Steve Winwood – Roll With It (1988)

FrontCover1Roll with It is the fifth solo studio album by English blue-eyed soul artist Steve Winwood, released on 21 June 1988. It topped the album charts in the United States, and has sold over three million copies. The title cut topped the pop and rock singles charts. The success led the subsequent songs to serve as singles, “Don’t You Know What the Night Can Do?” and “Holding On”.

“Don’t You Know What the Night Can Do?” had been written by Winwood to be featured in an ad campaign for Michelob which began running on American television on the day of the Roll with It album’s US release.

Two other tracks from Roll with It: “Hearts on Fire” and “Put on Your Dancing Shoes”, also achieved radio airplay. (by wikipedia)

This album is from 1988, which I had on vinyl, and felt the need to have on CD. The title track is a good example of whats to come later – Rock with a little R&B/Funk mixed in. It also has a ballad called “One More Morning” which starts with Vocal and Piano that shows the diversity of Steve Winwood. If you like Rock, you’ll like this. (by Paul)

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Winwood manages to reintroduce some of the R&B elements of the Spencer Davis Group and some of the psychedelic effects of early Traffic here, though this is also an effective follow-up to the directions indicated on Back in the High Life. Contains the number one title track and “Don’t You Know What the Night Can Do?” (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Bashiri Johnson (percussion)
Mike Lawler (keyboards)
John “J.R.” Robinson (drums)
Steve Winwood (vocals, keyboards, guitar, synthesizer, drums, bass)
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Tom Lord-Alge (tambourine)
Jimmy Bralower – percussion, drum machine on 04. + 08.)
Robbie Kilgore – keyboards on 02., 04, + 08.)
Paul Pesco – guitar on 03. + 06.)
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The Memphis Horns:
Wayne Jackson (trombone, trumpet)
Andrew Love (saxophone)
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background vocals:
Mark Williamson – Tessa Niles

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Tracklist:
01. Roll With It (Winwood/Jennings/Holland/Dozier/Holland) 5.21
02. Holding On (Winwood/Jennings) 6.16
03. The Morning Side (Winwood/Jennings) 5.14
04. Put On Your Dancing Shoes (Winwood/Jennings) 5.13
05. Don’t You Know What The Night Can Do? (Winwood/Jennings) 6.55
06. Hearts On Fire (Winwood/Capaldi) 5.17
07. One More Morning (Winwood/Jennings 5.00
08. Shining Song (Winwood/Jennings 5.29

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The official video clip:

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Chris de Burgh – High On Emotion – Live From Dublin! (1990)

FrontCover1.jpgHigh on Emotion: Live from Dublin is the first live album by Chris de Burgh, released by A&M Records in 1990. The album was recorded at the RDS, Dublin in December 1988.

The running time limitations of CD resulted in the CD version of the album missing two tracks which are included on the double vinyl and cassette versions of the album. These tracks, ‘Lonely Sky’ and ‘The Ballroom of Romance’, are included on the CD single release of the live version of ‘Don’t Pay the Ferryman’ which was released to support the album. (by wikipedia)

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Believe it or not, Chris de Burgh performs extremely well live, carrying out his ballads and story-songs with genuine passion and enthusiasm. With High on Emotion, de Burgh plays to a crowd to which he has close ties, since he attended Trinity College in Dublin after moving there from Argentina. This sets the stage for a very entertaining album, as he covers a favorable blend of love songs and musical tales, pulling some of his better material from out of the past. de Burgh sings such classics as “A Spaceman Came Travelling,” “Don’t Pay the Ferryman,” and “Patricia the Stripper” with a collected vigor played out in his trademarked classy style. “Spanish Train” is the album’s magnum opus, complete with haunting guitar and a mood-perfect vocal execution from de Burgh, proving it’s one his favorites as well.

