Gary Hoey – Deja Blues (2013)

FrontCover1Deja Blues is an interesting collection of blues tunes that features the blues skills of the talented rock and surf style guitarist Gary Hoey. Most people know him as an instrumental guitar player along the lines of a Steve Vai or Joe Satriani because of his billboard hit “Hocus Pocus,” or possibly know him from his Ho Ho Hoey Christmas albums, or have seen trading licks on tour with Jeff Beck, Ted Nugent, Peter Frampton, and Dick Dale. Let’s set the record straight – Gary is not a one trick rock guitar shredder.

The album has many Gary Hoey originals, some of which feature great guest appearances, including James Montgomery on “Boot Hill Blues,” Jon Butcher on the Texas Shuffle “Almost Over You,” Johnny A on “She’s Walking,” and finally, Frank Hannon on the southern rocking “Got to Believe.” There are a couple of covers of traditional blues songs where Gary makes the blues rock. “Going Down” is a down, dirty rockin’ take on the Don Nix penned classic recorded by everyone from the late great Freddie King to Led Zeppelin and Pearl Jam. Along with that is the lightly distorted Albert King classic “Born Under A Bad Sign.” An interesting track at the end is “Hold Your Head Up High” which features some slide guitar playing. If you close your eyes and forget who you’re listening to you might confuse this with an outtake form a Derek Trucks Band release.

GaryHoey

There are two stand out tracks on this album though. “Stranger” is an atmospheric mysterious blues where the tones clearly set the mood for one of the lyrics when Gary sings about being “like a stranger in my own town.” The best work on here though is when Gary lets his guitar do all the work on the instrumental slow blues title track – “Deja Blues.” The tension builds and reaches what you think is the peak at each chorus only to be taken to another level with another solo and then finally releases you back to the original slow blues jam.

If you’re looking for an album that straddles that fine line of blues and rock without turning into nothing but a guitar shredders excuse to solo than this fits the bill. It’s always interesting to see how artists who are mostly known for a different style of playing interpret the blues. Deja Blues does the blues justice with his pyrotechnic fretboard fluidity and ability to blend them with his rock background without losing the feeling and intent. (by bluesrockreview.com)

BackCover

Personnel:
Gary Hoey (guitar, vocals, bass, keyboards)
Matt Scurfield (drums)
+
Johnny A. (guitar, slide-guitar on 05.)
Jon Butcher (guitar on 03.)
Frank Hannon (slide-guitar on 08.)
James Montgomery (harmonica on 01.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Boss You Around (Hoey) 3.08
02. Boot Mill Blues /Hoey) 3.00
03. Almost Over You (Hoey) 4.44
04. Going Down (Nix) 3.40
05 She’s Walking (Hoey) 3.26
06. Stranger (Hoey) 4.22
07. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.59
08. Got To Believe (Hoey) 3.40
09. Deja Blues (Hoey) 4.22
10. Hold Your Head Up High (Hoey) 4.17

 

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Teeny Tucker – Voodoo To Do You (2013)

FrontCover1Upon checking out the title, along with the track list, which includes song titles such as “Voodoo Woman”, “Voodoo Voodoo”, “It’s Your Voodoo Working” , and “Love Spell”, one might be able to identify the recurring theme of Teeny Tucker’s latest album, if hard-pressed. That being said, Teeny Tucker doesn’t need voodoo to get anyone to love this recording, Voodoo To Do You! She’s got it covered with powerful vocals, down-home blues, choice song selections and a great band which includes guitarist Robert Hughes, bassist Robert Blackburn, drummer Darrell Jumper, David Gastel on harmonica and keyboards.

