Alan Hawkshaw – Girl In A Sports Car – The Essential Lounge Music Collection (1997)

FrontCover1William Alan Hawkshaw (born 27 March 1937) is a British composer and performer, particularly of themes for movies and television programmes. Hawkshaw worked extensively for the KPM production music company in the 1960s and 1970s, composing and recording many stock tracks that have been used extensively in film and TV. In 2016, he was awarded a doctorate, officially giving him the title of Doctor for his contributions to the music industry.[citation needed]

As such, he is the composer of a number of familiar theme tunes including Channel 4 News, Grange Hill and Countdown. In addition, he is an arranger and pianist, and in the United States with the studio group Love De-Luxe scored a number 1 single on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart with “Here Comes That Sound Again” in 1979.

He is the father of singer-songwriter Kirsty Hawkshaw, who was a member of the dance music group Opus III from 1991 to 1995, and has also worked with artists such as Tiësto, Delerium, BT, Seba, and Paradox.

Born in Leeds, Hawkshaw worked as a printer for several years before becoming a professional musician, first joining the pop group The Crescendos. In the early 1960s, he was a member of rock and roll group Emile Ford and the Checkmates. He also formed the Mohawks band and Rumplestiltskin with some session musicians. At that time, Hawkshaw was an exponent of the Hammond organ, heard in the Mohawks’ music, and also on the UK recording of the musical Hair. In 1965 Hawkshaw played piano on The Hollies group composed album track; “Put Yourself in My Place” included on the EMI/Parlophone album; Hollies (1965) being featured on a piano solo during the song.

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Hawkshaw was also featured playing with David Bowie on the Bowie at the Beeb album, in a performance recorded for the “John Peel in Top Gear” show on 13 May 1968, in which he played a solo on “In The Heat of the Morning”.

In 1969, Hank Marvin recruited Hawkshaw into The Shadows to tour Japan in which one concert was recorded and subsequently released in Japan, The Shadows Live in Japan (1969), taking a featured lead on piano on “Theme from Exodus”. In 1970, Hawkshaw recorded one more studio album with The Shadows, Shades of Rock before leaving this band.[citation needed] He also did appear as keyboardist on The Shadows’ spin-off vocal group Marvin, Welch, & Farrar’s self-titled debut and follow-up Second Opinion albums both released on EMI’s reactivated Regal Zonophone label in 1971.

In the 1970s, he played in The Shadows; he worked for Olivia Newton-John, Jane Birkin, and Serge Gainsbourg (including on “L’homme à tête de chou”) as a musical director, arranger and pianist and was a keyboard player for Cliff Richard, for whom he also co-wrote (with Douggie Wright) “The Days of Love”, one of six shortlisted songs which Richard performed in A Song for Europe that year. He also played keyboards on Donna Summer’s 1977 double album Once Upon A Time. One of his best-known compositions is “Blarney’s Stoned” (originally recorded for KPM in 1969 under the title “Studio 69”) which was used as the theme tune for Dave Allen’s television shows The Dave Allen Show and Dave Allen at Large. In 1975, he wrote the theme tune to the BBC’s On the Move educational programme, which featured Bob Hoskins as an illiterate lorry driver. The song was sung by The Dooleys. In 1977, he composed “New Earth Parts 1 & 2” for Hank Marvin’s Guitar Syndicate LP project. This was subsequently sampled over 30 years later by Jay-Z for his song “Pray”.

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Hawkshaw also performed the music The Night Rider (the theme for Cadbury’s Milk Tray adverts). He also composed “Best Endeavours”, which has been the theme for Channel 4 News since 1982, and was used for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s The National news and current affairs programme from 1984 to 1987. His tune “Chicken Man” was used as the theme for Grange Hill from its start in 1978 until 1989, and revived for the final series of Grange Hill in 2008. Another recording of Chicken Man was used contemporaneously with the original Grange Hill version for the ITV quiz show Give Us A Clue. The Countdown “Chimes” jingle used on Channel 4’s Countdown game show was also composed by Hawkshaw. He composed all the music for the Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World series, and the theme “Technicolour”, which was used for the BBC Midlands Today programme from 1984 to 1988, following which was replaced with a remix of this tune from 1989 to 1991.

In the United States, he also scored a number 1 single on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart with “Here Comes That Sound Again”, as part of Love De-Luxe With Hawkshaw’s Discophonia in 1979.

Also in 1979, he released a disco album under the moniker “Bizarre” which was essentially a solo project with the help of executive producer Barry Mason. It was released in the UK on Polydor Records (cat. no. 2383 553) in 1979 – tracks: Get Up/Don’t Move/Hot Hollywood Nights/You Make My Life So Beautiful/Let Me Fill Your World With Love/Take The Money And Run. he also once more appeared with The Shadows guesting on their 1979 UK chart-topping album String of Hits playing piano on a cover of Paul Simon’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water”.

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Hawkshaw is credited with the co-composition (with B. Henry) of “I Feel So Good”, a 1966 release by Manchester’s Playboys (Fontana TF745).

The Alan Hawkshaw Foundation in conjunction with the Performing Rights Society has since 2003 supported young underprivileged music students and Media composers to gain degrees and scholarships at both the Leeds College of Music and the National Film and Television School.

In July 2016, Hawkshaw was awarded a doctorate for his contributions to the music industry, adding the title of Doctor to his name.[citation needed]
Personal life
After a brief early marriage, Hawkshaw married German-born Christiane Bieberbach in 1968; they have two children; singer, composer and musician Kirsty (b.1969), and Sheldon (b.1971) (by wikipedia)

29/10/2008: at the Gold Badge Awards 2008, The Park Lane Hotel, London.

And here´s a nice compolation with many of his early compositions;

This retrospective album is entirely devoted to the wearly worj of Alan Hawkshaw and it represents only one of the variety of styles for which he is known. For example, nothing could be a diverse as the piece “!Girls In A Sports Car”and say “The Champ” from the group Mohawks in which Hawkshaw played organ and is known as “Morris Hawk”.

The original names of these instrumental appear in bold but new titels have been assigned to each and are indicated in brackets. They were originally published as libary pieces and thesetendto adopt the nmes of the particular programme for which they are used. (taken from the original liner notes.)

Enjoy this more or less happy sounds of Alan Hawkshaw !

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Personnel:
Alan Hawkshaw (keyboards)
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many, many unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Girl In A Sports Car (Clarissa) (Hawkshaw) 2.44
02. Scooter Girl (Tanta) (Hawkshaw) 2.42
03. Sunflower (Sunbird) (Hawkshaw) 2.24
04. Warm Hearts (Love On A Summer’s Day) (Hawkshaw) 2.30
05. Bluebird (Hummingbird) (Hawkshaw) 2.17
06. Midnight Rhapsody (Melody At Midnight) (Hawkshaw) 3.08
07. Happy Rainbow (Colours In the Rain) (Hawkshaw) 2.30
08. Amour (Love In Paris) (Hawkshaw) 2.15
09. Blue Note (Deep Blue) (Hawkshaw) 4.26
10. Grange Hill (Back To School) (Hawkshaw) 2.07
11. Brush Off (Cold Shoulder) (Hawkshaw) 2.14
12. Playmate (Great Pals) (Hawkshaw) 2.03
13. Flapjack (Dessert Storm) (Hawkshaw) 1.58
14. Knock About (Hang About) (Hawkshaw) 2.05
15. Lazy Evening Blues (Lay-Back Blues) (Hawkshaw) 4.41
16. Cruising (Cruise Around) (Hawkshaw) 4.27
17. A Man Alone (In Solitude) (Hawkshaw) 4.21
18. Sky Train (The Shuttle) (Hawkshaw) 2.36
19. Man Of Means (In the Money) (Hawkshaw) 3.14
20. Love At First Sight (Dumbstruck) (Hawkshaw) 2.36
21. Beauty Spot (The Mole) (Hawkshaw/Parker) 1.58
22. Moody (Dreamy) (Hawkshaw) 3.18
23. Sheer Elegance (Suave & Sophisticated) (Hawkshaw) 3.37
24. Blue Haze (Smokey) (Hawkshaw/Parker) 3.28
25. Piccadilly Night Ride (On Oxford Street) (Hawkshaw/Mansfield) 1.50
26. Beat Boutique (Mary Quant) (Hawkshaw/Mansfield) 1.52
27. Dave Allen At Large (Irish Gnome) (Hawkshaw) 1.51
28. Destination Venus (Jupiter Bound) (Hawkshaw) 2.41

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Pete Townshend – Who Came First (1972)

FrontCover1Who Came First is the debut album by Pete Townshend, released in 1972 on Track Records in the UK and Track/Decca in the US. It includes demos from the aborted concept album Lifehouse, part of which became Who’s Next. The original release had a gatefold cover and included a poster with additional photos of Meher Baba from the Louis van Gasteren film Beyond Words. The cover photo of Townshend standing on eggs is a reference to the eternal question “Who came first: the chicken or the egg?” It peaked at number 30 on the UK album chart and at number 69 on the US Billboard 200.

