Johnny Horton – Country & Western Superstar (1973)

FrontCover1.JPGJohn LaGale “Johnny” Horton (April 30, 1925 – November 5, 1960) was an American country music, honky tonk and rockabilly singer and musician, during the 1950s and early 1960s, best known for his international hits beginning with the 1959 single “The Battle of New Orleans”, which was awarded the 1960 Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording. The song was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2001 ranked No. 333 of the Recording Industry Association of America’s “Songs of the Century”. His first number 1 country song was in 1959, “When It’s Springtime in Alaska (It’s Forty Below)”.

Horton’s music usually encompassed folk ballads based on American historic themes and legend. He had two successes in 1960 with both “Sink the Bismarck” and “North to Alaska” utilized over the opening credits for the John Wayne film of the same name. Horton died in November 1960 at the peak of his fame in a traffic collision, less than two years after his breakthrough. Horton is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame and the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

Horton was born in Los Angeles, to John Loly Horton (1889–1959) and the former Ella Claudia Robinson (1892–1966), the youngest of five siblings, and reared in Rusk in Cherokee County in east Texas. His family often traveled to California to work as migrant fruit pickers. After graduation from high school in Gallatin, Texas, in 1944, Horton attended Lon Morris Junior College in Jacksonville, Texas, with a basketball scholarship. He later attended Seattle University and briefly Baylor University in Waco, although he did not graduate from any of these institutions.

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Horton soon returned to California, where he got a job in the mail room at Selznick International Pictures. His future wife, Donna Cook, was working at the studio as a secretary at the time. After a short stint studying geology in Seattle in 1948, Horton went to Alaska to look for gold. It was during this period that he began writing songs. Returning south, he entered and won a talent contest in Henderson, Texas. Encouraged by this result, he returned to California to pursue a music career.

His guest appearances on Cliffie Stone’s Hometown Jamboree on KXLA-AM and KLAC-TV in Pasadena and his own half-hour show The Singing Fisherman led to the opportunity to record some songs on the Cormac record label. By the time the company folded in 1952, Horton recorded ten singles for that label. Fabor Robison, owner of Abbott Records, acquired the masters. Around this time Horton married Donna Cook.

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By this time Horton was appearing regularly on Louisiana Hayride, so he and Donna moved to Shreveport, Louisiana, where the show was recorded. He also signed a contract with Mercury Records and began recording. His first song for that label, “First Train Headin’ South” b/w “(I Wished for an Angel) The Devil Sent Me You” (Mercury 6412), received good reviews. He and his new backup band, the Rowley Trio, began touring under the name The Singing Fisherman and the Rowley Trio in 1952, eventually changing the name to Johnny Horton and the Roadrunners. The group included Horton as lead singer, Jerry Rowley on fiddle, his wife Evelyn on piano, and his sister Vera (Dido) on guitars. The constant touring was hard on Horton’s marriage, and Donna moved back to Los Angeles. They were soon divorced.

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On September 26, 1953, Horton married Billie Jean Jones, widow of Hank Williams, who had died January 1, 1953. Horton parted ways with the Rowley trio, but continued to appear occasionally on Louisiana Hayride. His contract with Mercury expired in late 1954, with his recording of “All for the Love of a Girl” (Mercury 70227) being his best seller, at 35,000 to 45,000 copies. Horton, himself always an avid fisherman, got a job in a tackle shop and put his music career on hiatus. But by the following year, his new manager and bassist Tillman Franks had obtained Horton a one-year contract with Columbia Records. They traveled to Nashville in a borrowed car for their first recording session. Influenced by the work of Elvis Presley, Horton began adopting a more rockabilly style.

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“Honky-Tonk Man” was recorded on 11 January 1956 at the Bradley Film & Recording Studios in Nashville, one of four songs Horton recorded that day. Session musicians on the recording were Grady Martin and Harold Bradley, as well as Bill Black (at the time Presley’s bassist). Soon afterwards “Honky-Tonk Man” was released as a single (Columbia label: 4-21504) paired with another song from the same session, “I’m Ready if You’re Willing”. They went out on tour, with the band featuring Franks on bass and Tommy Tomlinson on guitar. He then moved to East Peoria, Illinois where he had had four children with Darcy Melba Dwyer.