Tucker kicks this thirteen track album off with a fantastic cover of Koko Taylor’s “Voodoo Woman”. It’s fast paced Blues, buttered on one side with her cool raspy vocals, and on the other side, with Hughes’ killer electric riffs. Linda Dachtyl, sitting in on this one with her B3, adds a cohesive bonding that nicely pulls the song together. Then without skipping a beat, the intro to Howlin’ Wolf’s “Commit a Crime” gently rolls in. Hughes scores big points on this one as he nicely sets the song in motion. Introducing new lyrics, Tucker tackles this one from a woman’s point of view. “Tough Lover” is another cover, with a little modification. This one isn’t your Etta James’ version. Tucker takes the original and slows it down a bit, which I think is a great decision. Interestingly, as the tempo increases, Hughes briefly steers the song from Blues to Rockabilly before bringing it back home again.

One of my favorite tracks on the album is Tucker’s rendition of “Death Don’t Have No Mercy”, originally by Gary Davis, and covered later by the Grateful Dead. I love the guitar licks Hughes lays down on this dark and sullen song. I can feel the emotion pouring off his guitar strings as he plays. This is probably the coolest song on the album.

TeenyTucker01

Tucker must have had her mojo working double time when she got the idea for the closer song, “Sun Room”. This upbeat original, about the history and spirit of the legendary Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, coincidentally was recorded at the Sun Studios. When this song plays, I feel momentarily transported to the studio itself. Tucker makes it easy to envision the iconic building at 706 Union Avenue, with her crafted lyrics. (by Phillip Smith)

Teeny Tucker comes honestly to the blues. Her father Tommy Tucker was the first to have a hit with “Hi-Heel Sneakers”. Her earliest musical experiences were in church in Dayton, Ohio but in her teens, Teeny discovered her true calling: deep, down-home blues. Since then she has paid her dues and gained national recognition as an independent recording artist, singer and songwriter. “Voodoo To Do You” is her fourth disc on TeBo Records. The fourth time may be the “charm” to catapult Ms. Tucker to worldwide fame. She tells great stories, struts her tough stuff, rocks with her band, delivers fresh covers of classics such as “I’m A Woman”, laughs at herself and croons tender blues ballads such as “Death Don’t Have No Mercy”. Many of the songs revolve around the mystique of “voodoo” from working it on a miscreant lover to the spells cast by a new love interest. Many CDs today are not worthy of listening from start to finish, but “Voodoo To Do You” by Teeny Tucker is one terrific tune after another. (by Linda Yohn)

TeenyTucker02

Personnel:
Robert Blackburn (bass)
David Gastel (harmonica, keyboards)
Robert Hughes (guitar)
Darrell Juper (drums)
Teeny Tucker (vocals)
+
background vocals:
Mary Lusco-Ashley – Paula Brown . Teeny Tucker
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Linda Dachtyl (organ, piano on 01., 03., 06. + 09.)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Voodoo Woman (Taylor/Eyebell) 3.27
02. Commit a Crime (Burnett) 3.26
03. Love Spell (Hughes/Tucker) 3.59
04. Voodoo Voodoo (Coleman/Avril) 2.26
05. Tuff Lover (James) 2.22
06. Can Do All That (Hughes/Tucker) 3.18
07. Shoes (Tucker) 2.48
08. It’s Your Voodoo Workin’ (Sheffield) 2.28
09. Muddier Things Get (Hughes/Tucker) 2.47
10. I’m a Woman (Leiber/Stoller) 2.57
11. Hard Time Killing Floor Blues (Curtis) 2.51
12. Death Don’t Have No Mercy (Davis) 3.12
13. Sun Room (Hughes/Tucker) 3.12

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Peter Maxwell Davies – Piano Concerto; Worldes Blis (2013)

FrontCover1As with most releases in the Naxos series on Maxwell Davies, these recordings were previously issued on Collins Classics, Worldes Blis in 1993 and the Piano Concerto in 1998. On the back cover CD insert, there Read more The Sunday Telegraph to proclaim the concerto as “one of the most attractive and immediately likeable piano concertos to appear for some time.” Although I liked it, I would never make such a claim. This piece, though not as astringent or cerebral as some of Maxwell Davies’s music, is far from “immediately likeable.” It sounds, rather, like Prokofiev swathed in the harmonies of Berio or, at times, Ligeti, which makes it interesting but certainly not immediately appealing to the average listener. Crushed brass chords underscore the piano’s often atonal tinkling, and even attempts at producing melodic themes challenge the listener with their atonal or bitonal harmonic clashes.

