Hassan Boussou – Maalem (80´s)

FrontCover1Hassan Hakmoun is one of the most notable figures in contemporary Moroccan music.

Though schooled in the deeply traditional sounds of the Gnawa people in his native Marrakesh, since moving to the U.S. in 1987, his music has absorbed elements from a variety of popular styles, from jazz and “world music” to neo-classical contemporary Western music and cerebral pop, resulting in a diverse, award-winning and critically acclaimed body of work. His participation in such internationally renowned arts festivals as WOMAD (World of Music, Arts and Dance) and collaborations with respected artists, including David Sanborn, Peter Gabriel, Don Cherry and The Kronos Quartet, among countless others, have brought him further into the spotlight and inspired many artists from North Africa and around the globe to follow in his footsteps.

As a master musician whose vision and contributions have enabled a unique fusion and blending of traditions, cultures and genres in a world of ever-expanding global communication and exchange, his work maintains its profound and enormous capacity to joyously inspire and heal the individuals and communities it reaches, as Hakmoun undoubtedly remains a commanding and intriguing artist in the world music scene.

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Hakmoun’’s musical origins are rooted in the African folk music of the Islamic Gnawa sect, descendants from West African slaves brought to North Africa several hundred years ago. Their music combines complicated West African syncopations with long, sinuous North African melodies. Tracing their roots back to the Bilal, a freed slave known for his beautiful voice and believed to have been chosen by the Islamic prophet Mohammed to serve as the first muezzin to call the people of the faith to their prayers, Gnawa musicians often express their religious devotion through their music, using it to enter into spiritual trance states.

These rich, ancient Gnawa traditions have powerfully and intimately influenced Hakmoun’s early life and calling as a musician as his mother is a mystic healer known throughout Marrakesh for her derdeba trance ceremonies, often all-night affairs involving hypnotic playing and chanting to exorcise spirits. Steeped in Islamic mysticism and West African rhythms, the Gnawa musical form and its rituals lift the spirit and heal the sick and wounded through its songs of praise.

Hakmoun began learning Gnawa music after witnessing his first trance ceremony at the young age of four. Through a miraculous incident involving his younger sister, whose body was mysteriously touched by the spirit, covered in cigarette burns and then healed as a result of a meeting of the local Gnawa masters who proceeded to gather and conduct a ceremony of singing, drumming and playing instruments such as the sintir while asking for forgiveness and inquiring as to the cause of her ailments, Hakmoun proceeded to study percussion, as well as traditional trance-inducing dances.

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He eventually chose the sintir as his main instrument, a three-stringed lute with a body made of camel skin stretched over nutwood. The strings of the sintir are pitched low, enabling the instrument to serve as the bass foundation much like the Western string bass, while its tone is sweet, making it well-suited to carry the melodic line of a composition. By drumming on the body of the instrument, Hakmoun added his own percussion while contributing vocals, thereby creating a unique foundation for his musical explorations and growth. By the age of fourteen, he was an established musician performing at Gnawa lila ceremonies with his own ensemble.

Hakmoun made his U.S. debut in 1987 at Lincoln Center in New York City with Etian and Blanca Lee’’s Trio Gna & Nomadas dance group … (taken from his website)

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I guess this is very rare record by Hassan Boussou … I found no further informations in the internet (this is maybe a bootleg, I don´t know) … I bought it last week in Marrakesh  at the Jamaa el Fna market:

Jamaa el Fna (also Jemaa el-Fnaa, Djema el-Fna or Djemaa el-Fnaa) is a square and market place in Marrakesh’s medina quarter (old city). It remains the main square of Marrakesh, used by locals and tourists.

And I guess, this were very erly recordings from the Eighties … unfortunatley the covers gives no more informations ..