“Honky-Tonk Man” was reviewed by the March 10 issue of Billboard, which said of “Honky Tonk Man”, “The wine women and song attractions exert a powerful hold on the singer, he admits. The funky sound and pounding beat in the backing suggest the kind of atmosphere he describes. A very good jukebox record.”[1] Their review of “I’m Ready if You’re Willing” was also positive: “Horton sings out this cheerful material with amiable personality. This ever more popular stylist ought to expand his circle of fans with this one.” The song peaked at No. 9 on the C&W Jockey chart (now Hot Country Songs) and at No. 14 on the Best Seller chart.

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Horton returned to the studio on May 23, but the “A” side of his next single, “I’m a One Woman Man” (Columbia 21538), was one of the songs recorded back in January. The “B” side was “I Don’t Like I Did”. Billboard described “One Woman Man” as a “smart and polished job,” and Horton as “singing with a light, airy touch. Guitar work is just as convincing, adding up to listenable, commercial stuff”. He and his band toured through the United States and Canada to promote the record, which reached No. 7 on the Jockey chart and No. 9 on the Best Seller and Jukebox charts.

“I’m Coming Home” / “I Got A Hole In My Pirogue” (Columbia 40813) was released around this time as well. On February 9, Billboard noted that “not only Southern markets are doing good business with this, but Northern cities report that both country and pop customers are going for this in a big way”.[1] It was again a success on the country charts (No. 11 Jockey, No. 15 Best Seller) but it failed to score the popular music charts.

Later major successes include the song “The Battle of New Orleans” (written by Jimmy Driftwood), which was awarded the 1960 Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording. The song was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2001 ranked No. 333 of the Recording Industry Association of America’s “Songs of the Century”. Horton had two other successes in 1960 with “Sink the Bismarck” and “North to Alaska” for John Wayne’s movie, North to Alaska.

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On the night of November 4–5, 1960, Horton and two other band members, Tommy Tomlinson and Tillman Franks, were travelling from Austin, Texas to Shreveport when they collided with an oncoming truck on a bridge near Milano in Milam County, Texas. Horton died en route to the hospital, and Tomlinson (1930-1982) was seriously injured; his leg later had to be amputated. Franks (1920-2006) suffered head injuries, and James Davis, the driver of the truck, had a broken ankle and other minor injuries.

The funeral was held in Shreveport on November 8, 1960, officiated by Tillman Franks’ younger brother, William Derrel “Billy” Franks, a Church of God minister. Johnny Cash did one of the readings, choosing Chapter 20 from the Book of John.[1] Horton is interred, with a cemetery bench in his honor, at the Hillcrest Memorial Park and Mausoleum in Haughton, east of Bossier City in northwestern Louisiana.

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When Johnny Cash, a good friend of Horton’s, learned about the accident he said, ” locked myself in one of the hotel’s barrooms and cried.” Cash dedicated his rendition of “When It’s Springtime in Alaska (It’s Forty Below)” to Horton on his album Personal File: “Johnny Horton was a good old friend of mine.” Over time, Horton’s material has been re-released a number of times, through boxsets and compilations.

Horton was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame and posthumously inducted into the Delta Music Museum Hall of Fame in Ferriday, Louisiana.

Some racist songs by “Johnny Rebel” have sometimes been incorrectly associated with Horton. Rebel did not begin recording until after Horton’s death. The mistake is apparently because Horton recorded the historical song “Johnny Reb”.

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Horton was married twice. His first marriage, to Donna Cook, ended with a divorce granted in Rusk, Texas. In September 1953, he married Billie Jean Jones, the widow of country music singer Hank Williams. (She was Williams’ second wife.) With Billie Jean, Horton had two daughters, Yanina (Nina) and Melody. Billie Jean’s daughter, Jeri Lynn, was legally adopted by Johnny. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a compilation album, produced for the German record market in 1973.

Enjoy this trip in the early days of Country & Western music !

