Mr Albert Show – Warm Motor (1971)

FrontCover1During the weekend of August 30th to 31st, 1969, a number of musicians from various bands active in the region of Eindhoven, The Netherlands, performed in a club in Mannheim, Germany. Some of the band members from “Moses and the Scouts” and “Dirty Underwear” discovered that they had much in common in terms of musical ideas and decided to form a new band – with Broer Bogaart drums and congas, Tom Fautubun bass, Eric Lintermans guitar, Bonki Bongaerts organ, Bertus Borgers saxophone and vocals and Inez and Moses performing as extra solo vocalists.

After some rehearsals, and on the way to the first gig, there wasn’t a name yet for the new band. To tease the shy roadie, Albert, it was decided to call the band “The Mr. Albert Show” and despite Albert’s protests, the name was never changed. After recording the new written repertoire on a cassette, Bertus and Moses hitched a ride to the Red Bullet record company. Willem van Kooten, the big boss, immediately decided to offer the band a four-year record contract, which the band members signed without any hesitation.

In 1971, the second LP, “Warm Motor”, which was also produced by Peter Koelewijn, was released and perfectly reflected the band at that time. However, Red Bullet was unable to lift a single from the LP, as the songs were too long, the band no longer had a female vocalist and the music was too freaky. The band was focussing on the new trends of the time and exploring music from around the whole world, i.e. Jazz, Underground, African, Indian and much more. We wanted to be actively involved in the cultural and social developments that were actually taking place and coming up with appropriate singles wasn’t exactly part of our daily interests.

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As a result, the first signs of friction arose between the band and the record company. As a compromise, additional recordings were made in order to be able to release a single, e.g. “Show Me Your Tongue”, but in 1972, we broke all ties with Red Bullet. We continued to play, but still had two years remaining on our contract, rendering the band members unable to sign up with another record company. We decided to go our own separate way and on September 29th, 1973, The Mr. Albert Show gave their last performance at “de Effenaar” in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. (by Bertus Borgers)

AlternateFrontCover2Alternate frontcover (1977)

This album is more on the trippy side than the first one, spheric organ, flute/sax, and great guitarwork . The 6 tracks show the bands outstanding talent for progressive rock music with trippy jazz elements but also straight Hardrock. Music ranges from Golden Earring, King Crimson, Colosseum style over to several Krautrock bands.

“Warm Motor”! Big differences to debut the group is more on the trippy side than the first one, spheric organ, flute/sax, and great guitarwork . The 6 tracks show the bands outstanding talent for progressive rock music with trippy jazz elements but also straight Hardrock. However, the women’s singing is gone, all the rocks are often a little harder now and the pieces have become longer. Still the foundation of the music of the five Dutch is a bluesy-jazzy Protoprog that sometimes slightly harder rocking lives, the interplay of organ and electric guitar. Based enriched the group their sound by jazz and rock influences Brass. Especially Bertus Borgers provides – not just when he sings – with various saxophones and a flute that the music somewhat from the usual organ-heavy and hard rock of the early Protoprog apart. Colosseum, Black Widow, Warm Dust or the compatriots of Focus are perhaps quite a good comparison to the music on “Warm Motor”, then the Danish sax Progger (Burnin Red Ivanhoe, Blast Furnace, the Rainbow Band and Thor’s hammer) but the compositions of the band from Eindhoven are knitted little easier.

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At the time of their second album, the band had dropped the psychedelic element of their music to concentrate more on the jazz-rock side, resulting in some first rate progressive rock. ‘Did You Really Find Somebody’ opens the album, and straight away you can hear the difference. Much more relaxed and jazz-orientated, it includes a lovely jazz guitar solo, which you hear far too little these days, and good use of the horn section. ‘Electronic Baby’ beefs up the rock element slightly, with some heavy guitars making an appearance, and also includes a good keyboard solo and a nice flute interlude. ‘Let It All Hang Out’ has a funky groove to it, and a vocal at times reminiscent of Joe Cocker, while ‘Bantal’ is the most out and out jazz track on here, featuring intricate rhythms and time changes. The generally longer tracks on this album (only six in all) work very well, and none of them drag at all, making for a truly progressive album – in that the band have actually progressed on from their debut. Now out on CD with bonus tracks – a couple of fifties style rock’n’rollers (which really do not fit in with the music on the rest of the album) in ‘I Can’t Help It’ and ‘Show Me Your Tongue’, and whether you have heard their first one or not this is definitely worth checking out

Singles

Then it apparently came into larger differences with the record company (marketed by Philip label Red Bullet Productions), with which the band then no longer wanted to work together. However, they were still under contract with the label, which, however, did not release the tape. To end the deadlock, the group finally dissolved in the fall of the 1973. The saxophonist and singer Bertus Borgers then worked with Robert Stips of Supersister in the band Sweet d’Buster,together with Robert Jan Stips of Supersister and is very active as a studio musician.