Townshend had already participated with other artists on two previous albums in tribute to his guru Meher Baba, Happy Birthday and I Am.  These albums were privately distributed in very small quantities between 1970 and 1972 in the UK. Soon after Decca asked Townshend for permission to release the recordings, as inferior copies were circulating in the US as bootlegs. Rather than re-issuing the original albums Townshend decided to change the track list substantially and develop the project into his first “official” solo album. Three of Townshend’s demos for Lifehouse were selected, along with two songs each from the earlier tribute albums and two additional songs.

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The Lifehouse demos included are: “Pure and Easy,” edited from its original length of 8:35; “Let’s See Action”; and (with minor overdubs added) “Time Is Passing.” Of these, only “Let’s See Action” had seen prior release, as a single by the Who in 1971. The Who’s versions of the remaining two Lifehouse songs were eventually released on Odds & Sods and on reissued versions of Who’s Next. All of Townshend’s Lifehouse demos were eventually released on Lifehouse Chronicles in 2000.

From the tribute album Happy Birthday came Townshend’s “Content” and Ronnie Lane’s “Evolution.” The latter is a reworking of the track “Stone” which had appeared on The Faces’ debut album First Step in 1970; the Happy Birthday version was over six minutes long and was edited to 3:36. From the follow-up tribute album I Am, Billy Nicholls’ “Forever’s No Time at All” and Townshend’s “Parvardigar” were selected; the latter’s lyrics are adapted from Meher Baba’s “Universal Prayer.” The track list was rounded out with Townshend’s composition “Sheraton Gibson” and his cover of “Heartache,” a.k.a. “There’s a Heartache Following Me,” which had been a UK number 6 hit in 1964 by the American country singer Jim Reeves and a favorite of Meher Baba, according to Townshend’s notes on the album’s back cover.

PosterThe songs were recorded at Townshend’s home studio, which was among the most advanced home studios in England at the time. Townshend does not appear on the Nicholls track, but does play guitar on the Lane track; he plays all other instruments on the remainder of the album.

One dollar from each sale of the 1972 album went to charities.

Original UK copies were on Track Records, reissued by Polydor Records after Track ceased operations in 1978. The first US issue appeared on the silver Track/Decca label. In 1973 it was reissued in the US on the MCA Records black with rainbow label, but without the gatefold cover or the poster.

The first compact disc release by Rykodisc appeared in 1992 with six bonus tracks taken from the privately distributed albums, also issued in a limited edition deluxe version with extra artwork. A remastered edition appeared in 2006 on Hip-O Records, the legacy division of the Universal Music Group, with nine bonus tracks, the first six being the ones from the Rykodisc reissue. The nine bonus songs on the Hip-O reissue comprise the remaining Townshend performances from Happy Birthday and the 1976 record, With Love, along with the track “I Always Say” recorded between 1968 and 1970.

Reviewing in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981), Robert Christgau wrote: “Townshend sounds as relaxed in this rather folkish Meher Baba tribute cum ‘gynormouse ego trip’ as Paul McCartney in his do-it-yourself studio, and a lot less self-absorbed—other musical gurumongers sound ‘Content’ (title of worst song here), but Pete seems happy, too. So much so that some of this music is a little lightweight—expressing the kind of undiscriminating joy in the everyday one might expect from somebody who considers ‘You always were, you always are, and you always will be’ both a profound sentiment and a snappy way to finish off a concept album. But I’m encouraged that Ronnie Lane (singer-songwriter on ‘Evolution’) offers a drink (alcohol, get it?) to the Master and his Truth. And in the end the homely sweetness and frailty of his music prevails.” (wikipedia)

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Pete Townshend’s first solo album was a homespun, charming forum for low-key, personal songs that weren’t deemed suitable for the Who, as well as spiritual paeans (direct and indirect) to his spiritual guru, Meher Baba. Who fans will be immediately attracted by the presence of a couple of songs from the aborted Who concept album Lifehouse (much of which ended up on Who’s Next), “Pure & Easy” and “Let’s See Action.” The Who did eventually release their own versions of both those songs. But Townshend’s own versions aren’t the highlights of this record, which shows a folkier and gentler side to the Who’s chief muse than his albums with the group. “Sheraton Gibson” is a neat tune about rock & roll road life, and “Time Is Passing” takes very subtle inspiration from Baba. Most of the rest of the album contains some of the most unusual pieces Townshend has released: his acoustic cover of Jim Reeves’ “There’s a Heartache Following Me” (recorded because it was one of Baba’s favorite tunes), “Evolution” (which is actually pretty much a solo track by his buddy Ronnie Lane of the Faces), “Parvardigar” (adapted from Baba’s Universal Prayer), and “Content” (a philosophical poem by Maud Kennedy that Townshend put to music). The 1993 reissue of this LP for compact disc fleshes out the program considerably with six previously unreleased tracks, including Townshend’s demo of the Who single “The Seeker.” The other bonus cuts are by no means filler; meditative and melancholy originals, they’re just as strong as the tracks on the original release. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Pete Townshend (all instruments, vocals)
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Ronnie Lane (guitar, vocals on 02.)
Billie Nicholls (guitar, vocals on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Pure And Easy (Townshend) 5.33
02. Evolution (Lane) 3.45
03. Forever’s No Time At All (Nicholls/McInnerny) 3.09
04. Nothing Is Everything (Let’s See Action) (Townshend) 6:25
05. Time Is Passing (Townshend) 3.28
06. There’s A Heartache Following Me (Baker) 3.23
07. Sheraton Gibson (Townshend) 2.38
08. Content (Kennedy/Townshend) 2.56
09. Parvardigar (Baba/Townshend) 6.50
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10. His Hands (Townshend) 2.08
11. The Seeker (Townshend) 4.37
12. Day Of Silence (Townshend) 2.53
13. Sleeping Dog (Townshend) 2.57
14. The Love Man (Townshend) 5.02
15. Lantern Cabin (Townshend) 4.11
16. Mary Jane (Townshend) 2.38
17. I Always Say (Townshend) 5.47
18. Begin The Beguine (Porter) 4.49

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Dave Clark Five – Instrumental Album (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is the hardest album to find, of all the rare Canada only Dave Clark Five releases. Twelve instrumental tunes all written by the DC5 with the exception of a great cover of Link Wray´s “Rumble”. Side 1 is more mellow listening with several songs sounding like old Duane Eddy twangers. Side 2 rocks out. The following is taken from the liner notes: “We have carefully packaged this album to suit all tastes. The selections of good listening tunes (“Theme Without A Name”) are together on the first half of the album. For your “Go-Go” parties at home, just flip the album over!” (rootsvinylguide.com)

Issued in Canada only in mid-1966, this LP is a real oddity in the Dave Clark Five discography, indeed consisting entirely of instrumentals as the title promises. As DC5 fans know, unlike just about every other notable British Invasion band, the group often relied on instrumental filler cuts to help pad out their LPs, and 12 of them are gathered on this release.

