Jorge Santana – Same (1978)

LPFrontCover1Guillermo “Jorge” Santana (13 June 1951 – 14 May 2020) was a Mexican guitarist, brother of musician Carlos Santana.

He was a member of Malo, who had a top twenty hit in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 with “Suavecito” in 1972.

He released two solo albums on Tomato Records, Jorge Santana and It’s All About Love, featuring former Malo members. In the mid-1970s he played with the Fania All-Stars.

His distinctive guitar is a green Fender Stratocaster, acquired in the 1970s.

After a long split, Santana toured with his brother, Carlos. The album Sacred Fire: Live in South America was recorded in Mexico City on this tour, featuring Jorge Santana, who played a personalized orange Paul Reed Smith guitar.

In 1994 he recorded an album with his brother and Carlos Santana’s nephew, Carlos Hernandez, called Santana Brothers.

He passed away of natural causes on 14 May 2020, aged 68. (by wikipedia)

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Musician Jorge Santana, guitarist and a pioneer of the Latin rock sound of the early ’70s through the Bay Area-based band Malo, has died. The 68-year-old musician died of natural causes on Thu., May 14 at his home in San Rafael, Calif., according to family.

Carlos Santana posted a tribute to his younger brother on his Facebook page on Friday: “We mourn the loss of our beloved brother, Jorge. He transitioned unto the realm of light that casts no shadow. The eyes of my heart clearly see him right in between our glorious and magnificent mother Josfeina and our father Jose.”

Jorge Santana and Malo — initially the Malibus — had a brush with chart fame through “Suavecito,” a single from the group’s self-titled first album, released in 1972. Though the group disbanded after four albums, it has recently become a popular concert draw on revival oldies circuits.

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But while that single remains a Latino soul classic, Malo was much more than that: As we pointed out for NPR’s Morning Edition feature One Hit Wonders/ Second-Best Songs, Malo was a musically sophisticated amalgamation of many influences, such that it deserves a place alongside other early-’70s, genre-defying bands.

It could have been the toughest job in the music business: being Carlos Santana’s guitar-playing younger brother. But musician, bandleader and WBGO radio host Bobby Sanabria summed it up well on his Facebook tribute to Jorge Santana: “Picture Blood Sweat & Tears fused with Chicago, fused with Afro-Cuban rhythms and guitar driven rock. It was Santana on steroids.”

Jorge Santana’s early-’70s peak was a heady time for Latin music. The younger Santana came roaring out of the starting blocks with his self-titled first album. Sensing an appetite for something beyond the more mainstream Latin acts, like Trini Lopez and Jose Feliciano, a mini-movement of Latin rock bands began to find, and create, their own spaces. Among them were Southern California’s jazz-influenced El Chicano; the Bay Area’s Azteca, which featured more than 15 members and leaned much more heavily on funk than rock; and even War, the largely African-American outfit that borrowed from cha-cha-chá and mambo, mixing them with deep-groove R&B.

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It was also the era of lead-guitarist gunslingers — and Jorge Santana more than held his own. The below playlist illustrates his ability to offer perfectly placed poetry amidst the dynamic passion of Afro-Cuban percussion and intricate horn arrangements.

The tragedy of that era is that ultimately the mainstream music business at the time, seemingly, had room for just one “Latin” act.

Santana was central in helping to open ears and hearts to the various forms of Latin music — the result is that everyone, from Gloria Estefan to J.Lo to Bad Bunny, can now more ably find a seat at the table. (www.npr.org)

And here´s his debut album as a solo artist … but … sorry folk … this album was inspired from this Funk/Disco/Philly-Sound style of these years … and this is relly not the kind of music I like …

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Personnel:
Richard Bean (vocals, guitar)
Jerry Marshall (drums)
Kincaid Miller (keyboards)
Yogi Newman (percussion)
Carlos Roberto (bass)
George  “Jorge” Santana (lead guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Sandy (Bean/Santana)
02. Tonight You’re Mine (Bean/Santana)
03. Darling I Love You (Bean/Santana)
04. We Were There (Bean/Santana)
05. Love You, Love You (Bean/Santana)
06. Love The Way (Bean)
07. Seychells (Takanaka)
08. Nobody’s Perfect (Bean/Miller/Estrella)

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Guillermo “Jorge” Santana (13 June 1951 – 14 May 2020)

Elkie Brooks – Shooting Star (1978)

FrontCover1Elkie Brooks (born Elaine Bookbinder, 25 February 1945) is an English singer. She was a vocalist with the bands Dada and Vinegar Joe, and later became a solo artist. She gained her biggest success in the late 1970s and 1980s, releasing 13 UK Top 75 singles, and reached the top ten with “Pearl’s a Singer”, “Sunshine After the Rain” and the title track of the album No More the Fool. She has been nominated twice for Brit Awards.

