Tony Williams Lifetime – (Turn It Over) (1970)

LPFrontCover1The Tony Williams Lifetime was a jazz fusion group led by jazz drummer Tony Williams.

The Tony Williams Lifetime was founded in 1969 as a power trio with John McLaughlin on electric guitar, and Larry Young (a.k.a. Khalid Yasin) on organ. The band was possibly named for Williams’ debut album as a bandleader, Life Time, released on Blue Note in 1964. Its debut album was Emergency!, a double album released on Polydor/PolyGram Records in 1969. It was largely rejected by jazz listeners at the time of its release because of its heavy rock influences, but it is now looked upon as a fusion classic. Jack Bruce joined the group to provide bass and vocals on its second album, Turn it Over, released in 1970 (by wikipedia)

The better of the two albums the Tony Williams Lifetime recorded in 1970, Turn It Over, is a far more focused and powerful album than the loose, experimental Ego, and one of the more intense pieces of early jazz-rock fusion around. In parts, it’s like Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys with much better chops. It’s more rock-oriented and darker-hued than their debut, 1969’s Emergency!, and the temporary addition of ex-Cream member Jack Bruce on bass and vocals alongside stalwart guitarist John McLaughlin makes this something of a milestone of British progressive jazz.

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The album’s primary flaw is that unlike the expansive double album Emergency!, these ten songs are tightly constricted into pop-song forms — only a swinging cover of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “Once I Loved” breaks the five-minute mark, and then only barely — which reins in these marvelous soloists too much. This is particularly frustrating since pieces like the two-part “To Whom It May Concern” feature some outstanding solos (especially from McLaughlin and organist Larry Young, the group’s secret weapon) that are frustratingly, tantalizingly short. Expanded to a double album, Turn It Over would probably surpass Emergency! as a pioneering jazz-rock fusion release; as it is, it’s an exciting but mildly maddening session. (by Stewart Mason)

What a line-up ! Including a very fine bass solo by Jack Bruce on “Right On”. The solo was called “Powerhouse Sod” and you can hear on the West, Bruce Laing live album, too.

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Personnel:
Jack Bruce (bass, vocals)
John McLaughlin (guitar, vocals)
Tony Williams (drums, vocals)
Larry Young (organ)

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Tracklist:
01. Vuelta Abajo (Williams) 6.34
02. To Whom It May Concern: Us/Them (Corea) 7.16
03. This Night This Song (Williams) 3.52
04. Do That (Williams) 2.56
05. Big Nick (Coltrane) 3.17
06. Once I Loved (Jobim/Demoraes/Gilbert) 5-10
07. To Whom (Williams) 2.20
08. Allah Be Praised (Young) 6.13
09. Right On (Williams) 8.05
10. A Famous Blues (McLaughlin) 4.16
11. New Piece (Williams) 6.16

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Land & Synir – Herbergi 313 (1999)

FrontCover1This is the first time I can present a band … and what a band ! from Iceland …

The band Land og Synir was founded in 1997 in Hvolsvollur by few Southeners and two of them are still in the band, Hreimur Ö. Heimisson singer and Jón Guðfinnsson bassist.

The band had a hitter that summer with the song Vöðvastæltur which was extreamly popular. In the beginning of the year 1998 occured some personnel changes in Land & synir, Birgir Nielsen drummer and Gunnar Þ. Eggertsson, gitarist joined the band along with Dísellu Lárusdóttur wichc played trumpet and keyboard. But in April ´98 Dísella quit the band and Njáll Þórðarson took her place. (by dalurinn.is)

This is the second album of Land & Synir and it´s an album full of magic … a powerful, a peaceful album with a very unique sound … strong melodies and great vocals …

Iceland must be a great country !

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Personnel:
Gunnar Þ. Eggertsson (guitar)
Jón Guðfinnsson (bass)
Hreimur Ö. Heimisson (vocals)
Birgir Nielsen (drums)
Njáll Þórðarson (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Undraland (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.02
02. Allt Á Hreinu (Heimisson) 3.06
03. Freistingar (Heimisson) 3.50
04. Saga (Heimisson) 4.03
05. Örmagna (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.35
06. Lending 407 (Heimisson/Eggertsson/Guðfinnsson) 4.35
07. Eitthvað Nýtt (Heimisson/Guðfinnsson) 3.16
08. Hvað Er Að (Heimisson) 3.11
09. Stríð (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 3.36
10. Fordómar (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.49
11. Örmagna II (Heimisson/Eggertsson) 4.38

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Pete Haycock Band – Livin´ It (1992)

FrontCover1It´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock !!!