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate frontcover from Canada

In the United States this album was called Dutch Treat and had a different cover On the cover you can see singer Floortje Klomp, who sang for a short time with the band, but she doesn’t appear on this album. Although singer Floortje Klomp had left the band after a few month after replacing singer Inez (sang on 1st album), she had credits as singer. As Bertus Borgers also told me, the musicians´ statements on the US cover’s back front were a result of the group promoter’s fantasy. The band members themselves hadn’t been informed.(by adamus67)

This is one of the finest LP´s from the prog-rock era … and their song “I’m Not More Than A Sign ” is such a killer song …

And Mr. rockasteria wrote in his blog: sensational prog jazz blues rock !

That´s right !

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Personnel:
Bertus Borgers (vocals, flute, saxophone, guitar, keyboards, vibraphone)
Bonki Bongaerts (keyboards, harmonica)
Broer Boogaart (drums, percussion)
Tom Fautubun (bass)
Erik Lintermans (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Did You Really Find Somebody (Borgers) 9.54
02. I’m Not More Than A Sign Borgers) 3.52
03. Electronic Baby (Borgers/Bongaerts/Sylvester) 6.45
04. Let It All Hang Out (Borgers) 4.39
05. Bantal (Borgers) 3.49
06. Woman (Borgers) 11.25
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07. I Can’t Help It (Borgers) 2.33
08. Show Me Your Tongue (Borgers) 3.32
09. Can’t Find My Way Home (Winwood) 5.00
10. Hooked On You (Borgers) 4.01
11. Picking Up Your Page (Borgers) 3.26LabelB1*
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The Blues Band – Official Bootleg Album (1980)

OriginalFrontCover1England’s the Blues Band is led by ex-Manfred Mann vocalist Paul Jones and guitarist/vocalist Dave Kelly, who, before forming the group in 1979, had been a member of the John Dummer Blues Band and issued several solo recordings on his own (Kelly had also received praise for his playing by such blues legends as Howlin’ Wolf and John Lee Hooker). After hooking up with friend/bassist Gary Fletcher, the seeds for the Blues Band were sown, resulting in countless albums (by Greg Prato)

The Blues Band is a virtual who’s who of the British blues scene. An ’80s supergroup of sorts, the band consists of Paul Jones, solo artist and former member of Manfred Mann (lead vocals and harmonica ); Dave Kelly, solo artist and former member of the John Dummer Blues band (lead vocals and slide guitar); Tom McGuinness, former member of Manfred Mann and McGuinness Flint (lead guitar and back-up vocals); Hughie Flint, also former McGuinness Flint (drums); and Gary Fletcher, formerly of Sam Apple Pie (bass and backup vocals).

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Taken from the inlets of this album

Although formed in 1979, the band released its debut album, The Bootleg Album, in 1980 as supposedly a one-time live project. The album was originally a private pressing, recorded live and released by the band themselves, but it sold so well it was re-released intact by Arista after signing the band to a contract. The Blues Band became so popular that they got together as a permanent unit.

A must for any fan of British blues music. (by by Keith Pettipas)

The Blues Band in their own words:

BluesBand01The individual members of The Blues Band were already held in admiration by generations of rhythm & blues fans when they formed back in 1979. Almost two and a half decades and over 16 albums later they continue to add to their growing army of followers, and it’s not unheard of to find three generations from the same family at a gig.

The band are today acknowledged throughout Europe and beyond as being amongst the very finest purveyors of rhythm & blues. They have inspired numerous other blues bands, many of which have come and gone …The Blues Band have remained a constant, increasingly popular fixture, however, and all with only a modicum of help from the record business – as Gary’s oft quoted comment states “the music industry doesn’t bother us and we don’t bother them.”