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The slower songs are heartfelt also, even in front of a live audience. “Risen Lord” and the famous “Lady in Red” are charming pieces, while “Sailing Away” and “Missing You” flow wonderfully through the crowd and are excellent choices for a live show. His most energetic single, “High on Emotion,” ends the album perfectly, releasing any intensity that de Burgh had left. Live From Dublin exhibits both sides of Chris de Burgh, proving that his style of music is just as earnest in a live environment as on a studio album. (by Mike DeGagne)

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Personnel:
Chris de Burgh (uitar, piano, vocals)
Ian Kojima (uitar, keyboards, saxophone, background vocals)
Al Marnie (ass, background vocals)
Danny McBride (gitar, background vocals)
Glenn Morrow (keyboards, background vocals)
Jeff Phillips (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Last Night 7.13
02. Sailing Away 5.14
03. The Revolution 4.03
04. I’m Not Scared Anymore 4.40
05. Spanish Train 6.00
06. Borderline 4.51
07. The Risen Lord 3.36
08. The Last Time I Cried 6.16
09. The Lady in Red 4.08
10. A Spaceman Came Travelling 3.43
11. Patricia The Stripper 4.21
12. Missing You 4.26
13. Say Goodbye To It All 5.59
14. Don’t Pay The Ferryman 4.12
15. High On Emotion 5.11

All songs written by Chris de Burgh

 

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The Traveling Wilburys – Vol. 01 (1988)

FrontCover1.jpgThere never was a supergroup more super than the Traveling Wilburys. They had Jeff Lynne, the leader of ELO; they had Roy Orbison, the best pop singer of the ’60s; they had Tom Petty, the best roots rocker this side of Bruce Springsteen; they had a Beatle and Bob Dylan, for crying out loud! It’s impossible to picture a supergroup with a stronger pedigree than that (all that’s missing is a Rolling Stone), but in another sense it’s hard to call the Wilburys a true supergroup, since they arrived nearly two decades after the all-star craze of the ’70s peaked, and they never had the self-important air of nearly all the other supergroups. That, of course, was the key to their charm: they were a group of friends that fell together easily, almost effortlessly, to record a B-side for a single for George Harrison, then had such a good time they stuck around to record a full album, which became a hit upon its 1988 release. The Traveling Wilburys was big enough to convince the group to record a second album, cheerfully and incongruously titled Vol. 3, two years later despite the death of Orbison. Like most sequels, the second didn’t live up to expectations, and by the time it and its predecessor drifted out of print in the mid-’90s, with the rights reverting to Harrison, nobody much noticed. A few years later, though, it soon became apparent that the Wilburys records — mainly, the debut, widely beloved thanks to its two hits, “Handle With Care” and “End of the Line” — were out of print, and they soon became valuable items as the Harrison estate dragged its heels on a reissue. Finally, the two albums were bundled up as a two-CD set simply called The Traveling Wilburys and reissued with a DVD containing a documentary and all the videos in the summer of 2007 (there is also a deluxe edition containing a longer, lavish booklet).

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Looking back via The Traveling Wilburys, the group’s success seems all the more remarkable because the first album is surely, even proudly, not a major statement. Even under the direction of Lynne, who seems incapable of not polishing a record till it gleams, it’s loose and funny, even goofy. It’s clearly a lark, which makes the offhanded, casual virtuosity of some of the songs all the more affecting, particularly the two big hits, which are sunny and warm, partially because they wryly acknowledge the mileage on these rock & roll veterans. “Handle With Care” and “End of the Line” are the two masterworks here, although Roy’s showcase, “Not Alone Anymore” — more grand and moving than anything on the Lynne-produced Mystery Girl — comes close in the stature, but its stylized melodrama is a ringer here: it, along with Dylan’s offhand heartbreak tune “Congratulations,” is the only slow thing here, and the rest of the album just overspills with good vibes, whether it’s Tom Petty’s lite reggae of “Last Night,” Jeff Lynne’s excellent Jerry Lee Lewis update “Rattled,” or Dylan’s very funny “Dirty World,” which is only slightly overshadowed by his very, very funny Springsteen swipe “Tweeter and the Monkey Man.” These high times keep The Traveling Wilburys fresh and fun years later, after Lynne’s production becomes an emblem of the time instead of transcending it. (The album contains two bonus tracks in this reissue, the excellent Harrison song “Maxine” — a low-key waltz that should have made the cut — and “Like a Ship,” a folky dirge that builds into ELO-esque pop which is pretty good but doesn’t have the effervescence of the rest.)