Peter John Haycock (4 March 1951 – 30 October 2013) was an English musician and film score composer. He began his career as lead guitarist, vocalist, and founding member of the Climax Blues Band.

Haycock was born in Stafford, and here he attended St. John’s Primary School and King Edward VI Boys Grammar School. As a child, he was impressed by the guitar solos of Hank Marvin of The Shadows. He played his first electric guitar at a miners club when he was 12. He then played guitar at school and college dances. Along with local boys, he formed a blues band, the Mason–Dixon Line.[3] In 1967, Haycock met Colin Cooper and joined his soul band The Gospel Truth.[2] In 1968, they founded a new band, the Climax Chicago Blues Band, and then they eventually changed its name to the Climax Blues Band, in 1970. The band’s original line-up consisted of Haycock (lead guitar, vocals), Cooper (harmonica, vocals), Derek Holt (guitar, vocals), Richard Jones (bass), Arthur Wood (keyboards), George Newsome (drums).

During the early 1970s, the Climax Blues Band went through a few personnel changes, before arriving at their most stable, creative, and successful line-up, which consisted of Haycock, Cooper, Holt (switched to bass guitar), and John Cuffley (drums). In 1976, the line-up with keyboardist Richard Jones wrote the band’s biggest hit “Couldn’t Get It Haycock02Right”. The song included the vocal harmonies of Haycock and Holt, behind Cooper’s lead. Haycock, an underrated vocalist, sang lead on several of the band’s tracks, particularly on the Sense of Direction (1974), Stamp Album (1975), Gold Plated (1976), Shine On (1978), and Flying The Flag (1980). albums. The band with the core line-up of Haycock, Cooper, Holt, and John Cuffley toured heavily in the 1970s and 1980s. During much of this period, Haycock played concerts with his rare trademark instrument, a gold-plated Veleno guitar, which was also on the cover of the album Gold Plated.

Holt and Cuffley left in 1983. Haycock and Cooper went their separate ways after their final Climax Blues Band album together, 1983’s Sample and Hold.

In May 2012, the Major League Productions Ltd record label released an until-then unknown vault recording of a 1976 live performance, featuring the Climax Blues Band at the top of their game: Climax Blues Band / World Tour 1976. Haycock provided some insightful liner notes for the CD’s insert, and the recording further demonstrates the tight musicianship that was found in the band’s line-up at that time.

In March 2015, a 4-CD retrospective was released entitled Live, Rare, and Raw 1973-1979, featuring the band at the height of their powers, in a variety of Live settings. This release would parallel the ferocity and acclaim of Climax Blues Band’s 1973 album, FM/Live. The band produced more than 15 successful albums in their heyday.

Though another group of musicians, which at one time was led by late former bandmate Colin Cooper, is currently calling themselves “Climax Blues Band”, their lineup does not consist of any founding members, and has not found the commercial success or following that the original, “true” Climax Blues Band enjoyed during Haycock’s years with the band. Cooper died in 2008.

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In 1984, the bandmembers went their separate ways, and Haycock went on to record several solo projects, the first of which was the album Total Climax (1986) recorded with his new band, Pete Haycock’s Climax. Pete Haycock’s Climax toured extensively in Europe, including Communist East Germany, as well as a well-received tour in Australia, also releasing The Soft Spot (1987). During this period, Haycock was asked by former Climax Blues Band manager, Miles Copeland, to record an instrumental album for I.R.S. No Speak, Guitar and Son, and Night of the Guitars, a live album from the tour of the same name.[9] After that tour, in 1989, Haycock teamed up with Holt and guitarist Steve Hunter to record an album under the name H Factor. The Pete Haycock Band consisted of the musicians from the Total Climax lineup, and went on to record a live album entitled Livin’ It in 1992. Copeland also signed Gary Numan to I.R.S. with whom Haycock collaborated with in the 1988 album Metal Rhythm.

Haycock was approached by Bev Bevan, formerly of Electric Light Orchestra, to join the newly formed Electric Light Orchestra Part II. The group toured and recorded with Haycock in the early 1990s, releasing both a live CD and video of their performance with the Moscow Symphony Orchestra. They recorded and toured together until 1993.