So … listen to the magic of a real unique world of music …

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Personnel:
Hassan Boussou (lute, vocals)
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Marie le Baron et la troupe Boussou Ganga

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Tracklist:
01. Part 1 / 22.07
02. Part 2 / 36.51

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Buddy Cole – Swing Fever (1960)

FrontCover1Edwin LeMar “Buddy” Cole (December 15, 1916 – November 5, 1964), was a jazz pianist and orchestra leader. He played behind a number of pop singers, including Rosemary Clooney, Jill Corey, Johnnie Ray and The Four Lads, who recorded for Columbia Records. As “Buddy Cole and his Trio” he recorded the albums Some Fine Old Chestnuts and New Tricks with Bing Crosby.

 

Buddy Cole was born in Irving, Illinois, and started his musical career in the theater playing between movies. He moved to Hollywood and played with a couple of bands, most notably the Alvino Rey big band, before becoming a studio musician. Joining the John Scott Trotter orchestra as a pianist in 1947, he worked closely with Bing Crosby for a number of years and in 1954 he began a daily radio show with Crosby supported by a trio comprising Vince Terri on guitar, banjo etc., Don Whittaker on bass and Nick Fatool on drums. Cole played piano and electric organ. He and Crosby built up a large library of songs which could then be inserted into the show. Cole also recorded a similar library of songs with Rosemary Clooney (with whom he had previously toured) and these songs together with those of Crosby’s were employed in The Bing Crosby – Rosemary Clooney Show (1960-1962). Albums with his combo were recorded on piano and Hammond organ.

BuddyCole01Cole recorded for Capitol Records as both Buddy Cole and Eddie LaMar and His Orchestra. He did both commercial and transcription recordings for Capitol.

Although primarily known as a pianist, he had an abiding love for the organ, both Hammond and theatre organ. In his capacity as a studio musician, he worked extensively with Henry Mancini, who used his distinctive Hammond organ sound for the sound track to the TV series “Mr. Lucky”. He also recorded several albums for Warner Brothers on piano, Hammond organ and theatre pipe organ.

The theatre organ heard on these albums was the 17-rank Wurlitzer organ from the United Artists theatre plus nine ranks from a one-time radio studio Robert Morton theatre organ which he installed in the garage of a former residence in North Hollywood and on which he recorded three albums for the Columbia and Capitol labels. The combined ranks were installed in a specially built studio next to his home.

Two albums – Modern Pipe Organ and Autumn Nocturne – were recorded for Warner Brothers, as well as two albums done in conjunction with arranger Monty Kelly, one of which contained an arrangement of Richard Rodgers’ Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, and the other of which contained transcriptions of big band arrangements with spaces for the organ. These two albums – for the Alshire label – were Cole’s last disc recordings.

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He married Yvonne King on 17 August 1940, member of the King Sisters, and with her had two daughters, actress Tina Cole and Cathy Cole Green. They divorced in 1953.

He married Clare Foley Woodruff on 12 November 1957, who already had two children, Jay and Jeffrey Woodruff, the latter of whom would often assist him in organ tuning. The marriage lasted until Cole’s death.

Cole had been suffering from an advanced case of heart disease for a number of years, and beginning as early as 1959, suffered a series of heart attacks as a result. On November 4, 1964, Cole was contracted to record some organ pieces featured in 20th Century Fox’s blockbuster hit The Sound of Music including sections of the “End Titles”, the reprise of “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” and “Processional” and “Maria”. In the early hours of November 5, after the marathon six-hour recording session had been completed for the evening, Cole headed home, went to bed and died in his sleep of a heart attack, being found the following morning by a staff member (by wikipedia)

And here´s one of his countless albums … this is not a real jazz-album but a Easy Listening album … with lot´s of all these swinging organ sounds from that period.

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Personnel:
Red Callender (bass)
Buddy Cole (organ)
Vince Terry (guitar)
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percussion:
Jack Costanzo – Al Stoller – Lou Singer – Milt Holland

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Tracklist:
01. Pagan Love Song (Brown/Freed) 1.36
02. Brazil (Barroso/Russell) 2.09
03. The Hour Of Parting (Khan/Spolianski) 2.15
04. The Peanut Vendor (Sunshine/Simons/Gilbert) 2.12
05. Solftly, As In The Morning Sunrise (Hammerstein/Romberg) 3.13
06. Old Devil Moon (Lane) 2.51
07. Heat Wave (Berlin) 2.07
08. La Rosita (Dupont/Stewart) 2.52
09. Frenesi (Charles/Russell/Dominguez) 2.19
10. The Moon Was Yellow (Leslie/Ahlert) 3.08
11. Poinciana (Bernier/Simon) 3.25
12, Crazy Rhythm (Caesar/Kahn/Meyer) 1,50

