Foghat – Fool For The City (1975)

FrontCover1Fool for the City is the fifth album released by English rock band Foghat, released in 1975. This was their first platinum album and features, along with the title track, their signature song “Slow Ride”.Fool for the City is the fifth album released by English rock band Foghat, released in 1975. This was their first platinum album and features, along with the title track, their signature song “Slow Ride”.

The album cover shows drummer Roger Earl sitting alone on a soap box fishing down a manhole in the middle of East 11th Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenue) in New York City, near the address of Foghat’s American office. The back cover features skeptical bystanders observing Earl’s unusual activity and the other members of the band either asking him what he is doing or trying to dissuade him from it. In a 2014 interview, Earl explained how the picture was taken:“ It was a Sunday morning and I hadn’t slept. […] It was Nick Jameson’s idea […] since I have this penchant for fishing. Anyway, we lift up the manhole cover and I’m sitting on a box. Almost immediately a couple of New York’s Finest come by in their patrol car. They’re looking at us and they wind the window down. We’re like, “Oh shit.” They yell out, “Hey! You got a fishing license?” and then start laughing. So they come over and say, “What the fuck are you doing?” They took some pictures with them handcuffing me. I love New York’s finest.

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After building a solid core audience through relentless touring and a string of hard-rocking albums, Foghat finally hit the big time in 1975 with Fool for the City. It still stands out as the best album in the group’s catalog because it matched their road-tested abilities as hard rockers to a consistent set of tunes that were both well-crafted and ambitious. The tone for the album is set by its title track: This hard-rocking gem not only pairs riff-driven verses with an effective shout-along chorus, but also throws in a few surprising moments where the guitars are taken out of the mix completely and Nick Jameson’s bass is allowed to take the lead in a funky breakdown. Fool for the City also produced an enduring rock radio favorite in “Slow Ride,” a stomping rock tune that transcends the inherent clichés of its “love is like a car ride” lyrics with a furious performance from the band and a clever arrangement that works in well-timed automotive sound effects during the verses and plays up the band’s ability to work an R&B-styled groove into their hard-rocking sound (again, note the thumping bassline from Jameson).

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Further radio play was earned with “Take It or Leave It,” an acoustic-based ballad that worked synthesizers into its subtle yet carefully layered arrangement to become one of the group’s finest slow numbers. The album’s other songs don’t stand like the aforementioned selections, but they all flow together nicely thanks to a consistently inspired performance from the band and clever little arrangement frills that keep the group’s boogie-oriented rock fresh (example: the witty spoken word bit at the end of “Drive Me Home”). All in all, Fool for the City is both Foghat’s finest achievement in the studio and one of the high points of 1970s hard rock. (by Donald A. Guarisco)

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Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Nick Jameson (bass, keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Lonesome Dave Peverett (vocals, guitar)
Rod “The Bottle” Price (guitar, slide guitar, steel guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01- Fool For The City (Peverett) 4.32
02. My Babe (Hatfield/Dixon/Medley) 4.37
03. Slow Ride (Peverett) 8.13
04. Terraplane Blues (Johnson) 5.44
05. Save Your Loving (For Me) (Price/Peverett) 3.32
06. Drive Me Home (Peverett) 3.55
07. Take It Or Leave It (Jameson/Peverett) 4.56

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Kip Hanrahan – Vertical’s Currency (1995)

FrontCover1Kip Hanrahan (born December 9, 1954) is an American jazz music impresario, record producer and percussionist.

Hanrahan was born in a Puerto Rican neighborhood in the Bronx to an Irish-Jewish family. He has an unusual role in the albums released under his name, one which he has analogized to that of a film director. He assembles players and materials, combining modern/avant-garde/free jazz figures like Don Pullen and Steve Swallow, Latin jazz players such as Milton Cardona and Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez, and occasionally rock musicians like Sting, Jack Bruce and Grayson Hugh, also Bassist,singer,song writer,producer Fernando Saunders.

