. Weeping Willow (Ashcroft) 4.50
09. Lucky Man (Ashcroft) 4.53
10. One Day (Ashcroft) 5.03
11. This Time (Ashcroft) 3.51
12. Velvet Morning (Ashcroft) 4.57
13. Come On (includes hidden song “Deep Freeze”) (Ashcroft/McCabe/Salisbury/ Tong) 15.15

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Various Artists – A Twist Of Jobim (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgTwist of Jobim contains a single disc with 11 songs. The CD has an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of the Twist of Jobim songs are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. Twist of Jobim are all jazz-oriented songs.

The debut release from the I.E. label (which is connected with Polygram) is an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of his tunes are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. The treatments are all jazz-oriented, and there is plenty of solo space for the likes of guitarist Lee Ritenour (in one of his finest jazz efforts), pianists Dave Grusin and Alan Pasqua, altoist Eric Marienthal, bassist Christian McBride, and tenor saxophonist Ernie Watts. Plus, there are guest spots for Herbie Hancock (an excellent acoustic piano solo on “Stone Flower”), the sopranos of Art Porter (on “Dindi”) and Steve Tavaglione, the Yellowjackets (who team up with Ritenour on “Mojave”), singer El DeBarge (“Dindi”) and the vocal duo of Al Jarreau and Oleta Adams (“Waters of March” and a lightweight rendition of “The Girl from Ipanema”). Nearly every song holds one’s interest, the melodies are celebrated, and the fresh interpretations contain more than their share of surprises. (by Scott Yanow)

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Personnel:
Oleta Adams (vocals on 04. + 11.)
El DeBarge (vocals on 03.
John Beasley (synthesizer on 02. + 04.)
Paulinho da Costa (percussion on 01., 06., 07, 10. + 11.)
Melvin Davis (bass on 02., 03. + 07.)
Cassio Duarte (percussion on 02.- 05 + 09.)
Russell Ferrante (synthesizer on 06., piano on 10. + 11.)
Dave Grusin (piano on 01., 02., 04. + 05.)
Herbie Hancock (piano on 06.)
Jimmy Haslip (bass on 10.)
Jerry Hey (flugelhorn on 07., 08.)
Dan Higgins (flute on 01., 07. – 09.)
Al Jarreau (vocals on 04. + 11.)
Will Kennedy (drums on 10.)
Eric Marienthal (saxophone on 02., 04 – 07.)
Harvey Mason (drums on 02., 04., 08. + 09.)
Christian McBride (bass on 08., 09.)
Bob Mintzer (saxophone on 10.)
Gary Novak (drums on 06.)
Alan Pasqua (piano on 08. + 09.)
John Patitucci (bass on 06.)
Lee Ritenour (guitar on 01., 02., 04., 06. – 10., keyboards, synthesizer on 01., 03. 07., 11., bass on 01. + 11.)
Steve Tavaglione (saxophone on 06., electronic wind instrument on 08. + 09.)
Ernie Watts (saxophone on 08. + 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. Dave Grusin / Lee Ritenour: Water To Drink (Agua de Beber) (Jobim) 5.06
02. Dave Grusin / Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Captain Bacardi (Jobim) 5.05
03. El DeBarge / Art Porter: Dindi (Jobim) 4.57
04. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: Waters of March (Aguas de Março) (Jobim) 4.38
05. Dave Grusin: Bonita (Gilbert/Jobim/Santamaria) 4.04
06. Paulinho Da Costa / Herbie Hancock / Steve Tavaglione: Stone Flower (Jobim) 8.49
07. Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Favela (Gilbert/Jobim/de Moraes) 4.47
08. Alan Pasqua / Ernie Watts: Children’s Games (Jobim) 3.53
09. Christian McBride / Ernie Watts: Lamento (Jobim/de Moraes) 6.27
10. Lee Ritenour / Yellowjackets: Mojave (Jobim) 5.22
11. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: The Girl From Ipanema (Gimbel/Jobim/de Moraes) 429

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Hilary Hahn – Plays Bach (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgHilary Hahn (born November 27, 1979) is an American violinist. In her career, she has performed throughout the world both as a soloist with leading orchestras and conductors and as a recitalist. She also built a reputation as a champion of contemporary music. Several composers have written works especially for her, including concerti by Edgar Meyer and Jennifer Higdon and partitas by Antón García Abril.