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Herbie Armstrong – Back Against The Wall (1985)

FrontCover1The young Herbie Armstrong spent his teens and early twenties touring Ireland and the North of England with Irish show bands, and also worked for six months in late 1967 as the lead guitarist in Screaming Lord Sutch’s backing band.

In the early 1970s, after a period living abroad in Portugal in which he ran a riding school, Armstrong founded in London the pop band Fox, with the American songwriter and musician Kenny Young (who had written the 1964 hit, ‘Under the Boardwalk’, for the Drifters) and Australian singer Noosha Fox. Fox had two major chart hits, 1974’s ‘Only You Can’ and 1976’s ‘S-S-S Single Bed’, both of which sold over 200,000 copies. While ‘Only You Can’ reached number three in the UK charts, ‘S-S-S Single Bed’ stalled at number four, but was also a number one hit in Australia. There were also three Fox albums, ‘Fox’ (1975), ‘Tails of Illusion’ (1975) and ‘Blue Hotel’ (1977).

HerbieArmstrong2When Noosha left Fox after ‘Blue Hotel’, Armstrong and Young maintained their song writing partnership and formed new wave act Yellow Dog. Yellow Dog released three albums, ‘Yellow Dog’(1977), ‘Beware of the Dog’(1978) and ‘Strangers in Paradise’(1981), and in 1978 had two chart singles, ‘Just One More Night’ and ‘Wait Until Midnight’ (the latter of which was the first single that this writer bought as a twelve year old).

Herbie Armstrong spent the late 1970s and early 1980s touring the world with his childhood friend Van Morrison, and played lead guitar on four of his albums, ‘Wavelength’(1978), ‘Into the Music’(1979), ‘Common One’(1980) and ‘Beautiful Vision’(1982). He then embarked on a solo career, which saw him release one album, ‘Back Against the Wall’, in 1983 on the short-lived Making Waves label, before he moved on from music to take up a career in management in the licensed trades.

He ran in London for a while Armstrong’s, a restaurant, whose regular customers included Yellow Dog’s old label boss Richard Branson at Virgin Records and the comedian Kenny Everett, for whom Fox had written his TV theme tune. Armstrong then went on to open two live venues in Sheffield including the renowned Boardwalk, and now runs The Fountain, an inn, live venue and restaurant in the village of Rowland’s Castle near Portsmouth. (by John Clarkson)

And here´s his first solo ablum … and it´s a superb album … This should have been so much more successful … if you like Van Morrison … than is this album a must.

A forgot hewel in the history of Irish rock, including a great band (Pee Wee Ellis !).

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Herbie Armstrong + rare single

Personnel:
Herbie Armstrong (guitar, vocals)
Mitch Dalton (guitar)
Pee Wee Ellis (saxophone)
Peter Van Hooke (drums, percussion)
Mark Isham (bass, keyboards, saxophone)
Patrick O’Hearn (bass, synthesizer)
Phil Palmer (guitar)
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background vocals:
Linda Taylor – Sharon Campbell

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Tracklist:
01. Losing You (Armsrong) 4.34
02. Horses Of Steam (Kelly/Richmond) 5.04
03. You Take Me Up (Armstrong) 4.08
04. Friday’s Child (Morrison)
05. Back Against The Wall (Armstrong) 3.55
06. Heaven Only Knows (Armstrong/Platania) 3.48
07. Josie (Armstrong) 5.17
08. Let It Run (Armstrong) 3.33
09. Save The Last Dance (Pomus/Shuman) 4.14
10. Coming In From The Rain (Armstrong) 4.38

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Herbie Armstrong in 2011

Rainbow – On Stage (1977)

OriginalFrontCover1Captured from various performances on the 1976 Rainbow world tour, ‘Rainbow On Stage’ showcases the power and improvisation displayed by Rainbow’s Mk.II line up. Not content with merely replicating the original recorded work, Blackmore would extend many numbers into lengthy guitar showcases lasting up to 20 minutes on some occasions.