This independent streak goes right back to their early days when in an unusual move the band “bootlegged” their own first album – certain copies of which are now collector’s items. The ‘bootlegging’ came about because, having recorded their first album, the so called ‘major label’ which was to release it changed their minds and the band didn’t have the cash to pay the studio bill. So they got 1000 copies pressed up, mastered from a copy tape that they had, signed the plain white numbered sleeves and sold them at gigs & via mail order etc. Only then did another ‘major label’ pick up the album and release it widely. (taken from the website of The Blus Band)

AlternateFront Cover

Alternate frontcover

Personnel:
Gary Fletcher (bass)
Hughie Flint (drums)
Paul Jones (vocals, guitar)
Dave Kelly (guitar, slide-guitar, vocals)
Tom McGuinness (guitar, background vocals)
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Bob Hall (piano)

OriginalBackCover

Tracklist:
01. Talk To Me Baby ((James) 3.55
02. Flatfoot Sam (Willis/Lewis) 2.57
03. Two Bones And A Pick (Walker) 3.09
04. Someday Baby (Estes) 3.21
05. Boom Boom (Out Go The Lights) (Jacobs) 3.33
06. Come On In (Stonebridge/Jones/McGuinness) 2-03
07. Death Letter (House) 3.03
08. Going Home (Kelly) 3.54
09. I Don’t Know (Mabon) 4.55
10. Diddy Wah Diddy (Blake) 2.44

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And here you´ll find The Blues Band Songbook (click on the pic):

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John Lennon – Rock ‘N’ Roll (1975)

FrontCover1Rock ‘n’ Roll is the sixth studio album by John Lennon. Released in 1975, it is an album of late 1950s and early 1960s songs as covered by Lennon. Recording the album was problematic and spanned an entire year: Phil Spector produced sessions in October 1973 at A&M Studios, and Lennon produced sessions in October 1974 at Record Plant Studios (East). Lennon was being sued by Morris Levy over copyright infringement of one line in his song “Come Together”. As part of an agreement, Lennon had to include three Levy-owned songs on Rock ‘n’ Roll. Spector disappeared with the session recordings and was subsequently involved in a motor accident, leaving the album’s tracks unrecoverable until the beginning of the Walls and Bridges sessions. With Walls and Bridges coming out first, featuring one Levy-owned song, Levy sued Lennon expecting to see Lennon’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album.

The album was released in February 1975, reaching number 6 in both the United Kingdom and the United States, later being certified gold in both countries. It was supported by the single “Stand by Me”, which peaked at number 20 in the US, and 30 in the UK. The cover was taken by Jürgen Vollmer during the Beatles’ stay in Hamburg. It was Lennon’s last album until 1980: With no recording contract obligation, he took a hiatus from the music business to raise his son Sean.

John Lennon01

In 1969, Lennon composed the song “Come Together” for the Beatles’ album Abbey Road. Inspired by the Chuck Berry tune “You Can’t Catch Me”, it bore too much of a melodic resemblance to the original—and Lennon took the third line of the second verse (“Here come old flat-top”) for the new lyric. Publisher Morris Levy brought a lawsuit for infringement, and the case was due to be heard in a New York court in December 1973. It was later settled out of court, with the agreement that, according to an announcement by Levy, Lennon had to “record three songs by Big Seven publishers on his next album”. The songs [he] intends to record at this time are “You Can’t Catch Me”, “Angel Baby” and “Ya Ya”.” Lennon had the right to change the last two songs to any other songs that were published by Big Seven. In the meanwhile,

Lennon had split with Yoko Ono and was living in Los Angeles with his personal assistant, May Pang. Nostalgia was a popular trend on film with American Graffiti, and television was readying the series Happy Days (Lennon and Pang had even visited the set). Lennon, rather than writing his own songs, and partly inspired by his arrangement to include at least three songs from Levy’s publishing company catalogue, Big Seven Music, decided to record an album of oldies as his next release, following on from Mind Games. (by wikipedia)

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Although the chaotic sessions that spawned this album have passed into rock & roll legend and the recording’s very genesis (as an out-of-court settlement between John Lennon and an aggrieved publisher) has often caused it to be slighted by many of the singer’s biographers, Rock ‘n’ Roll, in fact, stands as a peak in his post-Imagine catalog: an album that catches him with nothing to prove and no need to try. Lennon could, after all, sing old rock & roll numbers with his mouth closed; he spent his entire career relaxing with off-the-cuff blasts through the music with which he grew up, and Rock ‘n’ Roll emerges the sound of him doing precisely that. Four songs survive from the fractious sessions with producer Phil Spector in late 1973 that ignited the album, and listeners to any of the posthumous compilations that also draw from those archives will know that the best tracks were left on the shelf — “Be My Baby” and “Angel Baby” among them. But a gorgeous run through Lloyd Price’s “Just Because” wraps up the album in fine style, while a trip through “You Can’t Catch Me” contrarily captures a playful side that Lennon rarely revealed on vinyl.