Again, the liner notes belie what one actually hears, describing “the tense ‘Scots-snap’ rhythms” and “A vivacious dance.” If you can dance to this stuff, you must have three legs and be hardwired in your brain for shifting cross-rhythms. Again, this is not a criticism of the music, which I found to be extremely interesting and among Maxwell Davies’s best works, but it is a very challenging piece with almost foreboding harmonies, and to pretend otherwise is to deceive the potential listener.

PeterMaxwellDavies

Since the concerto was dedicated to pianist Kathryn Stott, who plays it here, it is almost a foregone conclusion that her playing would be quite fine, and it is. I found her to be more of a cerebral rather than an emotional player, at least from this recording, and thus I’d have to say that the music suits her perfectly. Maxwell Davies appears to have assigned the most emotional passages to the orchestra, which keeps up an almost unbroken undercurrent of unease and menace, while the piano soloist merely overlays her commentary on this canvas. As a result I found this piece to be much more in line with Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta despite the very different melodic and harmonic style. The middle-movement Adagio , which is ironically the briefest of the three movements, presents the listener with a moment of relative inertia—the music barely, almost imperceptibly, nudges forward—but not of any calm or comfort. (Oddly enough, the use of pizzicato bass lines under the piano here almost, but not quite, put it in the realm of Third Stream music.) The third movement returns us to the unease of the first.

Booklet02A

Worldes Blis, written in 1966-69, is based on a 13th-century plainchant yet is entirely instrumental. Here, Maxwell Davies’s flirtation with the kind of sound world being created by Ligeti is all the more obvious; even the use of a harp keeps the textures in the low range for much of the piece, and it seems to me to be more concerned with texture than anything else, though the slowly rising melody that begins in a solo cello is in some ways more melodic than anything in the concerto. Much of Worldes Blis has the same kind of rhythmic stasis and aura of unease that one hears in the middle movement of the piano concerto. It is, however, an interesting experiment in sound textures and suspension of time, so to speak, and it works very well. Slowly, almost imperceptibly at first, the music becomes busier, yet these “ Allegro s” will never be confused with a Mahler scherzo or a Prokofiev symphonic finale.

As the music becomes busier, it also becomes denser both harmonically and rhythmically, pulling the listener along but not quite engaging one except to admire the cleverness of his construction. In brief, an interesting contribution to the growing Maxwell Davies collection. If only Naxos would do the same for the music of Nancy Van de Vate! —FANFARE: Lynn René Bayley,

Scott

Personnel:
Kathryn Scott (piano)
+
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Peter Maxwell Davies

BackCover1

Tracklist:

Piano Concerto (1997) (36:02)
01. I – Moderato – Più Mosso – Andante – Più Mosso – Andante 17.22
02. II – Adagio 8.35
03. III – Allegro 10.04

Worldes Blis (1966-69) (42:23)
04. Lento Recitando – Lentissimo 18.50
05. L’ Istesso Tempo 4.31
06. Allegro 3.30
07. Poco Più Mosso 6.19
08. Allegro 1.46
09. Lento 7.27

