The James Cotton Band – Live & On The Move (1976)

FrontCover1James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)[1] was an American blues harmonica player, singer and songwriter, who performed and recorded with many of the great blues artists of his time and with his own band. He played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing.
Cotton began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s.[3] He made his first recordings in Memphis for Sun Records, under the direction of Sam Phillips. In 1955, he was recruited by Muddy Waters to come to Chicago and join his band. Cotton became Waters’s bandleader and stayed with the group until 1965.[4] In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. He eventually left Waters to form his own full-time touring group. His first full album, on Verve Records, was produced by guitarist Mike Bloomfield and vocalist and songwriter Nick Gravenites, who later were members of the band Electric Flag.
In the 1970s, Cotton played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter.
Born in Tunica, Mississippi, Cotton became interested in music when he first heard Sonny Boy Williamson II on the radio. He left home with his uncle and moved to West Helena, Arkansas, finding Williamson there. For many years Cotton claimed that he told JamesCotton01Williamson that he was an orphan and that Williamson took him in and raised him, a story he admitted in recent years is not true. However, Williamson did mentor Cotton during his early years. Williamson left the South to live with his estranged wife in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, leaving his band in Cotton’s hands. Cotton was quoted as saying, “He just gave it to me. But I couldn’t hold it together ’cause I was too young and crazy in those days an’ everybody in the band was grown men, so much older than me.”

Cotton played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing. He began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s. He made his first recordings as a solo artist for Sun Records in Memphis in 1953. In 1954, he recorded an electric blues single “Cotton Crop Blues”, which featured a heavily distorted power chord–driven electric guitar solo by Pat Hare. Cotton began working with the Muddy Waters Band around 1955. He performed songs such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “She’s Nineteen Years Old”, although he did not play on the original recordings; Little Walter, Waters’s long-time harmonica player, played for most of Waters’s recording sessions in the 1950s. Cotton’s first recording session with Waters took place in June 1957, and he alternated with Little Walter on Waters’s recording sessions until the end of the decade.
In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. Their performances were captured by producer Samuel Charters on volume two of the Vanguard recording Chicago/The Blues/Today! After leaving Waters’s band in 1966, Cotton toured with Janis Joplin while pursuing a solo career. He formed the James Cotton Blues Band in 1967. The band mainly performed its own arrangements of popular blues and R&B from the 1950s and 1960s. Cotton’s band included a horn section, like that of Bobby Bland’s. After Bland’s death, his son told news media that Bland had recently discovered that Cotton was his half-brother.

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In the 1970s, Cotton recorded several albums for Buddah Records. He played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter. In the 1980s he recorded for Alligator Records in Chicago; he rejoined the Alligator roster in 2010. The James Cotton Blues Band received a Grammy nomination in 1984 for Live from Chicago: Mr. Superharp Himself!, on Alligator, and a second for his 1987 album Take Me Back, on Blind Pig Records. He was awarded a Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for Deep in the Blues in 1996. Cotton appeared on the cover of the July–August 1987 issue of Living Blues magazine (number 76). He was featured in the same publication’s 40th anniversary issue of August–September 2010.
In 2006, Cotton was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame at a ceremony conducted by the Blues Foundation in Memphis. He has won or shared ten Blues Music Awards.
Cotton battled throat cancer in the mid-1990s, but he continued to tour, using singers or his backing band members as vocalists. On March 10, 2008, Cotton and Ben Harper performed at the induction of Little Walter into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, playing “Juke” and “My Babe” together; the induction ceremony was broadcast nationwide on VH1 Classic. On August 30, 2010, Cotton was the special guest on Larry Monroe’s farewell broadcast of Blue Monday, which he hosted on KUT in Austin, Texas, for nearly 30 years.

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Cotton’s studio album Giant, released by Alligator Records in late September 2010, was nominated for a Grammy Award. His album Cotton Mouth Man, also on Alligator, released on May 7, 2013, was also a Grammy nominee. It includes guest appearances by Gregg Allman, Joe Bonamassa, Ruthie Foster, Delbert McClinton, Warren Haynes, Keb Mo, Chuck Leavell and Colin Linden. Cotton played harmonica on “Matches Don’t Burn Memories” on the debut album by the Dr. Izzy Band, Blind & Blues Bound, released in June 2013. In 2014, Cotton won a Blues Music Award for Traditional Male Blues Artist and was also nominated in the category Best Instrumentalist – Harmonica.
Cotton’s touring band includes guitarist and vocalist Tom Holland, vocalist Darrell Nulisch, bassist Noel Neal (brother of the blues guitarist and harmonica player Kenny Neal) and drummer Jerry Porter.

