Carol Of Harvest – Same (1978)

CarolOfHarvestFCCarol Of Harvest, like Emtidi, Gurnemanz, Ougenweide and Hoelderlin, showed that a psychedelic prog folk scene did exist in Germany in the 70s, but their sole effort came along when the other bands had shifted or disappeared, and therefore the genre was of less interest by then. In fact, one might even ask what the point was. Most of the ideas presented here were long past their expiry date both in their native land and elsewhere, often sounding more like early than late 70s. The instrumentation is sparse and samey, featuring mostly heavily strummed electric or amplified acoustic guitars, with the keys secondary.
Where Carole of Harvest departs from all of the above in a favourable sense is the superb vocals of Beate Krause, who is reminiscent of the singers in the aforementioned groups but also of Jacquie MacShee and Annie Haslam. It is expressive and is in perfect sync with the accompaniment, no more so than in the finale of the original LP, “Try a LIttle Bit”, 10 minutes of prog folk bliss with more bite than Pentangle or Renaissance could ever hope to muster. Ms Krause’s wordless acompaniment that follows the main part of the song is masterfully expressive and harmonious, and the synthesizers, and perhaps mellotron at the finale, provide just the right augmentation to the basic sound. While drums are present on this track, they are kept low and are not needed, so potent is the basic groove. That is the general trend in the album.
The other major highlight is the longest song, the 16 minute anti war reflection called “Put on Your Nightcap” that opens the album with tentative guitar reflections, unrushed and pregnant with promise, accompanied by the sounds of the wind. The structure and manner of buildup is very progressive, with time given to express the lyrical themes and some impressive synthesizer and lead guitar work, mostly played at a slow pace reflecting the ponderous nature of the theme. A second part is slightly more upbeat with more emphasis on the rhythm, and some prominent bass work.
The other three original songs from the LP are all shorter and decent but not quite to 5 star level, being like more concise but less interesting versions of the two monsters. The bonus material is live, shows a more straightforward rocking side of the band, and sounds quite out of place given the strength and style of the other material.

While the harvest reaped is superficially similar to the usual autumn fare, the album manages to carve a feast for the prog fan with an interest in electric folk, as well as an indelible niche among the many German one-offs in existence. Highly recommended.(by kenethlevine)

CarolOfHarvestBCPersonnel:
Robert Högn (drums)
Beate Krause (vocals)
Jürgen Kolb (keyboards)
Axel Schmierer (guitar)
Heinz Reinschlüssel (bass)

CarolOfHarvestTracklist:
01. Put On Your Nightcap (Schmierer) 16.02
02. You And Me (Schmierer) 2.31
03. Somewhere At The End Of The Rainbow (Schmierer) 6.26
04. Treary Eyes (Schmierer) 4.17
05. Try A Little Bit (Schmierer) 9.59
06. River (Schmierer) 2.36
07. Sweet Heroin (Schmierer) 7.04
08. Brickstone (Schmierer) 1.14

CarolOfHarvestlLabel*
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The Golden Earrings – Miracle Mirror (1968)

FrontCover1Change was in the air when the Golden Earrings made their third album in 1967; psychedelia was sweeping the U.K. and Europe and the release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band had raised the bar in terms of production and arranging styles. the Golden Earrings had made some changes of their own as well — rhythm guitarist Peter De Ronde had left the group, and lead singer Frans Krassenburg was replaced by Barry Hay. Miracle Mirror was very much an album of its time, and predictably sounds a great deal different than their first two LPs. Like Just Earrings and Winter Harvest, Miracle Mirror clearly reflected what was going on in the British music scene at the time (even though the band was Dutch), but the heady atmosphere of 1967 made room for musicians to follow a number of different paths, and the Golden Earrings were eager to investigate as many as they could in the studio. “Born a Second Time” is a pastoral acoustic number with Hay contributing some accents on flute. “Magnificent Magisterial” sounds like some cross between the Who and the Byrds, with chiming 12-string guitars and crashing lead lines. Horns and strings fill out the grand-scale pop number “Crystal Heaven” and the folkier “Gipsy Rhapsody.” A harpsichord adds a GoldenEarringstouch of the Baroque to the melancholy “I’ve Just Lost Somebody.” The blues-influenced “Must I Cry” features some spacy slapback echo and reverse-gear guitar loops. You name the new-in-1967 sonic innovation, it’s probably somewhere on Miracle Mirror, but what hadn’t changed for the Golden Earrings was the songwriting talent of bassist Rinus Gerritsen and guitarist George Kooymans and the group’s uniform excellence in the studio; the confidence and sense of adventure that informed their first two albums was in full flower here, and if there are some moments on Miracle Mirror that sound a bit pretentious all these years later, the Golden Earrings’ instincts were spot-on most of the time, and this album has worn the test of time more gracefully than many other works from the first acid era.  (by Mark Deming)