The album was mixed and edited by Martin Birch, once again given sole duties at the production helm. The overall sound is impressive for a live show, although it later transpired that several performances had been edited together to create better versions of some songs. This was fairly standard practice for live albums, however, as it was unlikely that a single show would ever be good enough as a stand alone performance to be released as an album (e.g. Deep Purple’s ‘Made In Japan’ was compiled from three separate shows). Other well known sections of the Rainbow live set were cut altogether, such as Cozy Powell’s ‘1812 Overture’ drum solo and recent tracks off the ‘Rainbow Rising’ LP, namely ‘Do You Close Your Eyes’ and ‘Stargazer’. Some of these decisions were made in order to get the tracks to fit on a double LP, some because the performances weren’t quite good enough; ‘Stargazer’ was a tough one to replicate live without the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra filling out the sound as on the ‘Rising’ album…! The running order was also chopped around to fit across 4 sides of vinyl, and again, many purists felt disappointed at the final representation of a Rainbow gig.

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Taking that aside, the sound and individual performance of each song in its own right, is exemplary of the energy and quality of 1976 Rainbow at its peak.

‘Kill The King’ explodes as an opening track as the strains of the famous ‘Wizard Of Oz’ soundtrack introduction fade away. This song had been specifically written to open live shows and would not be committed to vinyl as an album track until 1978. Then a storming version of ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’, with much more power and vigour than the original studio cut, segueing into a familiar ‘Blues’ that Blackmore had introduced into Deep Purple Mk. III live shows 2 years earlier, a brief snippet of ‘Starstruck’ follows, which doesn’t quite seem to hit the mark or demonstrate the prowess displayed on ‘Rainbow Rising’, leading back into the closing finale of side 1 with Dio proclaiming “You’re all…the men…” and the closing ‘Man On The Silver Mountain’ riffs.

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Side 2 opens in a restrained manner with Blackmore displaying his classical prowess and performing a reasonable section of Bach’s ‘Das Wohltemperierte Klavier’ to introduce ‘Catch The Rainbow’. A storming vocal performance from Dio and sublime phased guitar from Blackmore with a lengthy solo to extend the track to a single side of vinyl.

The iconic Deep Purple ‘Mistreated’ number opens side 3 with a dynamic, echo-laden introduction. Dio seems to add an extra dimension to the vocal and again, Blackmore extends this into a personal showcase. Impressive.

Finally, onto side 4, and two more re-energised classics from the debut Rainbow album. Blackmore deftly intro’s with the original ‘Greensleeves’ tune before launching into a much more powerful and pacy version of ‘Sixteenth Century Greensleeves’. ‘Still I’m Sad’ is likewise, and with the stunning vocals from Dio again, one wonders why the now seemingly rather tame instrumental version was ever considered for the original album. An awesome display, but this track does seem disjointed where the drum solo has been edited out.

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According to the excellent book ‘Rainbow Rising’ by Roy Davies, his lengthy research has worked out where the tracks were used from each show:

Kill The King – opening first minute or so from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976) and the rest of the song from Munich (29th September 1976)

Man On The Silver Mountain section – from the afternoon and evening shows in Tokyo (16th December 1976)

Catch The Rainbow – mostly unedited from Hiroshima show (14th December 1976)

Mistreated – edited version from Cologne (25th September 1976)

Sixteenth Century Greensleeves – unedited version from Tokyo (evening show 16th December 1976)

Still I’m Sad – edited version from Munich (29th September 1976)

Blackmore had become frustrated at the lack of improvisational ability of Tony Carey during the tour, claiming he just played the same stuff over and over again, so Carey would become the next casualty of the Rainbow personnel changes, along with Jimmy Bain who Blackmore stated “couldn’t handle the complicated stuff…” (ritchieblackmoresrainbow.wordpress.com)

In other words: One of the finest hard & heavy live albums all time !

