Taste – Same (1969)

FrontCover1Taste was the debut album by the Irish rock band of the same name, released in 1969.
The fact that they, like so many late-’60s contemporaries, were molded in the image of Cream has often been cited to diminish the stature of Irish power trio Taste. But, all things being equal, it’s impossible to dismiss their fine eponymous debut based solely on obvious source of inspiration, nor, by any means, the singular talents of the band’s creative and performing focal point, vocalist and guitarist Rory Gallagher — barely 20 years of age upon its release in 1969. After opening with the menacing staccatos and power chords of the forward-looking, proto-metal classic “Blister on the Moon,” Taste turn right back around and indulge their retro-fueled Brit-blues influences with a bottleneck run through Leadbelly’s “Leavin’ Blues” — a show of contrasts that speaks volumes to the breadth of Gallagher’s instrumental versatility. The blues keep coming with the guitarist’s self-penned showcase “Sugar Mama” and a more restrained acoustic “Hail,” then the hard rock fires are stoked once again with “Born on the Wrong Side of Town” — a track whose regional folk music accents did much to foment Gallagher’s enduring status as a blue-collar, Emerald Isle legend.

TasteLive
And so it goes until the album’s conclusion: with alternating glimpses of past and future musical tendencies peppering remaining tracks “Same Old Story,” “Dual Carriageway Pain” (both gritty blues-rockers showing riffs that sometimes smacked of the then brand-new Led Zeppelin), “Catfish” (a traditional blues standard turned monster jam), and “I’m Moving On” (a spare but spunk-filled Hank Snow cover). Ultimately, it’s a stylistic stew that would arguably get honed to better focus and achieve greater distinction from the competition on Taste’s second album, a year later. But who’s to say that Taste didn’t have almost as much influence as Cream on future bands such as Rush, whose early records are quite literally mapped out on this release — a worthy addition to collections of this exciting period in British rock. (by Eduardo Rivadavia)

TasteLive2
Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals, saxophone, harmonica)
Richard “Charlie” McCracken (bass)
John Wilson (drums)

LPBackCover
Tracklist:
01. Blister On The Moon (Gallagher) 3.27
02. Leavin’ Blues (Ledbetter) -4.17
03. Sugar Mama (Traditional) 7.15
04. Hail (Gallagher) 2.37
05. Born On The Wrong Side Of Time (Gallagher) 4.01
06. Dual Carriageway Pain (Gallagher) 3.14
07. Same Old Story (Gallagher) 3.33
08. Catfish (Traditional) 8.04
09. I’m Moving On (Snow) 2.28
LabelB1
*
**
Blister On The Moon (lyrics):
Everyone is saying what to do and what to think,
And when to ask permission when you feel you want to blink.
First look left and then look right and now look straight ahead,
Make sure and take a warning of every word we’ve said.
Now you lay you down to sleep make sure and get some rest,
Tomorrow is another day and you must pass the test.
Don’t try and think too different now what we say is best,

Listen little man you’re no better than the rest.

Don’t lay beside the wayside all around the road we’ve set,
Smile and look happy fool or we’ll throw you in the wet.
Now if you learn your lesson well and step upon the line,
Save your breath until forever we should get along just fine.
We’ll bend your heart until it breaks make sure you feel no pain,

We’ll be the one to crush you and give you to the rain.

But now you want to run away oh can I see you run,
Run across the frozen air try resting on the sun.
And if you feel it burn you don’t yell out in pain,
Or wish you had a velvet sponge full of soothing rain.
So let’s have that stiff upper lip now take a long deep breath,
Close your ears you cannot hear the rules are all pre-set.
You thought we were illusions but we meant the word we said,
We’re in command, you tiny fly, we’ll crush you till you’re dead.