Hahn was born in Lexington, Virginia on November 27, 1979. She began playing the violin one month before her fourth birthday in the Suzuki Program of Baltimore’s Peabody Institute. She participated in a Suzuki class for a year. Between 1985 and early 1990 Hahn studied in Baltimore under Klara Berkovich. In 1990, at ten, Hahn was admitted to the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where she became a student of Jascha Brodsky. Hahn studied with Brodsky for seven years and learned the études of Kreutzer, Ševčík, Gaviniès, Rode, and the Paganini Caprices. She learned twenty-eight violin concertos, as well as recital programs, chamber works, and assorted showpieces.

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In 1991, at the age of eleven, Hahn made her major orchestral debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.[4] Soon thereafter, Hahn debuted with the Philadelphia Orchestra,[5] Cleveland Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic. Hahn made her international debut in 1994 performing the Bernstein Serenade in Hungary with Ivan Fisher and the Budapest Festival Orchestra. Her German debut came in 1995 with a performance of the Beethoven Violin Concerto with Lorin Maazel and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. The concert was broadcast in Europe. A year later, Hahn debuted at Carnegie Hall in New York City as a soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. In a 1999 interview with Strings Magazine, Hahn cited people influential to her development as a musician and a student, including David Zinman, the conductor of the Baltimore Symphony and Hahn’s mentor since she was ten, and Lorin Maazel, with whose Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra she performed in Europe.

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By sixteen, Hahn had completed the Curtis Institute’s university requirements, but elected to remain for several years to pursue elective courses, until her graduation in May 1999 with a Bachelor of Music degree.[3] During this time she coached violin with Jaime Laredo, and studied chamber music with Felix Galimir and Gary Graffman.[1] She appeared on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, in February 2000, discussing her early experiences with the violin and performing a solo and a duet.[9] In a December 2001 interview on PBS, Hahn stated that of all musical disciplines, she is most interested in performance. (by wikipedia)

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Hahn began recording in 1996 …

… and here´s her debut album:

I do not know what Bach expected or envisioned in a performance of these pieces. But it is awfully hard to imagine him not appreciating this recording. Yes, I do grant what several people have said about Milstein’s Chaconne (in particular) being deeper in emotion, etc., but the pure, plain beauty of the sound produced by Hahn and recorded so cleanly by more modern technology (and evidently in a remarkably resonant space) has it own inherent value. It makes me focus on the genius of Bach’s very notes themselves, especially in the opening E major Partita. And if you listen carefully, I don’t see how anyone could characterize this performance as lacking in creativity – the dynamic range is fantastic, and along with the pacing seems to me to represent a real thoughtfulness about each phrase. I also find that the relatively relaxed tempi add to this effect of simplicity, purity, and beauty, and allow the composer, rather than the virtuosity of the performer, to take center stage. A great recording, in a different, not inferior, sense, when compared to the Old Classics. (David F. Jackson)

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This recording must be heard to be believed.
Having listened to unacommpanied Bach for 45 years, I had long despaired of hearing it in tune, with love and precision.
I despair no longer.
Hilary Hahn is a treasure, who can can become the Michael Jordan of the violin.
We are privileged to share time with her on this planet. (Robert S. Eisenberg)

In other words: brilliant … and she was just 17 years old !

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Personnel:
Hilary Hahn (violin)

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Tracklist:

Partita No. 3 In E Major, BWV 1006:
01. I. Preludio 3:34
02. II. Loure 4:47
03. III. Gavotte En Rondeau 3:16
04. IV. Menuet I 1:53
05. V. Menuet II 3:04
06. VI. Bourrée 1:39
07. VII. Gigue 1:53

Partita No. 2 In D Minor, BWV 1004:
08. I. Allemande 5:13
09. II. Courante 2:09
10. III. Sarabande 4:44
11. IV. Gigue 3:23
12. V. Ciaccona 17:47

Sonata No. 3 In C Major, BWV 1005:
13. I. Adagio 4:55
14. II. Fuga 11:45
15. III. Largo 3:57
16. IV. Allegro Assai 4:38

Music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach

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Avishai Cohen – Adama (1998)

FrontCover1Adama is an album by bassist Avishai Cohen. This was Cohen’s first recording as leader. He co-produced it with Chick Corea.