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In the early 1990s, Haycock was asked by Hans Zimmer to collaborate on film scores for K2 (1991), and Toys (1992). Other film scores they worked on were for Drop Zone (1994), and The Dilemma (2011), among others. Haycock’s slide guitar contributed to Thunderbird, the theme music for the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise.[2] Haycock was asked by Zimmer to re-create his performance, with a live symphony orchestra for the recording of Wings of a Film, which was a compilation album of Zimmer’s successful film scores.[citation needed]

Haycock began composing music of his own for film and television. Along with Holt, he composed music for the 1992 film One False Move. More scores would follow, and Haycock helped produce recordings for other artists.

Haycock05.jpgIn 2005, Haycock supplied all the music for the Hollister Independence Motorcycle Rally DVD charity project, for producer Jeff Byler, with proceeds benefiting Emmaus House, a shelter for battered women and children. When the DVD’s producer suggested a follow-up soundtrack to the project, Haycock went back into the studio to complete the album that became Bikers’ Dozen, which featured a vocal performance by John Fiddler (Medicine Head).

Haycock signed on as a major contributor to the LovePower and Peace[ charity CD project in 2009, which was spearheaded by fellow musician Robin George, and was built around George’s hit song, “LovePower and Peace”. Haycock contributed many trademark slide guitar tracks and donated studio time to the project, a charity effort to benefit children with cancer and other terminal diseases.

This collaboration, which included the donated talents of scores of veteran musicians,[14] also resulted in the forming a “super group” called The LovePower Band, which landed a major record deal and completed its first album, which was released in 2011.

After an absence from the stage and live performances, Haycock formed a new band, Pete Haycock’s True Blues (featuring Glen Turner). In 2008, they toured Europe and released their first recording together: Pete Haycock’s True Blues Live (featuring Glen Turner).[16][17] In April 2009, Haycock, in an interview talked about the early days with the Climax Blues Band, the transition to studio work (with and without Hans Zimmer), and his return to the stage with his new band, after an absence from live performances of fourteen years.

Haycock continued to record, and perform live, and had been a featured guest performer with the Siggi Schwarz’ band, and was on the same bill with ZZ Top and Johnny Winter in 2012.

Haycock012013 found Haycock coming full-circle with the formation of a super-group recording and scheduled for touring as Pete Haycock’s Climax Blues Band featuring Robin George, with Haycock being joined by a lineup of musicians including George, with whom he had collaborated on the LovePower Band, and other projects. Haycock envisioned this project as a return to the “true” Climax Blues Band, and he had just completed the new album, Broke Heart Blues, before his death.

Haycock built a recording studio in Frankfurt, Germany where he lived for several years until his death. He died of a heart attack on 30 October 2013 in Frankfurt. The news was posted on the group’s official website. He was 62. (by wikipedia)

And this is one of his rarest album, only released in Germany. It was recorded live at a samll club called “Die Neue Kulisse”, Pirmasens / Germany in June 1992 and when I wrote it´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock … you will undertand me … after listening thiis album.

Pete Haycock … one of the most underrated musician in the history of Rock & Blues !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Livingstone Brown (bass, keyboards, vocals on 5)
Pete Haycock (guitar, vocals)
Clive Mayuyu (drums)
Mike Stevens (saxophone, flute, keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Liberty (Haycock) 3.29
02. So Many Roads (Marshall) 11.11
03. Communication (Haycock) 6.47
04. Medley: 6.48
04.1. Come On In My Kitchen (Johnson)
04.2. Country Hat (Haycock)
05. The Thrill Is Gone /Hawkins/Darnell) 13.09
06. Lucienne (Haycock) 10.41
07. Dr. Brown, I Presume (Haycock) 6.00
08. Blackjack And Me (Haycock) 5.32

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Bob Marley And The Wailers – Exodus (1977)

FrontCover1Exodus is the ninth studio album by Jamaican reggae recording band Bob Marley and the Wailers, first released 3 June 1977 through Island Records. With the other original members leaving the group, Marley recruited a new backing band. Their first major success was Rastaman Vibration (1976). On 3 December 1976, an assassination attempt was made on Bob Marley’s life in which his chest was grazed and his arm was struck, but he survived. Following the assassination attempt Marley left Jamaica and was exiled to London where Exodus was recorded.[2]Exodus is the ninth studio album by Jamaican reggae recording band Bob Marley and the Wailers, first released 3 June 1977 through Island Records. With the other original members leaving the group, Marley recruited a new backing band. Their first major success was Rastaman Vibration (1976). On 3 December 1976, an assassination attempt was made on Bob Marley’s life in which his chest was grazed and his arm was struck, but he survived. Following the assassination attempt Marley left Jamaica and was exiled to London where Exodus was recorded.