Cotton died at a medical center in Austin, Texas from pneumonia on March 16, 2017 at the age of 81.(by wikipedia)

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James Cotton, live 2015
I’m usually not a big fan of live recordings, but these mid-70’s recordings really catch the spirit of James Cotton “live & on the move”, while still in his prime! Sure, there may be sentimental reasons for my liking this disc {often caught Cotton during this period at the club where these recordings were made} but putting all sentimentality aside, I’ve gained a whole new level of appreciation for these cuts. Listening to these tracks with fresh aged ears {the first time in 20 some years} I can’t help but be impressed by Cotton and company’s tightness as a unit. A tough act to follow, there weren’t many shows rolling down the proverbial blues pike that packed as much punch as a James Cotton performance in it’s heyday, and these cuts certainly can attest to that. Cotton’s band, consisting of seasoned vets such as Matt “guitar” Murphy, know how to lay and hold down earthy funkified grooves, build energetic boogie’s, shuffle and swing without ever losing so much as a beat. If I had to criticize one thing, it would be Cotton’s choice of material. James Cotton had written some fine numbers while a recording artist for both the Sun and Vanguard labels, it’s too bad that he doesn’t showcase a few of them here. Instead, Cotton is content rekindling old chestnuts such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “Help Me”. What would a review of a James Cotton disc be without mentioning his harmonica playing? James Cotton shows why he’s earned the nickname “Mr. Superharp”, especially on tunes such as, “One More Mile”, “All Walks Of Life” and “Boogie Thang”, where the deep tonal qualities and grittiness of his harp work can be heard to full effect. A nice slice of what a James Cotton live show sounded like back in the 70’s, complimented by one of the tightest and hardest working bands in the blues biz, Recommended! (unknow amazon custiner)
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Recorded live in 1974 at the Shaboo Inn in Wlllimantic, Connecticut

Personnel:

Charles Calmese (bass)
James Cotton (harmonica, vocals)
George T. Gregory (saxophone)
Kenny Johnson (drums)
Matt Murphy (guitar)
Mike “Captain Z” Zaitchik (Keyboards)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01  Cotton Boogie (Cotton) 3.01
02. One More Mile (Cotton) 2.34
03. All Walks Of Life (Cotton) 2.22
04. Born In Missouri (Cobbs) 4.45
05. Flip Flop & Fly (Calhoun/Turner) 5.06
06  Mojo (Ervin) 4.15
07. Rocket 88 (Brenston) 2.27
08. Goodbye My Lady (Klingman/Smart II/Rundgren) 4.38
09. I Don’t Know (Mabon) 3.35
10. Caldonia (Moore) 5.11
11. Boogie Thing (Murphy) 4.50
12. Good Morning Lil’ Schoool Girl () 3.20
13  Oh Baby You Don’t Have To Go (Reed) 2.32
14. Help Me (Watson) 4.12
15. Fannie Mae () 4.03
16  Hot ‘N Cold (Toussaint) 3.59
17  Teeny Weeny Bit (Whitcomb) 2.48
18. Blow Wind Blow (Dickerson) 4.43
19. How Long Can A Fool Go Wrong (Cotton) 7.15
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20. Next Time You See Me (Forest/Harvey) 3.03
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James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)

 

 

Various Artists – The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones (2015)

FrontCover1This is a great sampler from Mexico !

The Rolling Stones have become the reincarnation of rock itself, being the representation, both musically and in terms of image and behavior, what rock & roll represents. In The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones, we will highlight their side-projects, their roots, their favorite songs and even a brand new song, which becomes and event in itself, for all the Stones’ fans around the world. The idea sounds wonderful right?. Well, The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones will meet the expectations of even the most demanding Stones fan. We have a lost recording by Leslie West (Mountain’s guitarist) with Mick Jagger playing guitar, a duet by Keith Richards with Ian McLagan (Faces’ keyboardist), and also the hard-to-find single versions of Bill Wyman’s solo hits.

Also we have Mick Jagger and Keith Richards all time favorite songs (handpicked by themselves), and an extremely rare track titled Catch As Catch Can, that was released only in a limited edition in France as a 7″ and never previously available on CD single, by musician and producer Robin Millar (Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel, Sade) recorded in 1973 along with Mick Taylor, Bobby Keys and Mick Jagger!!!.

Finally, we have the originals versions of the best songs the Stones covered during his long and illustrious career. This is a marvelous project that with remastered sound, beautiful cover art extended liner notes is an essential addition to your collection. (promo text)

Yes, yes, yes … a real great and intersting Project … Listen and discover the many faces of The Rolling Stones !
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Tracklist:

CD 1:
The Adventures Of The Stones:
01. Leslie West feat. Mick Jagger:High Roller (Jagger/Richards/Laing/Palmer) 4.13
02. Ron Wood & Ian McLagan: She Stole It (McLagan) 3.45
03. Bill Wyman: Monkey Grip (single edition) (Wyman) 3.17
04. Ian McLagan & Keith Richards: Truly (McLagan) 5.58
05. Toots & The Maytals feat. Keith Richards:- Careless Ethiopians (Hibbert) 3.22
06. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Had Me A Real Good Time (Lane/Wood) 4.45
07. Ian McLagan feat. Bobby Keys: Somebody (McLagan) 3.00
08 .British Invasion All-Stars feat. Dick Taylor: Gimme Some Loving (Winwood) 4.15
09. Bill  Wyman: (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star (single edit) (Wyman) 3.23
10. Robin Millar feat. Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins & Bobby Keys: Catch As Catch Can (Millar)  3.33
11. John Phillips feat. Mick Jagger, Mick Taylor & Keith Richards:- Zulu Warrior (Phillips/Jagger) 3.30
12. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 5.09
13. Chris Farlowe produced by Mick Jagger: Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
14. Johnny Winter: Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 4.42
CD 2:
Mick & Keith’s Favourite Tracks:
01. Little Walter: I Go To Go (Walter)  2.41
02. Muddy Waters: Forty Days And Forty Nights (Roth) 2.50
03. Robert Johnson: Stones In My Passway (Johnson) 2.28
04. Ray Charles: Lonely Avenue (Pomus) 2.34
05. Z.Z. Hill: Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson /Horton) 4.57
06. Blind Willie Johnson: Dark Was The Night (Cold Was The Ground) (Johnson) 3.20
07. Howlin’ Wolf: Forty Four (Burnett) 2.48
08. Jesse Fuller: Stagolee (Traditional) 3.44
09. Bill Broonzy: When Did You Leave Heaven (Bullock/Whiting) 3.29
10. Elmore James:- It Hurts Me Too (Red/James/London)  3.19
11. Little Walter: Key To The Highway (Segar) 2.45
12. Erna Franklin: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 2.38
13. Chuck Berry: Memphis (Berry) 2.14
14. Robert Johnson: 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 2.52
CD 3:
The  Originals:
01. Chuck Berry: Around And Around (Berry) 2.40
02. Larry Williams: She Said Yeah (Jackson/Williams) 1.50
03. Nat King Cole Trio: Route  66 (Troup) 3.01
04. Muddy Waters:  Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 2.51
05. Howlin’ Wolf: Little Red Rooster (Burnett/Dixon) 2.26
06. Buddy Holly: Not Fade Away (Holly/Petty) 2.23
07. Jimmy  Reed: Honest I Do (Reed/Abner) 2.42
08. Dale Hawkins: Suzie Q (Hawkins/Lewis/Broadwater)  2.19
09. The Coasters: Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.42
10. Jim Harpo: I’m A King Bee (Harpo) 3.04
11. Robertt Johnson: Love In Vain (Johnson) 3.20
12. Bo Diddley: Mona (McDaniel) 3.39
13. Gene Allison: You Can Make It If You Try (Jarrett) 2.09
14. Eric Donaldson: Cherry Oh, Baby (Donaldson) 3.07
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Straw – Shoplifting (1999)

FrontCover1Straw was an English post-Britpop band that released one album, Shoplifting, in 1999.
Straw was formed in Bristol by Mattie Bennett (vocals/guitar) and Roger Power (bass/guitar), formerly of The Blue Aeroplanes. Later adding keyboardist Mark “Duck” Blackwell, the group signed to Arista Records under the moniker “Please” with a different lead vocalist. They recorded an album in Boston with American record producers Sean Slade and Paul Q. Kolderie. Unhappy with the results, however, the band was dropped by the label after releasing a single, “If I Was God…” (1995, Sugarscoop Records).
When Arista kept Please’s singer under contract, Bennett stepped into the lead vocalist role, the band adding drummer Andy Nixon and re-christening themselves Straw. This newly revitalised line-up was quickly signed to WEA and issued its debut single “Weird Superman” in the summer of 1998. Two more singles and one EP were released: “The Aeroplane Song,” (charting at no. 37 in the UK Singles Chart on 6 February 1999), “Moving to California” (charting at no. 50 on 24 April 1999), and Soundtrack of the Summer (including “The World Is Not Enough” — a James Bond theme attempt) in 1999 before Straw released their first full-length effort, Shoplifting.

Throughout 1998 and 1999 the band toured extensively with Puressence, Space and Feeder alongside emerging future stars Muse and gigs with Supergrass, Alanis Morissette, Fountains of Wayne and Reef. The extensive touring and television appearances (including the O-Zone and TFI Friday) took their toll, and differences broke out in the band resulting in the dismissal of Power after the band’s final appearance of 1999 at the Glastonbury Festival. They were also subsequently dropped by WEA. They recruited new bassist Dan McKinna, and self-funded (and self-produced) the recording of several new tracks in the basement studio of Pete Thomas’ house. On the strength of this new material they were signed to Columbia in 2000 and released the 4-track EP Home Work and the single “Sailing Off the Edge of the World” to critical acclaim. A second album, Keepsakes, was slated for release later that year but they were dropped by Columbia and went their separate ways shortly afterwards.