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Personnel:
Johnny Horton (vocals, guitar)
+
a lot of other musicians

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Tracklist:
01. The Battle Of New Orleans (Driftwood) 2.31
02. When It’s Springtime In Alaska (It’s Forty Below) (Franks) 2.37
03. Johnny Reb Kilgore) 2.20
04. Sink The Bismarck (Horton/Franks) 3.14
05. North To Alaska (Phillips) 2.49
06. The Golden Rocket (Snow) 2.05
07. Got The Bull By The Horns (Boyd/Jones) 2.10
08. Johnny Freedom (“Freedomland”) (Weiss/Styne) 2.47
09. John Paul Jones (Driftwood) 2.20
10. Young Abe Lincoln (Make A Tall, Tall Man) (Huffstettler/Horton) 1.57
11. Rock Island Line (live) (Traditional) 2.41
12. All For The Love Of A Girl (live) (Horton) 2.54
13. Whispering Pines (Halsey) 2.56
14. The First Train Heading South (Horton) 2.20
15. Lost Highway (Payne) 2.36
16. The Battle Of Bull Run (Payne) 2.37
17. The Sinking Of Reuben James (Almanac Singers) 0.40
18. I’m Ready, If You’re Willing (Claud/Organ) 2.19
19. Honky-Tonk Man (Horton/Franks/Hauser) 2.13
20. I’m Coming Home (Horton/Franks) 2:05

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In may of nineteen forty-one the war had just begun
The germans had the biggest ships
That had the biggest guns
The Bismark was the fastest ship
That ever sailed the seas
On her deck were guns as big as steers
And shells as big as trees
Out of the cold and foggy night
Came the british ship the Hood
And ev’ry british seaman he knew and understood
They had to sink the Bismark the terror of the sea
Stop those guns as big as steers
And those shells as big as trees

We’ll find that german battleship
That’s makin’ such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin’ boys
And spin those guns around
When we find the Bismark we gotta cut her down

The Hood found the Bismark and on that fatal day
The Bismark started firin’ fifteen miles away
We gotta sink the Bismark was the battle sound
But when the smoke had cleared away
The mighty Hood went down
For six long days and weary nights
They tried to find her trail
Churchill told the people put ev’ry ship a-sail
‘Cause somewhere on that ocean
I know she’s gotta be
We gotta sink the Bismark to the bottom of the sea

We’ll find that german battleship
That’s makin’ such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin’ boys
And spin those guns around
When we find the Bismark we gotta cut her down

The fog was gone the seventh day
And they saw the mornin’ sun
Ten hours away from homeland
The Bismark made its run
The admiral of the british fleet said
Turn those bows around
We found that german battleship
And we’re gonna cut her down

The british guns were aimed
And the shells were comin’ fast
The first shell hit the Bismark
They knew she couldn’t last
That mighty german battleship is just a memory
Sink the Bismark was the battle cry
That shook the seven seas

We found that german battleship
Was makin’ such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismark
‘Cause the world depends on us
We hit the deck a-runnin’ and
We spun those guns around
We found the mighty Bismark
And then we cut her down

Various Artists – European Jazz – Volume 03 – Italy (2012)

FrontCover1.jpgAt one time, the concept of “European Jazz” meant very little indeed. While jazz was developing in the USA in the 1920s, there was almost no European jazz to speak of. Some Americans – Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, Sidney Bechet – came to Europe and made an impact there in the 1930s but it was not until the thirties that Europeans began to develop their own jazz significantly. Perhaps the most outstanding group was the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, formed in 1934, with its two virtuosos Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli.

This group is not represented in this ten-CD boxed set, which suggests that the compilation is making no attempt at a historical survey. Indeed, it is difficult to know what this set is trying to do. It seems as if the compilers simply put together tracks to which they had access, and there is little attempt to provide a balanced view of European jazz. Nevertheless, this collection can be educative in opening our ears to some artists we may not have heard before. It also supplies a cross-section (albeit limited) of how Europeans developed jazz, mostly in the 1950s and 1960s.

This compilation makes it clear that European jazz was very much influenced by the Americans. For example, the tenorist on track 2 of the third CD sounds very like Stan Getz, while the altoist on the third track betrays the influence of Charlie Parker. And the Michael Naura Quintet on the eighth CD could be mistaken for the Modern Jazz Quartet.

