Various Artists – Reading Rock – Volume One (1982)

lpfrontcover1The twenty second festival possibly had a more attractive lineup than 1981, at least if one was a heavy rock devotee. The inclusion of hard rock guitar stalwarts Gary Moore, Randy California, southern rockers Blackfoot and erstwhile pub rockers Dave Edmunds and Wilko Johnson gave the lineup spine that was missing from the previous year.

   The headliners were also a tad more prestigious. The Scorpions/UFO former lead guitarist Michael Schenker, whose repertoire veered into the sort of metal jazz/rock territory inhabited by Jeff Beck- as well as delivering more predictable hard rock fare -gave Sunday night a touch of class .
   Budgie and Iron Maiden were guaranteed to deliver an exciting hard rock show, regardless of whether one thought of them as innovators within the genre or not. Maiden’s credentials were reinforced by the presence of Bruce Dickinson , the erstwhile Samson lead vocalist , who had taken over the vocal spot from Paul Di’Anno .
   All three of these artists were recorded by the venerable BBC and broadcast on the Radio One Friday night rock show in 1983 .
ironmaiden
Iron Maiden
Once again, Reading delivered a mid range experience for the punters , no top end acts like Pink Floyd or the Stones which needed a mega crowd to return the organisers a profit, but a solid workmanlike bill that would leave the attendees satisfied in the main . This was what Reading was about at the time, but the formula was about to change , as 1983 would be the last Reading for several years, at long last , the never ending story was about to come to a ( temporary ) stop (by ukrockfestivals.com)
It is strange that Mean Records chose to include a couple of tracks that weren’t actually from the 82 Festival – Whitesnake’s recording was from the 79 Festival and UFO’s from 1980. Yet, they neglected to include tracks from bands that did perform like – Iron Maiden, Gary Moore and Tygers of Pan Tang. Below is the (almost) correct running order of the 1982 Reading Festival, taken from the official festival program. Perhaps they had intended to release a Volume Two (based on the name for this release – Volume One) but as far as I can gather this did not happen. (by Mr. AussieRock)
michael-schenker
Michael Schenker
I add ten more songs from this great Festival (thanks to rockonvinyl.blogspot.de)
lpbooklet1
Tracklist:
01. Whitesnake:  Walking In The Shadows Of The Blues (Coverdale/Marsden) 4.40
02. Terraplane: I Want Your Body (Morley)  5.47
03. Marillion: He Knows You Know (Marillion) 4.46
04. Jackie Lynton: Slow Rider (Lynton/White) 4.46
05: Budgie: Superstar (Shelley/Thomas) 4.07
06. Bernie Marsden: S.O.S. (Marsden/Hawthorn) 4.42
07. Chinatown: I Wanna See You Tonight (Chinatown) 3.58
08. Randy California:  Come On Woman (California) 4.07
09. Stampede: There And Back (L.Archer/R.Archer/Bond) 5.44
10. Twisted Sister: Shoot ‘Em Down (Snider) 5.07
11. Michael Schenker: Attack Of The Mad Axeman  (Schenker/Barden) 4.31
12. Marillion: Three Boats Down From The Candy (Marrilion) 4.40
13. Terraplane: Turn Me Loose (Morley) 4.13
14. Just Good Friends: You Really Got Me (Davies) 4.27
15. UFO: Hot And Ready (Schenker/Mogg) 3.25
16. Budgie: Panzer Division Destroyed (Shelley/Thomas) 6.20
17. Grand Prix: Keep On Believin’ (Lanzon/O`Donoghue) 5.10
18. Spider: All The Time (Burrows/Harkness) 4.07
19. Chinatown: Caught On The Wrong Side (Chinatown) 4.24
20. Jackie Lynton; Hedgehog Song (Lynton) 4.57
+
21. Gary Moore: Nuclear Attack (Moore) 5.27
22. Iron Maiden: Wrathchild (Harris) 3.32
23. Praying Mantis: Nightmares (C.Troy/Potts/Carroll/T.Troy) 3.01
24. Tygers Of Pan Tang: Blackjack (Tygers Of Pan Tan) 3.04
25. Y&T: Black Tiger (Kennemore/O´Conner/Rush/Haze/Alves/Meniketti) 4.14
26. Gary Moore: Parisean Walkways (Lynott/Moore) 5.25
27. Iron Maiden Tush (Beard/Gibbons/Hill) 6.05
28. Praying Mantis: Flirtin’ With Suicide (C.Troy/Potts/Carroll/T.Troy) 5.28
29. Tygers Of Pan Tang:
Slave To Freedom (Cox/Dick/Weir) 5.18
30. Y&T: Forever (Kennemore/O´Conner/Rush/Haze/Alves/Meniketti) 5.47
concertposter2
Advertisements

Marillion – Misplaced Childhood (1985)

FrontCover1Misplaced Childhood is the third studio album by the British neo-progressive rock band Marillion, released in 1985.