Avishai Cohen showed enormous promise as both a composer and an acoustic bassist on his first album as a leader, Adama, which he produced with Chick Corea for the company Corea co-owned, Stretch records. Reminding listeners of his Israeli heritage, the post-bopper brings a heavy Middle Eastern influence to such impressive originals as “Reunion of the Souls,” “Ora,” and “No Change.” Although Cohen’s 1997 music wasn’t innovative — John Coltrane, Yusef Lateef, and Miles Davis successfully experimented with Middle Eastern elements when they embraced modal jazz in the late ’50s — Adama has a certain freshness to it. “Madrid,” “Dror,” and the title song find one of Cohen’s sidemen, Amos Hoffman, putting down his guitar in favor of the oud, and his use of this lute (which is prominent in traditional Arabic music) works so well in a jazz setting that one wishes Cohen employed Hoffman on the instrument even more. Cohen’s Spanish-influenced “Gadu,” meanwhile, features Corea on electric keyboards. Captivating from start to finish, Adama made it clear that Cohen was someone to watch out for. (by Alex Henderson)

Bass.jpgHandling the acoustic bass like a flamenco guitar, then applying the blues, newcomer Avishai Cohen has produced a session in the modern mainstream with considerable intensity. The “fire” comes from his writing; these are all the bassist’s compositions except for the standard “Besame Mucho.” In putting together his arrangements, Cohen mixes meters in various combinations, allowing them to shift frequently, and couples that concept with a built-in intensity through his harmonic approach. With a core trio consisting of bassist Cohen, pianist Jason Lindner and drummer Jeff Ballard, the melodies are presented with a nod to the leader’s improvisational strengths. Soprano saxophonist Steve Wilson and trombonist Steve Davis provide support as well.

“Madrid” opens with the bowed bass and presents a unique approach to blending. Adding the oud of Amos Hoffman to the ensemble, Cohen has combined two distinct flavors – the oud is an Arabic stringed instrument commonly used with quarter tones; thus, the musical effect here is similar to inviting Spanish flamenco dancers and traditional Middle Eastern dancers to the same stage. The savory multi-ethnic flavor continues with “Dror” and “Adama.” Cohen stretches out on “Bass Suite #1,” providing both bass and percussion parts by slapping the bass and strings. Here and elsewhere, Hoffman, Cohen and Ballard are given an opportunity to stretch out; it is unfortunate that Davis, Wilson, and Lindner are bound by the arrangements and cannot improvise as freely.

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Cameos by pianists Brad Mehldau, Danilo Perez and Chick Corea appear at the close of the session. On “Besame Mucho” Mehldau spurs Cohen onward to some of his most lyrical playing on this album. Danilo Perez is at the piano and Chick Corea at the Fender Rhodes piano for “Gadu,” which allows the listener to appreciate the difference between the two instruments. Corea and Perez alternate, converse, and trade phrases as conguero Don Alias and bassist Cohen share the spotlight. Newcomer Avishai Cohen has assembled a unique session, largely through his interesting compositions, and is clearly a welcome voice on today’s jazz scene. (by Jim Santella)

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Personnel:
Jeff Ballard (drums, percussion)
Avishai Cohen (bass)
Steve Davis (trombone)
Jason Lindner (piano)
Steve Wilson (saxophone)
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Claudia Acuna (vocals on 12.)
Don Alias (percussion on 11.)
Chick Corea (piano on 11.)
Amos Hoffman (oud on 02., 05. + 08., guitar on 04. + 12.)
Brad Mehldau (piano on 10.)
Danilo Perez (piano on 11.)
Jorge Rossy (drums on 10. + 11.)

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Tracklist:
01. Ora (Cohen) 4.19
02. Madrid (Cohen) 4:45
03. Bass Suite #1 (Cohen) 5:51
04. Reunion Of The Souls <(Cohen)
05. Dror (Cohen) 5.17
06. No Change (Cohen) 4.31
07. Bass & Bone Fantasy (Cohen) 4.09
08. Adama 5.57
09. Bass Suite #2 (Cohen) 4.38
10 Bésame Mucho (Velázquez) 7.27
11. Gadu (Cohen) 6.24
12. Jasonity (Cohen) 1.18

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Chorus Of Tribes – Myth (1998)

FrontCover1.jpgChorus of Tribes is New Age music project from the UK. Símon Hulbert wrote all the tracks found on the project’s first and only album, Myth (1998).Chorus Of Tribes – Myth is a relatively unknown new age / ambient album from Etherean Records.

The album was released in 1998 in the UK. The album has a rather ironic story behind it. Late 1997 it was released as a bootleg across the internet and various p2p sites as an album by “Deep Forest and Enigma”, and not by “Chorus Of Tribes”.