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As every one of them also appears on one of the band’s 1964-1966 American long-players, it’s of interest only for completist collectors attracted by the rarity and artwork of the physical artifact, especially as the music is neither too good nor typical of what the Dave Clark Five were known for. Indeed, side one in particular has some surprisingly vapid easy listening numbers (sometimes with a Duane Eddy-like twanging guitar), though side two moves into more rocking if undistinguished territory, occasionally with spy movie-like motifs. It should also be noted that the LP somehow failed to include what were far and away the band’s three best instrumentals: the menacing “Tequila” update “Chaquita,” the weird and vicious “Five by Five,” and the early-1966 B-side rave-up “All Night Long.” (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Dave Clark (drums)
Lenny Davidson (guitar)
Rick Huxley (bass)
Denis Payton (saxophone, harmonica, guitar)
Mike Smith (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Theme Without A Name (Clark/Davidson) 2.00
02. Time (Clark/Davidson) 2.16
03. Sweet Memories (Clark/Davidson) 2.40
04. When I’m Alone (Clark/Smith) 2.30
05. Blue Monday (Clark/Smith) 2.55
06. Dum Dee Dee Dum (Clark/Payton) 1.48
07. Ol’ Sol (Clark/Payton) 1.58
08. Pumping (Clark/Payton) 1.44
09. No Stopping (Clark/Davidson) 2.01
10. Rumble (Wray/Grant) 2.34
11. Move On (Clark) 2.09
12. On The Move (Clark/Payton) 2.21
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13. Chaquita (Version 1) (Clark/Smith) 2.04
14. First Love (Clark/Davidson) 2.36
15. Chaquita (Version 2) (Clark/Smith) 2.10
16. I Walk The Line (Cash) 2.39
17. All Night Long (Clark/Payton) 3.05
18. Five By Five (Clark/Smith) 2.45

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Various Artists – The First Recordings of Cretan Music (1940 – 60) (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgBack from Crete …. :

The music of Crete (Greek: Κρητική μουσική), also called kritika (Greek: κρητικά), refers to traditional forms of Greek folk music prevalent on the island of Crete in Greece. Cretan traditional music includes instrumental music (generally also involving singing), a capella songs known as the rizitika, “Erotokritos,” Cretan urban songs (tabachaniotika), as well as other miscellaneous songs and folk genres (lullabies, ritual laments, etc.).

Historically, there have been significant variations in the music across the island (more violin than lyra in far Eastern and Western Crete, a preference for the syrtos in Western Crete and kondylies in Eastern Crete). Some of this variation continues today and in the late-twentieth and early-twenty-first centuries has received greater attention by scholars and the mass media. Nonetheless, over the course of the twentieth-century, the sense of a single, island-wide Cretan musical tradition emerged.

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Although much Cretan music remains consciously close to its folk roots and an integral part of the fabric of many Cretans’ everyday lives, it is also a vibrant and evolving modern, popular tradition that involves many professional and semi-professional musicians, numerous regional record companies and professional distributors, professional luthiers (especially of Cretan lyras and Cretan lutes), and Cretan kentra (clubs for dancing to live Cretan music). (by wikipedia)

And here are some early recordings of this unique sound of Cretan music.

The violin is the prevailling instrument that has been popular in Eastern und Western Crete for years !

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Personnel:
Pantelis Baritantonakis (violin)
Y. Dermitzogiannis (lyre, violin, guitar)
Giorgis Lapokostantakis (violin)
Yannis Papahatzakis (violin, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Kondilies me ti lyra 4.01
02. Ierapetritikos 3.34
03. Varis Haniotikos 3.58
04. Pono krifo i agapi sou 3.04
05. Kondilies me kithara 3.13
06. Haniotika sirta 4.20
07. Pseftiko louloudaki 4.17
08. Ta’mathes Aretousa mou 5.31
09. Makria mou ki an evriskese 2.51
10. Kastrinos horos 4.16
11. Lasithiotika pentozalia 4.01
12. Ithela namoun kladeftis 3.34
13. Rethemniotika sirta 3.41
14. Kondilies Kalogeridi 4.34
15. Irakliotikes kondilies 4.52
16. Pentozalis argos 2.30
17. Tragoudi tou gamou 4.53
18. Lasithiotikes melodies 2.25

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Porter Wagoner – Green Green Grass Of Home (1968)

FrontCover1.JPGPorter Wayne Wagoner (August 12, 1927 – October 28, 2007) was an American country music singer known for his flashy Nudie and Manuel suits and blond pompadour.

In 1967, he introduced singer Dolly Parton on his television show, and they were a well-known vocal duo throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Known as Mr. Grand Ole Opry, Wagoner charted 81 singles from 1954–1983. He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2002.

Wagoner was born in West Plains, Missouri, the son of Bertha May (née Bridges) and Charles E. Wagoner, a farmer. His first band, the Blue Ridge Boys, performed on radio station KWPM-AM from a butcher shop in his native West Plains, Missouri, where Wagoner cut meat. In 1951, he was hired by Si Siman as a performer on KWTO in Springfield, Missouri. This led to a contract with RCA Victor.

With lagging sales, Wagoner and his trio played schoolhouses for the gate proceeds; but in 1953, his song “Trademark” became a hit for Carl Smith, followed by a few hits of his own for RCA Victor. Starting in 1955, he was a featured performer on ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee in Springfield, Missouri. He often appeared on the show as part of the Porter Peter Wagoner02.jpgWagoner Trio with Don Warden and Speedy Haworth. Warden, on steel guitar, became Wagoner’s long-time business manager. In 1957, Wagoner and Warden moved to Nashville, Tennessee, joining the Grand Ole Opry.

Like many of his contemporaries in country music, Wagoner toured and performed outdoors for fans at American Legion houses in rural towns. Fans sat on wooden benches facing what was often a makeshift stage. Wagoner would mingle with the audience during performance breaks and usually remembered the names of the towns he visited.

Wagoner’s 81 charted records include “A Satisfied Mind” (No. 1, 1955), “Misery Loves Company” (No. 1, 1962), “I’ve Enjoyed as Much of This as I Can Stand” (No. 7, 1962–1963), “Sorrow on the Rocks” (No. 5, 1964), “Green, Green Grass of Home” (No. 4, 1965), “Skid Row Joe” (No. 3, 1965–1966), “The Cold Hard Facts of Life” (No. 2, 1967), and “The Carroll County Accident” (No. 2, 1968–1969).

Among his hit duets with Dolly Parton were a remake of Tom Paxton’s “The Last Thing on My Mind” (1967), “We’ll Get Ahead Someday” (1968), “Just Someone I Used to Know” (1969), “Daddy Was An Old Time Preacher Man”, (1970), “Better Move it on Home” (1971), “The Right Combination” (1972), “Please Don’t Stop Loving Me” (No. 1, 1974) and “Making Plans” (No. 2, 1980). He also won three Grammy Awards for gospel recordings.
Television series

Peter Wagoner01.jpgHis syndicated television program, The Porter Wagoner Show, aired from 1960 to 1981. There were 686 30-minute episodes taped; the first 104 (1960–66) in black-and-white and the remainder (1966–81) in color. At its peak, his show was featured in over 100 markets, with an average viewership of over three million.[citation needed] Reruns of the program air on the rural cable network RFD-TV and its sister channel in the UK Rural TV.

The shows usually featured opening performances by Wagoner with performances by Norma Jean, or later Parton, and comedic interludes by Speck Rhodes. During Parton’s tenure, she and Wagoner usually sang a duet. Each episode also featured a guest who would usually perform one or two songs. A spiritual or gospel performance was almost always featured toward the end of the show; generally performed by either Wagoner or Parton, or the show’s guest star, or occasionally the entire cast. After Dolly left the show, Porter began taping the show at Opryland USA in various locations around the park.