Recorded: September – December 1976, Germany, Tokyo

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Personnel:
Jimmy Bain (bass)
Ritchie Blackmore (guitar)
Tony Carey (keyboards)
Ronnie James Dio (vocals)
Cozy Powell (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro: Over The Rainbow (Arlen/Harburg)/Kill The King (Blackmore/Dio/Powell) 5.32
02. Man On The Silver Mountain (Blackmore/Dio)/Blues (Blackmore)/Starstruck (Blackmore/Dio) 11.13
03. Catch The Rainbow (Blackmore/Dio) 15.36
04. Mistreated (Blackmore/Coverdale) 13.03
05. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves (Traditional/Blackmore/Dio)
06. Still I’m Sad (McCarthy/Smith) 11.01

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Manfred Mann – The Five Faces Of (1964)

FrontCover1The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is the first studio album by British beat/R&B group Manfred Mann. It was first released in the United Kingdom on 11 September 1964 by His Master’s Voice. In late October/early November, the album was released in Canada by Capitol Records. The Canadian track listing was almost the same as the UK version, except it included the hit “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” instead of “I’ve Got My Mojo Working”. The record has been called “one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well”.

The American version of the album (their second U.S. release following The Manfred Mann Album) was released in February 1965 by Ascot Records (a subsidiary of United Artists) with a very different track listing.

The songs on the original version of the Five Faces of Manfred Mann are R&B, including the band’s cover versions of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, Muddy Waters’ “Got My Mojo Working”, and Bo Diddley’s “Bring It to Jerome”, as well as a few of the group’s own jazzy compositions. Particularly noticeable in the instrumental sections are Manfred Mann’s keyboard work, Mike Vickers flute and saxophone work, and Mike Hugg’s vibes. The album includes the Cannonball Adderley song “Sack O’ Woe” from the R&B-influenced school of early 60s jazz .

The American release is more pop-oriented with the inclusion of the hits “Sha-La-La”, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” and “Come Tomorrow”; as well as Jones’ compositions and the American folk song “John Hardy”. It also includes a smaller selection of the band’s R&B and jazz influences. (by wikipedia)

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The debut album by Manfred Mann holds up even better 40 years on than it did in 1964. It’s also one of the longest LPs of its era, clocking in at 39 minutes, and there’s not a wasted note or a song extended too far among its 14 tracks. The Manfreds never had the reputation that the Rolling Stones enjoyed, which is a shame, because The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well, and some of the best singing of its era, courtesy of Paul Jones, who blew most of his rivals out of the competition with his magnificently impassioned, soulful performance on “Untie Me,” and his simmering, lusty renditions of “Smokestack Lightning” and “Bring It to Jerome.” The stereo mix of the album, which never surfaced officially in England until this 1997 EMI anniversary reissue (remastered in 24-bit digital sound), holds up very nicely, with sharp separation between the channels yet — apart from a few moments on “Untie Me” — few moments of artificiality. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Vickers (guitar, flute, saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 3.33
02. Don’t Ask Me What I Say (Jones) 3.02
03. Sack O’ Woe (Adderley) 2.10
04. What You Gonna Do? (Jones/Mann) 2.39
05. Hoochie Coochie (Dixon) 3.20
06. I’m Your Kingpin (Mann/Jones) 2.49
07. Down the Road Apiece (Raye) 2.27
08. Got My Mojo Working (Preston Foster; credited to Muddy Waters) 3.13
09. It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (Seneca/Lee) 2.37
10. Mr. Anello (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09
11. Untie Me (South) 3.39
12. Bring It To Jerome (Green) 3.27
13. Without You (Jones) 2.22
14. You’ve Got To Take It”(Jones) 2.17
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15. Smokestack Lightning (alternate version) (Burnett) 2.54
16. What You Gonna Do? (mono version) (Jones/Mann) 2.39
17. Sack O’ Woe (instrumental version) (Adderley) 2.09
18. Mr. Anello(instrumental version) (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09

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