Singles

Singles
Andy Nixon and Dan McKinna went on to play in The Jeevas with Crispian Mills of Kula Shaker and then onto The Magic Bullet Band. McKinna has been a session player for many bands including James Morrison, Ben’s Brother, Stuart Staples (Tindersticks), A Man Called Adam and Farrah. Blackwell, after producing Straw, The Jeevas and The Magic Bullet Band, continues to work as a record producer and songwriter. Bennett is currently an English and media teacher at Bodmin College in Cornwall. (by wikipedia)
Booklet01A

Straw’s Shoplifting was truly one of the gems of late-1990s Britpop. While the British sound had more or less turned its back on pop music (with mainstream artists like Blur shunning their pop roots for more experimental territory), it’s refreshing to hear a band as unpretentious and shamelessly poppy as Straw. From the opening notes of “Dracula Has Risen From the Grave,” it’s obvious that this album is all about fun sound clips from old movies and video games, which abound on the album from start to finish. “Weird Superman” and “The Aeroplane Song” are catchy, if somewhat conventional, anthems, while the searing “Wake Up (Miss Venezuela)” is good disco-pop. Part of the true magic in Shoplifting, however, is its depth. Straw may be a pop band, but they aren’t superficial. Tender, emotional moments like “Kill Your Boyfriend” and “We Don’t Belong” show that this band has a lot more to offer than just shiny pop tunes; they go deeper, and this disc is one that’s worth diving into. (by Jason Damas)

BookletBackCover1
Personnel:
Mattie Bennett (vocals, guitar)
Mark “Duck” Blackwell (keyboards)
Andy Nixon (drums)
Roger Power (bass)
Booklet04A

Tracklist:
01. Dracula Has Risen From The Grave 3.42
02. Weird Superman 4.10
03. The Aeroplane Song 4.05
04. Moving To California 6.04
05. Shoplifting 3.54
06. Kill Your Boyfriend 3.56
07. Anthem For The Low In Self-Esteem 3.29
08. United States Of Amnesia 4.02
09. Postcards From Hell 4.28
10. Soundtrack Of The Summer 4.42
11. Wake Up (Miss Venezuela) 4.02
12. We Don’t Belong 5.04
13. Galveston 4.05

All Songs written by Mattie Bennett . Mark “Duck” Blackwell – Andy Nixon – Roger Power
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BackCover1

Various Artists – Harmonia Mundi – New Releases January – June (2004)

FrontCover1Harmonia Mundi is an independent record label founded in Paris, France, in 1958 by Bernard Coutaz. In 1986 Harmonia Mundi (France) moved to Arles, France.
The label’s catalogue is devoted to classical music, jazz, and world music (on the World Village label). Harmonia Mundi (US) is a branch of Harmonia Mundi (France). There are also operations in the United Kingdom and in Spain.
The label was acquired by PIAS Entertainment Group in September 2015.
The Latin phrase harmonia mundi means “world harmony”.
The classical label Deutsche Harmonia Mundi is not related to Harmonia Mundi (France) and belongs to Sony BMG. (by wikipedia)

The name harmonia mundi ‘France’ embraces a much wider range than its widespread image as an early music label would suggest. harmonia mundi is first and foremost a group, based in Arles since 1986 and numbering 330 people all over the world. That group now covers all the different crafts of the publishing business, for both recordings and books, from production to distribution – and even to a retail network in certain countries. Read on to discover that the sphere of influence of harmonia mundi extends far beyond ‘classical music’…

Labels
And this is a Promotion sampler from 2004 … and it´s great sampler from one of the best classic labels all over the world.
And because I´m too lazy today, to type all the tracks in theis blog … read this (taken from the booklet):

Personnel:
Personnel
Tracklist:
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The Beatles – Last Night In Hamburg(Live! At The Star-Club In Hamburg, Germany; 1962) (1977/1999)

LastNightFrontCover1Last Night In Hamburg (Live! at the Star-Club in Hamburg, Germany; 1962) waa a double album featuring live performances by the English rock group The Beatles, recorded in late December 1962 at the Star-Club during their final Hamburg residency. The album was released in 1977 in two different versions, comprising a total of 30 songs by The Beatles.
The performances were recorded on a home tape machine using a single microphone, resulting in a low fidelity recording. Ted “Kingsize” Taylor began to investigate possible marketing of the tapes in 1973. The tapes were eventually bought by Paul Murphy and subjected to extensive audio processing to improve the sound, leading to the 1977 album.
Although the poor sound quality limits its commercial appeal, the album provides historic insight into the group’s club act in the period after Ringo Starr joined but before the emergence of Beatlemania. The Beatles were unsuccessful in legally blocking the initial release of the album; the recordings were reissued in many forms until 1998, when The Beatles were awarded full rights to the performances.

The Beatles’ five residencies in Hamburg during 1960 to 1962 allowed the Liverpool band to develop their performance skills and widen their reputation. Drummer Pete Best was added to the band in August 1960 to secure their first Hamburg booking, where they played for 48 nights at the Indra Club and then 58 nights at the Kaiserkeller. The Beatles returned to Hamburg in April 1961 to play at the Top Ten Club for three months.
BeatlesStarclub01
A new Hamburg music venue, the Star-Club, opened on 13 April 1962, with The Beatles booked for the first seven weeks. The Beatles returned to Hamburg in November and December 1962 for their fourth and fifth engagements there, which had been booked for the Star-Club many months in advance. Unlike their previous three trips to Hamburg, their drummer was Starr, having replaced Best in August. The Beatles were reluctant to return for their final two-week booking, which started 18 December, as they were gaining popularity in Britain and had just achieved their first charted single with “Love Me Do”.