Sylvie Vartan – Au Palais Des Congres (1977)

FrontCover1Although actor/pop singer Sylvie Vartan is Bulgarian, she would eventually receive recognition from the French, usually singing entirely in the language of her adopted homeland. Born August 15, 1944, in Iskretz, Bulgaria, Vartan showed great talent for both acting and singing at an early age, resulting in an appearance in the Bulgarian film Under the Yoke in 1950. Two years later (while only ten years old), Vartan and her family relocated to France. 1961 would prove to be an important year for Vartan’s career, as she entered a recording studio for the first time, picked up some TV work, and appeared at the famed Olympia Theater. The early ’60s saw the release of a steady stream of singles, EPs, and albums (such as 1962’s Sylvie), in addition to further appearances in European movies — including A Moonlight in Maubeuge and Just for Fun.
Other impressive accomplishments for Vartan in the early ’60s included recording a pair of songs (“If I Sing” and “Most Beautiful to Go to Dance”) with famed country artists Chet Atkins and Ray Stevens, and playing on the same bill as the Beatles at the Olympia in January of 1964.
Vartan02
During the mid-’60s, Vartan concentrated on making inroads to the American music market, as she appeared on such TV shows as The Ed Sullivan Show, Hullaballooh, and Shindig, while one of her best singles, “2’35 de Bonheur,” hit the charts in early 1967. Subsequently, Vartan kept on issuing albums and touring at a steady rate right up to the 21st century, as 2001 saw the release of the 14-track career overview L’Essential. (by Greg Prato)
And here´s one of her glamourus Performance from the mid-seventies … and, oh yes … more or less in the disco-style … not really my world … but many fantastic colors, you know.
BackCover1
Photography by Helmuth Newton
Personnel:
Michel Barrault (trumpet)
Simon van der Cam (guitar)
Marc Chantereau (percussion)
Michel Ciric (violine)
Gilbert Ciuffi (saxophone)
Gérard Daguerre (piano)
Gilbert Dall’Anez (saxophone)
Pierre Defaye (violine)
Daniel Faidherbe (viola)
Christian Guizien (trombone)
André Laidli (trumpet)
Dino Latore (drums)
Pierre Louis (violine)
Alex Perdigon (trombone)
Slim Pezin (guitar)
Tonyo Rubio (bass)
Georges Tapie (piano)
Louis Toesca (trumpet)
Stephan Wiener (viola)
+
Background vocals:
Catherine Bonnevay – Cora Carnier – Dominique Poulain – Francine Chabot – Martine Latorre

Booklet1

Tracklist:

01. Ouverture (Kaufman) 3.03
02. C’est Instant Est A Moi (E. Vartan/Mallory) 4.27
03. Petit Rainbow (Summer Love Sensation) (Martin/Coulter/Grillet) 3.41
04. 4  L’Amour C’est Comme Les Bateaux (Popp/Thibaut) 3.32
05. Dieu Merci (Si Sisto) (Covecchio/Chammah/Thibaut) 3.00
 3:01
06. Qu’Est-Ce Qui Fait Pleurer Les Blondes (Kongos/Leroy/Delanoé) 1.26
07. Arrete De Rire (Sail On) (Rivat/Warren) 4.31
08. Ne Pars Pas Comme Ca (Don’t Leave Me This Way) (Manilow/Mallory) 4.26
09. Le Temps Du Swing (House Of Swing) (Thibaut/Stonebridge/McGuinness) 5.48
10. Tout Le Bazar (All That Jazz) (Stillman/Carter/Mallory) 7.01
11. Ouverture (Swing) (Kaufman) / Georges (George’s Disco Tango) (Hall/Mallory/Simon´/Billon/Strasser) 5.29
12. La Drole De Fin (Last Tango) (Libert/Rivat/Vincent/Meakin) 3.47
13. 2’35 De Bonheur (Thomas/Renart/Rivat) 2.32
14. Jubilation (Harris/Anka) 3.12
15. Operator (featuring Gary Chapman + Peter Newton) (Spiveri) 4.21
16. Photo (featuring Gary Chapman + Peter Newton) (E.Vartan/Mallory) 5.25
17. Medley (4.13)
17.1. Danse-La, Chante-La (Dibbens/Shepstone/Dessca)
17.2. Irrestistiblement (Aber/Renard)
17.3. Ta Sorcière Bien Aimée (Di Nino/Gouty/Mallory/Billon)
17.4. L’Amour Au Diapason (Renard/Mallory)
17.5. Danse-La, Chante-La (Dibbens/Shepstone/Dessca)
18. Parle-Moi De Ta Vie (Bourtayre/Dessca) 3.28
19. Je Suis Nee Dans Une Valise (E. Vartan/Mallory) 3.15
20. Dancing Star (Vartan/Mallory) 4.58
21. Finale (E. Vartan/Mallory) 2.38