Who dubbed “Chorus Of Tribes” to “Deep Forest and Enigma” is unknown, but musically it recembles the two artists in a fair amount, which makes the assumption understandable. This made some people confused, and the album was later rejected as any form of collaboration between the two famous new age artist groups from both sides. However, the songs on this album, independent of whoever made it, became more or less famous. In 1998 it was released on the label Etherean Music.

Now, musically the album is impressive. Into Morocco and Rain Song remain two of the most relaxing and best New Age / Tribal songs Símon Hulbert.jpgI’ve heard. The mood changes a great deal over the course of the album, from almost pure trance to groovy chilled beats, and tribal chants accompanied by soothing beats and vocals.

If Deep Forest and Enigma is up your alley, then this is just for you. (by www.last.fm)

Myth is a union between tribal vocals, instrumentals and popular dance music. Strong tribal/techno rhythms, featuring samples from numerous African tribes. Myth creates a musical hybrid between roots Africa and contemporary electronic.

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Personnel:
Símon Hulbert (all instruments)

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Tracklist:
01. Into Morroco 6.05
02. Inception 7.09
03. LoLo 5.16
04. Rain Song 7.21
05. Ikkijungle 2.52
06. Lullaby 5.59
07. Marakesh 5.59
08. Shackera 5.03
09. Hiyahiyahey 4.16
10. Myth 2.53
11. New Dawn 7.47

Music composed by Símon Hulbert

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Hot Tuna – Live In Japan, 1997 (2004)

EagleFrontCover1.jpgLive in Japan is a live album by Hot Tuna recorded in 1997 in Yokohama, Japan. Originally the band planned to play an electric set as part of their Japanese tour, but the venue in Yokohama was quite small (only holding fifty people) and there wasn’t any room for an electric setup. The band played acoustic, and afterwards Jack Casady suggested to Jorma Kaukonen that the recording was good enough for a new live album. Michael Falzarano and Kaukonen listened to the tape and decided that Casady was right, and a new album was released. The album was Hot Tuna’s last release on Relix Records. In 2004 Eagle Records remastered the album and re-released it with previously unreleased performances of “Parchman Farm”, “Follow the Drinking Gourd”, “Keep Your Lamps Trimmed & Burning” and “Folsom Prison.” Three of the tracks from the initial release were dropped from the remaster: “Hesitation Blues”, “Candy Man” and “Keep on Truckin'”.(by wikipedia)

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Live In Japan is the eighth live Hot Tuna performance released by Relix Records. It was recorded in a cramped club in Yokohama in 1997. The show was an impromptu acoustic set because the club was too small to hold the all the band’s electric equipment. However don’t expect the delicate, interwoven acoustic blues of 1969’s Hot Tuna (Recorded Live). Even though Hot Tuna draws on much of the same material here, the treatments are up-tempo and at times a little muddy. Like many of the Relix offerings, Live In Japan has a bootleg feel that is both immediate and rough. This version of Hot Tuna features Pete Sears, formerly of Jefferson Starship, on keyboards and accordion. He gives Hot Tuna a different dimension that is not always a smooth fit. As usual, though, the finger- picking of Jorma Kaukonen and the rumbling bass of Jack Casady dominate the stage. Their talents remain undiminished. This is an exuberant performance that must have been great to see. But home listeners may find themselves saying, “I guess you had to be there.” (by S. Colby Miller)

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Relix front + back cover

Personnel:
Jack Casady (bass)
Michael Falzarano (guitar)
Jorma Kaukonen (guitar, vocals)
Pete Sears (keyboards)
Harvey Sorgen (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Walkin’ Blues (Johnson) 5.16
02. Parchman Farm (Allison) 5.37
03. True Religion (Traditional) 5.20
04. Been So Long (Kaukonen) 3.52
05. Uncle Sam Blues (Traditional) 5.11
06. Vampire Woman (Smith) 2.59
07. Follow The Drinking Gourd (Traditional) 5.05
08. Keep Your Lamps Trimmed & Burning” (Rev. Gary Davis) – 4:19
09. Let Us Get Together Right Down Here (Davis) 3.00
10. Third Week In The Chelsea (Kaukonen) 5.05
11. 99 Year Blues (Daniels) 6.23
12. Ice Age (Kaukonen) 6.38
13. San Francisco Bay Blues (Fuller) 4.25
14. Folsom Prison Blues (Cash) 4.04
15. Mann’s Fate (Kaukonen) 6.09

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More Hot Tuna:

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