Single

The remainder of the album was cut a year later with Lennon alone at the helm, and the mood remains buoyant. It might not, on first glance, seem essential to hear him running through nuggets like “Be Bop A Lula,” “Peggy Sue,” and “Bring It on Home to Me,” but, again, Lennon has seldom sounded so gleeful as he does on these numbers, while the absence of the Spector trademark Wall-of-Sound production is scarcely noticeable — as the object of one of Lennon’s own productions, David Peel once pointed out, “John had the Wall of Sound down perfectly himself.” Released in an age when both David Bowie and Bryan Ferry had already tracked back to musical times-gone-by (Pin-Ups and These Foolish Things, respectively), Rock ‘n’ Roll received short shrift from contemporary critics. As time passed, however, it has grown in stature, whereas those other albums have merely held their own. Today, Rock ‘n’ Roll sounds fresher than the rock & roll that inspired it in the first place. Imagine that. (by Dave Thompson)

John Lennon03

Personnel:
Ken Ascher (keyboards)
Jeff Barry (horn)
Hal Blaine (drums)
Jim Calvert (guitar)
Steve Cropper (guitar)
Jesse Ed Davis (guitar)
José Feliciano (guitar)
Michael Hazelwood (guitar)
Peter Jameson (horn)
Arthur Jenkins (percussion)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Bobby Keys (horn)
Michael Lang (keyboards)
John Lennon (vocals, guitar)
Gary Mallaber (drums)
Barry Mann (horn)
Dennis Morouse (horn)
Eddie Mottau (guitar)
Leon Russell (keyboards)
Joseph Temperley (horn)
Nino Tempo (saxophone)
Frank Vicari (horn)
Klaus Voormann (bass guitar, vocals on 10.)

BackCover1
Tracklist:
01. Be-Bop-A-Lula (Davis/Vincent) 2.37
02. Stand By Me (Leiber/Stoller/King) 3.30
03. Medley: Rip It Up/Ready Teddy (Blackwell/Marascalco) 1.34
04. You Can’t Catch Me (Berry) 4.53
05. Ain’t That A Shame (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.33
06. Do You Wanna Dance? (Freeman) 2.54
07. Sweet Little Sixteen (Berry) 3.05
08. Slippin’ And Slidin’ (Bocage/Collins/Penniman/Smith) 2.18
09. Peggy Sue (Allison/Petty/Holly) 2.05
10. Medley: Bring It On Home To Me/Send Me Some Lovin’ (Cooke/Marascalco/Price) 3.42
11. Bony Moronie (Williams) 3.50
12. Ya Ya (Dorsey/Lewis/Robinson/Levy) 2.18
“13. ust Because (Price) 4.27

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Loreena McKennitt – The Mask And Mirror (1994)

FrontCover1The Mask and Mirror is an album by Loreena McKennitt. Released in 1994, the album has been certified Gold in the United States.

 

Like most of Loreena McKennitt’s albums, The Mask and Mirror is heavily influenced by her travels. Her experiences in Spain and Morocco, specifically, serve as the inspiration for this album.

As her introduction to the album, McKennitt wrote:

I looked back and forth through the window of 15th century Spain, through the hues of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, and was drawn into a fascinating world: history, religion, cross-cultural fertilization….For some medieval minds the mirror was the door through which the soul frees itself by passing…. for others the pursuit of personal refinement was likened to polishing the mirror of the soul. From the more familiar turf of the west coast of Ireland, through the troubadours of France, crossing over the Pyrenees, and then to the west through Galicia, down through Andalusia and past Gibraltar to Morocco….the Crusades, the pilgrimage to Santiago, Cathars, the Knights Templar, the Sufis from Egypt, One Thousand and One Nights in Arabia, the Celtic imagery of trees, the Gnostic Gospels…who was God? and what is religion, what spirituality? What was revealed and what was concealed…and what was the mask and what the mirror?

Accompanying all the selections, as the liner remarks, are some of the entries in a traveler’s log that McKennitt kept all throughout her journey.

The album’s cover uses a collage made from the medieval The Hunt of the Unicorn tapestries.

