Andre Kostelanetz And His Orchestra – Music Of Jerome Kern (1955)

FrontCover1Andre Kostelanetz (Russian: Абрам Наумович Костелянец, December 22, 1901 – January 13, 1980) was a Russian-born American popular orchestral music conductor and arranger who was one of the major exponents of popular orchestra music.Andre Kostelanetz (Russian: Абрам Наумович Костелянец, December 22, 1901 – January 13, 1980) was a Russian-born American popular orchestral music conductor and arranger who was one of the major exponents of popular orchestra music.

Biography This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
Abram Naumovich Kostelyanetz was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia to a prominent Jewish family. He was a cousin of physicist Lew Kowarski. His father, Nachman Yokhelevich (Naum Ignatyevich) Kostelyanetz was active on St. Petersburg stock exchange; his maternal grandfather, Aizik Yevelevich Dymshitz, was a wealthy merchant and industrialist, engaged in timber production. Kostelanetz escaped in 1922 after the Russian Revolution.

Andre Kostelanetz

He arrived in the United States that year, and in the 1920s, conducted concerts for radio. In the 1930s, he began his own weekly show on CBS, Andre Kostelanetz Presents. Kostelanetz was known for arranging and recording light classical music pieces for mass audiences, as well as orchestral versions of songs and Broadway show tunes. He made numerous recordings over the course of his career, which had sales of over 50 million and became staples of beautiful music radio stations. For many years, he conducted the New York Philharmonic in pops concerts and recordings, in which they were billed as Andre Kostelanetz and His Orchestra.
Andre Kostelanetz may be best known to modern audiences for a series of easy listening instrumental albums on Columbia Records from the 1940s until 1980. Kostelanetz actually started making this music before there was a genre called “easy listening”. He continued until after some of his contemporaries, including Mantovani, had stopped recording.

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Outside the United States, one of his best known works was an orchestral arrangement of the tune “With a Song in my Heart”, which was the signature tune of a long-running BBC radio program, at first called Forces Favourites, then Family Favourites, and finally Two Way Family Favourites.
He commissioned many works, including Aaron Copland’s Lincoln Portrait, Jerome Kern’s Portrait of Mark Twain, William Schuman’s New England Triptych, Paul Creston’s Frontiers, Ferde Grofé’s Hudson River Suite, Virgil Thomson’s musical portraits of Fiorello La Guardia and Dorothy Thompson, Alan Hovhaness’s Floating World, and Ezra Laderman’s Magic Prison. William Walton dedicated his Capriccio burlesco to Kostelanetz, who conducted the first performance and made the first recording, both with the New York Philharmonic.
His last concert was A Night in Old Vienna with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at that city’s War Memorial Opera House on December 31, 1979.

His first wife was actress/singer Sarah Loy; they were married from 1923 to 1937, when the marriage was dissolved. He was then married to soprano Lily Pons from 1938 to 1958, when the marriage was dissolved. They owned a home in Palm Springs, California which was built in 1955. In 1960 he married Sara Gene Orcutt; the marriage lasted several years.
His brother Boris Kostelanetz (1911–2006) was a prominent tax defense lawyer.

Kostelanetz died of pneumonia in Haiti on January 13, 1980, at the age of 78. (by wikipedia)

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And here we can hear him with many compositions by Jerome Kern:

Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as “Ol’ Man River”, “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man”, “A Fine Romance”, “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes”, “All the Things You Are”, “The Way You Look Tonight”, “Long Ago (and Far Away)” and “Who?”. He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and E. Y. Harburg.

Jerome Kern

A native New Yorker, Kern created dozens of Broadway musicals and Hollywood films in a career that lasted for more than four decades. His musical innovations, such as 4/4 dance rhythms and the employment of syncopation and jazz progressions, built on, rather than rejected, earlier musical theatre tradition. He and his collaborators also employed his melodies to further the action or develop characterization to a greater extent than in the other musicals of his day, creating the model for later musicals. Although dozens of Kern’s musicals and musical films were hits, only Show Boat is now regularly revived. Songs from his other shows, however, are still frequently performed and adapted. Many of Kern’s songs have been adapted by jazz musicians to become standard tunes. (by wikipedia)

First release on 78 rpm in 1946 (four shellac records)

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Personnel:
Andre Kostelanetz And His Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01 Smoke Gets In Your Eyes 4.38