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Exodus is a reggae album, incorporating elements of blues, soul, British rock and funk. The album’s production has been characterized as laid-back with pulsating bass beats and an emphasis on piano, trumpet and guitar. Unlike previous albums from the Wailers, Exodus thematically moves away from cryptic story-telling; instead it revolves around themes of change, religious politics, and sex. The album is split into two halves: the first half revolves around religious politics while the second half is focused on themes of sex and keeping faith.

The album was a success both critically and commercially; it received gold certifications in the US, UK and Canada, and was the album that propelled Marley to international stardom. In 2017 Exodus was remastered and re-released for its 40th anniversary. Exodus has more tracks on Marley’s greatest hits album, Legend—the highest selling reggae album of all time—than any of his other records.

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In 1974, the Wailers disbanded with each of the three main members pursuing solo careers. Despite the break-up, Marley continued recording as “Bob Marley & The Wailers”. His new backing band included brothers Carlton and Aston “Family Man” Barrett on drums and bass respectively, Al Anderson and Junior Marvin on lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl “Wya” Lindo on keyboards, and Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion. The “I Threes”, consisting of Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, and Marley’s wife, Rita, provided backing vocals. In 1975, Marley had his international breakthrough with his first hit outside Jamaica, “No Woman, No Cry”, from the Natty Dread album. This was followed by his breakthrough album in the United States, Rastaman Vibration (1976), which became the 48th best-selling album on the Billboard Soul Charts in 1978.

In December 1976, Jamaica was going through elections, generating substantial political discourse. In his campaign, Prime Minister Michael Manley used the campaign slogan “We know where we’re going.” In response Marley wrote “Exodus”, which is the title track of the album. The song became a No. 1 hit in Jamaica as well as the United Kingdom and Germany.

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Cam described the album’s musical style as being “different,” noting that Marley’s style of reggae was not what was prominent in Jamaica during the time, and that the album’s music sounds unlike any reggae that came before its release.[6] Emeritus continued to describe the album’s sound as being rooted in the blues and soul, with elements of British Rock with a reggae “façade thrown on top” however Emeritus praised this saying “if Exodus was straight reggae, it probably wouldn’t be as good as it is.”
Exodus contains elements of pulsating bass beats, pianos and funk along with a “liquid-y bass,” drumming and guitars with the inclusion of trumpets in the title track. Unlike previous albums Exodus lyrical content moves away from cryptic story-telling and instead is clearer and more straight forward, the lyrics touch upon themes of change, religious politics and sex. Vocally, Marley provides a minimalist approach, trying not to reach his falsettos.

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The album’s track listing is split over two halves, the first half features songs of religious politics and opens with Natural Mystic which is a slow tempo “fade up” song, followed by “So Much Things To Say” which was described by the BBC as being “exuberant” and features a reggae-scat. The following two songs Guiltiness and The Heathen explore darker territory, before ending on the album’s title track. The second half of the album features songs revolving around sex and keeping faith.
“Jamming”, “Waiting in Vain”, “One Love/People Get Ready”, and “Three Little Birds” were all major international hits. Exodus peaked at number 20 on the Billboard 200 and at number 15 on the Black Albums chart, as well as remaining in the UK charts for 56 consecutive weeks, where it peaked at number 8.

In 1999, Time magazine named Exodus the best album of the 20th century. In 2001, the TV network VH1 named it the 26th greatest album of all time. In 2003, the album was ranked number 169 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. (by wikipedia)

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After the success of 1974’s Natty Dread and 1976’s Rastaman Vibration, Bob Marley was not only the most successful reggae musician in the world, he was one of the most powerful men in Jamaica. Powerful enough, in fact, that he was shot by gunmen who broke into his home in December 1976, days before he was to play a massive free concert intended to ease tensions days before a contentious election for Jamaican Prime Minister. In the wake of the assassination attempt, Marley and his band left Jamaica and settled in London for two years, where he recorded 1977’s Exodus. Thematically, Exodus represented a subtle but significant shift for Marley; while he continued to speak out against political corruption and for freedom and equality for Third World people, his lyrics dealt less with specifics and more with generalities and the need for peace and love (though “So Much Things to Say,” “Guiltiness,” and “The Heathen” demonstrate the bullets had taken only so much sting out of Marley’s lyrics).