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The shows had a friendly, informal feel, with Wagoner trading jokes with band members (frequently during songs) and exchanging banter with Parton and Howser. In 1974, Dolly Parton’s song “I Will Always Love You”, written about her professional break from Wagoner, went to number one on the country music charts. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a sampler with his greatest hits … and yey, it´s another sentimental trip to these Country sounds and lyrics from the past.

My copy was a special edition for the German record market with a great cover.

AlternateFrontCover.JPGOriginal US frontcover

Personnel:
Peter Wagoner (vocals, guitar)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Green, Green Grass Of Home (Putman) 2.22
02. Ole Slew-Foot (Webb) 2.08
03. Eat, Drink And Be Merry (Tomorrow You’ll Cry) (C.Ferguson/S.Ferguson) 2.28
04. Stranger’s Story (Stamper) 2.01
05. False True Lover (Traditional) 2.38
06. You Can’t Make A Heel Toe The Mark (Pennington/Reno) 1.47
07. The Man In The Little White Suit (Frazier) 2.01
08. The Keeper Of The Key (Howard/Devine/Guynes/Stewart) 2.49
09. They Listened While You Said Goodbye (Howard) 2.45
10. I Dreamed I Saw America On Her Knees (Mullins) 2.22

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Al Kooper – Rare + Well Done (Greatest And Most Obscure Recordings (1964-2001) (2001)

FrontCover1.jpgEveryone knows Al Kooper in one form or another. If the name isn’t instantly recognizable, then Kooper’s long list of musical contributions and achievements should very well be. After all, this is the man who not only played the legendary and unforgettable organ part on Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”, but Kooper also did everything from having a hand in penning the classic tune “This Diamond Ring” to founding such incomparable Sixties groups such as Blues Project and Blood, Sweat and Tears. The man even started out as a member of The Royal Teens who charted with “Short Shorts”. He hung out with Hendrix, “discovered” Lynyrd Skynyrd, and produced a ton of classic albums. And he’s still going strong.

So much so, in fact, that Kooper has recently released Rare & Well Done, a two disc collection that fully represent the album’s title. All the tracks were 24-bit remastered with Kooper’s own supervision. Disc one is a 19-track collection of hard to find and previously unreleased material from the Kooper vaults, while disc two features plenty of the artist’s best known work, in solo and various band formats. For longtime fans, this collection is a welcome addition to their Kooper collection. For anyone else who’s even mildly curious about Kooper’s legacy, this album works as a nice springboard from which to begin exploring the man’s vast catalogue. As it usually is with such releases, not everything here works and not every “rare” found here needed inclusion, but overall Rare & Well Done is an indispensable look back at one of rock music’s most prolific artists.

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The “Rare” disc opens with a new demo, “I Can’t Quit Her 2001”. It’s not the best song on the disc that the collection could have started with. In fact, it’s a bit schmaltzy and sounds like something that you might hear Paul Schaffer’s band doing on Letterman. It’s certainly not the best version of this classic, as the live version included on the “Well Done” disc proves. However, things fall into place and start to genuinely rock with track two, Kooper’s 1964 demo of “Somethin’ Goin’ On”. Amazingly soulful, gospel tinged and incredibly deep, “Somethin’ Goin’ On” seems light years away from everything else that was coming out in ’64 — especially Beatlemania. Kooper’s voice instantly moves one emotionally as much as those fantastic piano, organ, and guitar parts. Stunning.

But then again, the disc manages to dip down for a moment as “Autumn Song” sounds like a mid-’80s fusion/muzak piece. It would have been better had the contents of this disc been arranged chronologically as the time warps back and forth through the years certainly mess up the grooves more than once. Kooper’s own phrasing of some of the words here, like “winter” also seem a bit silly as if he were just goofing off on the track. “I Can’t Stand The Rain” which follows is a bit better, though the horn section sounds like nothing more than synth brass. These are the kinds of rarities that may have been better off left on the shelves.

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Still, one can’t argue with the slow cooking “Baby Please Don’t Go” offered here in a live version from 1971 and getting and eight-and-a-half minute workout. Kooper’s amazing piano work on the track just simply burns, as does his vocal prowess once again. Giving Big Joe Williams a run for his money, “Baby Please Don’t Go” encapsulates not only the blues here, but also takes on funk and classical vestiges that must simply be heard to be appreciated. The band’s solo spots are equally remarkable, with the other-worldy synth break being especially dazzling.

But then the record shifts once more and we’re back into smoove rock territory with “I Let Love Slip Through My Fingers”, a number on which Kooper seems to be doing his best Lou Rawls impression that turns out to be not so good in the end. The sax and guitar parts are overwrought and cheese up the track way too much. “The Earthquake of Your Love” restores the good groove with an undeniably Seventies bounce and charm. This time, Kooper vocally sounds almost like Steve Miller. And that’s not too strange, considering Miller himself went on to create such plastic, yet likable boogie like “Abracadabra” a bit later on.

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Getting back to the downright essential tracks on the disc, of important note is the inclusion of Al’s very first single from 1965, “New York’s My Home (Razz-A-Ma-Tazz)”. Again, this long lost Sixties chestnut doesn’t sound much like anything else going on at the time with its pretty flute and string arrangement outdoing the Fab Four (again), and that indelible swinging jazz outbreak at the middle of the tune being especially captivating. If Kooper wasn’t influencing both Brian Wilson and Lennon and McCartney at this time, then I’d damn sure be surprised as Al had created his own “mini-epic” right here . . . in 1965 . . . in two-and-a-half minutes.

The “English Hall” cover of XTC’s “Making Plans for Nigel” is also excellent. Dare I say that it’s even better than XTC’s. Sure. I’m not so taken with that group that I can’t see that their career has been spotty through the decades. But even better than that is Kooper’s blistering version of Dylan’s “Went To See The Gypsy”, an outtake from Bob’s New Morning LP that rock fiercer than Dylan’s own take. Of course, that version was so subdued (yet equally great) that it wouldn’t be difficult to rock harder. But here, Kooper’s band injects stunning guitar parts that do sound distinctively Sixties, but all the better.

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Also of interest is Kooper’s instrumental rehearsal version of “Hey Jude” from 1969 with orchestra. Kooper jazzes the Beatles tune up with swinging horns and lickety-split drumming. It sounds a bit like a Vegas spectacular, but it’s by no means horrible. Hearing someone with Kooper’s talent reconfigure such a song in this format is impressive. Although it is hard not to laugh at “The Big Chase”, a piece of incidental music that was left out of an episode of TV’s Crime Story. It sounds like Jan Hammer and Harold Faltermeyer got together and created the most hellish cop music they could think of. Lots of fun (seriously).

Turning to the “Well Done” disc of the collection now, the old fans should finally start feeling like they’re on familiar territory as nothing on the CD here hasn’t been released before. Things start with a live 1994 take of “I Can’t Keep from Cryin’ Sometimes” recorded with the Blues Project. Once again, Al is in his element when he has a band behind him that complements his own talent. The organ work, the guitar licks are both hot, and Kooper puts in some of his most soulful vocalizing. Tasty.

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Set the Way Back Machine for 1968 then, because it’s time to hear Blood, Sweat and Tears’ “I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know”. Again, there’s a stunning amount of soulfulness ripping through this track with the undeniable organ and vocal parts (especially those of the backup singers). A slow burner if there ever was one, it’s followed up with a 1975 version of “This Diamond Ring” complete with funky keyboards a-la Billy Preston’s “Outa Space”. Personally, I dig this version a lot more than the original by Gary Lewis and the Playboys.

