Various Artists – European Jazz – Volume 05 – France (Part 2) (2012)

FrontCover1.jpgAt one time, the concept of “European Jazz” meant very little indeed. While jazz was developing in the USA in the 1920s, there was almost no European jazz to speak of. Some Americans – Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, Sidney Bechet – came to Europe and made an impact there in the 1930s but it was not until the thirties that Europeans began to develop their own jazz significantly. Perhaps the most outstanding group was the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, formed in 1934, with its two virtuosos Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli.

This group is not represented in this ten-CD boxed set, which suggests that the compilation is making no attempt at a historical survey. Indeed, it is difficult to know what this set is trying to do. It seems as if the compilers simply put together tracks to which they had access, and there is little attempt to provide a balanced view of European jazz. Nevertheless, this collection can be educative in opening our ears to some artists we may not have heard before. It also supplies a cross-section (albeit limited) of how Europeans developed jazz, mostly in the 1950s and 1960s.

This compilation makes it clear that European jazz was very much influenced by the Americans. For example, the tenorist on track 2 of the third CD sounds very like Stan Getz, while the altoist on the third track betrays the influence of Charlie Parker. And the Michael Naura Quintet on the eighth CD could be mistaken for the Modern Jazz Quartet.

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I can’t tell you who most of the individual musicians are, as detailed personnels are sadly not given. This is a nuisance, as I would like to be able to identify (for instance) the bongo Brandenburgplayer on track 9 of the fifth CD. However, one lesson of many tracks in this collection is that many Europeans learnt from the bebop pioneers – and from such groups as the Gerry Mulligan Quartet. As most of the tracks in this compilation come from the fifties and sixties, there is little individuality in the music from the different countries, as it was only later that they began to develop their own distinctive styles.

This CD is the second to be devoted to France, included Bernard Pfeiffer.  He is a world-class pianist and it is good to find him included here. Another is  Michel Legrand and he has always been a fine pianist. Michel’s clear lines and swinging style are a joy. He is followed by Stéphane Grappelli displaying his rhapsodic violin style but also playing the piano with delicacy. (musicweb-international.com)

Michel Legrand1

No, no, no … this compilation is not so weak, as we read above … it´s a great compilation with lots of rarities from the young European Jazz-Scene during the 50´and this time we hear great Jazz from France ! Excellent stuff !

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Tracklist:

Legrand:
01. Tired Blues (Pfeiffer) 2.39
02. Steeplechase (Parker) 2.49
03. Midday On The Champs-Elysées (Rocherolle) 2.49
04. Caravan (Mills/Tizol/Ellington) 3.10

Michel Legrand:
05. Sous les Ponts de Paris (Rodor/Scotto) 2.52
06. Paris In The Spring (Gordon/Revel) 3.31
07. Sous le Ciel de Paris (Giraud/Drejac) 1.50
08. Paris Canaille (Ferré) 2.03
09. Paris je t‘aime d‘amour (Bataille/Grey/Schertzinger) 4.23
10. I Love Paris (Porter) 2.51
11. La vie en Rose (Piaf/Louiguy) 3.08

Stéphane Grappelli:
12. Dans la Vie (Louiguy) 3.52
13. Vous Qui Passez Sans Me Voir (Hess/Misraki/Trénet) 3.54
14. Marno (Grappelli) 2.49
15. Crazy Blues (Grappelli) 2.46
16. Viens Au Creux De Mon Epaule (Aznavour) 2.55
17. Red-O-Rey (Grappelli) 2.52

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More from the “European Jazz” edition:

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Django Reinhardt – Djangology (2010)

FrontCover1This session was the first post-war collaboration between Reinhardt and Grappelli. Recorded in Rome, Italy in January and February of 1949:

In 1949, guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli performed together for the first time since the outbreak of World War II put an end to the classic lineup of the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, with the pair reuniting in an Italian recording studio and laying down a number of tunes with a solid local rhythm section. In 1961, 12 songs from those sessions were released in the United States by RCA Victor under the name Djangology (and with Grappelli’s name misspelled on the cover); this expanded CD reissue features 23 tunes recorded during Reinhardt and Grappelli’s Rome sessions.

Stylistically, this material doesn’t represent a dramatic departure from the material Reinhardt recorded in the 1930s (while he’d been experimenting with an electric guitar at the time, these are fully acoustic sessions), though there are glimmers of new ideas the great guitarist had picked up along the way, most notably a few bop-influenced solos. But Reinhardt’s trademark gypsy swing is still as effortlessly enthusiastic as ever, and his by-play with Grappelli is simply wonderful; the intuitive symmetry of their performances is a marvel, and it’s hard to imagine that these musicians had spent ten years apart, given the ease and finesse with which they work together. (Bassist Carlo Pecori and drummer Aurelio de Carolis support the soloists well without imposing their personalities too strongly on the arrangements, and pianist Gianni Safred’s free-spirited bounce meshes well with Reinhardt and Grappelli’s more adventurous swing.)

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Original frontcover from 1961

While the recording quality isn’t perfect, it’s noticeably better than the duo’s earlier sessions, and the remastering for this collection brings out the details without taking the edges out of the sound. Djangology is a lovely set of late-era performances from Django Reinhardt, and if it isn’t an ideal collection of his work, it’s certainly better (and better presented) than most Reinhardt CD’s currently on the market, and stands as further proof of the guitarist’s casual genius. (by Mark Deming)

ReinhardtGrappelliPersonnel:
Aurelio De Carolis (drums)
Stephane Grappelli (violin)
Carlo Pecori (bass)
Django Reinhardt (guitar)
Gianni Safred (piano)

BookletBackCover1Tracklist:
01. I Saw Stars (Goodhart/Hoffman/Sigler) 3.30
02. After You’ve Gone (Creamer/Layton) 3.00
03. Heavy Artillery (Artillerie Lourde) (Reinhardt) 3.40
04. Beyond the Sea (La Mer) (Lawrence/Trenet) 4.16
05. Minor Swing (Grappelli/Reinhardt) 2.37
06. Menilmontant (Trenet) 3.03
07. Brick Top (Grappelli/Reinhardt) 3.44
08. Swing Guitars (Grappelli/Reinhardt) 2.54
09. All the Things You Are (Hammerstein/Kern) 2.54
10. Daphne (Grappelli/Reinhardt) 2.26
11. It’s Only A Paper Moon (Arlen/Harburg/Rose) 2.51
12. Improvisation on Pathetique (Andante) (Tchaikovsky) 3.44
13. The World Is Waiting For The Sunrise (Lockhart/Seitz) 2.52
14. Djangology (Grappelli/Reinhardt) 2.46
15. Ou Es-Tu, Mon Amour? (Where Are You, My Love?) (Stern) 3.22
16. Marie (Berlin) 2.54
17. I Surrender, Dear (Barris/Clifford) 3.45
18. Hallelujah (Grey/Robin/Youmans) 3.09
19. Swing ’42 (Reinhardt/Reisner) 2.26
20. I’ll Never Be the Same (Kahn/Malneck/Signorelli) 4.02
21. Honeysuckle Rose (Razaf/Waller) 3.59
22. Lover Man (Davis/Ramirez/Sherman) 3.11
23. I Got Rhythm (Gershwin) 2.44

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