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The Traveling Wilburys built upon Harrison’s comeback with Cloud Nine and helped revitalize everybody else’s career, setting the stage for Dylan’s 1989 comeback with Oh Mercy, Petty’s first solo album, Full Moon Fever, produced by Lynne (sounding and feeling strikingly similar to this lark), and Orbison’s Mystery Girl, which was released posthumously. Given the success of this record and how it boosted the creativity of the rest of the five, it’s somewhat a shock that the second effort falls a little flat. In retrospect, Vol. 3 plays a little bit better than it did at the time — it’s the kind of thing to appreciate more in retrospect, since you’ll never get another album like it — but it still labors mightily to recapture what came so effortlessly the first time around, a problem that can’t merely be chalked up to the absence of Orbison (who after all, didn’t write much on the first and only took lead on one song).

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Where the humor flowed naturally and absurdly throughout the debut, it feels strained on Vol. 3 — nowhere more so than on “Wilbury Twist,” where Petty implores you to put your underwear on your head and get up and dance, the epitome of forced hilarity — and the production is too polished and punchy to give it a joie de vivre similar to the debut. That polish is an indication that Lynne and Petty dominate this record, which only makes sense because they made it between Full Moon Fever and Into the Great Wide Open, but it’s striking that this sounds like more like their work, even when Dylan takes the lead on “Inside Out” or the doo wop-styled “7 Deadly Sins.” Both of these are quite good songs and they have a few other companions here, like the quite wonderful country stomp “Poor House,” but they’re songs more notable for their craft than their impact — nothing is as memorable as the throwaways on the debut — and when combined with the precise production, it takes a bit for them to sink in. But give the record some time, and these subtle pleasures are discernible, even if they surely pale compared to the open-hearted fun of the debut. But when paired with the debut on this set, it’s a worthy companion and helps support the notion that the Traveling Wilburys were a band that possesses a unique, almost innocent, charm that isn’t diminished after all this time. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Charlie T. Wilbury Jr (Tom Petty) (vocals, guitar)
Lefty Wilbury (Roy Orbison) (vocals, guitar)
Lucky Wilbury (Bob Dylan) (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Nelson Wilbury (George Harrison) (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Otis Wilbury (Jeff Lynne) (vocals, guitar, bass, keyboards)
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Ray Cooper (percussion)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Buster Sidebury (Jim Keltner) (drums)
Ian Wallace (tom-toms on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. Handle With Care 3.19
02. Dirty World 3.30
03. Rattled 3.00
04. Last Night 3.48
05. Not Alone Any More 3.24
06. Congratulations 3.30
07. Heading For The Light 3.37
08. Margarita 3.15
09. “Tweeter and the Monkey Man” Dylan 5:30
10. End Of The Line 3.30

All song written by The Traveling WilburysCD1
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What a line-up !

 

Baden Powell – Rio das Valsas (1988)

OriginalFrontCover1An excellent Brazilian guitarist, Baden Powell has played with his share of American jazz greats (including Herbie Mann and the late Stan Getz). But there’s no jazz to be found on Seresta Brasiliera, which was recorded for the Brazilian Caju Music label in 1988 and released in the U.S. on Milestone/Fantasy in 1994.

The title Seresta Brasiliera translates to “Brazilian serenade,” and an unaccompanied Powell embraces the Brazilian serenade style on personal, introspective versions of Pixinguinha’s “Rosa,” as well as songs he wrote with his frequent partner, the late Vinicius De Moraes (including “Velho Amigo,” “Cancao Do Amor Ausente” and “Serenata Do Adeus”).

A melancholy mood defines much of the CD, and Powell’s playing is often as beautiful as it is sad and remorseful. Seresta Brasiliera is an album with little optimism and plenty of soul. (by Alex Henderson)

This beautiful album was later released under the titels “Vialao em Seresta” and “Seresta Brasileira”

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Alternate frontcovers

Personnel:
Baden Powell (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Rosa (Pixinguinha) 5.41
02. Serenata do Adeus (De Moraes) 5.14
03. Valsa Sem Nome (Powell/De Moraes) 3.30
04. Primeiro Amor (Silva) 1.53
05. Velho Amigo (Powell/De Moraes) 4.15
06. O Que Tinha de Ser (Jobim/De Moraes) 4.24
07. Cháo de Estrelas (Barbosa/Caldas) 4.51
08. Canção do Amor Ausente (Powell/De Moraes) 3.40
09. Revendo o Passado (Junior) 5.31
10. Valsa de Euridice (De Moraes) 4.45

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The Kinks – Paranoia & Destroyer (1988)

TheKinksFrontCover1Jim Rodford, a founding member of Argent and bassist for the Kinks and the Zombies, died last Saturday at the age of 76.