SinglePersonnel:
Jaap Eggermont (drums)
Marinus Gerritsen (bass, keyboards)
Barry Hay (vocals, flute)
George Kooymans (guitar, vocals)
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Frans Krassenburg (vocals on 13. – 17.)
*Cesar Zuiderwijk (drums (on 13. – 17.)
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Orchestra arranged and conducted by Frans Mijts

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. The Truth About Arthur Kooymans) 2.55
02. Circus Will Be in Town in Time (Kooymans) 3.25
03. Crystal Heaven (Kooymans) 3.50
04. Sam And Sue (Gerritsen) 1.42
05. I’ve Just Lost Somebody (Gerritsen) 3.06
06. Mr. Fortune’s Wife (Kooymans) 3.15
07. Who Cares? (Kooymans) 3.44
08. Born A Second Time (Gerritsen) 2.39
09. Magnificent Magistral (Kooymans) 2.43
10. Must I Cry? (Kooymans) 2.17
11. Nothing Can Change This World Of Mine (Gerritsen) 3.21
12. Gipsy Rhapsody (Gerritsen/Kooymans) 3.17
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13. Sound Of The Screaming Day (Gerritsen/Kooymans) 2.52
14. She Won’t Come To Me (Gerritsen/Kooymans) 2.32
15. Together We Live, Together We Love (Kooymans) 3.09
16. I Wonder — Preview/Together We Live and Love (Gerritsen/Kooymans) 3.36
17. Remember My Friend (Kooymans) 2.59

LabelA1*
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Higher Livin’ – A Tribute To The Music Of Uriah Heep (2012)

FrontCover1The collection that you hold in your hands was born from the immense admiration of Bassist and future Leader of Higher Livin’, Daniele Rossi towards this Band. A band that sadly has not gotten his due as far as praise and its place in Rock Olympus is concerned.Daniele, had the idea of involving the House Band of famed Club “Vivere Su”, i.e himself, Fabio Baruzzo on Guitar, Pierga Dettori on Drums and charming Vocalist Claudia Dani in his project, but in order to recreate the original sound of Heep consisting of a solid Rhythm base sustained by a deep Hammond organ and a nimble guitar switching swiftly from lead to back to support the Vocal harmonics of the Group, he needed his Ken Hensley. After countless efforts , Daniele finally found his man in Stefano Toni that in his old Band Butterfly’s Tail proposed several pieces of Uriah Heep, mainly due to the love of said band’s Vocalist Thor Bertolucci for David Byron. Obviously Daniele did not miss the opportunity to bring on board Thor adding further spices to the powerful vocal mix.All of Logo1them finally together , they proceded to organize the first “Heep Night”( and that’s where due to mere chance I got involved), that was held at “Vivere Su” on January 27 2011. Being among the public to celebrate my 49th birthday, I had the honour to be called on stage to aid in the presentation of this band that right from the word Go, showed to everybody that they had all it takes to be a real powerhouse. Several other concerts followed until they realized that they needed to leave to posterity something from this wonderful experience.From this primal need stems the cd that you are now holding in your hands, an album that on top of the pieces performed by the “Core Group”, can call on the superb interpretation of Vocalist Extraordinaire Jon Binder on Corridors of Madness, the only song that cannot count on the help that comes from being on the classic and better known albums from the Byron and Lawton periods.Please try to appreciate the effort from the band to record everything Live without overdubs, in order to try to recreate the magic of those concerts. (by Steve The Rock)

HigherLivin01Personnel:
Fabio Baruzzo (guitar)
Tor Bertolucci (vocals)
Claudia Dani (vocals)
Pierga Dettori (drums,  vocals)
Daniele Rossi (bass, vocals)
Stefano Toni (keyboards)

HigherLivin03

Tracklist:
01. Bird Of Prey (Hensley/Byron/Box/Newton) 3.53
02. Sweet Lorraine (Box/Byron/Thain) 4.34
03. Corridors Of Madness (Box/Lanzon) 5.32
04. Sunrise (Hensley) 4.16
05. Wise Man (Hensley) 4.29
06. Free ‘n Easy (Box/Lawton) 2.16
07. Gypsy (Box/Byron) 4.20
08. Rain (Hensley) 4.20
09. July Morning (Byron/Hensley) 8.32

John Coltrane & Dizzy Gillespie – Trane’s First Ride 1951 (2013)

FrontCover1Here’s another slice of jazz history.

