Till Brönner – That Summer (2004)

FrontCover1Till Brönner (born 6 May 1971 in Viersen, West Germany) is a jazz musician, trumpeter, singer, composer, arranger and producer.

His approach is influenced by bebop and fusion jazz, but also modern pop music, movie soundtracks (especially old German movies), country music and German pop songs. His trumpet playing is primarily inspired by Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie, and Chet Baker. His most influential teachers were Bobby Shew and Malte Burba.

Brönner was raised in Rome and received classical trumpet education at the Jesuit boarding school Aloisiuskolleg in Bonn. During high school, he completed a one-year exchange program to the United States with the organization ASSIST. He then studied jazz trumpet at the music academy in Cologne under Jiggs Whigham and Jon Eardley.

From 1989–1991, he was a member of the Peter Herbolzheimer Rhythm Combination & Brass. At the age of twenty, he became solo trumpeter of the RIAS Big Band Berlin under Horst Jankowski and Jiggs Whigham.

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He recorded his debut album, Generations of Jazz (1993) with Ray Brown and Jeff Hamilton. His vocal debut was on Love (Verve, 1998). His album That Summer (2004) landed on the German pop chart at No. 16 and made him the bestselling jazz musician in Germany’s history. Larry Klein produced his next two albums. Oceana (2006) featured appearances by vocalists Carla Bruni, Madeleine Peyroux, and Luciana Souza. Rio (2009) was a tribute to bossa nova and Brazilian music with appearances by Kurt Elling, Melody Gardot, Sergio Mendes, Milton Nascimento, and Luciana Souza.

Brönner wrote the score for Jazz Seen, a documentary about photographer William Claxton, and composed the soundtrack for Höllentour, a movie about the Tour de France bicycle race. In 2014, he released The Movie Album, which contained cover versions of songs from old movies to the present, recorded in Los Angeles.

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Brönner has worked with Monty Alexander, Tony Bennett, Dave Brubeck, Natalie Cole, Klaus Doldinger, Al Foster, Johnny Griffin, Chaka Khan, Joachim Kühn, Nils Landgren, James Moody, Aki Takase, and Ernie Watts. (by wikipedia)

And here´s is his very ucessful album “That Summer”:

German trumpeter Till Brönner’s 2004 album That Summer features the pop-jazz artists smooth, laid-back horn style. Included are such originals as “Your Way to Say Goodbye,” and “Ready or Not” as well as Brönner’s take on the standards “Bein’ Green” and “When Your Lover Has Gone.” (by by Matt Collar)

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Personnel:
Till Brönner (vocals, trumpet, flugelhorn)
Kai Brückner (guitar)
Roberto Di Gioia (keyboards)
Wolfgang Haffner (drums)
Timothy Lefebvre (bass)
Chuck Loeb (guitar)
Gareth Lübbe (biola)
Rolo Rodriguez (percussion)
Kim Sanders (background vocals)
Una Sveinbjarnardóttir (violin)

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Tracklist:
01. Your Way To Say Goodbye (Brönner/Hoare) 3.27
02. Bein’ Green (Raposo) 4.13
03. High Falls (Brönner/Hoare) 4.43
04. When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan) 5.33
05. Estrada Branca (Jobim) 3.35
06. Antonio’s Song (Franks) 5.02
07. Ready Or Not (Brönner/Hoare) 5.13
08. After Hours (Brönner/Hoare) 5.16
09. So Right, So Wrong (Brönner/Hoare) 3.54
10. Wishing Well (Brönner) 3:57
11. Rising Star (Brönner/Hoare) 7.46

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Trans-Siberian Orchestra – The Lost Christmas Eve (2004)

FrontCover1The Lost Christmas Eve is the fourth album by the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. It was released on October 12, 2004, and is the last album in their “Christmas trilogy”, with Christmas Eve and Other Stories (1996) and The Christmas Attic (1998) coming before it. All three albums, as well as their The Ghosts of Christmas Eve DVD, were featured in the box set of The Christmas Trilogy. In 2012 Trans-Siberian Orchestra toured a live production of The Lost Christmas Eve for the first time and performed the Rock Opera in over 100 arena shows across North America. In late October 2013, TSO released a narrated version of The Lost Christmas Eve much like they did in 2012 with Beethoven’s Last Night.