Rodford’s cousin and longtime band mate Rod Argent confirmed Rodford’s death on the Zombies’ Facebook page, with Argent adding that Rodford died Saturday following “a fall on the stairs.”

“Jim was not only a magnificent bass player, but also from the first inextricably bound to the story of The Zombies. An enormous enabler for us,” Argent wrote in his long tribute to Rodford. “To the end, Jim’s life was dedicated to music. He was unfailingly committed to local music – an ever present member of the local scene in St.Albans, where he had spent his whole life.”

The Kinks, who recruited Rodford following bassist John Dalton’s permanent exit from the band in 1978, also paid tribute to Rodford on Twitter. “It is with deep sadness that we have learned that Jim Rodford passed away – he toured and recorded with the Kinks for many years and will be greatly missed. He was much loved by all of us,” the band wrote.

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Rodford spent 18 years as the Kinks’ bassist, performing on every album from 1979’s Low Budget to 1993’s Phobia, the band’s final LP before their breakup three years later.

As Argent wrote in his tribute to his cousin, Rodford was the first musician Argent attempted to add to his then-fledgling Zombies, but the bassist ultimately turned down the job since he was already a member of the popular British band the Bluetones. However, Rodford was instrumental in the development of the Zombies, lending the group the Bluetones’ equipment, orchestrating the Zombies’ early shows and “passing judgment” on their breakout 1964 single “She’s Not There,” penned by Argent.

Rodford also served as bassist in the Mike Cotton Sound before the Zombies’ initial breakup in 1967; two years later, Argent would finally unite with his cousin to co-found Argent alongside drummer Bob Henrit and singer/guitarist Russ Ballard. Rodford would appear on all seven Argent albums – including the band’s best-known song “Hold Your Head Up” – before that band dissolved in 1976.

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Two years later, Rodford embarked on his nearly two-decade-long tenure with the Kinks. Dave Davies tweeted of Rodford Saturday, “I’m devastated Jim’s sudden loss I’m too broken up to put words together it’s such a shock I always thought Jim would live forever in true rock and roll fashion – strange – great friend great musician great man – he was an integral part of the Kinks later years.”

Rodford also played bass in the Kast Off Kinks, a group made up of Kinks expats like Mick Avory and Ian Gibbons, beginning in the late 2000s.

Over 40 years after he was first asked, Rodford finally joined the Zombies when Argent and singer Colin Blunstone revived the band in 2004; Rodford and his son, drummer Steve Rodford, remained members of the Zombies’ touring unit until the bassist’s death. Rodford also appeared on the group’s 2015 comeback LP Still Got That Hunger.

Argent continued in his tribute to Rodford, “Jim was a wonderful person, loved by everybody. When Colin [Blunstone] and I, shocked and hardly able to talk, shared the news this morning, Colin said ‘I’ve never heard anyone say a bad word about him…’ He will be unbelievably missed. Goodnight and God Bless dear friend.” (by Rolling Stone)

And here´s a rare and brilliant Kinks Radio Show (recorded for the legendary Westwood One label) …

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Recorded live At The Fox Theatre, St. Louis, Missouri, 14 April 1988
(Excellent FM broadcast)

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Personnel:
Dave Davies (guitar, vocals)
Ray Davies (vocals, guitar)
Ian Gibbons (keyboards)
BobHenrit (drums)
Jim Rodford (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Destroyer 5.26
02. Low Budget 5.46
03. Apeman 5.12
04. Sleepwalker 2.48
05. Art Lover 7.50
06. Come Dancing 4.06
07. Sleepwalker  4.04
08. Welcome To Sleezy Town 7.56
09. Think Visual 3.33
10. Living On A Thin Line 4.27
11. A Well Respected Man 1.58
12. It (She Wants It) 9.23
13. Guilty 4.40
13. All Day And All Of The Night
14. You Really Got Me 3.56
15. Celluloid Heroes 5.46
16. Lola 9.35

All songs written by Ray Davies, except “Living On A Thin Line” and “Guilty” which was written by Dave Davies
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And here´s the best live version of “All Day And All Of The Night” (featuring Jim Rodford):

 

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James Walter Rodford (7 July 1941 – 20 January 2018)

Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988)

FrontCover1In the 80´s & 90´s I was a real serious audience tape collector and I had contact with many other maniac collectors of rare audience tapes.