Music composed by Peter Maxwell Davies

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Trudy Lynn – Royal Oaks Blues Cafe (2013)

frontcover1Houston native Trudy Lynn has been singing rhythm and blues since the 60’s and has had albums issued on several labels since her Ichiban debut in 1989. In recent years she has not been prolific but, as she explains in the sleevenotes, she was searching for the right songs. The result is an album that brings together some fairly obscure songs from blues singers and writers of yesteryear with two of Trudy’s own compositions.
Trudy has a seasoned voice which has enough grit to convey the emotions of the songs, an excellent example being “Country Man Blues”, a song once covered by Candye Kane. Here Trudy’s voice really conveys the slightly risqué lyrics and both Steve and Jonn contribute significantly. The piano features on “Street Walkin’ Daddy”, a hit in 1950 for Margie Day but Jonn plays some wonderfully relaxed guitar too. Trudy’s own songs stand up well in comparison: her “Every Side Of Lonesome” has a live feel with lots of handclaps and backing vocals, Jonn on slide and Steve’s harp almost buzzing in the background, a very catchy shuffle with strong vocals from Trudy. “Down In Memphis” is Trudy’s other credit, a short tune with some striking harp leading on a rocking little number in praise of the Bluff city. Several of the songs Trudy has selected to sing here are what might be described as ‘suggestive’, trudylynn2none more so than Clara Smith’s “Whip It To A Jelly” which closes the album with Steve’s harp working very well with Trudy’s vocal, a late night piece with Jonn on acoustic guitar. Jay McShann’s “Confessin’ The Blues” provides a strong opener, a song that goes back to the 40’s, all three front line players providing strong solos.
On Don Robey’s “Play The Honky Tonks” (a hit for Marie Adams in 1951) Randy’s piano is well to the fore.
My research failed to discover anything about four other songs here. “Feel It” is credited to B Campbell, another suggestive lyric in a performance which, especially Steve’s harp, is relaxed but effective. Another relaxed performance is the fine “Effervescent Daddy” (E Bennett) on which Trudy’s voice is a little smoother than is typical of the album where she usually has more grit in her vocals. However, on this song she is much smoother, as befits the style of the song. “I’m Gonna Put You Down” (W Booze) is a slow blues on which Trudy’s expressive, deep voice is very effective and “Red Light” (V Green) is an upbeat rocker which makes use of some of the same imagery as “I Caught The Katy” and is a real toe-tapper as Jonn ramps up the pace in his solo as the piano and harp underpin Trudy’s vocals.
There is plenty to enjoy here and it is good to hear Trudy in such good voice, sounding very much like the early female pioneers that she has sought to celebrate on this Album. (by bluesblastmagazine.com)
trudylynn3
Personnel:
Steve Krase (harmonica, background vocals on 04.)
Eugene ‘Spare Time’ Murray  (bass)
Carl Owens (drums)
Jonn Del Toro Richardson (guitar)
Trudy Lynn (vocals)
Randy Wall  (piano)
+
Richard Cholawian (drums on 07.)
Rock Romano (bass, background vocals on 04.)
Robert ‘Pee Wee’ Stephens (piano on 04. + 07., background vocals on 04.)

backcover2

Tracklist:
01. Confessin’ The Blues (McShan) 3.51
02. Play The Honky Tonks (Robey) 4.27
03. Feel It (Campbell) 4.44
04. Every Side Of Lonesome (Lynn) 3.56
05. Country Man Blues (unknown) 3.57
06. Street Walkin’ Daddy (G.Day/M.Day) 5.35
07. Red Light (Green) 4.38
08. I’m Gonna’ Put You Down (Booze) 5.19
09. Down In Memphis (Lynn) 2.43
10. Effervescent Daddy (Bennett) 4.10
11. Whip It To A Jelly (Smith) 5.05

trudylynn

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stevekraseSteve Krase

Greg Lake – Songs Of A Lifetime (2013)

frontcover1 Greg Lake, a multi-instrumentalist who was a member of King Crimson and Emerson, Lake and Palmer, died yesterday, December 7, at age 69.

Lake, who was a singer, songwriter, musician and producer, had been battling cancer for quite some time.
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His death was confirmed via his official Twitter account by Stewart Young, Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s longtime manager.