She is generally referred to as the “British Queen of Blues”. Her 1981 album Pearls became the best-selling album by a UK female artist in the history of the charts at that point.[citation needed] In 2012, Brooks was the British female artist who had achieved the most Top 75 UK Albums Chart entries.

Brooks’ third album was a departure from her previous work and enjoyed relative success in the UK charts. Taking the place of Leiber & Stoller was renowned producer David Kershenbaum who guided Brooks along a more funk-orientated sound than on her previous work. The album has been released on CD, paired with its 1979 successor Live and Learn. (by wikipedia)

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This may not be the best album by Elkie Brooks . I still like her version of, “As”, better then the George Michael cover. (by bessie)

A bit of a low point here. Terrible versions of The Faces’ “Stay With Me” and Stevie Wonder’s “As”. Plus this album has some of the worst cover artwork too, so there really is no need to bother. (by MH 1000)

Indeed, Elkie Brooks sounds much better in her days with Vingar Joe ! On this album she sounds as just another Disco Queen …

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Personnel:
Elkie Brooks (vocals)
Jerry Knight (bass, background vocals)
Andy Newmark (drums)
Elliott Randall (guitar)
Jean Roussel – keyboards
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Pete Gage (guitar)
Simon Morton (percussion)

Elkie Brooks performs on stage circa 1978. (Photo by Gus Stewart/Redferns)

Tracklist:
01. Only Love Can Break Your Heart (Young) 3.05
02. Be Positive (Brooks) 3.47
03. Since You Went Away (Roussel/Knight) 3.43
04. Putting My Heart On The Line (Frampton) 3.09
05. Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 2.59
06. As (Wonder) 4.03
07. Learn To Love (Doheny) 4.04
08. Too Precious (Brooks/Hinkley) 4.23
09. Shooting Star (Gage) 2.51
10. Just An Excuse (Brooks) 3.41

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Scott McKenzie – San Francisco Remix `89 (1989)

FrontCover1Scott McKenzie (born Philip Wallach Blondheim III; January 10, 1939 – August 18, 2012) was an American singer and songwriter. He was best known for his 1967 hit single and generational anthem, “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”.

“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear [Some] Flowers in Your Hair)” is a psychedelic pop song, written by John Phillips (August 30, 1935 – March 18, 2001), and sung by Scott McKenzie. The song was produced and released in May 1967 by Phillips and Lou Adler, who used it to promote their Monterey International Pop Music Festival held in June of that year.

John Phillips played guitar on the recording and session musician Gary L. Coleman played orchestra bells and chimes. The bass guitar of the song was supplied by session musician Joe Osborn. Hal Blaine played drums. The song became one of the best-selling singles of the 1960s in the world, reaching the fourth position on the US charts and the number one spot on the UK charts. In Ireland, the song was number one for one week, in New Zealand the song spent five weeks at number one, and in Germany it was six weeks at number one.

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McKenzie’s version of the song has been called “the unofficial anthem of the counterculture movement of the 1960s, including the Hippie, Anti-Vietnam War and Flower power movements.”

According to Paul Ingles of NPR, “…local authorities in Monterey were starting to get cold feet over the prospect of their town being overrun by hippies. To smooth things over, Phillips wrote a song, “San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair).” Phillips reported writing the song in about 20 minutes.

The song, which tells the listeners, “If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair”, is credited with bringing thousands of young people to San Francisco, California, during the late 1960s.

Different issues of the recording use slightly different titles, including: “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”; “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Hair)”; and “San Francisco ‘Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair'”.

Released on May 13, 1967, the song was an instant hit. By the week ending July 1, 1967, it reached the number four spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, where it remained for four consecutive weeks. Meanwhile, the song rose to number one in the UK Singles Chart, and most of Europe. In July 1967, McKenzie’s previous record label, Capitol, claimed that the “follow-up” to this song was a re-release of his earlier single, “Look in Your Eyes.” The single is purported to have sold over seven million copies worldwide.In Central Europe, young people adopted “San Francisco” as an anthem, leading the song to be widely played during Czechoslovakia’s 1968 Prague Spring uprising.