He produced a number of significant recordings by the nuevo tango master Ástor Piazzolla in the last decade of Piazzolla’s life, as well as recordings by Latin music figures including Jerry Gonzalez. Hanrahan also worked with the poet Ishmael Reed on three recordings with the Conjure Ensemble, featuring Taj Mahal on the first release. These side projects were not the only poetry-based discs: Darn It from 1994 celebrates the work of Paul Haines (by wikipedia)

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Sting founded the Pangea label in the mid-’80s, unearthing some important and overlooked recordings from the defunct American Clave catalogue, much to the delight of ears lucky enough to hear (as a side note, some of tango sensation Astor Piazolla’s most important work would be lost were it not for the mining of such treasure). Such is the case for Kip Hanrahan, a soulful, New York-based percussionist and producer who unleashed two particularly fantastic albums — Days and Nights of Blue Luck Inverted and Vertical’s Currency — a lush, sensuous Afro-Cubano feast for the ears that is so warm as to engulf the listener with flames. There is a wonderful spirit to “Shadow Song,” an instantly recognizable anthem of Ricky Ricardo cliché that roars with boisterous horn arrangements, congas, cowbells, and vocals of uncanny, third-person self-analysis: “Today I have these blues that are wittier than me/That jokes with my girlfriend while drinking my rum.” “Smiles and Grins” follows with tight polyrhythms that snap and clap along with syncopated piano clusters, as vocalist Jack Bruce hurriedly lilts beat poetry through the chord changes that only twice pause for contemplation.

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Elsewhere in the disc there is an element of sultry longing and hot Miami sunsets, as with “Two Heartedly, To the Other Side,” “Make Love 2,” and “Dark (Kip’s Tune).” It is with this all-star cast of the New York underground jazz fusion scene that Hanrahan finds such rich moods, textures, and symbiosis. Steve Swallow on the bass rarely disappoints, and both guitarist/avant-gardist Arto Lidsay and keyboardist Peter Scherer, who together comprise the group Ambitious Lovers, fill out the room with equally reliable musicianship. Vertical’s Currency overflows with rich contributions in an organic stew of worldly fusion that slinks through the city streets after hours. Find this album and pounce on it. (by Keir Langley)

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Taken from the American Clave catalogue
(is a part of the file)

Personnel:
Frisner Augustin (quinto, tambou, tamboura)
Ignacio Berroa (drums)
Jack Bruce (bass, piano, vocals)
Milton Cardona (percussion)
Anton Fier(drums)
Kip Hanrahan (percussion)
Nancy Hanrahan (vocals)
Andriau Jeremie (saxophone)
Arto Lindsay (guitar)
Claudette Mitchell (chekere)
David Murray (sacophone)
Elysee Pyronneau (guitar) (Electric)Charles Reilly PhotographyOrlando
Orlando “Puntilla” Rios (percussion)
Mario Rivera (saxophone)
Ned Rothenberg (saxophone)
Peter Scherer (organ, synclavier, synthesizer)
Lew Soloff (trumpet)
John Stubblefield (saxophone)
Steve Swallow (bass)
Richie Vitale (trumpet)
Nancy Weiss (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. A Small Map Of Heaven (Hanrahan/Swallows) 5.17
02. Shadow Song (Mario’s In) (Hanrahan/Hernandez) 4.06
03. Smiles And Grins (Bruce/Brown) 3.02
04. Two Heartedly To The Other Side (Hanrahan/Swallows) 3.03
05. Chances Are Good (Baden’s Distance) (Hanrahan/Powell) 5.08
06. Make Love 2 (Bruce/Brown) 4.27
07. One Casual Song (After Another) (Bruce/Hanrahan) 3.03
08. Intimate Distances (Jack’s Margrit’s Natasha) (Hanrahan) 3.01
09. Describing It To Yourself As Convex (Hanrahan/Scherer) 4.07
10. What Do You Think ? That This Mountain Was Once Fire ? (Hanrahan/Swallows)v 1.41
11. Dark (Kip’s Tune) (Hanrahan/Lindsay) 2.59

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Chuck Berry – The London Chuck Berry Session (1972)

FrontCover1The London Chuck Berry Sessions is an album of studio recordings and live recordings by Chuck Berry, released by Chess Records in October 1972. Side one of the album consists of studio recordings, engineered by Geoff Calver; side two features three live performances recorded by the Pye Mobile Unit, engineered by Alan Perkins, on February 3, 1972, at the Lanchester Arts Festival in Coventry, England. At the end of the live section, the recording includes the sounds of festival management trying in vain to get the audience to leave so that the next performers, Pink Floyd, can take the stage; the crowd begins chanting “We want Chuck!”

“My Ding-a-Ling”, from the live side of the album, was edited to approximately 4 minutes for release as a single. It was Berry’s first and only single to reach number 1 in both the US and the UK.