“Yesterday, December 7th, I lost my best friend to a long and stubborn battle with cancer,” Young wrote. “Greg Lake will stay in my heart forever, as he has always been. His family would be grateful for privacy during this time of their grief.”

The news comes nine months after Lake’s bandmate, keyboardist Keith Emerson, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Yes keyboardist Geoff Downes was among first rockers to pay his respects, saying, “Very sad about Greg Lake. I had the privilege of working with him on several projects. His great talent will be sorely missed by all. Another genius has passed away. 2016 has truly been an annus horribilis in musical history.” (by guitarworld.com)

greglake01

Songs of a Lifetime is a live album by British musician Greg Lake. It contains songs played by Lake during his Songs of a Lifetime tour that highlight his career as a musician.

“It’s those classic songs and the stories behind them that make Greg Lake’s Songs Of A Lifetime so special. While the former Emerson, Lake & Palmer, King Crimson and one-time Asia vocalist and bassist penned his autobiography Lucky Man, “songs would crop up that were in some way crucial or extremely important in the development of my career,” giving Lake the idea to go out and perform these tunes – both his own and ones that influenced him.

Blasting storm effects, jabbing keys and a drum machine back Lake’s powerful vocal on a snippet of the King Crimson classic, “21st Century Schizoid Man,” that opens the 20-track disc. He moves onto a much less complicated “Lend Your Love To Me Tonight,” a personal highlight for me when I caught this tour in New York and one of the better songs on this CD.

Lake’s stories are as every bit as important as the songs he performed at these concerts. He recalls seeing Elvis in Lake Tahoe in the early 70s before going into a rendition of what he calls “the greatest rock and roll song ever written,” a rather solid stab at “Heartbreak Hotel.” Then we’re into the court of King Crimson with “Epitaph,” followed by a delicious story about the players in King Crimson and the famous cover of their debut album. On “I Talk To The Wind,” another classic Crimson tune, Lake’s vocals are very strong, even though at times the backing keys bleed through, adding a slight karaoke feel.

greglake02
Bright quick audience participation lifts the equally bright and quick Beatles song, “You Got To Hide Your Love Away,” after Lake’s story about touring with Ringo Starr. A major highlight is when Lake’s vocal and acoustic guitar brush over “Trilogy,” which is practically worth the price of this CD alone. “Still You Turn Me On” sounded big and another story about how “C’est la Vie” was a hit for Johnny Hallyday (aka the French Elvis) in France certainly explains the global appeal of ELP.

The night wouldn’t be complete without the ubiquitous “Lucky Man.” Lake’s powerful voice and simple playing on the keys work well on a very sweet “People Get Ready.” The encore of ELP’s “Karn Evil 9, First Impression, Part 2″ gets the crowd really crazy with full complement of backing tracks. We do get a good mix of Lake’s bass up nice and high and his voice sounds as good at the end of the show as it did at the beginning. Overall, Songs Of A Lifetime does a stellar job of bringing a show from Greg Lake’s recent tour to life. We can only hope more will follow.” (by Ralph Greco, J)

I guess, to present this album is probably the best was to say good bye to Greg Lake … he was a real great one …

greglake03

Personnel:
Greg Lake (vocals, guitar, bass, organ on 19.)
+
Andre Cholmondeley (vocals on 20.)
Jon Michael Engard (guitar on 20., background vocals)
April Laragy Stein (accordion on 11., background vocals)
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background vocals:
Rob LaVaque – John Akers – Mary Ellen Hayden – Cassidie Smith – Katie Andrianos