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And while songs like “Exodus” and “One Love/People Get Ready” were anthemic, they also had less to say than the more pointed material from Marley’s earlier albums. However, if Marley had become more wary in his point of view (and not without good cause), his skill as a songwriter was as strong as ever, and Exodus boasted more than a few classics, including the title song, “Three Little Birds,” “Waiting in Vain,” and “Turn Your Lights Down Low,” tunes that defined Marley’s gift for sounding laid-back and incisive at once. His gifts as a vocalist were near their peak on these sessions, bringing a broad range of emotional color to his performances, and this lineup of the Wailers — anchored by bassist Aston “Family Man” Barrett, drummer Carlton Barrett, and guitarist Julian “Junior” Murvin — is superb, effortlessly in the pocket throughout. Exodus was recorded at a time when Bob Marley was learning about the unexpected costs of international stardom, but it hadn’t yet sapped his creative strengths, and this is one of the finest albums in his stellar catalog. (by Mark Deming)

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Personnel:
Aston “Family Man” Barrett (bass, guitar, percussion)
Carlton Barrett (drums, percussion)
Tyrone Downie (keyboards, percussion, background vocals)
Bob Marley (vocals, guitar, percussion)
Julian (Junior) Marvin (guitar)
Alvin “Seeco” Patterson (percussion)
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I Threes:
Marcia Griffiths (background vocals)
Rita Marley (background vocals)
Judy Mowatt (background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Natural Mystic 3.27
02. So Much Things To Say 3.08
03. Guiltiness 3:19
04. The Heathen 2.32
05. Exodus 7.35
06. Jamming 3.31
07. Waiting in Vain 4.16
08. Turn Your Lights Down Low   3:39
09. Three Little Birds 3.00
10. One Love/People Get Ready  2.51

All songs written by Bob Marley, escept “People Get Ready” written by

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Simon & Garfunkel/Dave Grusin – The Graduate (OST) (1968)

FrontCover1The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.The Graduate is an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols’ movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel as well as several instrumental pieces by Dave Grusin. Released on January 21, 1968, the album was produced by Teo Macero.

Although the album features two versions of the acclaimed “Mrs. Robinson”, neither is the full version as featured on Bookends. The first is an instrumental, while the second is abbreviated, tapering off as it does in the film. However, the other major song of the album, “The Sound of Silence” is used three times in the film (by wikipedia)

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The soundtrack to Mike Nichols’ The Graduate remains a key musical document of the late ’60s, although truth be told, its impact was much less artistic than commercial (and, for that matter, more negative than positive). With the exception of its centerpiece track, the elegiac and oft-quoted “Mrs. Robinson” — which only appears here as a pair of fragments — the Simon & Garfunkel songs that comprise much of the record (a series of Dave Grusin instrumentals round it out) appeared on the duo’s two preceding LPs; Nichols’ masterstroke was to transplant those songs into his film, where they not only meshed perfectly with the story’s themes of youthful rebellion and alienation (and the inner life of the central character, Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock) but also heralded a new era in movie music centered around the appropriation of past pop hits, a marketing gimmick that grew exponentially in the years to follow.

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The Graduate soundtrack, then, merits the dubious honor of being the earliest and one of the most successful Hollywood repackagings of “found” pop songs, a formula essentially based around coercing fans to purchase soundtrack albums filled with material they already own in order to acquire the occasional new track or two.

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The album began its life because of Nichols’ enthusiasm for the duo’s music, and Columbia Records chief Clive Davis’ ability to persuade the pair of the importance of a soundtrack LP. Davis turned the actual making of the album over to producer Teo Macero, who approached it with skepticism — Paul Simon and Mike Nichols had discovered that they really weren’t on the same page, with Nichols rejecting “Overs” and “Punky’s Dilemma,” songs that ended up as highlights of the Bookends album, issued two months after The Graduate soundtrack.

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Thus, there wasn’t enough Simon & Garfunkel material to fill even one LP side, and only about eight minutes of that were “new” recordings, and barely a quarter of that (the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments) new song material. And there also wasn’t enough of David Grusin’s instrumental music (none of which meshed with the duo’s work) for an album. Macero combined this material into a musically awkward LP that somehow did its job — which, in Davis’ eyes, was to introduce Simon & Garfunkel’s music to the parents of their existing audience (topping the charts in the bargain, and turning Grusin’s “Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha” into a favorite of easy listening stations).