I can’t tell you who most of the individual musicians are, as detailed personnels are sadly not given. This is a nuisance, as I would like to be able to identify (for instance) the bongo Brandenburgplayer on track 9 of the fifth CD. However, one lesson of many tracks in this collection is that many Europeans learnt from the bebop pioneers – and from such groups as the Gerry Mulligan Quartet. As most of the tracks in this compilation come from the fifties and sixties, there is little individuality in the music from the different countries, as it was only later that they began to develop their own distinctive styles.

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I shall not attempt to describe the music in detail but will simply pick out tracks, artists or groups of note. Most discs are devoted to particular countries …

… Another weakness of these selections is that they are often chosen from a narrow range of bands. Thus the second CD illustrates Scandinavian jazz with 15 tracks, of which ten are by The Swedish Modern Jazz Group, all taken from the same 1960 LP. At least it included Lasse Gullin and Nils Lindberg – two of Sweden’s best-known jazzmen.

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The third CD with the theme of Italy includes at least one musician who is still very active today. Enrico Rava. He was in his teens when his quartet recorded the three tracks here, although he doesn’t appear on Tema for Franco. His playing is clear although a little uncertain. The recording quality is remarkably good on these three tracks. (by musicweb-international.com)

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No, no, no … this compilation is not so weak, as we read above … it´s a great compilation with lots of rarities from the young European Jazz-Scene during the 50´and this time we hear great Jazz from Italy ! Excellent stuff !

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Tracklist:
01. Quintetto Basso-Valdambrini: Lotar (Basso) 3.18

Franco Cerri:
02. Flavio‘s Blues (Ambrosetti) 4.06
03. Just One Of Those Things (Porter)

Piana, Mondini, Donadio, Azzolini:
04. Bag‘s Groove (Jackson) 5.23
05. All The Things You Are (Kern) 2.43
06. There Will Never Ne Another You (Warren) 2.13

Enrico Rava 4tet:
07. Tema For Franco (Lama) 2.45
08. Line For Lyons (Mulligan) 3.25
09. Fine And Dandy (Swist/James) 4.19

Modern Jazz Gang:
10. The Drum Is A Tramp (Santacci/Scappa/Bronollini) 3.15
11. Polimnia (Scappa/Santucci/Metallo) 3.42
12. Blue Mirria (Brugnolini) 3.30
13. Carme For J (Metallo) 3.16

Sestetto Bebop Gilberto Cuppini:
14. Esophagus (Spotti) 2.57
15. Perdido (Tizol) 6.19

16. Nunzio Rotondo and The Sextet Of Hot Club Of Rome: The Man I Love (Gershwin) 3.04

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More from the “European Jazz” edition:

More

Various Artists – Bravo Mexico ! (1969)

FrontCover1.JPGThe music of Mexico is very diverse and features a wide range of musical genres and performance styles. It has been influenced by a variety of cultures, most notably the culture of the indigenous peoples of Mexico and Europe. Music was an expression of Mexican nationalism, beginning in the nineteenth century.

Many traditional Mexican songs are well-known everywhere, including María Grever’s first international hit “Júrame” (“Swear to me”), and her song “Te quiero dijiste” (English version “Magic Is the Moonlight”), written for the 1944 Esther Williams film. “La Noche de los Mayas,” Huapango de Moncayo, “Sinfonía India (Second Symphony),” “Sobre las Olas,” “La Sandunga,” “Cielito Lindo” (“Beautiful Sweetheart”), “Bésame Mucho” (“Kiss Me a Lot”), “Perfidia”, “Solamente una vez” (English version “You Belong to My Heart”), “Esta Tarde Vi Llover” (English version “Yesterday I Heard the Rain”), “Somos Novios” (English version “We Are Dating”), “¡Ay, Jalisco, no te rajes!”, and “Jesusita en Chihuahua,”