In May 1970, Howlin’ Wolf traveled to Olympic Sound Studios in London, England, to record songs for The London Howlin’ Wolf Sessions. The album was released in August 1971[6] and peaked at number 28 on Billboard magazine’s R&B Albums chart and number 79 on the Billboard 200.[7] Because of Wolf’s success, Muddy Waters recorded his own London Sessions album in December 1971, and Berry did the same in 1972.

The album was not even out for a month, when on October 27, 1972, The London Chuck Berry Sessions was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America with sales of 1,000,000 units. It is Berry’s only album to be certified by the RIAA  (by wikipedia)

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One-half of this album is a studio recording featuring Ian McLagan and Kenny Jones of the Faces. The other half is a live recording from the Lancaster Arts Festival in Coventry, England, featuring performances of “My Ding-a-Ling” and “Reelin’ and Rockin'” that, in edited form, became the first hit singles for Chuck Berry in many years. (“My Ding-a-Ling” went gold and hit #1.) This gold-selling, Top Ten album represents Berry’s commercial, if not artistic, peak. (by William Ruhlmann)

But .. on this album we can hear the best version of “Reelin’ And Rockin'” … a male fantasy of omnipotence …

And his version of “My Ding-a-Ling” is another song by Chuck Berry … and his version is very hot:

The lyrics with their sly tone and innuendo (and the enthusiasm of Berry and the audience) caused many radio stations to refuse to play it. British morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse tried unsuccessfully to get the song banned. “One teacher,” Whitehouse wrote to the BBC’s Director General, “told us of how she found a class of small boys with their trousers undone, singing the song and giving it the indecent interpretation which—in spite of all the hullabaloo—is so obvious … We trust you will agree with us that it is no part of the function of the BBC to be the vehicle of songs which stimulate this kind of behaviour—indeed quite the reverse.”

In Icons of Rock, Scott Schinder calls the song “a sophomoric, double-entendre-laden ode to masturbation”. Robert Christgau remarked that the song “permitted a lot of twelve-year-olds new insight into the moribund concept of ‘dirty'”.

Berry refers to the song on the recording as “our alma mater

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Personnel:
Chuck Berry (vocals, guitar)
Derek Griffiths (guitar on 01. – 05.)
Kenney Jones (drums on 01. – 05.)
Dave Kaffinetti (piano on 06. -09.)
Robbie McIntosh (drums on 06. – 09.)
Onnie Owen McIntyre (guitar on 06. – 09.)
Ian McLagan (piano on 06. – 09.)
Nic Potter (bass on 06. – 09.)

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Tracklist:

Side one (studio recordings):
01. Let’s Boogie (Berry) 3.11
02. Mean Old World (Walter) 5.48
03. I Will Not Let You Go (Berry) 2.51
04. London Berry Blues (Berry) 6.00
05. I Love You (Berry) 3.26

Side two (live recordings):
06. Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Berry) 7.07
07. My Ding-a-Ling (Bartholomew) 11.34
08. Johnny B. Goode (& Closing) (Berry) 4.21
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09. My Ding-a-Ling (single edition) (Bartholomew) 4.22

(This version of “Johnny B. Goode” replaces the first verse of the original with the first verse of “Bye Bye Johnny”.)

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Singles

Jackson Browne – Running On Empty (1977)

FrontCover1Running on Empty is the fifth album by American singer-songwriter Jackson Browne. Released in 1977, the album reached #3 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart in 1978 and stayed on the charts for 65 weeks. The single for the title track, “Running on Empty”, peaked at #11 and the follow-up single, “The Load-Out”/”Stay”, reached #20 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.

The album received two Grammy Award nominations in 1979: one for Album of the Year and the other for Pop Male Vocal Performance for the song “Running on Empty”.

In addition to tracks recorded on-stage during concerts, it also contains songs recorded in hotel rooms, on the tour bus, and backstage. It is unusual among live albums in that none of the tracks had ever appeared on a previous studio album. Browne was the sole writer on only two songs, co-writing four others and covering another four. The theme of the album was life on the road. In a Rolling Stone interview about the tour during which the album was recorded, Browne expressed pleasure at finally being able to afford the session musicians he wanted to go out on the road with him.