Medley 1 (4.45):
02.1. Yesterdays
02.2.  I’ve Told Ev’ry Little Star
02.3.  The Song Is You

Medley 2 (4.14):
03.1. The Night Was Made For Love
03.2.  She Didn’t Say Yes
03.3.  All The Things You Are

Medley 3 (4.25):
04.1. Look For The Silver Lining
04.2. They Didn’t Believe Me
04.3. Long Ago (And Far Away)

Medley 4 (4.47):
05.1. I Dream Too Much
05.2. The Jockey On The Carousel

Medley 5 (4.47):
06.1. Why Was I Born?
06.2. The Way You Look Tonight
06.3. Who?

Medley 6 (4.18):
07.1. Only Make Believe
07.2. Bill

Medley 7 (4.34):
08.1. Why Do I Love You?
08.2. You Are Love
08.3.Ol’ Man River

List of the musicals from which the tracks were taken from:

1: “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” and “Yesterdays” taken from “Roberta” (1933).
2: “I’ve Told Ev’ry Little Star” and “The Song Is You” from “Music In The Air” (1932)
3: “The Night Was Made For Love” and “She Didn’t Say Yes” taken from “The Cat And The Fiddle” (1931). “All The Things You Are” taken from “Very Warm For May” (1939)
4: “Look For The Silver Lining” taken from “Sally” (1920). “They Didn’t Believe Me” taken from “The Girl From Utah” (1913). “Long Ago (And Far Away)” taken from the movie “Cover Girl” directed by Charles Vidor (1944).
5: “I Dream Too Much” and “The Jockey On The Carousel” taken from the movie “I Dream Too Much” directed by John Cromwell (1935).
6: “Why Was I Born?” taken from “Sweet Adeline” (1929). “The Way You Look Tonight” taken from the movie “Swing Time” directed by George Stevens (1936). “Who?” taken from “Sunny” (1925).
7 & 8: “Only Make Believe”, “Bill”, “Why Do I Love You?”, “You Are Love” and “Ol’ Man River” taken from “Show Boat” (1927).Recorded in March-April 1946, except tracks 7 and 8 recorded in December 1945.

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Original front + backcover from 1946:

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Louis Armstrong – Armstrong Forever Vol. 1 (1972)

FrontCover1Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901– July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo, Satch or Pops, was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance.[3] With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also very skilled at scat singing.

Armstrong is renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross over”, whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was extremely racially divided at the time. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society which were highly restricted for black men of his era. (by wikipedia)

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Louis Armstrong, nicknamed “Satchmo,” “Pops” and, later, “Ambassador Satch,” was born on August 4, 1901, in New Orleans, Louisiana. An all-star virtuoso, he came to prominence in the 1920s, influencing countless musicians with both his daring trumpet style and unique vocals. Armstrong’s charismatic stage presence impressed not only the jazz world but all of popular music. He recorded several songs throughout his career, including he is known for songs like “Star Dust,” “La Vie En Rose” and “What a Wonderful World.” Armstrong died at his home in Queens, New York, on July 6, 1971. (by

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And here´s just a sampler … but a real nice one … it´s a sort of “Best Of” Album …

And I guess it´s time to discover the great Louis Armstrong again … his music is timeless !