Thanks to u014945 who uploaded the tracks; and to ShaReeF who shared them at HungerCity.

Uploader’s notes:

Typical of many jazz bootleg LPs, this one contains no dates nor any information beyond song titles and the year of 1951 (despite having a long liner essay by one “E.S.Spoe”). After a good Birdlandbit of research (and matching some of it with my recollections from countless hours of listening to the pedantic, yet informative Phil Schaap on Bird Flight here in New York City weekday mornings on WKCR), I have come up with the following probable list of dates and line-ups.

The venue is always Birldand.

Recorded live at Birdland, NY. Very good radio broadcasts. Ripped from vinyl, slight crackling noises and hiss.
Tracks 01, 02, 03 – January 6, 1951

Tracks 04, 06, 08 – February 3, 1951
Track 05 – January 13, 1951
Track 07 – March 17, 1951

Personnel:
Art Blakey (drums)
John Coltrane (saxophone)
Carl “Kansas” Fields (drums on 07.)
Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet)
Percey Heath (bass)
Milt Jackson (vibraphone)
JJ Johnson (trombone on 04., 06. + 08.)
John Lewis (piano on 07.)
Billy Taylor (piano)

TwoGiantsJohn Coltrane & Dizzy Gillespie

Tracklist:
01. Congo Blues (Norvo) 3.06
02. Night in Tunisia (Gillespie/Paparelli) 6.24
03. Yesterdays (Harbach/Kern) 3.06
04. Birk’s Works (Gillespie) 4.50
05. Good Bait (Dameron) 3.33
06. I Can’t Get Started (Gillespie) 2.53
07. Birk’s Works (Air Check 2) (Gillespie) 5.16
08. Jumping With Symphony Sid (Young) 302

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Pete Seeger – American Folk Songs for Children (1953)

FrontCover1We are sorry to report that Pete Seeger himself passed away yesterday at 94 “after a short illness” (as reported by BBC News). His loss is keenly felt, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Seeger family at this difficult time. Pete was an extraordinary man – singer, songwriter, activist, and far more – but the influence of his life and his music will live on in all of us with whom he shared his gifts. He is well loved and will be sorely missed.

The Pete Seeger Appreciation Page will continue to be hosted in honor and memory of Pete. (taken from the Pete Seeger appreciation website).

The eleven songs on this album were specifically selected from an identically titled book anthology of folk songs for children collected by Seeger’s stepmother, Ruth Crawford Seeger. Pete Seeger renders them plainly and simply, singing and playing and banjo, on a program designed especially (but not solely) for children between three and seven years of age. “Jim Crack Corn,” “Frog Went A-Courting,” and “She’ll Be Coming ‘Round the Mountain” are some of the better-known tunes on the record, but not all of them are as overly familiar. It’s been reissued on a single-disc CD that also includes a similar Pete Seeger album, 1962’s American Game and Activity Songs for Children. (by Ritchie Unterberger)

PeteSeeger2

Personnel:
Pete Seeger (banjo, vocals)

AlternateFrontCoversAlternate frontcovers

Tracklist:
01. Jim Along Josie 2.06
02. There Was a Man and He Was Mad 1.44
03. Clap Your Hands 2.58
04. She’ll Be Coming ‘Round the Mountain 1.54
05. All Around The Kitchen 2.01
06. Billy Barlow 2.35
07. Bought Me A Cat 3.11
08. Jim Crack Corn 2.16
09. Train Is A-Coming 3.08
10. This Old Man 2.37
11. Frog Went A-Courting 4.23

All songs: Traditional

PeteSeeger3Thank you and goodbye Pete Seeger: R.I.P.

*
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The Sax Pack – Same (2008)

SaxPackSameFCThe joyful trend towards all-star tours in smooth jazz began in the mid-’90s with Guitars & Saxes and became the standard on summer festival circuits well into the 2000s. One of the most exciting and popular of these has been the Sax Pack, a clever turn of phrase that brings to mind great showmanship and supreme cool — qualities that popular and soulful genre saxmen Jeff Kashiwa, Kim Waters, and Steve Cole have in spades. All of them have enjoyed lengthy solo careers but were inspired when Kashiwa presented the idea of a trio tour around 2003 after seeing a PBS documentary on The Rat Pack. The concept was an instant success, and has resulted in lengthy annual tours ever since, but no doubt record company red tape held up the process of committing the energy of their three horns to commercially released tracks. Shanachie, Waters’ longtime label, won the rights, and this “debut” album — while not fully capturing the blistering energy and improvisations this trio projects on-stage — is full of outrageous, melodic, mostly high-grooving fun.