The album was certified as a Gold record in 1977 and Platinum in 1978 by the RIAA. It reached Multi-platinum in 1997 and 2001. It reached 7X platinum and is Browne’s best-selling album to date. In popular culture, the album cover can be seen framed and hanging on the wall next to the front door in the apartment on the set of Mork & Mindy. (by wikipedia)

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Having acknowledged a certain creative desperation on The Pretender, Jackson Browne lowered his sights (and raised his commercial appeal) considerably with Running on Empty, which was more a concept album about the road than an actual live album, even though its songs were sometimes recorded on-stage (and sometimes on the bus or in the hotel). Unlike most live albums, though, it consisted of previously unrecorded songs. Browne had less creative participation on this album than on any he ever made, solely composing only two songs, co-writing four others, and covering another four. And he had less to say — the title song and leadoff track neatly conjoined his artistic and escapist themes. Figuratively and creatively, he was out of gas, but like “the pretender,” he still had to make a living. The songs covered all aspects of touring, from Danny O’Keefe’s “The Road,” which detailed romantic encounters, and “Rosie” (co-written by Browne and his manager Donald Miller), in which a soundman pays tribute to auto-eroticism, to, well, “Cocaine,” to the travails of being a roadie (“The Load-Out”).

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Audience noises, humorous asides, loose playing — they were all part of a rough-around-the-edges musical evocation of the rock & roll touring life. It was not what fans had come to expect from Browne, of course, but the disaffected were more than outnumbered by the newly converted. (It didn’t hurt that “Running on Empty” and “The Load-Out”/”Stay” both became Top 40 hits.) As a result, Browne’s least ambitious, but perhaps most accessible, album ironically became his biggest seller. But it is not characteristic of his other work: for many, it will be the only Browne album they will want to own, just as others always will regard it disdainfully as “Jackson Browne lite.” (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Jackson Browne (guitar, piano, vocals)
Craig Doerge (keyboards)
Danny Kortchmar (guitar, background vocals)
Russ Kunkel (drums, percussion)
David Lindley (lap steel guitar, fiddle, co-lead vocals on “Stay”
Leland Sklar (bass)
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background vocals on
Joel Bernstein – Rosemary Butler  Doug Haywood

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Tracklist:
01. Running On Empty (Browne) 5.31
02. The Road (O’Keefe) 4.46
03. Rosie (Miller/Browne) 3.41
04. You Love The Thunder (Browne) 3.55
05. Cocaine (Davis/Frey/Browne) 4.57
06. Shaky Town (Kortchmar) 3.41
07. Love Needs A Heart (Browne/George/Carter) 3.30
08. Nothing But Time (Burke/Browne) 3.37
09. The Load-Out (Garofalo/Browne) 5.36
10. Stay (Just A Little Bit Longer) (Williams) 3.22

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Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
Looking back at the years gone by like so many summer fields
In sixty-five I was seventeen and running up one-oh-one
I don’t know where I’m running now, I’m just running on
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Gotta do what you can just to keep your love alive
Trying not to confuse it with what you do to survive
In sixty-nine I was twenty-one and I called the road my own
I don’t know when that road turned, into the road I’m on
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Everyone I know, everywhere I go
People need some reason to believe
I don’t know about anyone but me
If it takes all night, that’ll be all right
If I can get you to smile before I leave
Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
I don’t know how to tell you all just how crazy this life feels
Look around for the friends that I used to turn to to pull me through
Looking into their eyes I see them running too
Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
Honey you really tempt me
You know the way you look so kind
I’d love to stick around but I’m running behind
You know I don’t even know what I’m hoping to find
Running into the sun but I’m running behind

John Hammond – So Many Roads (1965)

FrontCover1John Hammond jr., son of the legendary Columbia Records A&R man who had signed Billie Holliday, Aretha Franklin and Bob Dylan, met the Hawks in Toronto in 1964 and was astonished by the perfection with which these young men played rhythm and blues. After several jam sessions with the Hawks, Hammond arranged for the Hawks to back him on this third album he would cut for Vanguard, but the record company insisted that he should use bassist Jimmy Lewis and piano player Mike Bloomfield. The old-time-blues inspired album So Many Roads ended up with Robbie, Levon and Garth contributing guitar, drums and keyboards. Robertson’s guitar work is among his most exciting blues performances, what Greil Marcus described as “all rough edges, jagged bits of metal ripping through the spare rhythm section”. (by http://theband.hiof.no)

So Many Roads is Hammond’s most notable mid-’60s Vanguard album, due not so much to Hammond’s own singing and playing (though he’s up to the task) as the yet-to-be-famous backing musicians. Three future members of the Band — Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson, and Levon Helm — are among the supporting cast, along with Charlie John Hammond01Musselwhite on harmonica, and Mike Bloomfield also contributes. It’s one of the first fully realized blues-rock albums, although it’s not in the same league as the best efforts of the era by the likes of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band or John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. In part that’s because the repertoire is so heavy on familiar Chicago blues classics by the likes of Willie Dixon, Bo Diddley, and Muddy Waters; in part that’s because the interpretations are so reverent and close to the originals in arrangement; and in part it’s also because Hammond’s blues vocals were only okay. Revisionist critics thus tend to downgrade the record a notch. But in the context of its time — when songs like “Down in the Bottom,” “Long Distance Call,” “Big Boss Man,” and “You Can’t Judge a Book By the Cover” were not as well known as they would become — it was a punchy, well-done set of electric blues with a rock touch. (by Richie Unterberger)

What a line-up !!!