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Personnel:
Bernard Addison (guitar on 07. + 12.)
Henry Allen (trumpet on 01.)
Edward Anderson (trumpet on 078 + 12.)
Gene Anderson (piano on 02. + 06.)
Paul Barbarin (drums on 01. + 1.)
Mancy Cara (banjo on 02., 05. – 07.)
Johnny Dodds (saxophone, clarinet on 10.)
Lilian Hardin Armstrong (piano on 10.)
Louis Armstrong (trumpet, vocals, cornet)
Pete Briggs (bass on 02. + 06.)
Ceele Burke (banjo on 03. 04. + 09.)
Eddie Condon (banjo on 11.)
Luther Craven (trombone on 03., 04. + 08.)
Bert Curry (saxophone on 02. + 06.)
John St. Cyr (banjo on 10.)
Carroll Dickerson (violin on 02. + 06.)
Pops Foster (bass on 01. + 11.)
Lionel Hampton (drums, vibraphone on 03., 05. + 09.)
Henry Hicks (trombone on 07. + 12.)
J.C. Higginbotham (trombone on 01. + 11.)
Teddy Hill (saxophone on 01. + 11.)
Earl Hines (piano on 05. + 07.)
Les Hite (saxophone on 03., 04. + 09.)
Homer Hobson (trumpet on 02. + 06.)
Bobby Holmes (clarinet, saxophone on 08. + 12.)
Charlie Holmes (saxophone on 01. + 11.)
Lavert Hutchinson (bass on 08. + 12.)
Franz Jackson (saxophone on 03., 04. + 09.)
Lonnie Johnson (guitar on 11.)
Otis Johnson (trumpet on 01.)
Will Johnson (guitar on 01.)
Willy Lynch (drums on 08. + 12.)
Castor McCord (saxophone on 07. + 12.)
Theodore McCord (saxophone on 07. + 12.)
Albert Nicholas (clarinet on 10., saxophone on 01.)
Richard Orendorf (trumpet on 03., 04. + 09.)
Kid Ory (trombone on 10.)
Jimmy Prince (piano on 03., 04. + 09.)
Don Redman (saxophone on 07.)
Fred Robinson (trombone on 02., 05. – 07.)
Marshall Royal (clarinet on 03., 04. + 09.)
Luis Russell (piano on 01. + 11.)
Zutty Singleton (drums on 02., 05. – 07.)
Jimmy Strong (saxophone on 02., 05. – 07.)
Joe Turner (piano on 07. + 12.)
Crawford Wetherington (saxophone on 02. + 06.)

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Tracklist:

Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra:
01. St-Louis Blues (Handy) 3.02
02. Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Razaf/Waller/Brooks) 3.24

Louis Armstrong & His Sebastian New Cotton Club:
03. Body And Soul (Heyman/Green/Sour) 3.15
04. The Peanut Vendor (Simons) 3.27

Louis Armstrong & His Savoy Ballroom Five:
05. Basin Street Blues (Williams) 3.17

Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra:
06. After You’ve Gone (Creamer/Layton) 3.21

Louis Armstrong & His Savoy Ballroom Five:
07. St-James Infirmary (Redman) 3.21

Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra:
08. Tiger Rag (La Rocca) 3.12

Louis Armstrong & His Sebastian New Cotton Club:
09. Just A Gigolo (Caesar/Casucci) 3.18

Louis Armstrong And His Hot Five:
10. Muskrat Ramble (Ory) 2.37

Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra:
11. I Can’t Give You Anything But Love (Fields/McHugh) 3.26
12. Dinah (Akst/Young/Lewis) 3.12

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Various Artists – The History Of Jazz – The New Orleans Joys (1994)

frontcover1This is a real fine compilation about the roots of Jazz, about the early Jazz in New Orleans:

The music of New Orleans assumes various styles of music which have often borrowed from earlier traditions. New Orleans, Louisiana, is especially known for its strong association with jazz music, universally considered to be the birthplace of the genre. The earliest form was dixieland, which has sometimes been called traditional jazz, ‘New Orleans’, and ‘New Orleans jazz’. However, the tradition of jazz in New Orleans has taken on various forms that have either branched out from original dixieland or taken entirely different paths altogether. New Orleans has also been a prominent center of funk, home to some of the earliest funk bands such as The Meters.

The African influence on New Orleans music can trace its roots at least back to Congo Square in New Orleans in 1835, when slaves would congregate there to play music and dance on Sundays. African music was played as well as local music, including that of such local white composers as Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Along with such popular European musical forms popular in the city, perhaps most notably the brass band traditions, the cultural mix laid the groundwork for the New Orleans musical art forms to come.
By 1838 the local paper—the daily Picayune—ran a scathing article complaining about the emergence of brass bands in the city, which it stated could be found on every corner.
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Caricature of an African-American band playing in New Orleans in 1890. New Orleans writer Al Rose has called this “The earliest known illustration of a jazz band”. While the instrumentation of cornet or trumpet, trombone, clarinet, and drums is suggestive of the early jazz bands of some 15 years later, how close this music was to what would be known as “jazz” is speculative.

The term “jazz” (early on often spelled “jass”) did not become popular until the mid and late 1910s, when New Orleans musicians first rose to prominence in other parts of the USA and the New Orleans style needed a new name to differentiate it from the nationally popular ragtime. Before then, the New Orleans style was frequently simply called “ragtime” (Sidney Bechet continued to call his music “ragtime” throughout his life), along with such local terms as “hot music” and “ratty music”.