The Lost Christmas Eve was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in five weeks,.[4] On March 27, 2013, the album was certified Double Platinum for shipment of two million copies in the United States since its 2004 release. As of November 2014, The Lost Christmas Eve is the twentieth best-selling Christmas/holiday album in the United States during the SoundScan era of music sales tracking (March 1991 – present), having sold 2,380,000 copies according to SoundScan.

The Lost Christmas Eve is the final installment In TSO’s Christmas trilogy. “The record continues the tradition of its two predecessors by telling a musical tale of loss and redemption, this one encompassing a rundown hotel, an old toy store, a blues bar, a gothic cathedral and their respective inhabitants, whose destines are intertwined by a single enchanted evening in New York City.

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The story starts with a teardrop of infinite sorrow falling from the heavens towards a business man who forty years prior had abandoned his newborn son to a state run institution, and how there is something about Christmas Eve that allows humans to correct mistakes we have made in our lives.

In this symphonic tale, God’s youngest angel is once again sent on a mission to bring his Lord the name of the person who best continued his Son’s work on Earth. However, unlike his other journeys, the angel could only use his wings twice, once when he descended to Earth and once more when he left. Looking for a likely place to search, the angel decided to land in New York City.

As soon as he touched the ground, he notices a street performer weaving a story about the Imperial Wizards Ball of Winter to a group of children. He then entered a hotel, and as he enters the ballroom, he encounters inhabitants from the future and the past. Then he leaves and walks into a blues club, where a jazz band is playing music, eventually the whole bar gets together and starts singing along with the band, except for one man who leaves without a word refusing to be involved in this yule tide cheer.

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The angel noticed that the man left a trail of blood. The blood came from a wound in the man’s soul combined with unwept tears that only an angel could see. As he followed the man, who had been the walking home from work, the angel peered into the man’s heart to find the reason behind the man’s wounded soul.

As the angel delved into the man’s past, he saw that he had not always hated Christmas and in fact loved it like any other child. His family was a good Christian one, and he had been taught that all men are created in God’s image. He eventually got married, and his wife became pregnant. On the night of the birth, things were going as planned and normal. However, the man then noticed that there were many doctors rushing to his wife’s room, but there were none leaving.

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The doctor told him that during the birth, she had hemorrhaged and that, unfortunately, they were unable to save her. When a nurse, in an effort to console him, gave him his son who had survived, the infant appeared sickly. The doctor explained that because the mother had hemorrhaged blood so badly, the baby had been cut from oxygen for so long that he suffered permanent brain damage; he would be unable to function as a normal person in adulthood and would be lucky if he learned to walk. Enraged by this outcome, the man screams towards heaven, that if man is made in God’s image that he saw nothing of God in his son. The man gave the baby back to the nurse and asked if the child could be placed into a state facility.

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After seeing this, the angel let go of the man, who did not notice the angel peering into him. He later encountered a young girl, dressed in a Russian Imperial style winter coat, in front of a toy store. The girl claimed to be staying with her parents on a twelfth floor room of the hotel across the street. She asked him if he had any children. The man responded with a short and gruff “No,” but he knew that he lied, and for the first time in decades he thinks about him and the son. The man told the girl to go back to her room in a nearby hotel, where she claimed she was staying on the twelfth floor room twenty four, then called a cab and set off to find his son.

Eventually, he arrived at a hospital, similar to the one where his son was born, and asked about his son. A nurse took him to a room where the son, now a grown man, was rocking babies born to crack cocaine addicted mothers to sleep. When the man asked if his son could talk, the nurse, realizing that it had been a while since they had met, said, “No, but he’s a good listener.” After so many years, father and son are reunited.

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The father asked his son to move out of the complex he lived in to stay with him, to which he agreed. They then took a cab to the hotel near the toy store to find the girl and asked for the girl’s room. However, strangely enough, there was no twelfth floor to the hotel, nor had there even been any children there the entire week. Confused, the man returned to the cab with his son. The man then took out his briefcase and spilled its contents out on the sidewalk including a folder containing his son’s possessions including a picture of his wife as a little girl that he had never seen before. The son gave a puzzled look, to which the man explained that he was going to quit his job to get a job at the hospital where his son worked. The son gleefully smiled.