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Fans of Simon & Garfunkel likely felt cheated by the presence of the “Mrs. Robinson” fragments, as well as repeats of the 1966-vintage “The Sound of Silence” and “April Come She Will,” and an edited extension of “Scarborough Fair/Canticle.” But there were two curiosities for the completist — a high-wattage, edited rendition of “The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine” (in a style seemingly parodying the sound of Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited); and a gentle, subdued acoustic reprise of “The Sound of Silence,” which was possibly the best studio rendition the duo ever. (by Bruce Eder)

But we should not forget, that the soundtrack, written by Dave Grusin is a great one … Listen to “A Great Effect” ..  a wonderful jazz tune.

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Personnel:
Art Garfunkel (vocals)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
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Dave Grusin & orchestra (additional music)

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Tracklist:
01. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.07
02. The Singleman Party Foxtrot (Grusin) 2.53
03. Mrs. Robinson (Version 1) (Simon) 1.15
04. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha (Grusin) 2:53
05. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Interlude) (Traditional) 1.42
06. On The Strip (Grusin) 2.01
07. April Come She Will (Simon) 1.50
08. The Folks (Grusin) 2.28
09. Scarborough Fair/Canticle (Traditional) 6.22
10. A Great Effect (Grusin) 4.07
11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (Simon) 1-46
12. Whew (Grusin) 2.12
13. Mrs. Robinson (Version 2) (Simon) 1.13
14. The Sound Of Silence (Simon) 3.06

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Happy Birthday !

Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937)

Rocky Hill – Same (1988)

FrontCover1John Rockford “Rocky” Hill (December 1, 1946 – April 10, 2009) was a blues guitarist, singer, and bassist from Dallas, Texas, United States. Hill was the older brother of ZZ Top bassist, Dusty Hill.

Hill was a member of the 1960s acid rock and blues group American Blues with his brother Dusty and drummer Frank Beard. Before the formation of ZZ Top, Rocky left the trio and subsequently played in blues bands for John Lee Hooker, Lightnin’ Hopkins (for whom he played bass), Freddie King, and Jimmy Reed.

In 1982, he released his first solo album, Texas Shuffle (reissued in 2005) which featured Johnny Winter and Dr. John. In 1988, Virgin Records released Hill’s eponymous album produced by ZZ Top’s manager and producer Bill Ham.

Hill, a self-styled “anti-Clapton”, was called “a monster on guitar” and “perhaps the wildest and scariest—both on stage and off—of all the white-boy Texas blues guitarists” and was noted in particular for his “metal-melting tone and whistling, artillery-shell harmonics”.

Hill died on April 10, 2009, aged 62. (by wikipedia)

RockyHillThe brother of ZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill, information on Rocky has always been kind of tough to find. He was in a band with his brother in the ‘60s when Dusty decided he wanted to play rock music and joined Billy Gibbons in what would eventually be ZZ Top. Rocky wanted to play blues so he went solo but quietly. He put out his debut record in 1982 and then didn’t release another on until his self-titled record in ’88. He never had much chart success which was surprising due to his brother’s major hits, but Rocky always kind of stayed to himself and didn’t want to compromise his love of blues for a record label. It’s a shame he wasn’t a hit because that record in ’88 is damn fine but most people don’t even know who Rocky Hill was. He passed away in ’09. (by popdose.com)
I have finally been re-united with this excellent, mainly blues-rock album from 1988. The best track on the album is the soul ballad “I’ll Be There With You”. But there are other great tracks like “Hoo Doo Eyes”, “Walked From Dallas” or “HPD” (Short for Houston Police Department) or “Mississippi Delta Blues”. Houston-based guitarist and singer Rocky Hill is sadly no longer with us. This is some of his finest work. (O.Laursenon)

I first heard this album when I bought a bunch of clearance LPs in 1990 for $1 each. GREAT BLUES! I always thought it was a shame Mr. Hill never got the recognition he deserved. Life just ain’t fair! (Earl Earon)

In other words: a forgotten pearl of Texas blues-rock … !