Portions of The Beatles’ final Star-Club performances (along with other acts) were recorded by the club’s stage manager, Adrian Barber, for Ted “Kingsize” Taylor. Barber used a Grundig home reel-to-reel recorder at a tape speed of 3¾ inches per second, with a single microphone placed in front of the stage. Taylor, leader of The Dominoes (who were also playing at the club), said that John Lennon verbally agreed to the group being recorded in exchange for Taylor providing the beer during their performances.

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The tapes were originally described as having been recorded in the spring of 1962, an attempt to pre-date The Beatles’ June 1962 contract signing with Parlophone. However, song arrangements and dialogue from the tapes pointed to late December 1962, and a recording date of 31 December 1962 (the group’s last day in Hamburg) was commonly cited. Later researchers have proposed that the tapes are from multiple days during the last week of December; Allan Williams (The Beatles’ booking agent at the time) recalled that a total of about three hours was recorded over three or four sessions between Christmas and New Year’s Day.
The tapes captured The Beatles performing at least 33 different titles, plus some repeated songs. Of the 30 songs that were commercially released from the tapes, only two were Lennon–McCartney compositions. The others were an assortment of cover versions, seventeen of which would be re-made by The Beatles and appear on their various studio albums or Live at the BBC. The arrangements played at the Star-Club are similar to the versions recorded later, albeit less refined, although there are a few cases with distinct differences. For example, “Mr. Moonlight” has a much quicker tempo, a guitar-based instrumental break, and an intentionally altered lyric with Lennon proclaiming he is on his “nose” instead of his “knees”; “Roll Over Beethoven” was described as “never taken at a more breakneck pace”.

50 Jahre Star-Club in Hamburg Der Star-Club
The recording equipment and method resulted in the tapes being unmistakably low fidelity. The vocals, even in the best cases, sound “somewhat muffled and distant”. The vocals on a few songs are so indistinct that labelling and liner notes on early releases gave incorrect information about who was singing and the exact song being performed. Much of The Beatles’ dialogue between songs is audible, which includes addressing the audience in both English and German, as well as repartee among themselves. The banter is irreverent and coarse at times, an aspect of their stage act that would soon cease under the influence of manager Brian Epstein.

Taylor said he had offered to sell the tapes to Epstein in the mid-1960s, but that Epstein did not consider them to be of commercial value and offered only £20. Taylor said he kept the tapes at home, largely forgotten until 1973 when he decided to look into their marketability. Williams related a different history than Taylor, stating that after Taylor returned to Liverpool, he left the tapes with a recording engineer for editing into a potential album. The project was never finished and the engineer later relocated, with the tapes being among many items left behind. In 1972, Williams, Taylor, and the engineer gained access to the abandoned office and recovered the tapes “from beneath a pile of rubble on the floor.”
When the existence of the tapes was first publicly reported in July 1973, Williams was planning to ask Apple for at least £100,000. Williams said he later met with George Harrison and Starr to offer the tapes for £5000, but they declined, citing financial difficulties at the time. Williams and Taylor teamed up with Paul Murphy, head of Buk Records, to find an outlet for the tapes.

Booklet
Booklet from the original double album from 1977

Murphy eventually bought the tapes himself and formed a new company, Lingasong, specifically for the project. He sold the worldwide distribution rights to Double H Licensing, which spent more than $100,000 on elaborate audio processing and mixing of the songs under the direction of Larry Grossberg. The sequence of songs was rearranged, and some of the individual songs were edited to bypass flawed tape sections or make up for an incomplete recording.
After an unsuccessful attempt by The Beatles to block it, the 26-song Live! at the Star-Club in Hamburg, Germany; 1962 was released by Lingasong. The album first appeared in Germany in April 1977 in association with Bellaphon Records, and was released in the UK the following month.[16] For the album’s June 1977 US release (in association with Atlantic Records), four songs were removed and replaced with four different songs from the tapes.

Over the next two decades, the recordings were licensed to several record companies, resulting in numerous releases with varying track selections. In 1979, Pickwick Records performed some additional audio filtering and equalisation of the songs on the Lingasong US version, and released it over two volumes as First Live Recordings; the set included the song “Hully Gully” that was mistakenly credited to The Beatles,but was actually performed by Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers, another act on the Star-Club bill. In 1981, Audio Fidelity Enterprises released Historic Sessions in the UK, the first single package with all 30 Beatles tracks from the original Star-Club releases.[20] Several additional songs from the Star-Club tapes have appeared on Beatles bootleg records over the years.