SaxPackSameA little short at nine cuts, they seem to be playing it a bit close to the vest until the final three originals, when they cut loose on the bubbling, retro-soul tune “A Little Bit Closer,” the urgently soulful, free-spirited jam patterned after their longtime idol “Maceo,” and the moody, blues-drenched closer “Goin’ Home,” which gives them all ample stretching time as the others back them with sensuous horn section subtlety. The disc kicks off with the playful, instantly infectious first single “Fallin’ for You,” which all three wrote but totally captures the vibe of many of Kashiwa’s previous hits. They load the front end of the track list with in the pocket, perfectly catchy original tunes that only hint at what they’re capable of, but part of smooth jazz’s success is being cool and polished so they get away with it. Live, their covers of “The World Is a Ghetto” and “Tequila” are major party tunes, while here the festivities are a bit more candlelit (but again, well played and supremely slick and cool) and less raucous; Jeff Golub’s guitar contribution on “Tequila” adds some great crunch to the mix. The mixed bag here epitomizes the dichotomy between radio-ready pop instrumentals the smooth jazz format jumps on, and the festive jams that happen when great musicians play live. The good news that even the songs that leave us wanting more sizzle are still enjoyable to tap along to. (by Jonathan Widran)

SaxPackSameBC
Personnel:
Ranedy Bowland (guitar)
Wayne Bruce (guitar)
Steve Cole (saxophone)
Chris Davis (keyboards)
Jeff Golub (guitar)
Gerey Johnson (guitar)
Jeff Kashiwa (saxophone)
David Andrew Mann (drums, synthesizer)
Mike Ricchiuti (keyboards)
Bernd Schoenhart (guitar)
Kim Waters (saxophone)

SaxPackSameBookletTracklist:
01. Fallin´ For You (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 4.33
02. The Sax Pack (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 3.37
03. All I Really Want (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 4.26
04. The World Is A Ghetto (Allen/Brown/Dickerson/Jordan/Levitin/Miller/Scott) 5.28
05. Tequilla (Rio) 6.17
06. You Are My Staqrship (Henderson) 4.47
07. A Little Bit Closer (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 4.40
08. Maceao (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 5.59
09. Goin´ Home (Cole/Kashiwa/Waters) 5.33

SaxPackSameCD*
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Nat Gonella & His New Georgians – Swing All Night (CD 2) (2003)

FrontCover1Nathaniel Charles (Nat) Gonella (7 March 1908 – 6 August 1998) was an English jazz trumpeter, bandleader, vocalist and mellophonist born in London, perhaps most notable for his work with the big band he founded, The Georgians, during the British dance band era.

His vocal style was reminiscent of Louis Armstrong, though the voice was often eclipsed by his achievements as a band leader and trumpeter. Gonella has been a major influence on other British jazz trumpeters, including Humphrey Lyttelton and Digby Fairweather.

NatGonellaGonella was born in a deprived area of east London, and took up cornet while attending an institution for underprivileged children, St Mary’s Guardian School in Islington.

His first professional job arrived when, after a short spell as a furrier’s apprentice, he joined Archie Pitt’s Busby Boy’s Band in 1924, a small junior pit orchestra and touring review band. He remained with the band until 1928, and it was during this period that he became acquainted with the early recordings of Louis Armstrong, and the New Orleans jazz style in general. He transcribed Armstrong’s solos and learned them by heart.

He worked with Bob Bryden’s Louisville Band for a time in 1928-9, and with pianist Archie Alexander in Brighton, then joined the Billy Cotton band at the end of 1929, a move which provided him with a more prominent platform, both on the concert stage and also on radio, and allowed him to record his first jazz solos and vocal features (which included scat singing).
The 1930s

NatGonella1He played briefly with Roy Fox in 1931, and then stayed in that band when Lew Stone, Fox’s former pianist, took over leadership the following year. It was with Stone’s band that he firmly established his reputation.

When Louis Armstrong visited London in 1932, Gonella met his idol by begging the staff at Boosey and Hawkes’s music shop to allow him to deliver Armstrong’s trumpet, left at the shop for cleaning, to his hotel room. Armstrong was apparently initially amused to find such an ardent devotee, but appreciated his willingness to help, and the two men became good friends.

In 1933 Gonella published a book called Modern Style Trumpet Playing – A Comprehensive Course. In the same year he made uncredited appearances (alongside Lew Stone and Al Bowlly) in the films Bitter Sweet and The King’s Cup.