When the angel returned to Heaven, to report to his Lord the angel at first gave the name of the man’s son, but then after a moment of hesitation added the name of the story teller, the jazz player, and all of the other people he had seen, even the father. It was at this point that the angel realized that everyone continues the work of his Son when they, “Do unto others as you would have others do unto you.” (by wikipedia)

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The story that unfolds during Trans-Siberian Orchestra’s third Christmas CD deals with angels visiting New York City, which gives this orchestrated rock group a chance to draw upon a wide variety of modern music. The jaunty “Christmas Nights in Blue” sounds like it was influenced by Louis Jordan and is the coolest moment the orchestra has ever offered, while the driving “Christmas Jam” is Edgar Winter’s “Frankenstein” with some sleigh bells. Not that the group was ever “traditional,” but the songs here sound less influenced by the old Christmas standards, and they’re generally more fun and uplifting. The quiet numbers are delicate and beautiful, and there are a number of them in the album’s fourth quarter.

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The problem with the album is it’s nearly choked with too much material, with a great number of the songs existing solely to move the story along. That’s when the album gets too emotive, too forced, and too Electric Light Orchestra without Jeff Lynne. Good new is, whittle out the dreck and you’ve still have plenty left to enjoy. Even though it won’t win them any new fans, The Lost Christmas Eve is rumored to be an “end of the trilogy” album. If so, the trilogy ends with a big, theatrical bang, and Trans-Siberian Orchestra fans wouldn’t have it any other way. (by David Jeffries)

And we hear a lot of kitsch, a lot of heavy metal …. what a crazy mix !

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Personnel:
Chris Caffery (guitar)
Angus Clark (guitar)
Robert Kinkel (keyboards)
Jane Mangini (keyboards)
Paul O’Neill (guitar)
John O. Reilly (drums)
Al Pitrelli (guitar, keyboards)
David Z. (bass)

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Jeff Allegue (bass)
Tristan Avakian (guitar)
John Clark horns)
Carmine Giglio (keyboards)
Amy Helm (whistle)
Mee Eun Kim (keyboards)
Johnny Lee Middleton (bass)
Jon Oliva (keyboards)
Takanori Niida (drums)
Jeff Plate (drums)
Alex Skolnick (guitar)
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lots of strings and background vocals (including a gospel choir)

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Tracklist:
01. Faith Noel (Reading/O’Neill/Kinkel) 4.32
02. The Lost Christmas Eve (O’Neill/Pitrelli) 5.33
03. Christmas Dreams (O’Neill/Kinkel) 3.54
04. Wizards In Winter (O’Neill/Kinkel) 3.06
05. Remember (O’Neill/Kinkel) 3.25
06. Anno Domine (O’Neill) 2.13
07. Christmas Concerto (O’Neill) 0.42
08. Queen Of The Winter Night (Mozart/O’Neill) 3.11
09. Christmas Nights In Blue (O’Neill/Pitrelli) 4.18
10. Christmas Jazz (O’Neill) 2.16
11. Christmas Jam (O’Neill) 3.47
12. Siberian Sleigh Ride (O’Neill) 3.08
13. What Is Christmas? (O’Neill/Oliva) 2.51
14. For The Sake Of Our Brother (Reading/O’Neill/Oakeley) 3.10
15. The Wisdom Of Snow (O’Neill/Kinkel/Oliva) 2.00
16. Wish Liszt (Toy Shop Madness) (Liszt/O’Neill) 3.42
17. Back To A Reason (Part II) (O’Neill/Oliva) 4.52
18. Christmas Bells, Carousels & Time (O’Neill/Oliva) 1.00
19. What Child Is This? (O’Neill/Kinkel) 6.00
20. O’ Come All Ye Faithful (Traditional) 1.30
21. Christmas Canon Rock (O’Neill) 4.57
22. Different Wings (O’Neill/Pitrelli) 2.44
23. Midnight Clear (O’Neill) 1.31

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Jon Lord – Beyond The Notes (2004)

FrontCover1Beyond the Notes is a studio album by former Deep Purple keyboard player Jon Lord, released in 2004. It features guest appearances from Frida Lyngstad, Sam Brown, Miller Anderson, Thijs van Leer, Pete York, and Trondheim Soloists.