In 1985, a bootlegger known as “Richard”, who had already found infamy by issuing several titles with controversial covers and content, issued his own bootleg version of the Star Club tapes without any of the editing found on the official releases, entitled The Beatles vs. the Third Reich—directly parodying The Beatles vs. the Four Seasons in both name and cover.
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Another alternate front+backcover

The release of the recordings on two CDs by industry giant Sony Music in 1991 sparked renewed legal attention by The Beatles (as represented by Paul McCartney, Harrison, Starr, and Yoko Ono). Sony also produced a version specifically for their Columbia House music club, but Sony withdrew the titles in 1992 as a lawsuit was progressing. Lingasong’s CD release of the original set prompted another lawsuit from The Beatles in 1996; the case was decided in 1998 in favour of The Beatles, who were granted ownership of the tapes and exclusive rights to their use. Harrison appeared in person to provide evidence in the case, and his testimony was cited as an important factor in the judge’s decision. Harrison characterised the claim that Lennon gave Taylor permission for the recording as “a load of rubbish”, and added: “One drunken person recording another bunch of drunks does not constitute business deals.”

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The album had limited commercial success, reaching a peak position of No. 111 during a seven-week run on the US Billboard 200 album chart. Assessments of the album often weigh the poor sound quality against the historic importance and insight provided into The Beatles’ early stage act. Rolling Stone reviewer John Swenson called the album “poorly recorded but fascinating” and commented that it showed The Beatles as “raw but extremely powerful.” Allmusic, commenting on a reissue, wrote: “The results were very low-fidelity, and despite The Beatles’ enormous success, it took Taylor fifteen years to find someone greedy and shameless enough to release them as a record”. Q Magazine described the recordings as having “certain historical interest” and remarked: “The show seems like a riot but the sound itself is terrible – like one hell of a great party going on next door.” George Harrison gave the assessment: “The Star-Club recording was the crummiest recording ever made in our name!” (by wikipedia)
Poster
Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, vocals)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Paul McCartney (bass, vocals)
Ringo Starr (drums)
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Fred Fascher (Star-Club waiter) (vocals on 19.)
Horst Fascher (Star-Club Manager) (vocals on 20.)
LastNightInlet

Trackist:
01. Introduction/I Saw Her Standing There (Lennon/McCartney)/I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You) (Thomas/Biggs) 5.18
02, Roll Over Beethoven (Berry) 2.14
03. Hippy Hippy Shake (Romero) 1.43
04. Sweet Little Sixteen (Berry) 2.46
05. Lend Me Your Comb (Kay Twomey/Wise/Weisman) 1.49
06. Your Feet’s Too Big (Benson/Fisher) 2.20
07. Where Have You Been (All My Life) (Mann/Weil) 1.45
08. Twist And Shout (Medley/Russell) 2.09
09. Mr. Moonlight (Johnson) 2.09
10. A Taste Of Honey (Scott/Marlow) 1.41
11. Bésame Mucho (Velázquez/Skylar) 2.02
12. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.22
13. Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey Hey (Leiber/Stpller/Penniman) 2.12
14. Nothin’ Shakin’ (But The Leaves On The Trees) (Fontaine/Colacrai/Lampert/Gluck) 1.21
15. To Know Her Is to Love Her (Spector) 3.03
16. Little Queenie (Berry) 3.55
17. Falling in Love Again (Can’t Help It) (Hollander/Lerner) 1.59
18. Sheila (Roe) 1.57
19. Be-Bop-A-Lula (Vincent/Davis) 2.29
20. Hallelujah I Love Her So (Charles) 2.09
21. Ask Me Why (Lennon/McCartney) 2.26
22. Red Sails In The Sunset (Kennedy/Williams) 2.02
23. Matchbox (Perkins) 2.34
24. I’m Talking About You (Berry) 1.50
25. I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate (Piron/Smith/Goldsmith) 2.19
26. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Blackwell/Penniman) 1.45
27. I Remember You (Mercer/Schertzinger) 1.55´
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28. Complete show (uncut) 1.05.041

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Celilo – Bending Mirrors (2009)

FrontCover1It’s possible Celilo were aiming for an anonymous feel to this album – for certainly band name, title and cover art (a shot of bare trees and grey skies, with no photo of the band to be seen) all conspire to give little clue of what awaits inside. If the intention is to persuade you to give it a listen with no preconceptions, let’s hope that strategy works, as this is really something of a hidden gem.

Celilo are from Portland, Oregon. Celilo Falls was the nearby fishing grounds used for generations by Native Americans until flooded by the building of a dam in 1957, and Celilo lament this on the song “Wy-am”. All thirteen songs on the album are written and sung by Sloan Martin. Martin slurs many of his lyrics in a manner reminiscent of Adam Duritz of Counting Crows. And in fact, if you had to describe Celilo’s music to someone who hadn’t heard them before, a slightly lighter, countrified version of that band – think Counting Crows with pedal steel – wouldn’t be a bad approximation.