John Phillips

The song has been featured in several films, including Frantic, The Rock, and Forrest Gump. It was also played occasionally by Led Zeppelin as part of the improvised section in the middle of “Dazed and Confused”. U2’s Bono also led the audience in singing this song during their PopMart performances in the San Francisco Bay Area on June 18 and 19, 1997. New Order covered the song on July 11, 2014, at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco. A cover of the song by Michael Marshall appears in the 2019 film The Last Black Man in San Francisco (wikipedia)

And CBS released a remix by Peter Slaghuis in 1989 :

Peter Slaghuis (21 August 1961 – 5 September 1991) was a Dutch DJ, producer and remixer, whose work was mostly released under the name Hithouse (a literal translation of his last name — slag, a hit, a beat; and huis, house).

Slaghuis was born in Rijswijk, Netherlands. He was a figure in the European dance music scene in the 1980s, producing popular remixes of various hits (most notably the “Long Vocal Dutch Mix” of “I Can’t Wait” by Nu Shooz). Slaghuis stated “I hated that song so much… I just had to put a hook over it.” With the arrival of house music in Europe, Slaghuis took up the pseudonym Hithouse and began using his sampling techniques in this field. His best known work, “Jack to the Sound of the Underground”, reached #14 on the UK Singles Chart in 1988. His next few works did not attain the same level of success, though “Jack to the Sound of the Underground” remained in public consciousness in the UK when used as the theme for both the radio and television versions of the BBC comedy show The Mary Whitehouse Experience.

Peter Slaghuis

He was part of the VideoKids group, which released the song “Woodpeckers from Space” in 1985, featuring Slaghuis in the video.

Slaghuis also delivered remixes to the Disco Mix Club which published them on their monthly and compilation CDs. One of his most famous mixes was Madonna’s “La Isla Bonita”. He also remixed Petula Clark’s “Downtown” as “Downtown ’88” which hit the British top 10 in December 1988.

Slaghuis’ career was cut short by his death, at the age of 30, in a car accident in 1991, when his car, traveling at a speed of 220 km/h (140 mph), crashed into an oncoming truck. (by wikipedia)

What a fucking and stupid cover version !

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Personnel:
Scott McKenzie
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some fucking overdubs

 

Tracklist:
01. San Franciasco Remix `89 (1) 4.46
02. San Franciasco Remix `89 (Original version) 2.55
03. San Franciasco Remix `89 (2) 3.00

Written by John Phillips

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Jimmy Goings & Santa Esmeralda – Green Talisman (1982)

OriginalFrontCover1The original concept of “Santa Esmeralda” was formed as a production project in 1976 by Jeanne- Manuel de Scarano and Nicholas Skorsky in Paris, France. Santa Esmeralda was inspired by the heroine of the same name from the Victor Hugo Classic “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”. American musician/vocalist Jimmy Goings recorded six of the group’s seven studio albums, permanently replacing American singer/saxophone player Leroy Gomez, who was used as lead vocalist for the first album titled “Santa Esmeralda”. That album featured the projects first international hit “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”, and the popular ballad, “You’re My Everything”. Creative differences lead to Gomez’s departure in late 1977. Goings joined the project in December of that year, recording lead vocals for the already complete follow up album “The House of the Rising Sun”, which garnered the projects second international hit with the title song. Showcasing a wonderful collaboration of French arranger Jean Claude Petit, brilliant Page 2 of 4 Flamenco/electric guitarist Jose Souc, and French studio guitarist Slim Pezin, the song’s Gypsy infused Flamenco style soon became a Latin disco innovation around the world. Goings was granted the rights to tour the concept and created his first touring band in January of 1978. The group hit the road immediately, touring with disco legend Barry White, and joining the resurgent tour of Carlos Santana. Santa Esmeralda quickly became international headliners, embarking on a world tour that included Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Brazil, Canada, and the United States.