Organist Jon Lord supposedly left Deep Purple to retire and take it easy, after he’d spent much of his life recording and touring the world with Purple and other artists. But upon his exit from the band, Lord played gigs and issued albums on his own, such as 2004’s Beyond the Notes. The split provided Lord with the opportunity to pursue some unexpected musical avenues, as the album sees a detour into soothing classical music. Gone is the blaring guitar through Marshall stacks and Lord’s overdriven organ rocking back and forth — in its place is the jazzy sound of “Cologne Again” a lovely piano ballad, and the string-heavy album closer, “Music for Miriam.” While it’s not unheard of for a rock musician to take the orchestral plunge, Beyond the Notes is one of the few instances where it works surprisingly well and doesn’t come off as a mere detour.(by Greg Prato)

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‘Jon Lord is addicted to harmony. Leaving Deep Purple meant leaving his best friends and a life that’s “a bubble, a support system”, as he himself puts it.

But putting an end to compromises did a world of good to keyboarder and composer Jon Lord. His latest album “Beyond The Notes” is the best proof of this. A free spirit blows through the ten tracks of the album. Pavanes and pop songs are peopled by musicians from drummer to violinist, from a rock band to members of a string orchestra. Oriental rhythms pushing classical melodies forward.

Jon Lord takes things seriously. Until he discovers something that does make him smile. “I call it ‘Jon Lord music’. I think the Americans have a label for it – they call it ‘classical cross-over’. So I’m going to call it ‘crossical class-over’. There’s elements of what I love out of orchestral music and there’s elements of what I love out of jazz, and what I love out
of folk music and rock music. And you throw it all in and that’s how you make the cake and experiment.”

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If you watch him at work in the studio, you quickly realise: Jon Lord loves people. He loves the 16 string players of the Trondheim Soloists just as much as his guitarist Paul Shigihara, keyboarder Matthias Krauss, bass player Urs Fuchs, and songstress Sabine von Baaren. He is friends with co-producer Mario Argandona, with songstress Sam Brown, and guest vocalist Miller Anderson. And of course he’s friends with Anni-Frid Lyngstad. Anni who? Frida. Frida of Abba. Jon Lord wrote “The Sun Will Shine Again” for the Swedish lady.

“We became friends a few years ago. And once we’d become friends, she actually asked me if I’d write a song for her. Easier said than done. When you’ve got a voice that is that specific and that glorious. So, I took about three years doing it, and only really found the right song just a few months ago and played it to her and luckily, she liked it.”

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Jon Lord is sitting in an easy chair. His long white hair is held by a ponytail and an equally white beard surrounds his face. The eyes of this humorous man often wander off, rather bridging time than space. He thinks a lot about his past, his life – something that also results in “Beyond The Notes”. “A Smile When I Shook His Hand” is his tribute to the late George Harrison. “George Harrison was a very, very close friend for many years and
one of those losses that are really hard to deal with. I miss him a great deal. The track is about the lightness and happiness I got from knowing that man.”

Tony Ashton is another close friend whose loss Jon Lord had to face recently. To Jon Lord, this keyboarder, vocalist, and painter was like a brother. “I’ll Send You A Postcard” is Jon’s musical memorial for his friend.

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“Music For Miriam” was written in 1995, the day after the death of Jon Lord’s mother. This spontaneous composition was then performed during her funeral by a string quartet and was already released on the album “Pictured Within”. Now, Jon Lord has rearranged this beautiful elegy. In a big orchestral arrangement, his mother’s character seems to be better represented.

And another track serves coming to terms with the past: “De Profundis”, “DP”, treats his separation from Deep Purple. Is music a kind of therapy? Jon Lord laughs. It certainly is a way to help him make a new start.

Even though it seems easier to him to compose sad songs, Jon Lord hasn’t lost his smile. “Telemann Experiment” is the best example for this: a serious piece of music at heart, Jon Lord here combines the style of the German Baroque composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) with a Swedish polka.

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The fact that “Beyond The Notes” was recorded in Germany underlines the artist’s wish to tread new, own paths. Instead of working in one of the halls of fame of British music, Jon Lord chose the Hansa Haus Studios in Bonn, where he recorded his new album in June and July 2004.