Throughout, the lyrics are poetic and evocative, but invariably indirect. Even with the help of the lyric sheet, you’ll be hard pushed to pin down exactly what some of these songs are about. Certainly they are songs that don’t yield up their meaning on first listen. So, depending on your point of view, you’ll either dismiss them as obscure or look forward to repeated listens to try to tease out further meaning.

But the songs aren’t lyric-heavy or ponderous, thanks to Martin’s gift for melody and the uniformly excellent playing of the band. “Bush Pilot” in many ways encapsulates what the band is all about. The lyrics have a poetic feel, if a little oblique, but by the time they get to the chorus, the lovely melody and swirling pedal steel will undoubtedly capture you. The next track “Piñata” is better still, probably the best on the album. Simple acoustic guitar, just Martin’s voice and a harmony vocal: A busted up piñata lying in the street, Empty of everything that once was sweet, with a delightful melodic hook guaranteed to get stuck in your head. (by backroadsmusic.co.uk)

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The opening song on “Bending Mirrors”, Easter Lily could quite easily have been included in the organised chaos that was Journey Through the Past, Neil Young’s ambitious early 1970s film soundtrack. Initially it has the same sort of jamming immediacy, then settles into a perfectly likeable rock driven anthem with a slight nod towards Dark Side era Pink Floyd. Portland’s Celilo, comprised of Sloan Martin providing lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Damon Dunning and Adam East sharing lead guitar and bass duties, Kipp Crawford on drums, Tucker Jackson with that all important pedal steel and finally David Pulliam on keyboards, together with a handful of guest musicians have come up with a piece of laid back and lyrical Americana that straddles the boundaries between inde rock, psychedelia and country folk.

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At times unavoidably sounding like Neil Young’s kid brothers or occasionally Ryan Adams, Celilo have managed to plough their own furrow, largely due to the writing credentials of former drummer turned frontman Sloan Martin. The themes do vary but the songs are unified by the sensitive arrangements and production prowess of the band and Mike Coykendall (She&Him, Blitzen Trapper and M. Ward) respectively.

If indeed the opening song has the driven rock base of a Young classic, then the bulk of the album settles into almost contemplative ballad mode demonstrating the sensitive side of Martin’s writing such as the achingly confessional love poem Pinata or the soulful Bush Pilot. Martin’s strong point though is in the almost surreal rhetoric he employs in songs such as Little Coquette.

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Personnel:
Kipp Crawford (drums)
Damon Dunning (guitar, bass, background vocals)
Adam East (bass, guitar, background vocals, harmonica)
Tucker Jackson (pedal steel-guitar)

Sloan Martin (vocals, guitar)
Dave Pulliam (keyboards)
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Jasmine Ash (synthesizer on 03.)
Mike Coykendall (guitar on 09.)“
Matt Kendall (Banjo on 02.)
Graham Nystrom (piano on piano on 08.)
Andy Parker (percussion on 03.)
Annalissa Tornfelt (fidle, Background vocals)
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background vocals:
Gaudie Darling – Pia DiSilva

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Tracklist:
01  Easter Lily 2.40
02. Wy-Am 4.01
03  Winter Pills 3.43
04  Bush Pilot 3.28
05  Piñata 3.03
06  Cigarette Blues 3.13
07  Donut Queen 3.49
08  Sunken Ships  3.23
09  Sirens Of Metropolis 3.19
10  Pink Sofa 3.26
11  Little Coquette 3.17
12  Clatter Of Hooves  3.43
13  Pleistocene 4.24
All Songs written by Sloan Martin
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Various Artists – The Rocky Horror Picture Show (OST) (1975)

FrrontCover1The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the original soundtrack album to the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show, an adaptation of the musical The Rocky Horror Show that had opened in 1973. The soundtrack was released as an album in 1975 by Ode Records, produced by Richard Hartley.
This low-budget freak show/cult classic/cultural institution concerns the misadventures of Brad Majors (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss (Susan Sarandon) inside a strange mansion that they come across on a rainy night. After the wholesome pair profess their love through an opening song, their car breaks down in the woods, and they seek refuge in a towering castle nearby. Greeting them at the door is a ghoulish butler named Riff Raff (Richard O’Brien), who introduces them to a bacchanalian collection of partygoers dressed in outfits from some sort of interplanetary thrift shop. The host of this gathering is a transvestite clad in lingerie, Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry), a mad scientist who claims to be from another planet. With assistants Columbia (Nell Campbell) and Magenta (Patricia Quinn) looking on, Frank unveils his latest creation — a figure wrapped in gauze and submerged in a tank full of liquid.

With the addition of colored dyes and some assistance from the weather, Frank brings to life a blonde young beefcake wearing nothing but skimpy shorts, who launches into song in his first minute of life. Just when Brad and Janet think things couldn’t get any stranger, a biker (Meat Loaf) bursts onto the scene to reclaim Columbia, his ex-girlfriend. When Frank kills the biker, it’s clear that Brad and Janet will be guests for the night, and that they may be next on Frank’s list — whether for murder or carnal delights is uncertain. And just what is that mystery meat they’re eating for dinner, anyway? In addition to playing Riff Raff, O’Brien wrote the catchy songs, with John Barry and Richard Hartley composing the score. (vy Derek Armstrong)

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The album peaked at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 in 1978. It reached No. 12 on the Australian albums chart and No. 11 on the New Zealand albums chart. William Ruhlmann of Allmusic gave the album a star rating of five stars out of five and described it as the “definitive version of the [Rocky Horror] score”.