Irma SerranoOther famous songs include “México Lindo y Querido” (“Beautiful, Beloved Mexico”), “Jarabe Tapatío’ (known internationally as “The Mexican Hat Dance”), “El Rey” (“The King”), “El Triste” (“The sad one”), “Pelea de gallos”, “Enamorada” (“Enamoured”), “Échame a mi la culpa” (“Blame me”), “La ley del monte” (“The law of the land”), “La Bikina” (“The Bikina”), “Por Debajo de la Mesa,” “La Media Vuelta,” “La Bamba,” (“The Bamba”), “Lilongo,” and “Jarabe Pateño”. “La Cucaracha” (“The Cockroach”), although popularized during the Mexican Revolution, is a Mexican corrido. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a rare sampler, produced for the German record market with many of popluar singers from Mexico during this period. And maybe you will hear te soul of Mexico …

And we hear the roots of this famous sound of HerbAlpert and his Tijuana Brass Band …

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Tracklist:
01. Mariachi Los Mensajeros: El Sonero – El Guaje (Sones Jaliscienses) (d.Loza) 2.18
02. Irma Serrano: Flor del Rio (Cordero) 2.45
03. Jorge Valente: El Vivio (Ruiz/Zorrilla) 2.58
04. Mariachi “Jalisco” De Pepe Villa: Guadalajara (Villa) 3.04
05. Los Panchos; La Corriente (Navarro) 2.59
06. Eva Garza: Pader Nuestro (Delfino) 2.32
07. Fernando Soto: Rayando El Sol (Cancion Mexicana) (Traditional) 2.19
08. Mariachi Los Mensajeros: Chapala (Son) (Traditional) 2.21
09. Irma Serrano: La Martina (Castro) 3.03
10. Cuco Sanchez y Antonio: Bribiesca Maria Elena (Barcelata 3.07
11. Linda Vera Guindame: La Hamaca (Guaracha) 2.24
12. Irma Serrano: La Abandonada (Castro) 3.18
13. Mariachi “Jalisco” De Pepe Villa: El Mariachi (Guizar) 2.51
14. Jorge Valente: Calladamente (Maldonado) 2.26
15. Irma Serrano: Cariñto De Mi Vida (Valdes/Ortega) 1.46
16. Coral Mexicano: Cielito Lindo (Fernandez) 2.22

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Los Panchos

Spooky Tooth – Live In Europe (2001)

FrontCover1.jpgA new dawn broke in England in 1966-67 and it was a blues-rock dawn. Bands like Cream, Free, Ten Years After, The Rolling Stones and even Fleetwood Mac were blending their blues roots with the insistent beat of rock and gaining commercial success from it. and during the late 1960s, Spooky Tooth was one of a contingent of new British rock bands inspired by the first British Rock Invasion of acts like The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds and The Animals.

Spooky Tooth took Europe and America by storm; alongside their Island Records label mates Traffic, Free and Jethtro Tull. From 1967 through 1974, they released seven Billboard-charting albums. After the band’s demise, all of the members went on to careers as solo artists or members of other successful bands.

It’s been 30 years since “It’s All About”, their first Stateside release on Bell Records (later reissued by A&M as “Tobacco Road”). For musicians who have not recorded together for many years, there were a number of obstacles to overcome. Each of the group members had created their own lives and coming together again presented somewhat of a challenge. Although the group wanted to honor some of their past material, they were also very conscious of writing contemporary new material which would reflect who they are now.

Part of the Spooky Tooth legacy is that they were always great at covering songs by then-unknown writers (Elton John, Robbie Robertson) and at recording songs by established writers and making them their own (Lennon/McCartney, Al Kooper, Bob Dylan) in the inimitable Spooky Tooth style.

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One of the more intriguing components of the blues-rock movement was Spooky Tooth. They differed from other bands in that they utilized two very distinctive, talented vocalists (Mike Harrison and Gary Wright) and they featured an ominous yet potent organ sound.

By 1968, they had broken through commercially in England and were on the verge of releasing their most popular material. It was at this time that they performed on several editions of BBC´s radio program Top Gear.

Six of the nine tracks presented on BBC Sessions are taken from those appearances and showcase a band poised at the brink of big-time success. An aural snapshot of a well known band at that juncture of its recording career is very rare.