22. Side 1 (uncut) 20.19
23. Side 2 (uncut) 22.10
24. Side 3 (uncut) 20.16
25. Side 4 (uncut) 25.37

LabelC1

*
**

Vartan01
Sylvie Vartan , 1968

Balázs Szokolay – Lyric Pieces (Edvard Grieg) (1990)

FrontCover1Lyric Pieces (Norwegian: Lyriske stykker) is a collection of 66 short pieces for solo piano written by Edvard Grieg. They were published in 10 volumes, from 1867 (Op. 12) to 1901 (Op. 71). The collection includes several of his best known pieces, such as Wedding Day at Troldhaugen (Bryllupsdag på Troldhaugen), To Spring (Til våren), March of the Trolls (Trolltog), and Butterfly (Sommerfugl).

The theme of the first piece in the set, Arietta, was one of the composer’s favorite melodies. He used it to complete the cycle in his very last lyric piece, Remembrances (Efterklang) — this time as a waltz. (by wikipedia)

This is a very pleasing assortment from among Grieg’s 66 short Lyric Pieces, written between 1866-1891. There were 6-8 pieces in each of the 10 “books”, and this collection of 30 pieces contains selections from 9 of the books (there is no selection from Book 62 for TitlePagesome reason).

Each and every one presented here is a pure delight, and represent Grieg’s life-long desire to create a true Norwegian music genre derived from the folk music, dances, stories and natural environment of Norway. Every piece is evocative and the entire disc is delightful, thanks to the colorful and imaginative piano of Balazs Szokolay.

These pieces were recorded in 1989 at the Italian Institute in Budapest, and first released in Germany in 1990  The DDD recording quality was excellent and stands the test of time.
Since his first international appearance in 1979 with Peter Nagy at the Salzburg Interforum, pianist Szokolay has been a successful contender who has won many important awards and who maintains a steady following. His piano is energetic and expressive, and he is featured in over 90 albums on the Naxos label. As he is not yet 60 years old, we can hope for more from this productive and interesting artist. (by Philly Galon)

Balázs Szokolay

Balázs Szokolay
Personnel:
Balázs Szokolay (piano)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Arietta, Op. 12, No. 1  1.09
02. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 38, No. 4  0.46
03. Melodie, Op. 38, No. 3  1,40
04. Melodie, Op. 47, No. 3  2.39
05. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 47, No. 4  1.12
06. Fra Ungdomsdagene (From Years Of Youth). Op. 65, No. 1  4.27
07. Canon, Op. 38, No. 8  4,31
08. Småtrold (Puck), Op. 71, No. 3  1.42
09. Walzer, Op. 38, No. 7  1.01
10. Matrosernes Opsang (Sailor’s Song), Op. 68, No. 1  1.04
11. Springtanz, Op. 38, No. 5  1.20
12. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 71, No. 5  2.43
13. Volksweise (Folk-Song), Op. 38, No. 2  1.33
14. Elegie, Op. 38, No. 6  2.10
15. Gangar (Norwegian March), Op. 54, No. 2  2.42
16. De Var Engang (Once Upon A Time), Op. 71, No. 1  3.28
17. Einsamer Wanderer (Solitary Wanderer), Op. 43, No. 2  1.36
18. Elverdans (Elves’ Dance), Op. 12, No. 4  0.42
19. Vals, Op. 12, No. 2  1.40
20. Folkewise (Folk-Song), Op. 12, No. 5  1.11
21. Skovstilhed (Peace Of The Wood), Op. 71, No. 4  4.58
22. Stambogsblad (Album-Leaf), Op.12, No. 7  1.11
23. Valse-Impromptu, Op. 47, No. 1  2.59
24. Forbi (Gone), Op. 71, No. 6  2.10
25. Sie Tanzt (She Dances), Op. 57, No. 5  2.43
26. Albumsblatt (Album-Leaf), Op. 47, No. 2  2.58
27. Sommeraften (Summer Evening), Op. 71, No. 2  2.24
28. For Dine Födder (At Your Feet), Op. 68, No. 3  2.22
29. Valse Mélancolique, Op. 68, No. 6  3.24
30. Efterklang (Remembrance) , Op. 71, No. 7 1.45