“I lived down in Munich for a few months toward the end of the 70s. And I’ve always enjoyed the country. It seems to have taken me to its heart in a way that it understands that I’m not ‘just’ the keyboard player of Deep Purple, but that I have other musical aspirations outside of that, and this country seems to have understood that better than most.” (by deep-purple.net)

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Personnel:
Emilia Amper (nyckel harpe)
Mario Argandona (percussion, drums, background vocals)
Sabine van Baaren (background vocals)
Urs Fuchs (bass)
Michael Heupel (flute)
Matthias Krauss (keyboards)
Thijs van Leer (flute)
Jon Lord (keyboards)
Andy Miles (clarinet)
Paul Shigihara (guitar)
Gerhard Vetter (oboe)
Pete York (drums)
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Miller Anderson (vocals on 08.)
Sam Brown (vocals on 03.)
Frida (vocals on 06.)
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The Vocaleros (background vocals)
Cologne String Ensemble under the direction of Albert Jung
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Trondheim Soloists

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Tracklist:
01. Miles Away 7.42
02. De Profundis 7.22
03. One From The Meadow (8:14)
04. Cologne Again 6.47
05. I’ll Send You A Postcard (Pavane for Tony Ashton) 6.57
06. The Sun Will Shine Again 4.24
07. A Smile When I Shook His Hand (In Memorian George Harrison) 7.31
08. November Calls 5.03
09. The Telemann Experiment 7.08
10. Music For Miriam (Version for String Orchestra) 8.05

All songs composed by Jon Lord. All lyrics by Sam Brown, except “November Calls” by Jon Lord

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Avril Lavigne – Under My Skin (2004)

FrontCover1Under My Skin is the second studio album by Canadian singer-songwriter Avril Lavigne that was released through the RCA Records Label internationally throughout May 2004. Lavigne wrote most of the album with singer-songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk, who invited her to a Malibu in-house recording studio shared by Kreviazuk and her husband Raine Maida, where Lavigne recorded many of the songs. The album was produced by Maida, Don Gilmore, and Butch Walker.

Under My Skin debuted at number-one on the U.S. Billboard 200 albums chart and according to Billboard magazine, was ranked number 149 on the list of top-selling albums of the 2000s. It has sold more than 10 million copies worldwide, 3 million of which were sold in the United States, ranking the album No. 149 on the Billboard 200 Decade End Chart. Because of the album’s darker, heavier, more aggressive vibe reminiscent of post-grunge, nu metal and more melodic rocker songs, it received generally positive reception from critics. (by wikipedia)

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Part of Avril Lavigne’s appeal — a large part of it, actually — is that she’s a brat, acting younger than her 17 years on her 2002 debut, Let Go, and never seeming like she much cared about the past (she notoriously mispronounced David Bowie’s name when reading Grammy nominations), or anything for that matter. She lived for the moment, she partied with sk8er bois, she didn’t want anything complicated, and she sang in a flat, plain voice that illustrated her age as much as her silly, shallow lyrics. Those words got disproportionate attention because they were so silly and shallow, but most listeners just didn’t care because, thanks to producer gurus the Matrix, they were delivered in a shiny package filled with incessant, nagging hooks — a sound so catchy it came to define the mainstream not long after Let Go hit the radio. The Matrix became ubiquitous on the strength of their work with Lavigne, who herself became a big star, earning constant play on radio and MTV, kick starting a fashion trend of ties-n-tank tops for girls and inexplicably providing a touchstone for indie rock queen Liz Phair’s mainstream makeover. Fame, however, didn’t pull the two camps together; it pushed them their separate ways, as the Matrix went on to record their own album and Avril decided to turn serious, working with a variety of co-writers and producers, including fellow Canadian singer/songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk, for her second album, 2004’s Under My Skin. Lavigne hasn’t only shed her trademark ties for thrift-shop skirts, she’s essentially ditched the sound of Let Go too, bringing herself closer to the mature aspirations of fellow young singer/songwriter Michelle Branch.