There’s still no getting over the Kooper/Bloomfield (as in Mike) number “Albert’s Shuffle” from ’68. Here it is once again in all of its blistering glory. The blues as pounded out by two of the best. All you have to do is hear that organ and guitar and those horns and that’s all it takes. Next thing you know, you’re somewhere else. All great music should move you. Here’s a number that does it every time. And the movement continues with the classic “Bury My Body” recorded with Shuggie Otis in 1969 and “Season of the Witch” with Stephen Stills in 1968. It’s truly a joy to hear Kooper’s phenomenal work from the Sixties here all laid out. The man was clearly an inspired and enviable musician at that point in his career.

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“New York City (You’re A Woman)” is also great. Here, Kooper’s organ sounds just like Booker T.’s good old Hammond B-3. And who could forget such brazen opening lines like “New York City you’re a woman / Cold hearted bitch ought to be your name / Oh you ain’t never loved nobody / Yet I’m drawn to you like a moth to flame/ . . . Yeah”? This piece of classic funkiness is then followed with a damned great live version of “I Can’t Quit Her” from 1994 that shows just how great the song really is (you wouldn’t know it from that limp version that opened the “Rare” disc as stated earlier).

The classics just keep on coming from there, from the fantastic “I Stand Alone” to another slow burner, this time in the form of “I Got a Woman”. Also included is the closing “Love Theme from The Landlord”, which is the only Al Kooper disc not currently on CD. All in all, “Well Done” lives up to its name and then some

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It’s just too bad that the “Rare” portion of this collection didn’t include an equal portion of indispensable tracks. The nuggets from the Sixties and Seventies are cool and wonderful, but with only a couple of exceptions, like “Making Plans for Nigel”, and “The Big Chase”, the rest of the rarities kind of bring about a cringe-inducing element, proving once and for all that there was a very good reason a lot of the tracks here were previously unissued.

Yet the “Well Done” disc is impeccable, making this collection a must-have. It’s great to have all these tracks in once place. Al Kooper continues to play a highly influential part in the music industry. His well-documented history up this point has been preserved beautifully and put on display for all to hear in this collection. Kooper has certainly been deserving of a release like this for a long time, and even if the whole thing isn’t flawless, it damn sure rocks 95% of the time. Thanks for the memories, Al. (Jason Thompson)

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Tracklist:

CD 1 (Rare):
01. I Can’t Quit Her (New Studio Version) (Kooper)Levine) 4.25
02. Somethin’ Goin’ On (Demo) (Kooper) 3.04
03. Autumn Song (Kooper) 2.50
04. I Can’t Stand The Rain (Bryant/Miller/Peebles) 4.29
05. Baby Please Don’t Go (live) (Williams) 8.24
06. I Let Love Slip Through My Fingers (Kooper) 5.01
07. The Earthquake Of Your Love (Demo) (Kooper) 3.19
08. Bulgarya (outtake) (Kooper) 2.32
09. Nuthin’ I Wouldn’t Do (For A Woman Like You) (Kooper) 3.29
10. New York’s My Home (Razz-A-Ma-Tazz) Aka The Street Song (Kooper) 2.32
11. Making Plans For Nigel (Moulding) 4.07
12. I Believe To My Soul (outtake) (Charles) 4.28
13. Went To See The Gypsy (Dylan) 3.30
14. Rachmaninoff’s Birthday (Kooper) 4.08
15. Hey Jude (rehearsal tape) (Lennon/McCartney) 5.11
16. Living In My Own Religion (demo) (Kooper) 4.51
17. The Big Chase (Kooper/Calello) 3.24
18. They Just Don’t Make Them Like That Anymore (Kooper) 2.25
19. A Drive Through The Old Neighborhood (Kooper) 4.37

CD 2 (Well Done):
01. I Can’t Keep From Cryin’ Sometimes (live) (Kooper) 4.01
02. I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know (Kooper) 5.56
03. This Diamond Ring (Kooper/Levine/Brass) 4.08
04. Albert’s Shuffle (Bloomfield/Kooper) 6.53
05. Bury My Body (Kooper) 8.56
06. Season Of The Witch (Leitch) 11.05
07. New York City (You’re A Woman) (Kooper) 4.45
08. I Can’t Quit Her (live) (Kooper/Levine) 3.46
09. I Stand Alone (Kooper) 3.42
10. Flute Thing (Kooper) 6.02
11. You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (Kooper) 2.53
12. I Got A Woman (Charles) 6.29
13. Brand New Day (Kooper) 5.09
14. Love Theme (Jolie) (Kooper) 3.41

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Various Artists – That´s Underground – The Rock Machine Turns You On (1968)

FrontCover1.jpgDuring the Sixties, “underground music” became very popuilar all over the world.

So many record companies decided to release sampler to push this exciting sound.

That’s Underground, The Rock Machine Turns You On (original 1968 CBS pressing), is one of the most treasured records not only for featuring some big names of the era but because of its spectacular psychedelic splatter multicoloured vinyl. Made before they became fashionable and they hardly get more coloured than this.

The West German album has on the rear sleeve the familiar words “The Rock Machine Turns You On” (not the same compilation as the UK, Dutch and French albums The Rock Machine Turns You On above). The West German records are on distinctive “psychedelic” multicoloured vinyl, but both records shown have orange CBS labels. The rear sleeve shows pictures of other contemporary CBS releases.

This album was for many people a very important album:

“This must have been the first colored vinyl I saw in my life. Not only the splashing colors blew my mind, but also the music heard on this album must have blown the brains out of the 16 year old boy I was then. Still love each and every track on this album.” (Leonard)

“Blown my mind just looking at it. It sure is one hell of a production, the vinyl and song selection all look great. I couldn’t believe I hadn’t seen or heard of this before but then looked it up and found it was only issued in Germany, Italy and South Africa. Surely, it deserved a much wider release and I can see why it would have been a totally mind-bending experience to a youngster in the 60’s. 50 years on and it’s freaking me out right now.” (Lee Wrecker)

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Alternate front + back cover from South Africa

This LP was  reissued of released in Germany by Repertoire in 2005 under licence from Sony BMG Music Entertainment (Germany) GmbH. It dates the original release as 1970 (!) …

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I´m sure, that this compilation was for many, many people a very important part of their life … you can call it … a soundrack of their youth …

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Tracklist:
01. The Electric Flag: Killing Floor (Burnett) 4.14
02. Spirit: Mechanical World (Andes/Ferguson) 5.19
03. The Chambers Brothers: Time Has Come Today (J. Chambers/W. Chambers) 4.53
04. Leonard Cohen: Suzanne (Cohen) 3.49
05. Moby Grape: Can’t Be So Bad (Miller)
06. Big Brother And The Holding Company: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 4.15
07. The United States Of America: Hard Coming Love (Moskowitz/Byrd) 4.44
08. Blood, Sweat And Tears: My Days Are Numbered (Kooper) 3.19
09. Bob Dylan: Highway 61 Revisited (Dylan) 3.28
10. Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper, Steve Stills: You Don’t Love Me (Cobb) 4.08

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Many fantastic colors … 

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I got this sampler from Mr. Sleeve … thank you very much !!!

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Edith Piaf – Les plus grands succés (1963)

FrontCover1Edith Piaf, byname of Edith Giovanna Gassion, (born December 19, 1915, Paris, France—died October 10, 1963, Plascassier, near Grasse [see Researcher’s Note]), French singer and actress whose interpretation of the chanson, or French ballad, made her internationally famous. Among her trademark songs were “Non, je ne regrette rien” (“No, I Don’t Regret Anything”) and “La Vie en rose” (literally “Life in Pink” [i.e., through “rose-coloured glasses,” from an optimistic point of view]).