Jimmy Goings

Goings went on to record two more albums for the Skorksy/de Scarano team: “Another Cha Cha” which was a completely original collection of songs with Goings making his first co-writing contributions on all tracks. The title song went on to become another world wide disco hit. The album also contained the popular songs, “Generation”, “Answer”, and “Back to the Beginning”. The final album recorded with the team was C’est Magnifique” also titled “Don’t Be Shy Tonight”, which contained the follow up hit “C’est Magnifique”, and the radio hit “Don’t Be Shy Tonight”, again with Goings contributing to the song writing, providing the lyrics for five of the albums six tunes. Skorsky and de Scarano spilt up in 1980, and Goings continued his collaboration with Skorsky on the next two albums. The group reprised its original sound, on the cover version of another popular 60’s hit, “Hush”. On this album Goings also collaborated again with Jose Souc on “Welcome to the World” and “What I Wanna Do With Your Love”, and provided original arrangements for the cover songs “No Reply” and “Street Fighting Man” which were then transcribed and orchestrated by Souc. The final album of the collaboration came in 1982 with Jimmy Going and Santa Esmeralda “The Green Talisman”. This collection returned to the concept album genre and produced the striking title tune “The Green Talisman” as well as covers of “Siboney” and “Children of Sanchez”, and the lush ballads “Sweet Fusion” and “Eternal Light”. Goings continued to tour through 1982 and the group disbanded officially in 1983 While many greatest hits compilations followed, Goings put his touring aside to raise his daughter, Genevieve, and son Jesse. He was reunited with his first son Dominic in 1989. He continues working in the entertainment field as a music producer, talent agent, and event coordinator through his entertainment company, GFI ENTERTAINMENT, located in the San Francisco Bay Area. (associatedentertainment.com)

Okay … this is disco music ! Not my kind of music, of course.

And this album was even released in Russia:

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Personnel:
Jimmy Goings (vocals)
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Celmar Engel (synthesizer)
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Unknown Orchestra conducted by Jose Souc (on 02. + 05. + 07.) and Slim Pezin (on 01. + 06.)

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Tracklist:
01. The Green Talisman (Skorsky/Carmone/Goings) 9.41
02. Sweet Fusion (Skorsky/Ellis) 3.45
03. Children Of Sanchez (Mangione) 3.29
04. Siboney (Lecuona) 4,28
05. Fortune Teller (Skorsky/Goings) 3.44
06. Eye Of The Cat (Skorsky/Ellis/Goings) 4.10
07. Eternal Light (Skorsky/Ellis/Goings) 3.56

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Barbara Streisand – Guilty (1980)

FrontCover1The biggest selling album of Barbra Streisand’s career is also one of her least characteristic. The album was written and produced by Barry Gibb in association with his brothers and the producers of the Bee Gees, and in essence it sounds like a post-Saturday Night Fever Bee Gees album with vocals by Streisand. Gibb adapted his usual style somewhat, especially in slowing the tempos and leaving more room for the vocal, but his melodic style and the backup vocals, even when they are not sung by the Bee Gees, are typical of them. Still, the record was more hybrid than compromise, and the chart-topping single “Woman in Love” has a sinuous feel that is both right for Streisand and new for her. Other hits were the title song and “What Kind of Fool,” both duets with Gibb. (The song “Guilty” won a Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal by Duo or Group.) (by William Ruhlmann)

And no, this is not my kind my music, but this blog is called “Many Fantastic Colors”, you know.

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Personnel:
George Bitzer (synthesizer on 05., 07. + 08.)
Dan Bonsanti (saxophone on 04. + 09.)
Neal Bonsanti (saxophone on 04. + 09.)
Dennis Bryon (drums on 07.)
Pete Carr (guitar on 02., 06. + 09.)
Harold Cowart (bass)
Cornell Dupree (guitar on 01., 08. + 09.)
Ken Faulk (tracks: A4, B1, B2, B4)
Russ Freeland (trombone on 06.)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Barry Gibb (vocals, guitar on 01. + 06.)
Peter Graves  (trombone on  04., 06., 07. + 09.)
David Hungate (bass on 08.)
Mike Katz (trombone on 06.)
Joe Lala (percussion)
Bernard Lupe (drums on 02., 06. + 07.)
Brett Murphey (trumpet on  04., 06., 07. + 09.)
Jerry Peel (french horn on 02., 03.)
Lee Ritenour (guitar on 04. + 07.)
Whit Sidner (saxophone on 04. + 09.)
Barbara Steisand (vocals)
Richard Tee (piano, synthesizer, clavinet)
George Terry (guitar on 01., 03., 04., 08. + 09.)
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Background vocals:
Denise Maynelli – Marti McCall – Myrna Mathews
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Tracklist:
01. Guilty (B.Gibb/R.Gibb/M.Gibb) 4.24
02. Woman In Love (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 3.51
03. Run Wild (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 4.06
04. Promises (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 4.20
05. The Love Inside (B.Gibb) 5.07
06. What Kind Of Fool (Galuten/B.Gibb) 4.04
07. Life Story (B.Gibb/R.Gibb) 4.34
08. Never Give Up (Galuten/B.Gibb) 3.41
09. Make It Like A Memory (Galuten/B.Gibb) 7.28
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