Music written by Edvard Grieg
CD1
*
**
Edvard Grieg
Edvard Grieg

Melanie Safka – BBC On Air (1997)

FrontCover1Ten of the 18 songs on this CD were recorded live in 1975, another four date from 1969, and the last four are from 1989. Thus, we get a glimpse of Melanie in performance across a period of 20 years, doing a variety of material ranging from her own originals (including familiar songs such as “Beautiful People” and “Baby Guitar”) to covers of Phil Ochs’s “Chords of Fame,” Alan J. Lerner and Frederick Loewe’s “Almost Like Being in Love” (from Brigadoon), and the Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday.” Her rendition of “Almost Like Being in Love” is a folk-blues style interpretation, and one of the most downbeat and interesting (if not necessarily successful) takes on the song ever done. There is a certain sameness to much of the rest of the material that works against too many people other than hardcore fans appreciating this disc, although some numbers, such as “The Nickel Song” and “Beautiful People,” always work. The version of “Ruby Tuesday,” like the other three 1989 vintage songs here, features a full band with synthesizers and drum machines, and is a bit jarring, though Melanie still throws herself impressively into the classic Rolling Stones song. (by Bruce Eder)

Melanie01

Featuring a series of live recordings covering a period of 20 years this CD provides excellent sound and a unique record of Melanie’s live and session work for the BBC. The first 10 tracks feature a concert recorded for the BBC Radio One In Concert series in 1975. Track 5 is incorrectly listed and is actually a song called Here We Go Again. During this concert Melanie is accompanied by Barry Lee Harwood on guitar and mandolin. Barry played on Sunsets and Other Beginnings and As I See It Now but fails to be credited on the cover of the CD.

Tracks 11 to 14 are rare session recordings from 1969, just Melanie and her guitar. Visit My Dreams is perhaps better known as Deep Down Low from Melanie’s second album.
While all tracks have so far featured acoustic versions of songs, the last four feature Melanie with a full band. The tracks where recorded during a visit to the UK to promote Cowabonga. The musicians that accompany Melanie also accompanied her during two concerts at the Shaw Theatre in London in 1989. (by melaniesafkarecordings.uk)

And I confess … I´m a real fan of Melanie Safka … what  wonderful voice, what sensitive music and lyrics …

But … her 1989 recordings were not really good (especially tzhe Version of “Goodybye Ruby Tuesday is more than lousy …) … but …

… don’t miss “Rock An’ Roll Heart” — a song every baby boomer can relate to.
Melanie02
Personnel:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:
Barry Lee Hardwood (guitar, mandolin)
Melanie (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 1969:
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)

BBC Session, September 89:
Kay Langford (vocals)
Justin Myers (bass)
Neil Palmer (keyboards)
Alan Ross (guitar, background vocals)
Melanie Safka (vocals, guitar)
Chris Staines (background vocals)
Pete Thompson (drums)

BackCover

Tracklist:

BBC Radio One In Concert, November 1975:

01. Autumn Lady (Safka) 4.13
02. Chords Of Fame (Ochs) 5.14
03. Almost Like Being In Love (Lerner/Loewe) 5.09
04. Stoneground Words (Safka) 5.09
05. Here I Am (Safka) 2.37
06. Any Guy (Safka) 2.560
07. Do You Believe (Safka) 6.08
08. Leftover Wine (Safka) 5.44
09. The Nickel Song (Safka) 4.03
10. Beautiful People (Safka) 5.31

BBC Session, September 1969:
11. Visit My Dreams (Deep Down Low) (Safka) 3.51
12. Up Town And Down (Safka) 2.51
13. Baby Guitar (Safka) 2.49
14. Tuning My Guitar (Safka) 4.16

BBC Session, September 89:
15. Ruby Tuesday (Jagger/Richards) 3.50
16. Rock ‘n’ Roll Heart (Safka) 5.17
17. Racing Heart (Safka) 5.17
18. Apathy (Safka/Schekeryk) 3.50