~Spooky Tooth´s “BBC Sessions” is that rare photograph~

As a special bonus, three additional tracks are included, one an obscure 1966 recording from Deep Feeling (featuring Spooky Tooth guitarist Luther Grosvenor and pre Traffic drummer Jim Capaldi !)) and two alternate mixes from the Spooky Tooth´s 1999 reunion release Cross Purpose.

Music from Deep Yesterday, Classic Yesterday and Reunion Yesterday´s BBC Sessions is everything a title like this should be.

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This is a nice addition for every serious Spooky Tooth collector, but:

For years now bootlegs of Spooky Tooth’s BBC recordings have been circulating, most with less than excellent sound. Finally we get a chance to hear the band at its finest: LIVE “at the Beeb,” and what do we get? A truncated set, short in selections and definitely not what we would like to hear. The half dozen BBC songs come from but one or two of the numerous sessions the band recorded between 1968 and 1969, and many are faded in, suggesting that they are taken from transcription discs with spoken voice-over introductions that were simply edited out. Missing are some of the best BBC sessions, songs like “Tobacco Road,” and “Evil Woman” that were hallmarks of the band in concert. Although the studio outtakes from the 1999 reunion album are nice to have, they really do not fit comfortably into this collection. Equally disappointing are the two “bonus cuts” tacked on to the end of the disc which come from a 1970 Berlin concert, but which are rather shabby sounding, and which appear with no explanation as to their origins. In short we get a taste of what might have been, namely a Spooky Tooth BBC set to rival those recently issued by the Kinks, and the Who, but which instead winds up a missed opportunity. (by Christopher L. Dolmetsch)

More rare Spooky Tooth recordings will come !

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Personnel:

Live at the BBC:
Mike Harrison (vocals, keyboards)
Luther Grosvenor (guitar)
Mike Kellie (drums)
Greg Ridley (bass)
Gary Wright (vocals, organ)

Deep Feeling:
Jim Capaldi (drums, vocals)
Luther Grosvenor (guitar, vocals)
Gordon Jackson (guitar)
David Meredith (bass)
Poli Palmer (vibraphon, flute)

1999 Reunion:
Mike Harrison (vocals)
Luther Grosvenor (guitar, percussion)
Mike Kellie (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Dave Moore (keyboards, synthesizer)
Greg Ridley (bass, background vocals)

Live in Berlin, 1970:
Mike Harrison (vocals, keyboards)
Luther Grosvenor (guitar)
Mike Kellie (drums)
Andy Leigh (bass)
Gary Wright (vocals, keyboards)

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Tracklist:

Live at the BBC:
01. Sunshine Help Me (Wright) 2.03
02. Too Much Or Nothing (Dylan)I 3.54
03. Feelin’ Bad (Kellie/Wright) 2.56
04. The Weight (Robertson) 3.17
05. I Can’t Quit Her (Kooper/Levine) 3.02
06. Blues Town (Harrison/King/Wright) 3.35

Deep Feeling (feat. Jim Capaldi and Luther Grosvenor):
07. Pretty Colours (unknown) 2.41

1999 Reunion Recordings Studio Outtakes:
08. Sunshine (Wallinger) 4.55
09. How (Kellie) 4.49

Live in Berlin, 1970:
10. Better You Better Than Me (Wright) 4.17
11. Soulful Lady (unknown) 8.50

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Mike Harrison (03 September 1945 – 25 March 2018)
Mike Kellie (24 March 1947 – 18 January 2017)
Greg Ridley (23 October 1947 – 19 November 2003)

Los Paraguayas – A Banda (1966)

FrontCover1.JPGLos (3) Paraguayos is a music group consisting of musicians from Paraguay. Since its foundation in the 1950s, the group has featured many singers and musicians, playing guitars, bongo drums and a Paraguayan harp, including Luis Alberto del Paraná, Reynaldo Meza, Angel “Pato” Garcia and Carlos Espinoza. The group performs many South American and Mexican tunes and songs, including classics, such as Guantanamera, El Cóndor Pasa and La Bamba. Having had many changes in their line-up, the group has retained its popularity, selling many albums and appearing at many concerts throughout the world. In 2007, Los Paraguayos played a world tour, including appearances in The Netherlands and Israel.