So here´s one of these tapes, recorded live with two very fine musicians:

Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg:

Peter Edward “Ginger” Baker (born 19 August 1939) is an English drummer, best known as the founder of the rock band Cream. His work in the 1960s earned him praise as “rock’s first superstar drummer,” although his individual style melded a jazz background with his interest in African rhythms. Baker is credited as a pioneer of drumming in genres like jazz fusion, heavy metal and world music.

Baker began playing drums at age 15 around 1954, and later took lessons from Phil Seamen. In the 1960s, he joined Blues Incorporated, where he met bassist Jack Bruce. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in the Graham Bond Organisation and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with Eric Clapton in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but only lasted until 1968, in part due to Baker’s and Bruce’s volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in Blind Faith and leading Ginger Baker’s Air Force, Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with Fela Kuti, in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music.[3] Among Baker’s other collaborations are his work with Gary Moore, Masters of Reality, Public Image Ltd, Atomic Rooster, Bill Laswell, jazz bassist Charlie Haden, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and another personally led effort, Ginger Baker’s Energy.

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Baker’s drumming attracted attention for his style, showmanship, and use of two bass drums instead of the conventional one. In his early days, he performed lengthy drum solos, most notably in the Cream song “Toad”, one of the earliest recorded examples in rock music. Baker is an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Cream, of the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 2008, and of the Classic Drummer Hall of Fame in 2016 (by wikipedia)

Jonas Hellborg (born 7 June 1958) is a Swedish bass guitarist. He has collaborated with John McLaughlin, Ustad Sultan Khan, Fazal Qureshi, Bill Laswell, Shawn Lane, Jens Johansson, Anders Johansson, Ginger Baker, Michael Shrieve, V. Selvaganesh, Jeff Sipe, Mattias IA Eklundh, Public Image Ltd, and Buckethead. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s not only a very rare audience tape from a concert in 1988, but a real superb audience recording from this concert.

Let´s talk about the freedom of music … and you´ll hear the magic of jamming … including two Hendrix compositions …

Enjoy the music

Recorded live at Neuried, June 27, 1988

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Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums)
Jonas Hellborg (bass)
André Louis (keyboards, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro Jam (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.46
02. Who Knows (Hendrix) 9.47
03. Instrumental (1) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis)
04. Little Wing (Hendrix) 21.58
05. Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Clapton) +  Instrumental (2) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.28
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06. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 1) 38.42
07. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 2)

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Roy Orbinson – Mystery Girl (1989)

FrontCover1Mystery Girl is the twenty-second album by American singer Roy Orbison. It was completed in November 1988, a month before his death at the age of 52, and released on the Virgin record label in February 1989. It includes the hit single “You Got It”, which was co-written by Orbison and his Traveling Wilburys bandmates Jeff Lynne and Tom Petty, and “She’s a Mystery to Me”, written by Bono and The Edge. The album was a critical and commercial success; it peaked at number 5 on the Billboard 200 in the United States, the highest position Orbison had achieved on that chart, and number 2 on the UK Albums Chart.

Mystery Girl was Orbison’s first album of all-new material since 1979 and its success posthumously continued the resurgence that his career had undergone since 1986. Among the many other contributors to the album were Mike Campbell and other members of the Heartbreakers, T Bone Burnett, George Harrison, Jim Keltner and Rick Vito. For the 25th anniversary of its release, the album was reissued with bonus tracks including “The Way Is Love”, a song recorded by Orbison on a cassette tape in the 1980s that was subsequently completed by his sons and producer John Carter Cash. (by wikipedia)