Piaf’s songs and singing style seemed to reflect the tragedies of her own difficult life. Her mother, a café singer, abandoned her at birth, and she was taken in by her grandmother, who reared the girl in a brothel. Piaf reportedly became blind at age three as a complication of meningitis but recovered her sight four years later. A few years after that she joined her father, a circus acrobat, and accompanied him while he performed. She sang in the streets of Paris, earning a meagre living while often in the company of petty criminals. Piaf gave birth to a daughter in 1932, but the child died two years later from meningitis. In 1935 she was discovered by Louis Leplée, a cabaret owner, who gave her her first nightclub job. It was Leplée who began calling her “la môme piaf,” Parisian slang for “little sparrow,” in apparent reference to her diminutive size—under 5 feet (142 cm) tall and about 90 pounds (40 kg) in weight. She later adopted the name professionally. Her debut was acclaimed by the actor Maurice Chevalier, who was in the audience that night.

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In 1935 Piaf made her theatrical debut, and within a few years she was singing in the large music halls of Paris. Initially her material was standard music hall fare, but eventually she had songwriters such as Marguerite Monnot and Michel Emer writing songs specifically for her. In the mid-1940s she became a mentor to the young Yves Montand, and she worked with him in the film Étoile sans lumière (1946; “Star Without Light”). She had an affair with the middleweight boxer Marcel Cerdan, who died in a plane crash on his way to meet her. Her unhappy personal life and unadorned though dramatic style underlined her expressive voice, and she was able to move audiences with her passionate rendition of songs that were often about loss and love. In her later life, Piaf was involved in several serious car accidents, and she suffered from failing health, partly due to alcohol and drug abuse. She died at the age of 47, reportedly from liver cancer. Her death was mourned across France, and thousands lined the route of her funeral procession.

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In addition to singing, Piaf recorded her thoughts about her life in two books, Au bal de la chance (1958; “At the Ball of Fortune”; Eng. trans. The Wheel of Fortune) and the posthumously published Ma vie (1964; My Life). She was the subject of several biographies as well as plays and movies. (britannica.com)

And here´s a great sampler with songs recorded between 1949 and 1961 … a greates hits album of course.

Edith Piaf was one of the most important singers in France … emjoy her very special voice … enjoy all these chansons.

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Personnel:
Edith Piaf (vocals)
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Robert Chauvigny Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Les Trois Cloches (Villard) 4.06
02. Hymne À L’amour (Piaf/Monnot) 3.25
03. La Vie En Rose (Piaf/Louiguy) 3.07
04. Padam..Padam (Contet/Glanzberg) 3.15
05. La Goualante Du Pauvre Jean (Rouzaud/Monnot) 2.01
06. C’est A Hambourg (Delécluse/Senlis/Monnot) 2.57
07. Milord (Moustaki/Monnot) 4.27
08. C’est L’amour (Piaf/Monnot) 2.58
09. Cri Du Coeur (Prevert/Crolla) 2.34
10. Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien (Vaucaire/Dumont) 2.20
11. Jerusalem (Chabrier/Moutet) 3.57
12. Exodus (Marnay/Gold) 3.27

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Edith Piaf03.jpgÉdith Piaf (19 December 1915 – 10 October 1963)

Various Artists – That´s Soul 1 (1967)

FrontCover1.jpgSoul music (often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre that originated in the African American community in the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music, rhythm and blues and jazz. Soul music became popular for dancing and listening in the United States, where record labels such as Motown, Atlantic and Stax were influential during the Civil Rights Movement. Soul also became popular around the world, directly influencing rock music and the music of Africa.

According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, soul is “music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm & blues into a form of funky, secular testifying”. Catchy rhythms, stressed by handclaps and extemporaneous body moves, are an important feature of soul music. Other characteristics are a call and response between the lead vocalist and the chorus and an especially tense vocal sound. The style also occasionally uses improvisational additions, twirls and auxiliary sounds. Soul music reflected the African-American identity and it stressed the importance of an African-American culture. The new-found African-American consciousness led to new styles of music, which boasted pride in being black.

Soul music dominated the U.S. R&B chart in the 1960s, and many recordings crossed over into the pop charts in the U.S., Britain and elsewhere. By 1968, the soul music genre had Wilson_Pickettbegun to splinter. Some soul artists developed funk music, while other singers and groups developed slicker, more sophisticated, and in some cases more politically conscious varieties. By the early 1970s, soul music had been influenced by psychedelic rock and other genres, leading to psychedelic soul. The United States saw the development of neo soul around 1994. There are also several other subgenres and offshoots of soul music.

The key subgenres of soul include the Detroit (Motown) style, a more pop-friendly and rhythmic style; deep soul and southern soul, driving, energetic soul styles combining R&B with southern gospel music sounds; Memphis soul, a shimmering, sultry style; New Orleans soul, which came out of the rhythm and blues style; Chicago soul, a lighter gospel-influenced sound; Philadelphia soul, a lush orchestral sound with doo-wop-inspired vocals; psychedelic soul, a blend of psychedelic rock and soul music; as well as categories such as blue-eyed soul, which is soul music performed by white artists; British soul; and Northern soul, rare soul music played by DJs at nightclubs in Northern England. …

but in the Sixties Soul was a very imporant part of the international music scene … it was the golden age of Soul !

CarlaThomasWriter Peter Guralnick is among those to identify Solomon Burke as a key figure in the emergence of soul music, and Atlantic Records as the key record label. Burke’s early 1960s songs, including “Cry to Me”, “Just Out of Reach” and “Down in the Valley” are considered classics of the genre. Guralnick wrote:

“Soul started, in a sense, with the 1961 success of Solomon Burke’s “Just Out Of Reach”. Ray Charles, of course, had already enjoyed enormous success (also on Atlantic), as had James Brown and Sam Cooke — primarily in a pop vein. Each of these singers, though, could be looked upon as an isolated phenomenon; it was only with the coming together of Burke and Atlantic Records that you could begin to see anything even resembling a movement.”

Aretha Franklin is widely known as the “Queen of Soul”

Ben E. King also achieved success in 1961 with “Stand By Me”, a song directly based on a gospel hymn.[5] By the mid-1960s, the initial successes of Burke, King and others had been surpassed by new soul singers, including Stax artists such as Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett, who mainly recorded in Memphis, Tennessee, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama. According to Jon Landau:[20]

Arthur Conley“Between 1962 and 1964 Redding recorded a series of soul ballads characterized by unabashedly sentimental lyrics usually begging forgiveness or asking a girlfriend to come home…. He soon became known as “Mr. Pitiful” and earned a reputation as the leading performer of soul ballads.”

The most important female soul singer to emerge was Aretha Franklin, originally a gospel singer who began to make secular recordings in 1960 but whose career was later revitalised by her recordings for Atlantic. Her 1967 recordings, such as “I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)”, “Respect” (written and originally recorded by Otis Redding), and “Do Right Woman, Do Right Man” (written by Chips Moman and Dan Penn), were significant and commercially successful productions.

Soul music dominated the U.S. African-American music charts in the 1960s, and many recordings crossed over into the pop charts in the U.S. Otis Redding was a huge success at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. The genre also became highly popular in the UK, where many leading acts toured in the late 1960s. “Soul” became an umbrella term for an increasingly wide variety of R&B-based music styles – from the dance and pop-oriented acts at Motown Records in Detroit, such as The Temptations, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder, to “deep soul” performers such as Percy Sledge and James Carr. Different regions and cities within the U.S., including New York City, Detroit, Chicago, Memphis, Sam&DaveNew Orleans, Philadelphia, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama (the home of FAME Studios and Muscle Shoals Sound Studios) became noted for different subgenres of the music and recording styles.

By 1968, while at its peak of popularity, soul began to fragment into disparate subgenres. Artists such as James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone evolved into funk music, while other singers such as Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Curtis Mayfield and Al Green developed slicker, more sophisticated and in some cases more politically conscious varieties of the genre. However, soul music continued to evolve, informing most subsequent forms of R&B from the 1970s-onward, with pockets of musicians continuing to perform in traditional soul style. (by wikipedia)

And here´s is he legendary Soul samper “That´s Soul 1” from 1967 … released by Atalntic Records, many tracks on this album are from the legendary Stax label:

Stax Records is an American record label, originally based in Memphis, Tennessee. Founded in 1957 as Satellite Records, the label changed its name to Stax Records in 1961 and shared its operations with Volt Records, a sister label created to avoid the impression of favoritism among radio stations playing their records.