Loreena McKennitt
Photo by Donna Griffith

Press play and enter the world of Loreena McKennitt, where walls dissolve into thick, billowing mists as the ground beneath your feet turns to compacted earth and the sky above opens up to reveal a black cloak dotted with shimmering stars draped beneath silk-like clouds. Were McKennitt’s composing and songwriting abilities lacking of any luster (as they most certainly are not), her voice would still possess the strength to hold her fifth album, The Mask and Mirror, up on its own. But the combination of this talented woman’s vocal prowess and songwriting ability makes her all the more similar to her work — ethereal and almost unbelievable in its level of quality. A mythical menagerie, The Mask and Mirror contains songs that lift the veil to reveal the soul of McKennitt’s work in eight dreamlike, Celtic-inspired tracks.

The opening track, “The Mystic’s Dream” (featured on the TNT movie The Mists of Avalon, based on the novel by Marion Zimmer Bradley), is a haunting tune that features McKennitt at her most heavenly peak as a vocalist, evoking the spirits of the instruments and Gregorian chant-like background vocals that accompany her on the track. The album excels at conjuring up mythical visions in the listener’s imagination, as with the gypsy-like tune “Marrakesh Night Market,” which echos of the picturesque scene the title invokes. The soul-searching “Full Circle” best exhibits McKennitt’s ability to transpose the true meaning of the lyrics into her songs.

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Even after the song ends, the somber mood lingers softly in the air. The balalaika (a three-stringed triangular-shaped instrument), the bouzouki (an eight-stringed instrument), and the hurdy-gurdy (a stringed instrument that also has keyboard and percussion parts) are among the rare, strange instruments introduced on many of the songs, including the lighthearted, uplifting “Ce He Mise Le Ulaingt? (The Two Trees),” on which these instruments demonstrate their incredible quality and prowess. The lyrics of this track are none other than the words of the poem of the same name by William Butler Yeats. McKennitt’s unique use of the lyrical words of William Shakespeare, combined with her skillful adaptation of the words to the heavenly, undulating music, make the final track, “Prospero’s Speech,” an inspiration in itself. (by Kerry L. Smith

Inlet01A

Personnel:
Anne Bourne (cello, background vocals)
Al Cross (drums)
Nigel Eaton (hurdy gurdy)
Ofra Harnoy (cello)
Brian Hughes (guitar, oud, balalaika, sitar)
Patrick Hutchinson (Bagpipes, pipe)
George Koller (bass, tambura, cello, esraj, tambura)
Rick Lazar (drums, percussion, udu)
Donal Lunny  (bouzouki, bodhrán)
Hugh Marsh (fiddle)
Loreena McKennitt (vocals, keyboards, goblet drums, accordion, piano,pipe)
Ravi Naimpally (tabla)
Abraham Tawfik (oud)
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background vocals:
Victoria Scholars Choir conducted by Jerzy Cichocki
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strings (on 07.2.)
Adele Armin – Andy Benac – David Hetherington – David Miller –  Douglas Perry –  Fujico Imajishi – Heinz Boshart – Kent Teeple – Mark Sabat – Marie Berard – Morry Kernerman – Sharon Prater – Susan Lipchak – Sylvia Lange

Booklet06A

Tracklist:
01. The Mystic’s Dream (McKennitt) 7.43
02. The Bonny Swans (Traditional) 7.21
03. The Dark Night Of The Soul (Traditional/St. John Of The Cross) 6.44
04. Marrakesh Night Market (McKennitt) 5.30
05. Full Circle (McKennitt) 5.57
06. Santiago (Traditional) 5.59
07. 1. Cé Hé Mise Le Ulaingt? (“Who Am I To Bear It”) (Hutchinson) 1.31
07.2. The Two Trees (Traditional/Yeats) 7.35
08. Prospero’s Speech (Traditional/Shakespeare) 3.23

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Inlet02ACommunication … before we had the internet

Jacinta – Convexo (A Música De Zeca Afonso) (2007)

FrontCover1“Her approach to music is absolutely adult and mature. Jacinta is an assertive singer, solid, with excellent expression and musical sense” –All Jazz, Portugal

Critically acclaimed for her “warm, velvety and powerful voice” (Com・rcio do Porto, Portugal), Jacinta won “Best New Artist” honors in 2001 by Cinco Minutos de Jazz (Antena 1 since 1966) and was referred to as “The Portuguese Jazz Singer” by Jose Duarte

“Self-confident and knowledgeable” (Jornal de Noticias, Portugal), Jacinta’s singing has both the fleshiness, that bluesy quality, and also an incredible depth to the swing. Her amazing intonation and vocal command set her apart from the average jazz singer. From classic Bossa Nova and acrobatic Djavan tunes, or from her own Portuguese originals to swinging Monk tunes and soulful jazz ballads, Jacinta reveals a capacity to present a mixture of repertoire that is given structure by her well trained vocal instrument.