The local New Orleans dance music style was already distinctive in the 19th century. When this style became what was later known as “jazz” remains a matter of debate and definition, although most New Orleans music historians believe what became known as New Orleans style jazz was the product of a series of developments, probably reaching its famous form no earlier than the 1890s and no later than the mid 1910s.
By the 1890s a man by the name of Poree hired a band led by cornetist Buddy Bolden, many of whose contemporaries as well as many jazz historians consider to be the first prominent jazz musician. The music was not called jazz at this time, consisting of marching band music with brass instruments and dancing. If anything, Bolden could be said to have been a blues player.
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The actual term “jazz” was first “jass”, the etymology of which is still not entirely clear. The connotation is sexual in nature, as many of the early performers played in rough working class venues. Despite colorful stories of mid-20th century writers, the prostitution district known as Storyville was no more important in the development of the music than the city’s other neighborhoods, but did play a role in exposing some out of town visitors to the style. Many instruments used were often acquired second-hand at pawn shops, including used military band instruments.

The Creole people of New Orleans also contributed greatly to the evolution of the artform, though their own music became heavily influenced by the pioneering work of Bolden. New Orleans-born musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet and Jelly Roll Morton all recalled the influence Bolden had on the direction of the music of New Orleans. (Armstrong himself had no memory of Bolden, but was told about him by his mentor King Oliver), and jazz itself. (by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental journey to the roots of (New Orleans) Jazz !
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Personnel:
see booklet for details
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Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. King Oliver and His Creole Jazz Band: Chimes Blues (Oliver) 2.53
02. Piron’s New Orleans Orchestra: Bouncing Around (Bocage/Piron) 2.45
03. Fate’s Society Orchestra Marable: Frankie & Johnny (Traditional) 2.47
04. Jelly Roll Morton: Tia Juana (Morton) 2.50
05. Clarence Williams Blue Five: Texas Moaner Blues (Barnes/Williams) 3.14
06. Red Onion Jazz Babies: Calke Walking Babies (Williams/Smith/Troy) 3.18
07. Celestin’s Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra: Original Tuxedo Rag (Celestin) 2.44
08. King Oliver & Jelly Roll Morton:King Porter Stomp (Morton) 2.31
09. Bertha “Chippie” Hill: Trouble in Mind (Jones) 2.52
10. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five: Cornet Shop Suey (Armstrong) 3.01
11. Arthur Sims & His Creole Roof Orchestra: Soapstick Blues (Jones) 3.06
12. Cookie’s Gingersnaps: Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man (Rose/Harrison) 3.24
13. New Orleans Wanderers: Perdido Street Blues (Armstrong) 3.11
14. Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers: Doctor Jazz (Other) 3.26
15. Louis Dumaine Jazzola Eight: Franklin Street Blues (Dumaine/Jackson) 3.22
16. Sam Morgan Jazz Band: Mobile Stomp (Morgan) 3.00
17. Johnny’s  Dodds Black Bottom Stompers: New Orleans Stomp (Dodds) 2.44
18. King Oliver and His Dixie Syncopators: Willie The Weeper (Rymal/Melrose/Bloom) 2.54

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CD 2:
01. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Wild Man Blues (Armstrong/Morton) 3.18
02. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Ory’s Creole Trombone (Ory) 3.08
03. The Chicago Footwarmers: Get ’em Again Blues (Barbarin/Russell) 2.54
04. Johnny Dodds: Too Tight (Armstrong) 2.59
05. Jabbo Smith’s Rhythm Aces: Sweet ‘n’ Low Blues (Smith) 4.23
06. Omer Simeon and Earl Hines: Beau Koo Jack (Simeon) 2.43
07. Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight: Duet Stomp (Collins/Jones) 2.53
08. New Orleans Feetwarmers: Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 2.59
09. Trixie Smith: He May Be Your Man (But He Comes To See Me Sometimes) (Fowler/Bradford) 2.50
10. Tommy Ladnier: Really the Blues (Mezzron) 3.39
11. Jelly Roll MortonNew Orleans Jazzmen: Oh, Didn’t He Ramble (Handy) 2.59
12. Louis Armstrong: 2.19 Blues (Desdume) 2.51
13. Zutty Singleton: Shimme-Sha-Wobble (Williams) 3.06
14, Henry “Red” Allen and His Orchestra: Down In Jungle Town (Morse/Madden) 2.50
15. Sidney Becher and His New Orleans Feetwarmers: Make Me A Pallet On The Floor (Traditional) 3.15
16. Johnny Dodds: Red Onion Blues (Williams) 2.54
17. Jimmie Noone: New Orleans Hop Scop Blues (Thomas) 2.55
18. Edmond Hall’s Blue Note Jazzmen: High Society (Piron) 4.05