Stax was influential in the creation of Southern soul and Memphis soul music. Stax also released gospel, funk, and blues recordings. Renowned for its output of blues music, the label was founded by two siblings and business partners, Jim Stewart and his sister Estelle Axton (STewart/AXton = Stax).

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It featured several popular ethnically integrated bands (including the label’s house band, Booker T. & the M.G.’s) and a racially integrated team of staff and artists unprecedented in that time of racial strife and tension in Memphis and the South. According to ethnomusicologist Rob Bowman, the label’s use of “one studio, one equipment set-up, the same set of musicians and a small group of songwriters led to a readily identifiable sound. It was a sound based in black gospel, blues, country, and earlier forms of rhythm and blues. It became known as southern soul music.”

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Following the death of Stax’s biggest star, Otis Redding, in 1967, and the severance of the label’s distribution deal with Atlantic Records in 1968, Stax continued primarily under the supervision of a new co-owner, Al Bell. Over the next five years, Bell expanded the label’s operations significantly, in order to compete with Stax’s main rival, Motown Records in Detroit. During the mid-1970s, a number of factors, including a problematic distribution deal with CBS Records, caused the label to slide into insolvency, resulting in its forced closure in late 1975.

In 1977, Fantasy Records acquired the post-1968 Stax catalogue and selected pre-1968 recordings. Beginning in 1978, Stax (now owned by Fantasy) began signing new acts and issuing new material, as well as reissuing previously recorded Stax material. However, by the early 1980s, no new material was being issued on the label, and for the next two decades, Stax was strictly a reissue label.

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After Concord Records acquired Fantasy in 2004, the Stax label was reactivated, and is today used to issue both the 1968–1975 catalog material and new recordings by current R&B and soul performers. Atlantic Records continues to hold the rights to the vast majority of the 1959–1968 Stax material. (by wikipedia)

Yes … a legendary sampler … and if you would like to know, what´s soul all about … listen to this record !

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Tracklist:
01. Wilson Pickett: Mustang Sally (Rice) 3.08
02. Carla Thomas: B-a-b-y (Hayes/Porter) 2.56
03. Arthur Conley: Sweet Soul Music (Redding/Conley) 2.22
04. Percy Sledge: When A Man Loves A Woman (Lewis/Wright) 2.56
05. Sam & Dave: I Got Everything I Need (Cropper/Floyd/Isbell) 3.00
06. Ben E. King: What Is Soul (Gallo/King) 2.22
07. Aretha Franklin: I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You (Shannon) 2.50
06. Otis Redding: Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song) (Redding/Cropper) 2.44
07. Eddie Floyd: Knock On Wood (Cropper/Floyd) 3.07
08. Solomon Burke: Keep Looking (Burke) 2.41
09. Wilson Pickett: Land Of 1000 Dances (Kenner) 2.28
10. Joe Tex: Papa Was Too (Tex) 2.44
11. Percy Sledge: Warm And Tender Love (Robinson) 3.23
12. The Drifters: Baby What I Mean (Hamilton/Sheldon) 2.36

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OriginalBackCover1Original back cover (1st pressing)

 

I got this item from Mr. Sleeve … what a great gift … thanky you very much !!!!

And here are the lyrics of “Sweet Soul Music”:

Do you like good music?
Huh, that sweet soul music
Just as long as it’s swinging
Oh, yeah

Way out here on the floor, ya’ll
Ah, going to a go-go
Dancing with the music
Oh, yeah

Spotlight on Lou Rawls, ya’ll
Ah, don’t he look boss, ya’ll
Singing ‘Love’s a Hurtin Thing’, yall
Oh, yeah

Spotlight on Sam and Dave, ya’ll
Oh, don’t they look great y’all?
Singing, ‘Hold On I’m Coming’
Oh, yeah

Spotlight on Wilson Pickett, now
That wicked Wilson Pickett
Singing, ‘Mustang Sally’
Oh, yeah

Spotlight on Otis Redding, now
Singing ‘Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa’
‘Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa’
Oh, yeah
Get it Otis

Spotlight on James Brown, ya’ll
He’s the king of them all, ya’ll
He’s the king of them all, ya’ll
Oh, yeah

Do ya like good music?
That sweet soul music
Just long as it’s swinging
Oh, yeah

I got to get the feeling
I got to get the feeling
Do ya like good music?
That sweet soul music
Help me get the feeling
I want to get the feeling
Otis Redding’s got the feeling

James Brown he got the feeling
Oh, I love good music

Johnny Horton – Country & Western Superstar (1973)

FrontCover1.JPGJohn LaGale “Johnny” Horton (April 30, 1925 – November 5, 1960) was an American country music, honky tonk and rockabilly singer and musician, during the 1950s and early 1960s, best known for his international hits beginning with the 1959 single “The Battle of New Orleans”, which was awarded the 1960 Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording. The song was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2001 ranked No. 333 of the Recording Industry Association of America’s “Songs of the Century”. His first number 1 country song was in 1959, “When It’s Springtime in Alaska (It’s Forty Below)”.

Horton’s music usually encompassed folk ballads based on American historic themes and legend. He had two successes in 1960 with both “Sink the Bismarck” and “North to Alaska” utilized over the opening credits for the John Wayne film of the same name. Horton died in November 1960 at the peak of his fame in a traffic collision, less than two years after his breakthrough. Horton is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame and the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

Horton was born in Los Angeles, to John Loly Horton (1889–1959) and the former Ella Claudia Robinson (1892–1966), the youngest of five siblings, and reared in Rusk in Cherokee County in east Texas. His family often traveled to California to work as migrant fruit pickers. After graduation from high school in Gallatin, Texas, in 1944, Horton attended Lon Morris Junior College in Jacksonville, Texas, with a basketball scholarship. He later attended Seattle University and briefly Baylor University in Waco, although he did not graduate from any of these institutions.

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Horton soon returned to California, where he got a job in the mail room at Selznick International Pictures. His future wife, Donna Cook, was working at the studio as a secretary at the time. After a short stint studying geology in Seattle in 1948, Horton went to Alaska to look for gold. It was during this period that he began writing songs. Returning south, he entered and won a talent contest in Henderson, Texas. Encouraged by this result, he returned to California to pursue a music career.

His guest appearances on Cliffie Stone’s Hometown Jamboree on KXLA-AM and KLAC-TV in Pasadena and his own half-hour show The Singing Fisherman led to the opportunity to record some songs on the Cormac record label. By the time the company folded in 1952, Horton recorded ten singles for that label. Fabor Robison, owner of Abbott Records, acquired the masters. Around this time Horton married Donna Cook.

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By this time Horton was appearing regularly on Louisiana Hayride, so he and Donna moved to Shreveport, Louisiana, where the show was recorded. He also signed a contract with Mercury Records and began recording. His first song for that label, “First Train Headin’ South” b/w “(I Wished for an Angel) The Devil Sent Me You” (Mercury 6412), received good reviews. He and his new backup band, the Rowley Trio, began touring under the name The Singing Fisherman and the Rowley Trio in 1952, eventually changing the name to Johnny Horton and the Roadrunners. The group included Horton as lead singer, Jerry Rowley on fiddle, his wife Evelyn on piano, and his sister Vera (Dido) on guitars. The constant touring was hard on Horton’s marriage, and Donna moved back to Los Angeles. They were soon divorced.