Coming from an unlikely background for a jazz singer–delving into classical training in composition and piano, and even heading up a progressive rock group–Jacinta’s boundless musical energies finally found full expression in the field of jazz.

A jazz vocal performance on a popular Portuguese television show propelled her to national fame and jump started her vocal career, eliciting numerous concert appearances.

Jacinta traveled to perfect her craft at the Manhattan School of Music where she was granted a full scholarship toward her Masters degree. Her study of improvisation continued with Chris Rosenberg of the Ornette Coleman Band and Peter Eldridge of the New York Voices.

Jacinta01

Still in New York, Jacinta participated in workshops with renowned names of contemporary jazz, such as Maria Schneider, Ed Neumeister, Mark Murphy, Dave Holland and Annie Ross.

Later, during her four year residency in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, Jacinta performed regularly with several musical bands, with whom she appeared at top jazz venues such as Kimball’s East and Yoshi’s.

In 2001, invited by trumpeter/producer Laurent Filipe, Jacinta sings in a live concert series paying tribute to Bessie Smith. Jacinta was considered by the Portuguese critic as “One of the top vocalists of our day” (Blitz, Portugal), as having “a remarkable presence on stage, confident and graceful” (Correio da Manh・, Portugal), and as owner of a “strong and sovereign voice” (Sete, Portugal).

Jacinta02She is “an inspired and skilled jazz improviser” (Correio da Manh・, Portugal), with an incredible deep sense of groove and swing that is unlike any other singer. The success of this project culminated with its discographic edition on the prestigious Blue Note/EMI Portugal, in February 2003. This album, Tribute to Bessie Smith, reached the Portuguese national top sales and was warded a Gold Record for sales over 25.000 copies, something never before achieved in Portuguese jazz history.

After this big hit in the Portuguese musical scene, Jacinta looked for new ways and new approaches by dedicating herself to several satellite projects such as Jacinta Sings Monk and Jacinta Sings Brazil. In her study of Thelonious Monk music, the singer picks challenging ways preferring a more instrumental approach and highlighting not only the swing but also the angular melodies and the less obvious harmonies.

The project Jacinta Sings Monk was premiered in jazz Quintet format and later enlarged for jazz Quartet with classical orchestra. Amongst the several orchestras with whom the singer worked, the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra stands out. In this project, just as noticeable are the directors Gra・a Moura, Vasco Pierce de Azevedo, Rui Massena and the arranger Paulo Perfeito.

The project Jacinta Sings Brazil emerges from the singer’s need to explore sonorities and swings which are distinct from the American jazz. Here, the singer revisits and deepens an already experimented style with her American bands. The repertoire of this project is marked mostly by Jobim and Djavan tunes, presented with jazz Quintet.

With this specific program, Jacinta appeared seven nights at the Winter Garden of the S・o Luiz Theatre, selling out every performance. The singer’s rhythmic sense stands out once again showing total indulgence and an intrinsic musical knowledge providing the listener with a sense of lightness and great naturalism.

In March 2006, Blue Note/EMI Portugal releases Day Dream, Jacinta’s new studio album. This is a new musical phase, where the singer rediscovers Duke Ellington and enlarges her musical spectrum when including tunes of very distinct styles. The greatest challenge came from Greg Osby, saxophonist, arranger and producer of the project, by proposing the inclusion of composers as diversified as Djavan, Cole Porter, Tom Jobim, Duke Ellington, Zeca Afonso, Martin and Monk.

Rui Caetano

This record could be considered a landmark by the way instrumentalists play and expand creatively, in constant dialog between themselves and with the singer who, in turn, interacts with the band, approaching the melodies with the fluidity of a wind instrument. This approach results in fresh music, marked with a strong mainstream jazz swing but of contemporary flow. Osby suggested the inclusion of adaptations of some of the songs to Portuguese language, in an effort to bring this music style closer to the Portuguese public. In the Day Dream tour, a series of 20 huge box-office success concerts throughout Portugal, Jacinta was enthusiastically welcomed by an euphoric and appreciative audience.

In 2007, Jacinta dedicated herself to new projects, including a homage show to Zeca Afonso (Portuguese traditional singer-songwriter) in Trio format, which resulted in her third album Convexo [the music of Zeca Afonso]. In this new work, Jacinta takes this strongly flavored Portuguese traditional music and transforms it with a cool jazz approach. The new harmonies and the strong rhythmical concept develop these compositions and give them freshness and modernity.