CD1
*
**

Manfred Mann´s Earth Band – Solar Fire (1973)

OriginalFrontCover1Fans of muscular progressive rock will love Solar Fire, a concept album loosely designed around cosmology. The album opens with the majestic “Father of Night, Father of Day,” which has the drive and complexity of a prime King Crimson track. As unlikely as it may seem, the track was controversial in Mann’s native South Africa because of the “Father of black, father of white” line, implying that apartheid might not extend to infinite space. The album moves on to the progressive rock/jazz fusion of “In the Beginning, Darkness,” a swinging, even funky track that benefits from soulful vocals by Doreen Chanter and Irene Chanter of the Grove Singers. The same duo contributes to the title track, a slow piece that begins with a fairly standard rock structure and incorporates a massive progressive jam in the middle. The instrumental suite which follows is a showcase for the combination of angular, sometimes slightly dissonant guitar with fluid keyboard work, and the band rocks straight through with stately grace.

Once again, one is reminded of early King Crimson, which was about the only other group to turn out complex, shifting instrumentals of this quality. The album closes with the strange “Earth, the Circle, Pt. 1,” which begins almost like a nursery rhyme, switches to a jazz shuffle, and fades out as an odd combination of the two. The album was groundbreaking when it was released and is still a delightful listen. If you like the hard-edged side of Manfred Mann, this may be your favorite album. (by Richard Foss)

Inlet02

Personnel:
Manfred Mann (Keyboards, Synthesizer, vocals)
Colin Pattenden (bass)
Mick Rogers (guitar, vocals)
Chris Slade (drums)
+
Peter Miles (percussion on 02.)
Paul Rutherford (trombone)
+
background vocals:
Doreen Chanter – Irene Chanter – The Grove Singers

Booklet

Tracklist:

01. Father Of Day, Father Of Night (Dylan) 9.55
02. In The Beginning, Darkness (Slade/Mann/Rogers) 5.22
03. Pluto The Dog (Slade/Pattenden/Mann/Rogers) 2.48
04. Solar Fire (Slade/Rogers) 5.16
05. Saturn, Lord Of The Ring / Mercury, The Winged Messenger (Mann/Rogers) 6.31
06. Earth: The Circle Part Two (Mann) 3.32
07. Earth: The Circle Part One (Mann) 3.46
+
08. Joybringer (Bonus track) (Holst/Mann/Rogers/Slade) 3.25
09. Father Of Day, Father Of Night (edited single Version) (Dylan) 3.03

BronzeLabelB1

*
**

SingleSleeves

Various “Father Of Day, Father Of Night” single sleeves

Father of night, Father of day
Father, who take the darkness away
Father, who teacheth the bird to fly
Builder of rainbows up in the sky
Father of loneliness and pain
Father of love and Father of rain

Father of day, Father of night
Father of black, Father of white
Father, who build the mountain so high
Who shapeth the cloud up in the sky
Father of time, Father of dreams
Father, who turneth the rivers and streams

Father of grain, Father of wheat
Father of cold and Father of heat
Father of air and Father of trees
Who dwells in our hearts and our memories
Father of minutes, Father of days
Father of whom we most solemnly praise

 

 

 

Boston – Cleveland (1976)

FrontCover1John “Sib” Hashian, who played the drums on arena-rock group Boston’s first two albums, has died on March 22, 2017. He was 67, TMZ and The Associated Press reported. His son Adam, who confirmed his death to TMZ, said Hashian was playing a set on a Legends of Rock Cruise when he collapsed Wednesday night.

He did not provide the cause of death. The cruise began on March 19 in Miami and was scheduled to make stops in the Bahamas and Puerto Rico. It’s not clear how his death will impact the rest of the voyage.