Gonella’s standing grew even more quickly after the formation of his own band, The Georgians, in 1935. The band took its name from a highly-popular version of the song “Georgia On My Mind” that he recorded for Lew Stone in 1932, and which became the trumpeter’s signature tune. The Georgians began as a featured band within Stone’s shows, before setting up as an independent unit.

NatGonella2Gonella formed his own big band, and quickly became a headline artist on the still-thriving variety circuit, and they continued to top bills around the country until the outbreak of World War II.

He joined the army in 1941, and was recruited into the Stars in Battledress campaign, touring allied camps in Europe and North Africa. Whilst in Europe and North Africa Gonella served as the personal servant or “batman” to Major Alexander Karet and once the war had ended was offered the position as personal Butler to the Major, but he politely refused in order to pursue his music career.

He reformed his band after the war, but the economic and musical climate was changing rapidly at that time. He flirted briefly with bebop, acknowledged that it was not for him, and returned to the variety stage during the 1950s, touring with the likes of the comedian Max Miller.

The revival in traditional jazz in the late Fifties allowed him to reform his Georgians in 1960. In February 1960 he featured on the UK television show This Is Your Life, an appearance which later inspired an album The Nat Gonella Story, modelled on Louis Armstrong’s A Musical Autobiography. He also appeared on the BBC radio programme Desert Island Discs in August 1966.

All of this attention re-established Gonella, at least until the advent of The Beatles brought the trad jazz boom to a halt. He moved to Lancashire in 1962, and toured regularly on the Northern club circuit until his alleged retirement on his 65th birthday, on 7 March 1973.

That retirement did not last long. Drummer Ted Easton persuaded him to come to play to his (Easton’s) club in Holland during the mid-1970s, and a new recording of a song he had first cut with Roy Fox in 1931, “Oh, Monah”, became a big hit in Holland.

It was to be his final flourish on trumpet, but he continued to sing after moving to Gosport, Hampshire, in 1977 – where a square was renamed in his honour in 1994, and was always happy to stand up and do so in a local pubs or at the Gosport Jazz Club.

LabelDigby Fairweather’s New Georgians paid tribute to Gonella’s musical heritage in 1984, and Fairweather and fellow trumpeter Humphrey Lyttelton co-hosted a television tribute, Fifty Years of Nat Gonella, the following year, in which Gonella himself was an enthusiastic participant.

He continued to sing occasionally with various bands, and made the headlines again in 1997 when a sampled excerpt of his trumpet playing from a recording he made in 1932 was used in White Town’s number one pop hit, “Your Woman”.

Nat Gonella died at his home in Gosport on 6 August 1998, aged 90.

Gonella was a down-to-earth and unassuming character, and remained so throughout his life. On BBC Radio 4, Barry Humphries said that “Oh Mona” was one of two tracks that had most appealed to him in his life. Humphrey Lyttelton is among those who have testified to the fact that fame and success sat easily on his shoulders, and reports that he would show genuinely astonishment when Lyttelton would confess, as well as other prominent musicians, to Gonella having been his first jazz hero. (by wikipedia)

This is part 2 of a sampler of his very fine recordings during the 30´s … Enjoy this music from the golden days of swing !

Booklet1Personnel:
Nat Gonella (trumpet, vocals)
Jimmy Messene (vocals)
Stella Moya
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The Nat Gonella Orchestra

NatGonella3Tracklist:
01. On The Sunny Side Of The Street (Fields/McHugh) 3.09
02. I Can´t Dance (Williams/Graine) 3.22
03. How I´m Doin´ (Fowler/Redman) 2.37
04. Take Another Guess (Sherman/Newman/Mencher) 3.00
05. Bessie Couldn´t Help It (Richmond/Warner/Bayhay) 3.02
06. Bill (Gonella) 2.51
07. Smoke Dreams (Freed/Brown) 3.07
08. Got A Pebble In My Shoe (Tobias/Feldman) 2.56
09. Let Us Be Sweethearts Over Again (Gilbert) 2.50
10. The Gypsy In My Sole (Jaffe/Boland) 2.55
11. Sing Me A Swing Song (Adams/Carmichael) 2.36
12. Swingin´ To Those Lies (Mayhen/Gonella) 2.45
13. The Spider And The Fly (Waller/Razaf/Johnson) 3.18
14. I´m Confessin´ (Doughterty/Nieberg/Reynolds) 3.03
15. Me, Myself And I (Gordon/Robert/Kaufman) 2.44
16. Deep Purple (DeRose/Parrish) 3.01
17. Three Little Fishes (Dowell) 3.07
18. Got Gratitude (Williams) 2.40
19. Ol´ Man River (Hammerstein/Kern) 2.42
20. The Handsome Territorial (Kennedy/Carr) 2.52

CD1*
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