Again, with Convexo, Jacinta sells over 18.000 copies and carries out an amazing 20 venues Tour, around the country, between March and May 2008.

”Convexo reveals an unorthodox repertoire of the author (Zeca Afonso), far from the cliches where Jacinta develops and explores, recreates and expands the music of the author… “ (by allaboutjazz.com)

Booklet05A

Zeca Afonso;
José Manuel Cerqueira Afonso dos Santos, known as José Afonso, Zeca Afonso (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈzɛkɐ aˈfõsu]) or just Zeca (2 August 1929 – 23 February 1987), was born in Aveiro, Portugal, the son of José Nepomuceno Afonso, a judge, and Maria das Dores. Zeca is among the most influential folk and political musicians in Portuguese history.

He became an icon among Portuguese left-wing activists due to the role of his music in the resistance against the dictatorial regime of Oliveira Salazar, resistance that triumphed in 1974 with the pro-democratic leftist military coup of the Carnation Revolution. His song “Grândola, Vila Morena” is closely associated with the revolution, since it was chosen to be the password transmitted by radio for the beginning of the movement that toppled the dictatorship.

In the ensuing revolutionary process, Zeca was a very active musician and continued composing political and folk songs, often criticizing the post-revolutionary changes. Years after his death, Zeca Afonso is still widely listened to, not only in Portugal, but also abroad. (by wikipedia)

Zeca Afonso

Personnel:
Rui Caetano (piano)
Jacinta (vocals)
Bruno Pedroso (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Adeus Ó Serra Da Lapa 4.51
02. O Homem Voltou 5.42
03. A Formiga No Carreiro 4.40
04. Era Um Redondo Vocábulo 5.17
05. Cantigas De Maio 5.33
06. Tenho Um Primo Convexo 4.09
07. Se Voaras Mais Ao Perto 3.28
08. A Morte Saiu À Rua 4.10
09. Que Amor Que Me Engana 5.40
10. De Não Saber O Que Me Espera 5.32
11. Coimbra Do Mondego 4.43

All Songs written by Zeca Afonso

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Inlet1

Najee – Share My World (1994)

FrontCover1One of the best-selling instrumentalists of the late ’80s to mid-’90s, Najee has been a consistent favorite in the quiet storm and so-called “smooth jazz” markets. Often compared to Kenny G, George Howard, and Dave Koz, the New Yorker has been greatly influenced by Grover Washington Jr. — although he hasn’t been nearly as adventurous. Heavily produced and quite formulaic, Najee’s albums have tended to avoid improvisation and strive for commercial radio airplay above all else. Debuting in 1987 with Najee’s Theme, Najee was an immediate hit in the new adult contemporary (NAC) market. Similar pop/urban jazz dates like 1988’s Day by Day and 1990’s Tokyo Blue did nothing to jeopardize his niche on smooth jazz radio.

Onstage, Najee takes some risks and stretches out more. Morning Tenderness was released in 1998, followed by Love Songs (2000), Embrace (2003), My Point of View (2005), True Spirit (with John Grant, Victor Williams, and Dennis Chambers in 2006), Rising Sun (2007), and Mind Over Matter (2009). In 2012, Najee released his 14th studio album, The Smooth Side of Soul, featuring the track “First Kiss,” a collaboration with R&B vocalist Phil Perry. Najee returned in 2013 with The Morning After: A Musical Love Journey which included the song “Shinjuku,” a tribute to the late jazz keyboard legend George Duke. (by Alex Henderson)

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Well played typical set of Smooth Jazz with R&B vocals, nothing major here just good music for mellow moments. I actually find this one more playable than his 1990 album “Tokyo Blue” the production has improved greatly since then, the melodies are well-balanced. Since some songs can get boring at points my standouts are “Secret Admirer” “My Angel” If only “Laid Back” didn’t have that corny male hook then it woulda been a huge standout, how could they funk up a couldhave been great song, it was a fusion between Hip-Hop/R&B & Jazz which some call “Urban Jazz” which is an nice title IMO and “Broken Promises” is another nice one. Fans will enjoy this. (by Oldspice Evans)

And “I Didn’t Know (Instrumental) / Reprise “is one of the best smooth jazz compositions ever !