Hashian was recruited in 1975 to play drums on Boston’s self-titled debut album, replacing Jim Masdea at the request of their record label. He remained with the band for their second album, Don’t Look Back. Masdea returned for the next record, Third Stage. But that was enough time to become part of rock history, playing on hits like More Than a Feeling, Long Time and Peace of Mind. (by USA Today)

Boston – the band behind “classic rock” – a label that had been thrown at Tom Scholz’s group. And not far behind… the excesses of “corporate rock.” But then, guitar virtuoso Scholz, who has a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from MIT, was fiercely independent, taking his time to get the sound right; and the band was a real garage outfit – Scholz recorded his tracks in his basement studio.

Boston01

Boston’s rise was meteoric and this was before MTV. Overnight they had a hit debut album on their hands and vocalist (the late) Brad Delp was recognised as much as guitarist Scholz. To this day, More Than A Feeling remains a radio staple.

Thanks then to Philip Cohen for sharing the excellent sounding lossless tracks, and we are offering them as high quality mp3s (320 kbps). This is what Philip noted: “This unofficial release was taken from a radio broadcast that was aired locally in Cleveland, Ohio… which was a homecoming of sorts for Boston leader Tom Scholz, who was born in Cleveland. This was recorded by the original line-up while they were touring behind their highly successful debut album.”

Darryl Hirschler, reviewing the CD on his Unofficial Boston site adds: “This concert is one of Boston’s earliest concerts. The band had only been on the road for just over a month and it shows. Their performance is raw and unrefined with an occasional mistake. Brad is especially enthusiastic in his vocal performance. The highlight for me was the very early version of A Man I’ll Never Be. It is not to be missed. The chorus is totally different from any other version of this song anywhere. We are so lucky that this concert was recorded if not for anything else but that song. Sib’s drumming is also noteworthy, especially on Peace of Mind.

Sib Hashian

“This concert was recorded for broadcast on WMMS in Cleveland, OH back in 1976. Parts of it have been occasionally broadcast to this day. The sound quality is top notch. It rivals that of the King Biscuit CDs and may even be a tad better… The reel to reel masters have survived 20-plus years remarkably well. The odd (but beautiful) thing is that I know that the reel is presently damaged with about 3.5 seconds missing from More Than A Feeling, but source used for this CD must’ve been digitally recorded 10 years earlier – before the damage, and before 10 additional years of degradation (hiss).”

And here´s not only a tribute to John “Sib” Hashian but to the band “Boston”, too …  the perfect masters of the “adult orientad rock” (AOR) of the Seventies … and of course I have to mention Tom Scholz … the mastermind of “Boston” …

Tom Scholz

Personnel:
Brad Delp (vocals)
Barry Goudreau (guitar)
Sib Hashian (drums)
Fran Sheehan (bass)
Tom Scholz (guitar, organ)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Rock & Roll Band (Scholz) 3.44
02. Help Me (Shattered Images) (Scholz) 3.54
03. Peace Of Mind (Scholz) 5.06
04. Something About You (Scholz) 4.32
05. A Man I’ll Never Be (Scholz) 6.39
06. Smokin’ (Scholz/Delp) 8.04
07. Foreplay (Scholz) 2.40
08. Long Time (Scholz) 6.38
09. Don’t Be Afraid Of Love (Scholz) 5.01
10. More Than A Feeling (Scholz) 9.49
11. Television Politician (Scholz) 3.54

Sib Hashian2

John Thomas “Sib” Hashian
(August 17, 1949 – March 22, 2017)

*
**

 

AC/DC – Festival Hall Melbourne (1974)

FrontCover1.jpgIt was in September 1974 when the legend that was Bon Scott joined the then still wet behind the ears AC/DC, formed the year before by brothers Angus and Malcolm Young in Melbourne, Australia. Over the next five and a half years, Scott fronted the band and, in tandem with the Youngs, established the group as arguably the finest rock act in the world. Bon’s tragic passing in the early months of 1980 only served to strengthen AC/DC’s fan base and appeal and across the next 35 or so years (and counting!) with perennial new boy Brian Johnson having taken on Bon Scott’s role with both aplomb and dignity, AC/DC have gone from strength to strength to strength.
But the Bon Scott years remain those that most adherents of the group remember most fondly and it is with this in mind that this live recording of one of his earliest shows with AC/DC is presented here
In November 1974, Michael Browning, manager of the Hard Rock Cafe (Melbourne), became AC/DC’s full time manager. Together they all moved into a house in Melbourne where there was apparent nightly debauchery. Nevertheless, though the band clearly knew how to party, especially with Bon now on board, they could also work hard and fast. Within ten days the group had recorded their first album, which they named High Voltage. This was undoubtedly influenced by the AC/DC name itself and was perhaps a discreet assertion that the name represented power and energy as opposed to sexual preferences. It also covered the base of the music, which was somewhat lo-fi, straight to the point good time rock n’ roll with an added kick; the verve of youth and the unmistakable howl of Bon Scott.