Recorded during the spring of 1985 at Hansa Tonstudio in Berlin and produced by Chris Kimsey, who had previously worked with the Rolling Stones, Misplaced Childhood has been the group’s most successful album to date, peaking immediately at number one in the UK charts, spending a total of 41 weeks on the chart, and ultimately gaining the Platinum status. It features Marillion’s two most successful singles, the guitar-led rock ballad “Kayleigh”, which reached number two in the UK, and piano-led “Lavender” which peaked at number five.

The album’s positive reception included its selection as one of the best of 1985 by rock publications Sounds and Kerrang!. It was later named one of the best concept albums of all time by Classic Rock. According to John Franck from AllMusic, the album was the band’s “most accomplished” and “streamlined” work to date, while Ultimate Classic Rock has called it “the cornerstone of the entire ‘neo-prog’ movement”.

Misplaced Childhood was Marillion’s first full concept album consisting of two continuous pieces of music on the two sides of the vinyl record. In live performances preceding the album Fish had originally claimed as a teaser that the next album would consist of only two tracks, “Side 1” and “Side 2”. Then, during the Misplaced Childhood tour Fish would announce, “Now there is time for one more track… the name of the track is ‘Misplaced Childhood'”, and the band performed the entire album in sequence.

“I was in ‘Padres Bay’ when suddenly I felt a child standing behind me on the stairs. I knew he was dressed as a soldier and vanished as soon as he entered the corner or my eye. Perhaps it was my muse; perhaps it was the drug. It was enough to propel me into reaming off a large scrawl of prose.” (Fish)

Singles

The story has thematic elements of lost love, sudden success, acceptance, and lost childhood, along with an upbeat ending. As Fish explains, he conceived the concept during a 10-hour acid trip.

Several of the songs and titles contain notable autobiographical references, for example, “Kayleigh” references breakdown of relationships as a whole but is centered around a Fish’s past girlfriend named Kay Lee. The name Kayleigh was thought of by Fish to slightly obscure the original name due to the song being too personal. Another example is “Heart of Lothian” (“I was born with the heart of Lothian”) which is a reference to a traditional region of Scotland – Fish himself being from Midlothian – and a reference to the Heart of Marillion01Midlothian (Royal Mile) – a mosaic heart in the pavement of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile.

The theme of childhood is developed in “Lavender” which is partly based on the traditional folk song “Lavender Blue”. Like “Kayleigh” it is a love song, but whereas “Kayleigh” was about the failure of an adult relationship, “Lavender” recalls the innocence of childhood.

Like Script for a Jester’s Tear and Fugazi, the original vinyl edition of Misplaced Childhood was released in a gatefold sleeve. The album design was created by Mark Wilkinson who was commissioned to the role on all Marillion albums and 12″ singles of the Fish-era.

The front cover features a soldier drummer portrayed by Robert Mead, a then ten-year-old boy who lived next door to Wilkinson. Mead also appeared on the artwork of the album’s three hit singles, “Kayleigh”, “Lavender”, and “Heart of Lothian”, and can be seen in the music video for “Kayleigh”. The Jester from the two previous studio albums is imagined escaping through the window on the back cover.

Misplaced Childhood was released in the United Kingdom on 17 June 1985 by EMI Records on LP, 12″ picture disc and cassette and went on to be the band’s biggest selling album. It topped the UK Albums Chart, becoming the first and the only Marillion album to do so. It stayed on the charts for 41 weeks, the longest chart residency of any of the band’s albums.[11] Misplaced Childhood was certified Platinum by the BPI for sales in excess of 300.000 copies on 26 November 1985 just 5 months after the release. It was the 20th best selling album in the United Kingdom for 1985.

The album was also highly successful across mainland Europe reaching number 3 in Germany, number 6 in Switzerland and the Netherlands, the country where Marillion have one of their largest fanbases, number 10 in Norway. In the United States Misplaced Childhood came out on the Capitol Records label and reached number 47 on the Billboard 200 chart, the highest position the band has ever achieved.