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Personnel:
Doyle Bramhall (guitar)
William Brown (drums)
Reid Farrell (guitar)
Steve Hardin (keyboards, harmonica)
Rocky Hill (guitar, vocals)
Randy Jo Hobbs (bass)
Lester Snell (keyboards)
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The Duncan Sisters (baclground vocals)
The Memphis Horns

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Tracklist:
01. HPD (Farrell/Hill) 4.28
02. I Won’t Be Your Fool (Hill) 4.55
03. Bad Year For The Blues (Farrell/Hill) 3.36
04. I’ll Be There (Hill) 5.18
05. New York Turn Around (Bramhall/Hill) 4.05
06. Take My Love (Farrell/Hill) 3.18
07. Hoo Doo Eyes (Farrell/Hill/Bramhall) 3.28
08. Sam Bass (Hill) 3.22
09. Walked From Dallas (Traditional) 3.40
10. Mississippi Delta Blues (Traditional) 3.34

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Colosseum – Daughter Of Time (1971)

FrontCover1.Daughter of Time is the fourth album by Colosseum, released in 1970. The album remained for five weeks in the UK Albums Chart peaking number 23. Recorded in the midst of an upheaval in the band’s lineup, only one of its eight tracks, “Three Score and Ten, Amen”, features all six of the official band members. (by wikipedia)

A concept album loosely based on man’s fascination and allure for war throughout the ages, Daughter of Time contains all the elements required to create a pure progressive rock album. Joining David Greenslade and Chris Farlowe is Louis Cennamo from Renaissance, who plucks away at the bass guitar with a heavy hand. A multitude of instruments combine to create a brilliant melange of music on every one of the eight songs. Vibrant spurts of trombone, trumpet, and flute are driven to the height of each song, which gives way to some implements of jazz fusion. Rich organ and vibraphone can be heard in behind “Three Score and Ten Amen” and “Take Me Back to Doomsday” adding to the melancholy theme.

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Colossum (with Dave Clempson + Tony Reeves)

Countering this are beautiful string arrangements made up of violin, viola, and cello used effectively to conjure up mood, and doing an excellent job. Even a flügelhorn is blared from time to time on top of the accentuated drums. A spoken word passage from Dick Heckstall-Smith creates an eerie aura, as his voice echoes on about the coming of the apocalypse. Colosseum’s music works extremely well in that it builds suspense and reels the listener into the songs. As far as the lyrics go, they’re stark and foreboding and have a mediaeval taste to them, coinciding with the music perfectly. Each song, all around six minutes in length, should have been longer to let the instruments play out with their illustriousness. Except for the fact that it is a short album, Daughter of Time is a sturdy example of progressive rock. (by Mike DeGagne)

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In other words: this is a classic and timeless album, a must for every serious record collection …

Listen to the great cover version of Jack Bruce´s “Theme For An Imaginary Western” … totally different from the version of Mountain … but what a version … hear Chris Farlowe, hear the drums of Jon Hiseman … and listen to the lyrics of Pete Brown:

When the wagons leave the city
For the forest, and further on
Painted wagons of the morning
Dusty roads where they have gone
Sometimes traveling through the darkness
Met the summer coming home
Fallen faces by the wayside
Looked as if they might have known
Oh the sun was in their eyes
And the desert that dries
In the country towns
Where the laughter sounds

Oh the dancing and the singing
Oh the music when they played
Oh the fires that they started
Oh the girls with no regret
Sometimes they found it
Sometimes they kept it
Often lost it on the way
Fought each other to possess it
Sometimes died in sight of day

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And I got tears in my eyes, when I´m listing to he titel track of this album:

And I saw the…

Daughter to time through the lens of a dream
Reflecting the world as it seems to have been

Riding the night with a net full of stars
Her spirit is truth and her truth is ours

An unbelievable album … a monster album … each track is a classic … including the great drum solo on “The Time Machine”.

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass guitar)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar, vocal on 03.)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibes, background vocals)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone, spoken word on 01.)
Jon Hiseman (drums, percussion)
+
Louis Cennamo (bass on 02.,03., 04. + 06.)
Tony Reeves (bass on 08.)
Barbara Thompson (flute. saxophone; background vocals on 01. – 04.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Three Score And Ten, Amen (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman) 5:38
02. Time Lament (Greenslade) 6:13
03. Take Me Back To Doomsday (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith 4:25
04. The Daughter Of Time (Dennen/Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith) 3:33
05. Theme For An Imaginary Western (Bruce/Brown) 4:07
06. Bring Out Your Dead (Clempson/Greenslade) 4:20
07. Downhill And Shadows (Clempson/Hiseman/Reeves) 6:13
08. The Time Machine (live) (Hiseman) 8.11

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