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George Gershwin – Rare Recordings 1932 – 1935 (1999)

frontcover1Widely regarded as one of the finest composers of both popular and classical music in the 20th century, George Gershwin wrote for Broadway musicals and the concert hall, creating many American standards in the process.

In a career tragically cut short in mid-stride by a brain tumor, George Gershwin (1898-1937) proved himself to be not only one of the great songwriters of his extremely rich era, but also a gifted “serious” composer who bridged the worlds of classical and popular music. The latter is all the more striking, given that, of his contemporaries, Gershwin was the most influenced by such styles as jazz and blues.

Gershwin’s first major hit, interpolated into the show Sinbad in 1919, was “Swanee,” sung by Al Jolson. Gershwin wrote both complete scores and songs for such variety shoes as George White’s Scandals (whose annual editions thus were able to introduce such songs as “I’ll Build a Stairway to Paradise” and “Somebody Loves Me”).

After 1924, Gershwin worked primarily with his brother Ira as his lyricist. The two scored a series of Broadway hits in the ’20s and early ’30s, starting with Lady Be Good (1924), which included the song “Fascinatin’ Rhythm.” 1924 was also the year Gershwin composed his first classical piece, “Rhapsody in Blue,” and he would continue to work in the classical field until his death.

By the ’30s, the Gershwins had turned to political topics and satire in response to the onset of the Depression, and their Of Thee I Sing became the first musical to win a Pulitzer Prize. In the mid ’30s, Gershwin ambitiously worked to meld his show music and classical leanings in the creation of the folk opera Porgy and Bess, with lyrics by Ira and Dubose Heyward. The Gershwins had moved to Hollywood and were engaged in several movie projects at the time of George Gershwin’s death. (by William Ruhlmann)

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And this is a double CD album (taken from an eight CD Box) with rare recordings, radio broadcasts, interviews and commerials from the 30´s …

Enjoy this nostalgic trip in the 20´s and 3´0´s of the last century ! And don´t forget: George Gershwin was one of the most important composers of this decades. So, this is another sentimental journey in this blog.

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Personnel:
George Gershwin (piano)
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Ann Brown (vocals on CD 1/21.)
Todd Duncan (vocals on CD 1/21.)
Ruby Elzy (vocals on CD 1/20.)
Edward Matthews (vocals on CD 1/18.)
Abbie Mitchell (vocals on CD 1/17.)
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George Gershwin Orchestra (on CD 2/07.)
Paul Whiteman & His Concert Orchestra (on CD 2/01.)
Victor Symphony Orchestra (on CD 2/06.)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Variations on Fascinating Rhythm/Variations on Liza 2.28
02. Second Prelude 2.33
03. Interview 1.30
04. I Got Rhythm 1.11
05. Signature 1.33
06. Of Thee I Sing (Overture) 3.33
07. The Man I Love 4.44
08. I Got Rhythm 2.47
09. Commmercial 0.59
10. Swanee/Sign Off 1.16
11. Signature 1.28
12. Mine 1.06
13. Variations on “I Got Rhythm” 8.34
14. Love Is Sweeping The Country 1.01
15. Commercial 1.28
16. Wintergreen For President/Sign Off 1.15
17. Introduction/Summertime 4.09
18. A Woman Is A Sometime Thing 2.32
19. Act I, Scene 1: Finale 1.42
20. My Man’s Gone Now 4.16
21. Bess, You Is My Woman Now 5.34

CD 2:
01. Rhapsody In Blue 9.09
02. Prelude, No. 1 1.20
03. Prelude, No. 2 2.37
04. Prelude, No. 3 1.06
05. Andante from Rhapsody in Blue 2.35
06. An American In Paris 15.54
07. Second Rhapsody (Rehearsal Performance) 14.24

Music by George Gershwin:
Lyrics by Ira Gershwin

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