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Personnel:
Michael Bloomfield (piano)
John Hammond (vocals, guitar)
Levon Helms (drums)
Eric Hudson (organ)
Jimmy Lewis (bass)
Charlie Musselwhite (harmonica)
Robbie Robertson (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.05
02. Long Distance Call (Morganfield) 3.22
03. Who Do You Love (McDaniels) 3.03
04. I Want You To Love Me (Morganfield) 4.09
05. Judgment Day (Johnson/Hammond) 3.26
06. So Many Roads, So Many Trains (Paul) 2.43
07. Rambling Blues (Johnson) 3.19
08. O Yea! (McDaniels) 3.36
09. You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover (Dixon) 3.32
10. Gambling Blues (Jackson) 3.14
11. Baby, Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.23
12. Big Boss Man (Smith/Dixon) 2.41

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More John Hammond:

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Julian Cannonball Adderley – And Strings (1955)

FrontCover1Julian Cannonball Adderley and Strings is the second album by jazz saxophonist Cannonball Adderley to be released on the EmArcy label and features Adderley with and orchestra directed by Richard Hayman.

The “and Strings” album is one of the biggest clichés of ’50s jazz. The idea of taking a prominent jazz soloist and placing him in an orchestral context usually doesn’t work as jazz and often doesn’t cut it as mood music, either. Julian Cannonball Adderley and Strings suffers a bit in terms of song selection — “Surrey With a Fringe on Top” and “Polka Dots and Moonbeams (Around a Pug-Nosed Dream)” are a little on the corny side — but Adderley himself plays beautifully, showing off his typically excellent soloing throughout, and Bill Russo’s orchestral arrangements are less invasive than similar arrangements for other “and Strings” albums, more Gil Evans than Mantovani. The opening “I Cover the Waterfront” is a stellar kickoff, a smoky ballad perfect for Adderley’s soulful style, but barring a few minor missteps, all of Julian Cannonball Adderley and Strings is well worth hearing. (by Stewart Mason)

And here´s another sentimental journey in the past …

Recorded in New York City on October 27 (tracks 9-12) & October 28 (tracks 1-8), 1955

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Personnel:
Julian Cannonball Adderley (saxophone)
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unknown Orchestra conducted by Richard Hayman ( arranged by Bill Russo

Inside
Tracklist:
01. I Cover The Waterfront (Green/Heyman) 2.27
02. A Foggy Day (Gershwin) 2.42
03. The Surrey With the Fringe On Top (Hammerstein II/Rodgers) 2.33
04. Two Sleepy People (Carmichael/Loesser) 3.01
05. I’ll Never Stop Loving You (Brodszky/Cahn) 2.41
06. (I’m Afraid) The Masquerade Is Over (Magidson/Wrubel) 3.11
07. I’ve Never Been in Love Before (Loesser) 2.20
08. Lonely Dreams (Gubenko) 2.30
09. Falling In Love With Love (Hart/Rodgers) 2.33
10. Street Of Dreams (Lewis/Young) 2.14
11. Polka Dots And Moonbeams (Burke/v.Heusen) 3.04
12. You Are Too Beautiful (Hart/Rodgers) 2.55

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Santana – Santana III (1971)

FrontCover1Santana is the third studio album by Santana. The band’s second self-titled album, it is often referred to as III or Santana III to distinguish it from the band’s 1969 debut album. The album was also known as Man with an Outstretched Hand, after its album cover image. It was the third (and until the group’s 2016 reunion, the last) album by the Woodstock-era lineup, and it was also considered by many to be the band’s peak commercially and musically, as subsequent releases aimed towards more experimental jazz fusion and Latin music. The album featured two singles, “Everybody’s Everything”, which hit #12 in October 1971, and “No One to Depend On”, a staple in FM radio. The album also marked the addition of 17-year-old guitarist Neal Schon (who performed notable solos on both singles) to the group.Santana is the third studio album by Santana. The band’s second self-titled album, it is often referred to as III or Santana III to distinguish it from the band’s 1969 debut album. The album was also known as Man with an Outstretched Hand, after its album cover image. It was the third (and until the group’s 2016 reunion, the last) album by the Woodstock-era lineup, and it was also considered by many to be the band’s peak commercially and musically, as subsequent releases aimed towards more experimental jazz fusion and Latin music.