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Since Avril is still a teenager and still a brat, it’s livelier than Branch. Even when it sags under minor keys and mid-tempos, it’s fueled on teen angst and a sense of entitled narcissism, as if she’s the first to discover the joys of love and pain of heartache. In a sense, she comes across as Alanis Morissette’s kid sister, especially now that the Matrix are gone and the hooks have been pushed to the background for much of the record; it’s the teen spin on Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, where she’s self-consciously trying to grow as an artist. Naturally, this means that Under My Skin is less fun than Let Go since there’s nothing as giddy as “Sk8er Boi,” even if much of it is written from a similarly adolescent vantage. Lavigne’s collaborators, Kreviazuk and Evan Taubenfeld chief among them, have helped streamline her awkward writing, and her performances are also assured, which almost makes up for the thinness of her voice, which sounds far younger than the meticulous arrangements around it. So, Under My Skin is a bit awkward, sometimes sounding tentative and unsure, sometimes clicking and surging on Avril’s attitude and ambition. But it’s telling that the one song that really catches hold on the first listen and stands out on repeated spins is “He Wasn’t,” the fastest, loudest, catchiest, and best song here, and the one closest to the spirit and sound of Let Go — it’s not that Lavigne hasn’t matured, but it’s that her talents are better suited on music that’s a little less contemplative and deliberate than Under My Skin. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Kenny Aronoff (drums, percussion)
Kenny Cresswell (drums)
Mike Elizondo (bass)
Sam Fisher (violin)
Samuel Formicola (violin)
Josh Freese (drums)
Brian E. Garcia (percussion)
Chantal Kreviazuk (keyboards)
Jason Lader (bass)
Bill Lafler (drums)
Avril Lavigne (vocals, guitar)
Nick Lashley (guitar)
Victor Lawrence (cello)
Raine Maida (keyboards)
Jon O’Brien (keyboards)
Shanti Randall (viola)
Mark Robertson (violin)
Static (keyboards)
Evan Taubenfeld (guitar, drums, background vocals)
Brooks Wackerman (drums)
Butch Walker (guitar, bass, percussion, keyboards, background vocals)
Michael Ward (guitar)
Patrick Warren (strings, keyboards, chamberlain)
Phil X (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Take Me Away (Lavigne/Taubenfeld) 2.57
02. Together (Lavigne/Kreviazuk)  3.14
03. Don’t Tell Me (Lavigne/Taubenfeld) 3.21
04. He Wasn’t  (Lavigne/Kreviazuk) 3.00
05. How Does It Feel (Lavigne/Kreviazuk) 3.44
06. My Happy Ending (Lavigne/Walker) 4.02
07. Nobody’s Home (Lavigne) 3.32
08. Forgotten (Lavign/Kreviazuk) 3.16
09. Who Knows (Lavigne/Kreviazuk) 3.30
10.  Fall To Pieces (Lavigne/Maida) 3.28
11.  Freak Out (Lavigne/ Taubenfeld/Brann) 3.11
12. Slipped Away (Lavigne/Kreviazuk) 3.33

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Lady Pank – Teraz (2004)

FrontCover1Lady Pank is a popular Polish rock band. It was started in 1982 in Warsaw by Jan Borysewicz and Andrzej Mogielnicki. Its first famous song was “Mała Lady Punk” (Little Lady Punk). Lady Pank garnered some attention in the United States in 1986 when MTV placed the video for the band’s single “Less Than Zero” on heavy rotation.

Lady Pank is quite a curiosity on the Polish musical market. They got popular before they were actually… formed! The group, which was originally planning to call itself “Żużel”, received a lot of media coverage as a result of a skilfully conducted promotional campaign combined with group’s unquestionnable talent.
Lady Pank’s lineup has changed many times over the years. The most frequent changes concerned the drummers and guitar-players, but the group has always remained a quintet with an easily-recognizable guitar sound. The core of the group are Jan Borysewicz and Janusz Panasewicz, who have been constituting the image of the group from the very beginning.

Lady Pank is a quintet, although there have been times when more musicians were involved. Despite all changes in the lineup, the basic shape of the group remains the same: lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass and drums. The role of the frontman is played by Janusz Panasewicz, with occasional help from Jan Borysewicz who sings a couple of songs too.

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The band’s most popular songs are: “Tańcz głupia, tańcz”, “Mniej niż zero”, “Wciąż bardziej obcy”, “Kryzysowa narzeczona”, “Zamki na piasku, “Tacy sami”, “Zostawcie Titanica”, “Mała wojna”, “Zawsze tam gdzie ty”, “Znowu pada deszcz”, “Na granicy”, “Stacja Warszawa”.