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On September 26, 1953, Horton married Billie Jean Jones, widow of Hank Williams, who had died January 1, 1953. Horton parted ways with the Rowley trio, but continued to appear occasionally on Louisiana Hayride. His contract with Mercury expired in late 1954, with his recording of “All for the Love of a Girl” (Mercury 70227) being his best seller, at 35,000 to 45,000 copies. Horton, himself always an avid fisherman, got a job in a tackle shop and put his music career on hiatus. But by the following year, his new manager and bassist Tillman Franks had obtained Horton a one-year contract with Columbia Records. They traveled to Nashville in a borrowed car for their first recording session. Influenced by the work of Elvis Presley, Horton began adopting a more rockabilly style.

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“Honky-Tonk Man” was recorded on 11 January 1956 at the Bradley Film & Recording Studios in Nashville, one of four songs Horton recorded that day. Session musicians on the recording were Grady Martin and Harold Bradley, as well as Bill Black (at the time Presley’s bassist). Soon afterwards “Honky-Tonk Man” was released as a single (Columbia label: 4-21504) paired with another song from the same session, “I’m Ready if You’re Willing”. They went out on tour, with the band featuring Franks on bass and Tommy Tomlinson on guitar. He then moved to East Peoria, Illinois where he had had four children with Darcy Melba Dwyer.

“Honky-Tonk Man” was reviewed by the March 10 issue of Billboard, which said of “Honky Tonk Man”, “The wine women and song attractions exert a powerful hold on the singer, he admits. The funky sound and pounding beat in the backing suggest the kind of atmosphere he describes. A very good jukebox record.”[1] Their review of “I’m Ready if You’re Willing” was also positive: “Horton sings out this cheerful material with amiable personality. This ever more popular stylist ought to expand his circle of fans with this one.” The song peaked at No. 9 on the C&W Jockey chart (now Hot Country Songs) and at No. 14 on the Best Seller chart.

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Horton returned to the studio on May 23, but the “A” side of his next single, “I’m a One Woman Man” (Columbia 21538), was one of the songs recorded back in January. The “B” side was “I Don’t Like I Did”. Billboard described “One Woman Man” as a “smart and polished job,” and Horton as “singing with a light, airy touch. Guitar work is just as convincing, adding up to listenable, commercial stuff”. He and his band toured through the United States and Canada to promote the record, which reached No. 7 on the Jockey chart and No. 9 on the Best Seller and Jukebox charts.

“I’m Coming Home” / “I Got A Hole In My Pirogue” (Columbia 40813) was released around this time as well. On February 9, Billboard noted that “not only Southern markets are doing good business with this, but Northern cities report that both country and pop customers are going for this in a big way”.[1] It was again a success on the country charts (No. 11 Jockey, No. 15 Best Seller) but it failed to score the popular music charts.

Later major successes include the song “The Battle of New Orleans” (written by Jimmy Driftwood), which was awarded the 1960 Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording. The song was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2001 ranked No. 333 of the Recording Industry Association of America’s “Songs of the Century”. Horton had two other successes in 1960 with “Sink the Bismarck” and “North to Alaska” for John Wayne’s movie, North to Alaska.

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On the night of November 4–5, 1960, Horton and two other band members, Tommy Tomlinson and Tillman Franks, were travelling from Austin, Texas to Shreveport when they collided with an oncoming truck on a bridge near Milano in Milam County, Texas. Horton died en route to the hospital, and Tomlinson (1930-1982) was seriously injured; his leg later had to be amputated. Franks (1920-2006) suffered head injuries, and James Davis, the driver of the truck, had a broken ankle and other minor injuries.

The funeral was held in Shreveport on November 8, 1960, officiated by Tillman Franks’ younger brother, William Derrel “Billy” Franks, a Church of God minister. Johnny Cash did one of the readings, choosing Chapter 20 from the Book of John.[1] Horton is interred, with a cemetery bench in his honor, at the Hillcrest Memorial Park and Mausoleum in Haughton, east of Bossier City in northwestern Louisiana.

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When Johnny Cash, a good friend of Horton’s, learned about the accident he said, ” locked myself in one of the hotel’s barrooms and cried.” Cash dedicated his rendition of “When It’s Springtime in Alaska (It’s Forty Below)” to Horton on his album Personal File: “Johnny Horton was a good old friend of mine.” Over time, Horton’s material has been re-released a number of times, through boxsets and compilations.

Horton was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame and posthumously inducted into the Delta Music Museum Hall of Fame in Ferriday, Louisiana.

Some racist songs by “Johnny Rebel” have sometimes been incorrectly associated with Horton. Rebel did not begin recording until after Horton’s death. The mistake is apparently because Horton recorded the historical song “Johnny Reb”.

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Horton was married twice. His first marriage, to Donna Cook, ended with a divorce granted in Rusk, Texas. In September 1953, he married Billie Jean Jones, the widow of country music singer Hank Williams. (She was Williams’ second wife.) With Billie Jean, Horton had two daughters, Yanina (Nina) and Melody. Billie Jean’s daughter, Jeri Lynn, was legally adopted by Johnny. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a compilation album, produced for the German record market in 1973.

Enjoy this trip in the early days of Country & Western music !

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Personnel:
Johnny Horton (vocals, guitar)
+
a lot of other musicians

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Tracklist:
01. The Battle Of New Orleans (Driftwood) 2.31
02. When It’s Springtime In Alaska (It’s Forty Below) (Franks) 2.37
03. Johnny Reb Kilgore) 2.20
04. Sink The Bismarck (Horton/Franks) 3.14
05. North To Alaska (Phillips) 2.49
06. The Golden Rocket (Snow) 2.05
07. Got The Bull By The Horns (Boyd/Jones) 2.10
08. Johnny Freedom (“Freedomland”) (Weiss/Styne) 2.47
09. John Paul Jones (Driftwood) 2.20
10. Young Abe Lincoln (Make A Tall, Tall Man) (Huffstettler/Horton) 1.57
11. Rock Island Line (live) (Traditional) 2.41
12. All For The Love Of A Girl (live) (Horton) 2.54
13. Whispering Pines (Halsey) 2.56
14. The First Train Heading South (Horton) 2.20
15. Lost Highway (Payne) 2.36
16. The Battle Of Bull Run (Payne) 2.37
17. The Sinking Of Reuben James (Almanac Singers) 0.40
18. I’m Ready, If You’re Willing (Claud/Organ) 2.19
19. Honky-Tonk Man (Horton/Franks/Hauser) 2.13
20. I’m Coming Home (Horton/Franks) 2:05

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*
**

In may of nineteen forty-one the war had just begun
The germans had the biggest ships
That had the biggest guns
The Bismark was the fastest ship
That ever sailed the seas
On her deck were guns as big as steers
And shells as big as trees
Out of the cold and foggy night
Came the british ship the Hood
And ev’ry british seaman he knew and understood
They had to sink the Bismark the terror of the sea
Stop those guns as big as steers
And those shells as big as trees

We’ll find that german battleship
That’s makin’ such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin’ boys
And spin those guns around
When we find the Bismark we gotta cut her down

The Hood found the Bismark and on that fatal day
The Bismark started firin’ fifteen miles away
We gotta sink the Bismark was the battle sound
But when the smoke had cleared away
The mighty Hood went down
For six long days and weary nights
They tried to find her trail
Churchill told the people put ev’ry ship a-sail
‘Cause somewhere on that ocean
I know she’s gotta be
We gotta sink the Bismark to the bottom of the sea

We’ll find that german battleship
That’s makin’ such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin’ boys
And spin those guns around
When we find the Bismark we gotta cut her down

The fog was gone the seventh day
And they saw the mornin’ sun
Ten hours away from homeland
The Bismark made its run
The admiral of the british fleet said
Turn those bows around
We found that german battleship
And we’re gonna cut her down

The british guns were aimed
And the shells were comin’ fast
The first shell hit the Bismark
They knew she couldn’t last
That mighty german battleship is just a memory
Sink the Bismark was the battle cry
That shook the seven seas

We found that german battleship
Was makin’ such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
We hit the deck a-runnin’ and
We spun those guns around
We found the mighty Bismark
And then we cut her down