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Roy Orbison’s comeback started in 1986, when David Lynch used “In Dreams” for a pivotal sequence in his masterwork Blue Velvet. So mesmerizing was Dean Stockwell’s pantomime of the 1963 hit that Orbison soon became in demand. He re-recorded his hits for a collection naturally called In Dreams, he gave a star-studded concert called Black & White Night, and then he began work with ELO leader Jeff Lynne on a comeback album. The duo tabled the album to join the supergroup the Traveling Wilburys, a collaboration with Tom Petty, George Harrison, and Bob Dylan that turned into a surprise smash in 1988. Once that record began its run up the charts, Lynne and Orbison completed the album that became Mystery Girl, but the record didn’t come out until February 1989, a few months after Roy’s tragic death. His passing colored the reception of the record, helping turn it into a genuine hit — it peaked at five on Billboard’s 200 and two in the U.K. and went platinum in both countries — and while his death may have helped boost sales, it’s likely Mystery Girl would’ve been a success anyway. Orbison, unlike any of his ’60s peers, was an actual hot property at the end of the ’80s, and he surrounded himself with collaborators who cared enough to showcase him at his best.

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Lynne is the best known of these and his contributions are strong, although perhaps a bit too redolent of the Baroque pop that became his trademark at the turn of the ’80s: they’re big, bright, and bold, slathered in harmonies and guitars, their over-production obscuring the songs’ simple charms. “You Got It,” the hit from the record, perfectly captures this characteristic, but so do the other Lynne contributions “A Love So Beautiful” and “California Blue,” the latter in particular a very nice evocation of Roy’s early-’60s balladry. “In the Real World,” a song co-written by Will Jennings and co-produced by Heartbreaker Mike Campbell along with Orbison and his wife Barbara, is in the same vein, acting as an explicit sequel to “In Dreams,” while “Windsurfer” touches upon a California pop Roy rarely attempted, and “The Only One,” co-written by his son Wesley, evokes a nice southern soul groove. The two showy collaborations with U2 (“She’s a Mystery to Me”) and Elvis Costello (“The Comedians”) garnered headlines at the time but are a shade florid — Costello’s melodrama edges out Bono & the Edge, because it respects pacing — but T-Bone Burnett’s “(All I Can Do Is) Dream You” is the real surprise, a nifty resuscitation of Roy’s early rockabilly sides for Sun. The fact that all involved found a way to get a bit of swing into this attractive, overwrought pop illustrates just how handsome the whole endeavor is: it’s designed as a graceful coda to a legendary career and, amazingly enough, it succeeds (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Roy Orbison (vocals, guitar)
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Mike Campbell  (guitar, bass, mandolin)
Howie Epstein (bass, background vocals)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Jeff Lynne (guitar, keyboards, bass, background vocals)
Benmont Tench (keyboards, strings)
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Bono (guitar on 06.)
Billy Burnette (guitar, background vocals on 03.)
T Bone Burnett (guitar on 07.)
Gary Coleman (percussion on 07.)
Ray Cooper (drums on 04.)
Steve Cropper (guitar on 08.)
Mickey Curry (drums on 03.)
Mitchell Froom (piano on 07.)
George Harrison (guitar on 04.)
Phil Jones (drums, percussion on 01.)
Al Kooper (organ on 02.)
The Memphis Horns (horns on 08.)
David Miner (bass on 07.)
Buell Neidlinger (bass on 03. + 07.)
Barbara Orbison (background vocals on 02.)
Roy Orbison Jr. background vocals on 02.)
Tom Petty (guitar on 01. + 05., background vocals on 01., 02. + 05.)
David Rhodes (guitar on 7.)
Jerry Scheff (bass on 07.)
Rick Vito (guitar, background vocals on 03., slide guitar on 09.)
Ian Wallace (drums, percussion on 05.)
Tom “T-Bone” Wolk (bass on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. You Got It (Orbison/Lynne/Petty) 3.30
02. In The Real World (Kerr/Jennings) 3.44
03. (All I Can Do Is) Dream You (Burnette/Malloy) 3.39
04. A Love So Beautiful (Orbison/Lynne) 3.33
05. California Blue (Orbison/Lynne/Petty) 3.57
06. She’s A Mystery To Me (Bono/The Edge) 4.16
07. The Comedians (Costello) 3.26
08. The Only One (W.Orbison/Wiseman) 3.55
09. Windsurfer (Orbison/Dees) 4.01
10. Careless Heart (Orbison/Warren/Hammond) 4.08

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Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988)