Alberto y Los Trios Paraguayos was a trio from Paraguay formed by Luis Alberto del Paraná, with Digno García (1919-1984) and Agustín Barboza. They toured the UK in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and released a number of UK records in the 1960s. The band leader, del Paraná, died in England in 1974. (by wikipedia)

And this is another sampler, released in Germany during the sixites.

And this is another chance to listen to this beautiful trio, this time as a quartet.

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Personnel:
Carlos Espinoza (guitar, vocals)
Angel “Pato” Garcia (harp, vocals)
Reynaldo Meza (guitar, vocals)
Luis Alberto del Paraná (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Cuando calienta el sol (C.Rigual/M.Rigual) 2.53
02. Vaya con Dios (May God Be With You) (Russell/James/Pepper/Dasca) 2.42
03. Amor, amor (Ruiz/Mendez) 3.14
04. Cu-cu-rru-cu-cu Paloma (Mendez) 3.45
05. María Dolores (Garcia/Morcillo) 3.57
06. A banda (de Hollanda) 2.45
07. La felicidad (Ortega) 2.53
08. La Paloma (Yradier) 3.22
09. México (Lopez/Vincy/del Parana) 3.59
10. El porom pompero (Solano/Ochaita) 2.52
11. Canción de Orfeo (Maria/Bonfa/de Arozamena) 3.01
12. La bamba (Traditional/Zuber) 2.55

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Various Artists – Surfbeat Behind The Iron Curtain (Planetary Pebbles, Vol. 3) (1999)

FrontCover1.jpgPart one of this series got a little flak because about half the tracks were recorded by bands that were not from behind the Iron Curtain. No such problem with the follow-up; all 24 cuts were done by groups from East Germany, Russia, Hungary, Romania, Czechoslovakia, and Poland between 1963-1967. Many of them are instrumental, and despite the “Surfbeat” in the album title, it’s striking how much they’re influenced not by surf music or the Ventures, but by the Shadows. Those galloping rhythms, the tremolo-laden sound with hints of country and Hawaiian music — it’s beyond a doubt that the Shadows, through radio broadcasts or clandestine means, were getting heard in Eastern Europe. Of course the recording conditions and execution were more primitive in these socialist lands, which puts on a layer of spookiness that gives it a certain charm.

Karel Duba

There are also some vocal numbers that show the more expected British Invasion influence, like the Olympics (from Czechoslovakia) singing in very clumsy English on “Story of the Girl with the Bass Guitar”; the East German Team 4, who sound like a credible American folk-rock garage band; and Romania’s Mondial, who do a song that quite resembles Paul Revere & the Raiders’ “Just Like Me.” Oddly, the T. Schumann Combo (from East Germany) do a pretty faithful and competent cover of Booker T. & the MG’s “Hip Hug-Her.” (by Richie Unterberger)

In other words: This album means fun, fun and much more fun !

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Tracklist:
01. Singing Guitars: Torpedo 1.48
02. Singing Guitars: Perfida 2.19
03. Hungarian Ensemble: Konzerta marson 2.45
04. Satelliten; Scary night 1.51
05. Karel Duba & Guitarmen: Winnetou 2.28
06. Sputniks: So much love 1.36
07. Mefistos: I Am Coming Home Baby 2.57
08. Taifuns: The West Wind 2.33
09. Olympics: Story Of The Girl With The Bass Guitar 1.56
10. Spuzniks: Spanish Gypsy Dance 1.52
11. Karel Duba & His Big Band: Steps In The Sand 2.50
12. Theo Schumann Combo: Puszta Beat 2.21
13. Cornel Fugaru & Sincron: The Jodler From Gorj 2.32
14. Studio 6: Party Time 2.44
15. Illes: Oh mondd 2.23
16. Hungarian Ensemble: Rollin Rollin 2.23
17. Team 4: Ich hab ihr ins Gesicht gesehn 3.40
18. Sincron: Play With The Maiden 2.56
19. Olympics: Mary Mary 2.18
20. Theo Schumann Combo: Hackepeter 2.48
21. Amigos: Komm gib mir deine Hand 2.21
22. George & Beathovens: Lez blaznihevo basnika 2.35
23. Mondial: Omule 3.00
24. Mondial: Orbul 3.27

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Theo Schumann Combo

Dutch Swing College Band – Dixie Jubilee (1970)

FrontCover1.JPGThe Dutch Swing College Band “DSCB” is a traditional dixieland band founded on 5 May 1945 by bandleader and clarinettist/saxophonist Peter Schilperoort.