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Personnel:
Victor Bailey (bass)
Buz (vocals)
Robert Damper (keyboards, strings)
Bernard Davis (drums)
Fareed (guitar, synthesizer, programming, drums, percussion);
Bill Jacobs (vibraphone)
Pocket, D “Dirty Mugg” James (guitar)
Barry Johnson (bass, background vocals)
Morris Pleasure (keyboards, strings),
Najee (saxophone, various instruments)
Artie Reynolds (bass)
Richie Ruiz (percussion)
Alec Shantzis (keyboards)
Andrew Sherman (keyboards)
Bryan Tate (clavinet)
Issac Wiley Jr. (drums)
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background vocals:
Jerry Elcock – Christian – Armstead – Amanda Elliot – April Spikes – Lori Ann Velez – Angela Stribling – Ushanda Tiana Goldsboro

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Tracklist:
01. My Angel (Najee/Sherman/Fareed) 6.16
02. Laid Back (Christian) 4.51
03. Now That I’ve Found You (Pleasure) 6.53
04. Joy (Najee/Christian) 4.52
05. I Didn’t Know (Holmes/Basby) 5.53
06. Secret Admirer (Najee/Fareed) 4.59
07. (G) Street (Christian)  5:15
08. Broken Promises (Najee/Fareed) 5.11
09. Heart Like Mine (Christian) 6.37
10 Saleemah’s Dream (Najee) 2.00
11 Share My World (Sherman/Glannille/Najee/Fareed) 4.44
12. I Didn’t Know (Instrumental) / Reprise (Najee) 6.27

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Paul Simon – Paul Simon’s Concert In The Park (1991)

FrontCover1Paul Simon’s Concert in the Park is a live album released in 1991 by Paul Simon. It provided a survey of his two most recent albums, Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, and also drew liberally from his earlier songbook including a number of tunes from the Simon and Garfunkel era. 600,000 people were initially claimed to have attended the show, which was held in Central Park, New York City on August 15, 1991.[1] The concert was similar to The Concert in Central Park, a reunion concert for Simon and Garfunkel held ten years earlier. The album was released on the 50th birthday of Art Garfunkel. (by wikipedia)

Ten years after playing a free concert in New York’s Central Park with Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon returned, backed by the New York session musicians and the native musicians from South Africa and Brazil who had enlivened his solo work. The show was PaulSimon01filmed and recorded, and the audio release was a 23-track double-disc set running nearly two hours. Half the selections came from his Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints albums, but unlike the Graceland Tour of 1987, the Born at the Right Time Tour of 1991 made room for Simon’s earlier solo work as well as a few Simon & Garfunkel songs. Simon made such stylistically various material work together by front-loading the set with the newer stuff and rearranging some of the older solo stuff, so that “Kodachrome,” for example, was refitted with a guitar line courtesy of Graceland player Ray Phiri. (Wisely, except for a becalmed Africanization of “Cecilia,” Simon didn’t monkey with the S&G songs, most of which came at the end of the set.) But Simon also toned down the Brazilian percussion that had dominated the Saints material and sang it more convincingly, so that “Born at the Right Time,” for example, was far more effective than it had been in its studio version. On the whole, then, Concert in the Park managed to be an enjoyable and surprisingly cohesive career summary. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Mingo Araujo (percussion)
Cyro Baptista (percussion)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Tony Cedras (piano, keyboards, accordion)
Dom Chacal (Percussion)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Sidinho Moreira (percussion)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Ray Phiri (guitar)
Barney Rachabane (saxophone, pennywhistle)
Armand Sabal-Lecco (bass)
John Selolwane (guitar)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
Richard Tee (piano)
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background vocals:
The Waters:
Oren Waters – Maxime Waters – Julia Waters

Special guests: Briz, Grupo Cultural OLODUM and Chevy Chase join Paul, dancing to “You Can Call Me Al”.

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Obvious Child 4.39
02. The Boy in the Bubble 4.49
03. She Moves On 6.26
04. Kodachrome 4.13
05. Born At The Right Time 5.12
06. Train In The Distance 4.45
07. Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard 3.14
08- I Know What I Know 3.14
09. The Cool, Cool River 5.41
10. Bridge over Troubled Water 5.16
11. Proof 5.39

CD 2:
01. The Coast 7.06
02. Graceland 5.31
03. You Can Call Me Al 5.10
04. Still Crazy After All These Years 3.42
05. Loves Me Like A Rock 2.54
06. Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes 9.30
07. Hearts And Bones 6.17
08. Late In The Evening 4.45
09. America 3.23
10. The Boxer 4.18
11. Cecilia 3.24
12. The Sound Of Silence 5.45

All Songs written by Paul Simon

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The Waters