ACDC 1974

AC/DC, 1974
George Young and Harry Vanda manned the controls behind the production desk whilst George played bass himself on some songs. Session musician Tony Currenti was enlisted to finish the drum parts as Peter Clack and John Proud had only played on one track each. The band now had a real record to stand behind and after a tour of South Australia finished the year off in style with a New Year’s Eve gig at Festival Hall in Melbourne. By their own admission they would pretty much play in front of anyone, and often did. Every type of fan could be seen at an AC/DC show, from gays who assumed they were named for a different reason, to typical girl groupies and the standard male rockers – this was an act that could transcend boundaries. The High Voltage record was to set them well on their way down the road to glory. [extract from AC/DC – Two Sides To Every Glory, by Paul Stenning, Chrome Dreams Publishers, 2005. p49]

ACDC 1975
AC/DC, 1975

Thanks to heavy attention from the police, by the time AC/DC set up base in Melbourne the roaming hordes of Sharps had largely, though not entirely, died down; but a toughness of spirit and attitude in the city’s audiences remained. Melbourne’s character was what AC/DC were all about: Michael Browning was dead right.
Their reputation for high-energy performances preceded them thanks to a major New Year’s Eve show at Melbourne’s Festival Hall, and more notoriously, an incident at Prahran’s Station Hotel, when Angus took exception to someone clearly unmoved by the band’s performance.

Malcolm: ‘Angus jumped out into the crowd and he ran up to this guy, grabbed his beer and poured it on his head. This guy had really fuzzy hair and it formed a puddle on top first and then slowly fucking rolled over his face. I thought, this guy’s going to kill Angus! He didn’t. He just sat there and took it. He felt so embarrassed. I thought at that time Angus had overdone it, but the place loved it. This guy that had the beer poured over his head became a bit of a cult hero!’

Browning’s next move was to sign the band to a deal with agent Bill Joseph, who handled a number of major venues in Melbourne. A six-month contract with Joseph’s Premier Artists agency provided each member with a wage of $60 a week, and covered the cost of their sound system and repairs to their tour bus, a huge beast of a thing formerly owned by Ansett Airlines.[extract from Ac/DC – Maximum Rock & Roll, by Murray Engleheart & Arnard Durieux, Harper Collins Publishers, 2006. p98]

ACDC 1974_02
So weird hearing the “Dave” arrangement of Can I Sit Next To You Girl with Bon’s voice.
Notice that Malcolm alternates solos with his Brother during Soul Stripper and Show Business. It also happened in the launceston boot, but in this one (melbourne) we can hear it more clearly. In the BBC boot (1976), we realize that malcolm has already leaved his guitar solo roll.

Pretty weird drumming on the songs, but intersting to hear Mal and Ang trading solos on Soul Stripper, otherwise no great shakes.

That was the first time at a show I encountered religious picketers who were handing out pamphlets about the devil and rock music , some people were giving them a real hard time.

Definitely a show for all diehards to have in their file.

This concert was recorded by Melbourne radio station 2SM.
Excellent soundboard recording !

AlternateFront+BackCover1

Personnel:
Rob Bailey (bass)
Peter Clack (drums)
Singer: Bon Scott (vocals)
Angus Young (lead guitar)
Rhythm Guitar: Malcolm Young (guitar)

Tracklist:
01. She’s Got Balls (M.Young/A.Young/Scott) 7.07
02. Soul Stripper (M.Young/A.Young) 4.15
03. Show Business (M.Young/A,Young/Scott) 4.27
04. Can I Sit Next to You Girl? (M.Young/A.Young) 3.38
05. Baby Please Don’t Go (Broonzy) 11.02