Highly successful in their native home of The Netherlands, the band quickly found an international following. It has featured such musicians as Huub Janssen (drums), Henk Bosch van Drakestein (double bass), Kees van Dorser (trumpet), Dim Kesber (saxes), Jan Morks (clarinet), Wout Steenhuis (guitar), Arie Ligthart (banjo/guitar), Jaap van Kempen (banjo/guitar), Oscar Klein (trumpet), Dick Kaart (trombone), Ray Kaart (trumpet), Bert de Kort (cornet), Bert Boeren (trombone), Rod Mason, Rob Agerbeek (piano) – among many others.

The band continues to tour extensively, mainly in Europe & Scandinavia, and record directed by Bob Kaper, himself a member since 1967, following the former leader, Peter Schilperoort’s death on 17 November 1990. Schilperoort had led the band for more than 45 years, albeit with a five-year sabbatical from 13 September 1955, when he left to pursue an engineering career before returning to lead the band again officially on 1 January 1960

DSCB

On this record, the Dutch Swing College Band celebrates their 25th anniversary with a couple of old tunes, from the very early days (mono recordings) till 1970.

Enjoy this beautiful trip in the past … enoy this trip to the early days of Jazz !

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Personnel:
Dick Bakker (banjo on 01. – 03.)
Martin Beenen (drums on 07.)
Chris Bender (bass on 01. – 03.)
Wybe Buma (trumpet on 05. – 07.)
Kees van Dorsser (trumpet on 01. – 05.)
Eddie Hamm (vocals on 05.)
Huub Jansen (drums on 12.)
Arie Ligthart (banjo on 05. + 06.)
Bob Kaper (clarinet on 12.)
Dick Kaart (trombone on 07. – 12.)
Ray Kaart (trumpet on 08. – 11.)
Dim Kesber (clarinet on 01. – 06.)
Oscar Klein (trumpet on 07.)
Wim Kolstee (trombone on 01. – 07.)
Bert de Kort (corent on 12.)
Joop Van Leeuwen (banjo on 04.)
Arie Merkt (drums on 01. – 04.)
Jan Morks (clarinet on 07.)
Bob van Oven (bass on 04. – 11.)
Lu Ssanet (drums on 07. – 11.)
Peter Schilperoort (saxophone on 12.)
Joop Schrier (piano on 01. – 07.)
Koos Serierse (bass on 10.)
Peter Schilperoort (clarinet on 01. – 03., 05., 07. – 10., cornet on 04., drums on 12.)
Chris Smildiger (bass on 12.)
Andre Westendorp (drums on 05., trumpet on 06.)
Ferry Wienneke (piano on 09.)
Peter Ypma (drums on 11.)

Conductor: Peter Schilperoort

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Tracklist:
01, PanamaA1 Panama (Tyers)  3.04
02. At The Jazzband Ball (Shields/La Rocca) 3.96
03. Tin Roof Blues (Pollack/Brunies/Roppolo/Stitzel/Mares/Melrose) 3.11
04. Snake Rag (Oliver) 2.48
05. Dipper Mouth Blues (Oliver/Armstrong/Melrose) 2.41
06. Steamboat Stomp (Senter) 3.17
07. Buddy’s Habits (Nelson/Straight) 8.35
08. Big Butter And Eggman (Armstrong/Venable) 2.39
09. Besame Mucho (Velazquez) 2.37
10. Clarinet Marmalade (Raggs/Shields) 3.41
11. Melancholy (Blues) (Bloom/Melrose) 3.27
12. Since My Best Gal Turned Me Down (Quicksell/Lodwig) 3.14

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