The recording history of Lady Pank is impressive. Their discography consists of about 20 albums and over 200 tracks, many of which exist in a few versions (eg. studio, live, English-language, acoustic, techno). Juni 28, 2004 saw the issue of the latest Lady Pank’s album so far – “Teraz” (“Now”). (by wikipedia)

And here´s their last album … I understand no word … but the music … wow ! A real strong rock album … with many sweet memories into the history of rock …

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Personnel:
Jan Borysewicz (guitar, vocals, piano)
Kuba Jabłoński (drums, percussion)
Krzysztof Kieliszkiewicz (bass)
Janusz Panasewicz (vocals)
Michał Sitarski (guitar)
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Wojtek Olszak (keyboards)
Mariusz “Georgia” Pieczara (vocals)
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Tracklist:
01 Sexy-Plexi 3.03
02. http://www.god.com 3.42
03 Krzycz Mały, Krzycz 3.57
04. Stacja Warszawa 4.22
05 Mój Dom Wariatów 3.52
06 Bóg I Boogie Woogie 3.34
07. Walker 4.30
08. Pani Moich Snów 4.06
09. Lachy Na Strachy 3.52
10. Ciepły Śnieg 6.20

Music: Jan Borysewicz
Lyrics: Andrzej Mogielnicki

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Maplewood – Same (2004)

FrontCover1This is the sought-after debut album by Brooklyn’s Maplewood, originally released in 2004. Rising up on a breeze of three-part harmonies and 12-string acoustic guitars, Maplewood evokes a joyride up the Pacific Coast Highway.

Like the scent of night jasmine in bloom, the Maplewood sound wafts from the canyons to the beaches and out into the desert, an ode to a Californian ideal mapped out by such precursors as America, Bread, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Gene Clark, ’70s-era Beach Boys, late-period Byrds, The Stone Canyon Band, John Phillips, Neil Young, Hearts And Flowers, and even CSNY. For the five dudes who make up Maplewood, lost gems like “Ventura Highway” and “Make It With You” evolved from guilty pleasure to buried treasure: in such castoff anthems of mellowness, Maplewood managed to find improbable inspiration.

Call it canyon rock, call it breeze rock, Maplewood is like a desert sunrise, like a dappled afternoon up in the orange groves, like a moon-lit walk on the beach and a swig of dandelion wine with the one you love the most. (by forcedexposure.com)

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Maplewood is a low-key indie rock supergroup with members of Champale, Koester, Cub Country, and Nada Surf gathered together in the spirit of ’70s canyon rock. Their self-titled debut brings back hazy memories of groups like America, Bread, and CSNY. The kind of groups who always seemed ready to break out their acoustic guitars and serenade the sweet hippie chicks around campfires and in hazy bars with heartfelt lead vocals and harmonies, ringing open-chord strumming, lazy tempos, and occasional pedal steel for added melancholy. There are also echoes of more modern bands like R.E.M. on “Darlene,” Lambchop on “Bright Eyes,” and Teenage Fanclub on the chiming “Morning Star.” The spirit of Matthew Sweet also hovers over the proceedings, as he’s been treading these light rock boards for quite a while. So there you have all the influences and connections, all of which don’t mean much if Maplewood can’t deliver the songs. Luckily, they do. Tunes like “Indian Summer,” “Little Dreamer Girl,” and the quiet epic “Desert Queen” sound like they were taken right off a Time/Life Sounds of the 70’s comp. The rest are solid and memorable too. They escape being mere revivalists by investing their hearts into the material. There is no winking or obvious lifting of melodies. They create the feel of the sensitive California ’70s with an easy, sweet manner and plenty of laid-back soul. Not bad for a bunch of short-haired, East Coast fellas. Line them up next to the lovely Autumn Defense and let the ’70s begin again. (by Tim Sendra)
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“For me, there is something wonderfully familiar about the sound of Maplewood. Ever since McGuinn started combining those basic elements—chiming 12-string, soaring harmonies, laid-back California cool—so many years ago, the genre itself (call it what you will) earned the right to be called timeless.
Maplewood are a much newer band, but their sound rings as true to me now as when I bought my first acoustic guitar back in the late sixties. I speak from experience when I say that a lot of work can go into something sounding so effortless. Maplewood understood this from the start. I have always been a fan… from the opening bars of “Indian Summer”—a song we were destined to cover (& we rarely do covers )—to this latest collection.
I was an early convert and it’s clear I’m not alone. The sound that Maplewood wears with such ease has never felt better….
If you’re not already a fan, this new record will soon convert you.
Enjoy.”
(Gerry Beckley, America)