Illustration

Three singles, “Kayleigh”, “Lavender”, and “Heart of Lothian” were released, with the first preceding the album. “Kayleigh” peaked at number 2 in the UK Singles Chart turning out to be the biggest hit for Marillion and prompting the success of Misplaced Childhood. The two further singles were less successful but still ended up at high positions as “Lavender” reached number 5[6] and “Heart of Lothian” peaked at number 29.

In April 2015, it was announced that Fish would be performing a 30th anniversary tour of Misplaced Childhood, playing the album in full for the very last time. (by wikipedia)

PictureDisc
The Picture Disc

After the album-tour-album cycle of Script for a Jester’s Tear, Fugazi, and the subsequent Euro-only release of Real to Reel, Marillion retreated to Berlin’s Hansa Ton Studios with Rolling Stones producer Chris Kimsey to work on their next opus. Armed with a handful of lyrics born out of a self-confessed acid trip, Fish came up with the elaborate concept for 1985’s Misplaced Childhood. Touching upon his early childhood experiences and his inability to deal with a slew of bad breakups exacerbated by a never-ending series of rock star-type “indulgences,” Misplaced Childhood would prove to be not only the band’s most accomplished release to date, but also its most streamlined. Initial record company skepticism over the band’s decision to forge ahead with a ’70s-style prog rock opus split into two halves (sides one and two) quickly evaporated as Marillion delivered its two most commercial singles ever: “Kayleigh” and “Lavender.” With its lush production and punchy mix, the album went on to become the band’s greatest commercial triumph, especially in Europe where they would rise from theater attraction to bona fide stadium royalty. The subsequent U.S. success of “Kayleigh” would also see Marillion returning to the States for a difficult tour as Rush’s support act. (by John Franck)

Marillion02

Personnel:
Derek William “Fish” Dick (vocals)
Mark Kelly (keyboards)
Ian Mosley (drums, percussion)
Steve Rothery (guitar)
Pete Trewavas (bass)

LPBooklet1
Tracklist:
01. Pseudo Silk Kimono 2.15
02. Kayleigh 4.04
03. Lavender 2.28
04. Bitter Suite 7.53
04.1. Brief Encounter
04.2. Lost Weekend
04.3. Blue Angel
04.4. Misplaced Rendezvous
04.5. Windswept Thumb
05. Heart of Lothian 4.08
05.1. Wide Boy
05.2. Curtain Call
06. Waterhole (Expresso Bongo) 2.13
07. Lords Of The Backstage 1.53
08. Blind Curve 9.30
08.1. Vocal Under A Bloodlight
08.2. Passing Strangers
08.3. Mylo
08.4. Perimeter Walk
08.5. Threshold
09. Childhoods End? 4.33
10. White Feather 2.24

All lyrics written by Fish, all music composed by Mark Kelly, Ian Mosley, Steve Rothery and Pete Trewavas.

LabelB1

*
**

Front+BackCover

Marillion – Real To Reel (1984)

FrontCover1 Featuring the best material from their first two albums as well as their classic debut single “Market Square Heroes,” 1984’s Real to Reel is an excellent live document of Marillion, the undisputed leaders of the short-lived mid-’80s progressive rock revival. In fact, these recordings make a strong case for the many fans who actually prefer the band’s more refined live versions over their rather flat studio counterparts. For the uninitiated, Marillion basically picks up where Peter Gabriel-era Genesis left off, writing complex, multifaceted, and unashamedly overblown compositions topped with dense, often incomprehensible lyrics from vocalist Fish. Thematically, the darkly ironic “Assassing” and the flippant “Garden Party” are complete polar opposites and clearly display the band’s incredible creative scope. But the album’s centerpiece has to be the dramatic, ten-minute war chronicle “Forgotten Sons.” (by Eduardo Rivadavia)

Tracks 1–4 recorded at the Spectrum in Montreal, Canada on 19–20 June 1984
    Tracks 5–7 recorded at De Montfort Hall in Leicester, England on 5 March 1984

BackCover1Personnel:
Fish (vocals)
Ian Mosley (drums)
Mark Kelly (keyboards)
Steve Rothery (guitar)
Pete Trewavas (bass)

Booklet1Tracklist:
01. Assassing 7.29
02. Incubus 8.43
03. Cinderella Search 5.45
04. Emerald Lies 5.28
05. Forgotten Sons 10.36
06. Garden Party 6.32
07. Market Square Heroes 7.32

All songs written by Fish – Ian Mosley – Mark Kelly – Steve Rothery – Pete Trewavas

LabelB1*
**