booklet03a

Tracklist:
01. 21st Century Schizoid Man (Fripp/Giles/Lake/McDonald(Sinfield) 1.00
02. Lend Your Love to Me Tonight (Lake/Sinfield) 3.39
03. Songs of a Lifetime Tour Introduction (Lake) 1.03
04. From The Beginning (Lake) 5.03
05. Tribute to the King (Lake) 7.03
06. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Presley) 2.25
07. Epitaph/The Court Of Zhe Crimson King (Fripp/Giles/Lake/McDonald/Sinfield) 5.05
08. King Crimson Cover Story (Lake) 4.46
09. I Talk To The Wind (McDonald/Sinfield) 4.29
10. Ringo and the Beatles (Lake) 4.15
11. You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away (Lennon/McCartney) 2.51
12. Touch And Go (Emerson/Lake) 3.06
13. Trilogy (Emerson/Lake) 2.56
14. Still… You Turn Me On (Lake) 3.34
15. Reflections of Paris (Lake) 1.21
16. C’est Le Vie (Lake) 3.57
17. My Very First Guitar (Lake) 4.05
18. Lucky Man (Lake) 4.45
19. People Get Ready (Mayfield) 3.25
20. Karn Evil 9: 1st Impression, Pt. 2 (Emerson/Lake) 5.41

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REST IN PEACE.
(* 10. November 1947 in Poole, England; † 7. Dezember 2016 in London)

He had white horses
And ladies by the score
All dressed in satin
And waiting by the door

Ooh, what a lucky man he was

White lace and feathers
They made up his bed
A gold covered mattress
On which he was laid

He went to fight wars
For his country and his king
Of his honor and his glory
The people would sing

A bullet had found him
His blood ran as he cried
No money could save him
So he laid down and he died

Urszula Dudziak – Wszystko Gra (2013)

frontcover1Back from Poland … and here´s an album from one of most important jazz singers from this country …  :

Urszula Bogumiła Dudziak-Urbaniak (born 22 October 1943) is a leading Polish jazz vocalist. She has worked with artists such as Krzysztof Komeda, Michał Urbaniak (her ex-husband), Gil Evans, Archie Shepp, and Lester Bowie. Her 1970s song, Papaya, gained widespread popularity in Asia and Latin America in 2007.

Dudziak was born in the Straconka, now a neighborhood of Bielsko-Biała, Poland. She studied piano, but began to sing in the late 50s after hearing records by Ella Fitzgerald. Within a few years she was one of the most popular jazz artists in her native country. She met and later married Michał Urbaniak. In the late 60s they began to tour overseas and in the 70s settled in New York City.

Dudziak has some problems with language and customarily eschews words in favour of wordless vocalizing that is far more adventurous than scat. Already gifted with a remarkable five-octave vocal range, Dudziak employs electronic devices to extend still further the possibilities of her voice. She has frequently worked with leading contemporary musicians, including Archie Shepp and Lester Bowie, and was a member of the Vocal Summit group, with Jay Clayton, Jeanne Lee, Bobby McFerrin, Norma Winstone, Sting, Michelle Hendricks, and Lauren Newton. Dudziak has also cooperated and performed with her fellow Polish female jazz vocalist Grażyna Auguścik.

On 11 November 2009 Dudziak was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta by President Lech Kaczyński.

Dudziak and Michał Urbaniak are divorced, together they have two daughters: pop singer Mika (Michelle, born 1980) and Kasia. After the divorce she was in a relationship with Jerzy Kosiński for four years. In 1993 she married Swedish captain Benght Dahllof. Dudziak owns apartments in Manhattan, Sweden and Warsaw.

On 8 March 2011 she released her autobiography called Wyśpiewam wam wszystko (I’ll sing everything for you).