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When Maplewood released their self-titled debut in 2004, it was as if a strong, hot Santa Ana wind had blown through New York’s indie-rock scene. Here was a New York band that didn’t care to sound like the Ramones or Television or the Velvet Underground, but rather one that cast its eyes westward, toward the golden shores of California and – unusual for any band in the 21st century let alone one from Brooklyn – to the laidback legacies of the Beach Boys, the Byrds, the Flying Burritos, and CSNY.
If fans of the members’ previously well-received bands Nada Surf, Champale, and Koester were a bit thrown off by the breezy turn, it didn’t take long for the harmony-heavy Maplewood sound to catch on, as the group showcased at New York’s CMJ Festival, shared a stage with Liz Phair and Camper Van Beethoven at South By Southwest in Austin, Texas, and was soon finding its way into the pages of Spin, The New Yorker, and the Wall Street Journal. Pop Matters declared Maplewood to be “one toke away from the cosmos and harbingers of a movement already afoot. [Their music] makes you want to hit the highway and fly on the ground past the outer limits“. Paste found their first album, which featured guest appearances from members of the Hold Steady and Sparklehorse, to have “a gorgeous, pot-smoking melancholy that perfectly recaptures the easy, breezy sound of vintage FM radio.“ And Newsday proclaimed Maplewood one of New York’s top ten rock bands. (by tapetenrecords)

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Personnel:
Ira Elliot (drums, Percussion, vocals)
Steve Koester (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Mark Rozzo (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Craig Schoen (vocals, bass, guitar)
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Elaine Ahn (cello)
Judd Counsell (drums, percussion)
Kate Hohman (violin)
Joe McGinty (piano)
Geoff Sanoff (chamberlin)
Alan Weatherhead (pedal steel-guitar, wurlitzer)
Jude Webre (bass, wurlitzer)

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Tracklist:
01. Indian Summer (Rozzo) 3.16
02. Darlene (Schoen) 2.32
03. Gemini On The Way (Koester/Rozzo) 3.41
04. Little Dreamer Girl (Koester) 3.38
05. Santa Fe (Koester) 3.14
06. Be My Friend (Rozzo) 2.10
07. Bright Eyes (Koester) 3.23
08. Morning Star (Rozzo) 2.44
09. Sea Hero (Koester) 323
10. Think It Through (Rozzo) 3.12
11. Poconos (Schoen) 2.39
12. Carolina Jasmine (Koester) 4.00
13. Desert Queen (Rozzo) 5.37

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Lars Winnerbäck – Vatten under broarna (2004)

FrontCover1Lars Mattias Winnerbäck (born 19 October 1975 in Stockholm) is a Swedish singer and songwriter. He was born in Stockholm but spent his childhood in Linköping, where he attended Katedralskolan. He moved back to Stockholm in 1996, the same year he released his first album, Dans med svåra steg. He is now one of Sweden’s most popular artists.

The influence of songwriters like Carl Michael Bellman, Evert Taube, Bob Dylan, Ulf Lundell and Cornelis Vreeswijk shines through in Winnerbäck’s exclusively Swedish lyrics, which deal with shallowness, prejudice in society, as well as romance, relationships and anxiety. Several songs depict the difference between living in small town Linköping and the capital Stockholm.

His vinyl records were re-released in October 2011, many of them charting again on the Sverigetopplistan, the official Swedish Albums Chart. (by wikipedia)

And this is one of his beautiful albums … unfortunately I don´t understand Swedish, but I´m sure, this man has very much to say.

And even I don´t understand the words – the music is brilliant, a real fine album from a great singer/songwriter … listen to the music and you´ll know what I mean. Discover this masterpiece !

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Personnel:
Ola Gustafsson (guitar, banjo, steel-guitar, mandolin, dobro)
Sara Isaksson (keyboards, drums, percussion, vocals)
Lars Winnerbäck (vocals, guitar, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Se dig om (Look Around You) 3.16
02. Det är visst någon som är tillbaka (Seems Like Someone Is Back) 3.32
03. Elegi (Elegy) 4.38
04. Jag är hos dig igen (I’m With You Again) 3.55
05. Dom tomma stegen (The Empty Steps) 4.57
06. Hjärter dams sista sång (The Queen Of Hearts’ Final Song) 3.55
07. Stackars (Poor) 3.22
08. Hon kommer från främmande vidder (She Comes From Foreign Plains) 4.14
09. Dom sista drömmarna del II (The Final Dreams Part II) 3.53
10. Mareld 6.50

All songs written by Lars Winnerbäck

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