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The album featured two singles, “Everybody’s Everything”, which hit #12 in October 1971,[1] and “No One to Depend On”, a staple in FM radio. The album also marked the addition of 17-year-old guitarist Neal Schon (who performed notable solos on both singles) to the group.
The original album was recorded at Columbia Studios, San Francisco, and released in both stereo and quadraphonic.
Santana III was also the last Santana album to hit #1 on the charts until Supernatural in 1999. According to Guinness Book of World Records 2005, this is the longest delay between #1 albums ever occurring. The original album was re-released in 1998 with live versions of “Batuka”, “Jungle Strut” and a previously unreleased song, “Gumbo”, recorded at Fillmore West in 1971 which features lead guitar solos by both Santana and Schon. /by wikipedia)

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Singles from all over the world

Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band’s second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon — who was 17 years old — into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist Thomas “Coke” Escovedo was brought in to replace (temporarily) José Chepitó Areas, who had suffered a brain aneurysm, yet who recovered quickly and rejoined the band. The rest were Carlos, organist Gregg Rolie, drummer Michael Schrieve, bassist David Brown, and conguero Michael Carabello. “Batuka” is the powerful first evidence of something being very different. The band was rawer, darker, and more powerful with twin leads and Schon’s harder, edgier rock & roll sound paired with Carlos’ blend of ecstatic high notes and soulful fills.

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It cooks — funky, mean, and tough. “Batuka” immediately transforms itself into “No One to Depend On,” by Escovedo, Carabello, and Rolie. The middle section is highlighted by frantic handclaps, call-and-response lines between Schon and Rolie, and Carlos joining the fray until the entire track explodes into a frenzied finale. And what’s most remarkable is that the set just keeps on cooking, from the subtle slow burn of “Taboo” to the percussive jam workout that is “Toussaint l’Overture,” a live staple in the band’s set list recorded here for the first time (and featuring some cooking Rolie organ work at its beginning). “Everybody’s Everything” is here, as is “Guajira” and “Jungle Strut” — tunes that are still part of Santana’s live show.

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With acoustic guitars, gorgeous hand percussion, and Santana’s fragile lead vocal, “Everything’s Coming Our Way” is the only “feel good” track here, but it’s a fitting way to begin winding the album down with its Schon and Santana guitar breaks. The album ends with a completely transformed reading of Tito Puente’s “Para los Rumberos,” complete with horns and frantic, almost insanely fast hand drumming and cowbell playing. It’s an album that has aged extremely well due to its spare production (by Carlos and the band) and its live sound. This is essential Santana, a record that deserves to be reconsidered in light of its lasting abundance and vision. (by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
José “Chepito” Areas (percussion, conga, timbales, drums)
David Brown (bass)
Mike Carabello (percussion, conga, tambourine, vocals)
Gregg Rolie (vocals, keyboards)
Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals)
Neal Schon (guitar)
Michael Shrieve (drums, percussion)
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Greg Errico (tambourine)
Thomas “Coke” Escovedo (percussion, vocals)
Luis Gasca (trumpet on 09.)
Mario Ochoa (piano on 06.)
Rico Reyes (percussion, vocals on 06.)
Linda Tillery (background vocals)
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Tower Of Power (horn section on 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Batuka (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve) 3.35
02. No One to Depend On (Carabello/Rolie/Escovedo) 5.31
03. Taboo (Areas/Rolie) 5.34
04. Toussaint L’Overture (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve/C.Santana) 5.56
05. Everybody’s Everything (C.Santana/Brown/Moss) 3.31
06. Guajira (Areas/Brown/Reyes) 5.43
07. Jungle Strut (Ammons) 5.20
08. Everything’s Coming Our Way (C.Santana) 3.15
09. Para los Rumberos (Puente) 2.47
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10. Batuka (Areas/Brown/Carabello/Rolie/Shrieve) 3.41
11. Jungle Strut (Ammons) 5.59
12. Gumbo (Santana/Rolie) 5.26

The three bonus tracks were recorded live at the Fillmore West, San Francisco, California, July 4, 1971

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