And this is her very special album …  celebrating her 70ths birthday … and it´s maybe one of her best albums ever recorded … listen and enjoy !

booklet01a

Personnel:
Robert Cichy (guitar)
Urszula Dudziak (vocals)
Artur Lipiński (drums)
Krzysztof Pacan (bass)
Łukasz Poprawski (saxophone)
Jan Smoczyński (keyboards)

booklet02a

Tracklist:
01. Wookies Walk (Smoczyński) 9.11
02. Turkish Mazurka (Smoczyński) 8.21
03. Song For S (Smoczyński/K.Urbaniak) 8.56
04. Cajon (Smoczyński) 6.45
05. Balkan Dance (Smoczyński) 3.13
06. Shortcut To Heaven (Smoczyński) 6.46
07. Drumming (Lipiński) 1.42
08. Happy Riding (Smoczyński) 5.23
09     Let’s Have A Good Time (Smoczyński/M.Urbaniak) 3.57

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Clem Clempson – In The Public Interest (2013)

FrontCover1Taken from a press notice:

“I get up and plan to do some writing and actually end up spending most of it being distracted by other things,” that’s how Clem Clempson explained why he hadn’t come up with a solo album, when asked by DME ten years ago. Indeed, having worked with BAKERLOO, COLOSSEUM, ROUGH DIAMOND and some other project, one of the finest British guitarist didn’t have time to make a proper record of his own. Until now, that is.

Last year, Clem hooked up for some songwriting with Pete Brown, a lyricist par excellence, most famous for his stints with CREAM and Jack Bruce, and then threw in some classics. One of these is Ray Charles’ “I Don’t Need No Doctor,” a PIE live staple which gets delivered by COLOSSEUM voice Chris Farlowe and the most fabulous Maggie Bell. The other, “Route 66,” sees Maggie joined by her former STONE THE CROWS colleague Ronnie Leahy on keyboards. A lot to enjoy then, when the record, titled “In the Public Interest,” comes out.

ClemClempsonBandCream rises [and there’s a pun to rise within the metaphor later on] and this first ever solo outing from founding member of Bakerloo [and later Colosseum and Humble Pie], David ‘Clem’ Clempson, is just that in its classic presentation of rock and blues perfection. For those who recall, Bakerloo’s blues gem This Worried Feeling – gaining prominence on the Harvest label’s Picnic sampler of 1970 – features one of the greatest fuzzed-up and wah-wahed guitar solos ever. Ever. Sustained sumptuousness.

The tracks on this album are more mainstream modern rock, and exude class. There is gorgeous guitar on the instrumental fourth track Can’t We Try Again – a tranquil antithesis to the feedback-heavy brilliance of Clem’s Bakerloo classic: age does not wither but it becalms – and of course his guitar soloing throughout all tracks is exemplary. Second instrumental, eighth track Leopold’s Great Escape, jazzes things up a bit. The third, 7th Blues, [that’s a load of numbers….] is again calmly sweet.

ClemClempson03There are great guest vocalists: Maggie Bell on third Route 69, and Chris Farlowe on blues chug Who, whilst they both combine to contribute to Ray Charles’ I Don’t Need No Doctor.

Pete Brown, former Cream lyricist, also adds to the quality mix, with title track In The Public Interest reflecting Brown’s classic satirical insights.(by somediurnalauralawe.blogspot)

ClemClempson04Personnel:
Adrian Askew (keyboards, synthesizer)
Clem Clempson (guitar, vocals)
Eddie Filip (drums. percussion)
Reggie Worthy (bass)
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Maggie Bell (vocals in 03. + 09.)
Chris Farlowe (vocals on 06. + 09.)
Ronnie Leahy (piano on 01. + 03.,bass on 03., organ on 01.)
Booklet03ATracklist:
01. Think About Me (Clempson/Leahy/Brown) 5.35
02. In The Public Interest (Clempson/Brown) 5.14
03. Route 69 (Clempson/Leahy/Brown) 3.50
04. Can’t We Try Again (Clempson) 7.16
05. Dancing With The Blues (Clempson/Brown) 4.59
06. Who (Dixon) 4.24
07. Waiting For The Day (Clempson) 5.32
08. Leopold’s Great Escape (Clempson/Askew) 6.41
09. I Don”t Need No Doctor (Simpson/Ashford/Armstead) 5.00
10. 7th Blues (Clempson/Askew) 4.07
11. The Way You Waved Goodbye (Clempson/Brown) 5.21

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