Following its initial release, the album was not successful, and was deleted everywhere but in Canada. Marty Scott, co-founder of Jem Records, obtained a licensing agreement from Ode Records owner Lou Adler, which enabled the album to be imported to the United States. Scott also obtained a production and distribution license from Adler, which resulted in renewed interest in the album.

The soundtrack omits two of the songs sung in the film: Rocky’s “The Sword of Damocles”, and the Frank-N-Furter-led “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” (often erroneously referred to as “Wise Up, Janet Weiss”). Also omitted is “Once in a While,” which was shot for the film but later unincluded.
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“The Sword of Damocles” and “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” are included on the album “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” however “Planet, Schmanet, Janet” is missing the last verse (don’t get hot and flustered) and they are in mono and ported directly from the film itself and so include all the sound effects and dialogue that would normally be omitted from a soundtrack album.
In 2011 these three songs were released, as MP3 format only, in their stereo, studio mixes on the download only release “The Rocky Horror Picture Show Complete Soundtrack: Absolute Treasures 2011 Special Edition”. The album was later issued on double red vinyl for the film’s 40th anniversary. However, incidental music and cues are not included and “The Sword of Damocles” features an unknown lead vocalist in place of Trevor White. The latter is included with Trevor White’s vocals as a bonus track for the iTunes edition; this is the same version found on the “25 Years of Absolute Pleasure” release, albeit in stereo and contains the dialogue and sound effects from the film. (by wikipedia)
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For the 1975 film version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, American producer Lou Adler wisely mixed the best of the London and Los Angeles stage versions, shooting the movie in England with Tim Curry and several of the other original cast members, plus Meatloaf (years before Bat Out of Hell), and Americans Barry Bostwick and Susan Sarandon as the innocent couple Brad and Janet. Adler also brought back original London stage musicians in place of the slick studio musicians who had marred the L.A. cast album. The film version resequenced the songs and reassigned some of the vocals, with Brad’s song “Once in a While” dropped. But it all worked out fine. The strings that were added to ballads like “Science Fiction/Double Feature” only improved them; the rockers rocked out; Bostwick and Sarandon proved to be the best Brad and Janet ever; the original cast members, especially Curry, reveled in the opportunity to immortalize their portrayals; and Rocky Horror’s potential as a witty parody of cheap movies, rock & roll, and sexual mores was fully realized.

The film soundtrack album became the definitive version of the score, despite lacking the songs “Planet Shmanet Janet” and “The Sword of Damocles.” The Rocky Horror Picture Show was not successful in its initial theatrical run, but then a strange thing happened. In 1976, the Waverly Theater in New York’s Greenwich Village began showing the film at midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Soon, a cult of repeat viewers began turning up every week; they began to dress like the characters, call out their own comments at strategic moments, sing along, and add their own theatrical effects. The phenomenon spread across the U.S., with fans rivaling Trekkies and Deadheads for loyalty and eccentricity, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show took on a life Richard O’Brien never could have anticipated. (William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Count Ian Blair (guitar)
John Bundrick (keyboards)
Mick Grabham (guitar)
Phil Kenzie (saxophone)
B.J. Wilson (drums)
Dave Wintour (bass)
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background vocals:
Abigale Haness – Susan Morse – Bruce Scott
BackCover
Trackist:

Richard O’Brien:
01. Science Fiction/Double Feature 4.30

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon:
02. Dammit Janet 2.51

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Richard O’Brien:
03. Over At The Frankenstein Place 2.37

Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Little Nell:
04. Time Warp 3.15

Tim Curry:
05. Sweet Transvestite 3.21
06. I Can Make You A Man 2.07

Meat Loaf:
07. Hot Patootie – Bless My Soul  3.00

Tim Curry:
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8. I Can Make You A Man (Reprise) 1.44

Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Patricia Quinn:
09. Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch Me 2.27

Jonathan Adams, Little Nell, Susan Sarandon, Tim Curry:
10. Eddie 2.44

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Little Nell, Peter Hinwood, Tim Curry, Trevor White, Jonathan Adams   :
11.1. Rose Tint My World :
11.2. Floor Show
11.3. Fanfare/Don’t Dream It
11.4. Wild and Untamed Thing 8.13

Tim Curry:
12. I’m Going Home 2.48

Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Jonathan Adams:
13. Super Heroes 2.45

Richard O’Brien:
14. Science Fiction/Double Feature (Reprise) 1.26
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15. Time Warp (1989 remix – extended version) 5.36
16. Time Warp (music – 1 = background track = U mix) 4.09

All Songs written by Richard O’Brien.
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